EditorsAbout the SiteComes vs. MicrosoftUsing This Web SiteSite ArchivesCredibility IndexOOXMLOpenDocumentPatentsNovellNews DigestSite NewsRSS

04.07.07

Novell Responds With More Spin

Posted in Deals, Deception, FUD, GPL, Intellectual Monopoly, Interoperability, Marketing, Novell, Patent Covenant at 4:47 pm by Shane Coyle

Bruce Lowry has posted a new entry on the Novell PR blog, responding to comments and criticisms of his "cavalier" attitude regarding the latest GPLv3 draft.

Lowry sticks to the party line regarding the deal, that it was to foster Linux adoption in the enterprise and improve Linux-Windows interoperability, and that the IP aspects of the deal are just for additional "comfort" for Novell customers.

Third, we don’t see intellectual property, in general, as big impediment to Linux adoption. That’s been our position for a number of years now. Go back and look at statements we made during the SCO debate, or when we launched our indemnification program. We’ve consistently argued that customers should not avoid Linux because of intellectual property concerns. At the same time, we’ve provided a level of comfort (via indemnification, our patent policy and, now, with the Microsoft agreement) to those customers who do have concerns about the issue. We certainly aren’t out in the market telling customers to use our Linux because it has patent protection from Microsoft. We’re out there telling them to use SUSE Linux Enterprise because it’s a strong distribution that will integrate well into their mixed environments. If the patent agreement with Microsoft means a few more customers than before are willing to take the plunge with Linux, that’s a good thing. But we don’t think patent concerns are driving Linux adoption one way or the other. The deal with Microsoft simply removes the issue from the table for customers.

Of course, Stafford Masie is on record as stating that the patent covenant is indeed a competitive advantage for Novell, and Ron Hovsepian also stated that IP concerns were costing Novell deals, and the patent covenant addresses those concerns for Novell customers.

Did anyone at Novell wonder why these IP concerns weren’t affecting Red Hat adoption rates? This just sounds like weak salespeople, honestly, who are accepting the clients excuses instead of working through them. It reminds me of a quote from Boiler Room

And there is no such thing as a no sale call. A sale is made on every call you make. Either you sell the client some stock or he sells you a reason he can’t. Either way a sale is made, the only question is who is gonna close? You or him? Now be relentless.

That’s it, I’m done.

Bob Sutor on OpenDocument (2 Videos); More Microsoft Lobbying in Florida (Updated)

Posted in America, Europe, IBM, Interoperability, Microsoft, Office Suites, Open XML, OpenDocument, Standard at 10:58 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

It is pretty hard to find Open XML and OpenDocument videos on the Web, but they do exist. Here are a couple from Bob Sutor’s (of IBM) speech in Denmark. If you wish to explain to someone why Novell supports a document monopoly (and let’s not forget APIs and network communication), then point him/her to any of these videos. People would take audio-visual over textual information any day.

Earlier today, through a confession by a friend, I witnessed something which I had not quite grasped before. Many people simply perceive Office formats as the standard. Therefore, we must educate the less technical citizens, explaining to them the dangers of a monopoly and the inability to access personal information in the future. There is also the issue of competition and interoperability (or lack thereof). The roots of this debate pertain to and stem in perception, which is sometimes difficult to change (software freedom in another related peril that’s perceptual). Patience and perseverance are the key here.

Mind the fact that Florida seems to be approaching Open Source and OpenDocument, but Microsoft lobbyists step in and intervene.

Open Standards for Florida vs Microsoft lobbyists

[...]

Bottom line: Rep. Ed Homan (R-Tampa) tried to get a small paragraph added to a general IT bill in the State Senate that mildly favored open standards (i.e. ODF etc.) in state IT operations. It was a quiet effort, he told me, but still, within 24 hours all the State Senators on the appropriate committee had been contacted by lobbyists representing Microsoft, who also paid him a visit.

IBM and Microsoft are also having a brawl in Malaysia.

Standards body Sirim Bhd has stopped a feud between IBM Malaysia and Microsoft Malaysia over competing technologies in this country.

Datuk Dr Mohamad Ariffin Aton, Sirim chief executive, has suspended the process for approving the Open Document Format (ODF), which is backed by IBM Corp, as a Malaysian standard. A competing format is OpenXML, currently used only in Microsoft Corp’s Office suite of desktop products.

The latter point — that which refers to the number of companies supporing Open XML — is also one that Bob Sutor repeats in his talks. Open XML is not about sharing, but about building walls. It is shocking that Novell has turned from an Open Source enthusiast into a passive supporter of this impossible-to-reproduce-mockery-of-the-standards-system.

Related new links:

Update:

Part 2 of the second video is now available as well.

Novell Rejected GNU/Linux a Decade Ago

Posted in GNU/Linux, NetWare, Novell at 5:14 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

While Wikipedia provides some solid background on Novell, nothing beats a few lesser-known facts. In a new article titled “Nine things you don’t know about Novell” you will find an interesting nugget of information.

7. When did Novell first start tinkering with Linux?

As early as 1994, with the launch of the Corsair skunkworks project at Novell. Corsair was a project to create a desktop metaphor to compete with Windows. When then-president of Novell Ray Noorda retired and Robert Frankenburg took over, Frankenburg cut out many of Novell’s unofficial products. A number of employees, dissatisfied with the decision to abandon their project, left Novell and founded Caldera with funding from Noorda.

Let us see if this time, for a change, Novell is pressured to leave GNU/Linux, or maybe even finds what Bruce Perens hyptothesises is an exit strategy (from Free software as we know it).

NetworkWorld has another article that’s derived from the main story, which makes a good read.

The Importance of OpenDocument (Oregon State Video)

Posted in America, Office Suites, OpenDocument, Videos at 12:20 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

RSS 64x64RSS Feed: subscribe to the RSS feed for regular updates

Home iconSite Wiki: You can improve this site by helping the extension of the site's content

Home iconSite Home: Background about the site and some key features in the front page

Chat iconIRC Channels: Come and chat with us in real time

New to This Site? Here Are Some Introductory Resources

No

Mono

ODF

Samba logo






We support

End software patents

GPLv3

GNU project

BLAG

EFF bloggers

Comcast is Blocktastic? SavetheInternet.com



Recent Posts