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01.02.08

IBMers Stress the Importance of (Truly) Open Standards

Posted in Formats, IBM, Microsoft, Open XML, OpenDocument, Standard at 11:22 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

XML is not open and the word ‘open’ alone doesn’t make a standard…

There are a couple of blog posts that are worth pointing out. The first one comes from Rob Weir, who uses an example from history to show the huge cost of multiple standards (not to mention a case where one is a standard and another is a proprietary format in a gown).

That is the distortion you get if you look at a standards war through the narrow blinders of commercial interest. But if you look at the full market impact, the simple economics of it, it becomes a lot clearer. What brings greater efficiency, greater fidelity, greater innovation and lower costs? Having two incompatible document format standards? Or having a single harmonized document format standard? Fighting against economics is like fighting against gravity or the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. You are going to lose in the end. The piemen of Erie, and their modern counterparts, are on the wrong side of economics, and history,

Bob Sutor adds his insights in a post on open standards in 2008.

Over the next couple of weeks I plan to publish several entries on “challenges and priorities in 2008 on a range of topics, some related to work areas of interest, some related to personal ones. I’m kicking this off today with standards.

Microsoft has already had its say on the issue of standards. The following was found some time in the past.

OOXML on the trash can…we should take the lead in establishing a common approach to UI and to interoperability (of which OLE is only a part). Our efforts to date are focussed too much on our own apps, and only incidentally on the rest of the industry. We want to own these standards, so we should not participate in standards groups. Rather, we should call ‘to me’ to the industry and set a standard that works now and is for everyone’s benefit. We are large enough that this can work.

–Microsoft Corporation, internal memo (source [compressed PDF])

Masuran’s on 2007, a Year of Microsoft FUD and Bribes

Posted in Deception, Fraud, FUD, GNU/Linux, Linspire, Microsoft, Novell, Patent Covenant, Patents, Xandros at 11:06 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Microvell

”What we have observed in recent months is a disturbing pattern of Microsoft briberies.“Sometimes, no matter how strong an accusation may seem, you have to call something what it truly is. What we have observed in recent months is a disturbing pattern of Microsoft briberies. This includes Microsoft briberies in Nigeria, Microsoft’s use of money to influence media, Microsoft bribing bloggers for positive coverage, Microsoft money buying OOXML support from an apathetic industry, and the list goes on and on. It could go on forever if smaller incidents are covered as well.

Briberies aside, there is the long-going intimidation campaign as well, not to mention lawsuits by proxy. Those who still believe that Microsoft has changed it ways must be either blind or overly hopefully, or maybe it’s just that Microsoft knows better how to cover its tracks.

The following new article from Masuran talks about some of the key issues that we have covered in the past year.

FUD and bribes

But there are some clouds at the horizon, the patent ‘agreements’ Microsoft has forced on various Linux distributors being one of them. After Novell gave in, more companies gave in to the FUD spread by Microsoft. After Novell, both Xandros and Linspire have made deals with Microsoft regarding technical interoperability and legal protection. Fortunately, not all companies delivering Linux based solutions are giving in. Canonical, Red Hat, Mandriva and others continue to say no to Microsoft. It’s strange that even though Microsoft won’t give more information on the 235 patents that it believes Linux is violating.

Unfortunately it didn’t stay at spreading FUD, during the ISO approval process of Microsoft’s OOXML wanabee-standard, it became clear that there had been some unfair play by Microsoft. The entire chain of events is to long to list again here but you can read all about them here on masuran.org or the excellent no-ooxml website.

Regardless of all the Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt Microsoft tries to spread, regardless of the bribing of ISO committee members, 2008 will be good for us. We who love freedom and openness, we who like to share information, we who love technology, we’ll have it good.

Let’s end this post on Masuran’s optimistic note.

Oops! Microsoft Admits OOXML is Flawed

Posted in Deception, ECMA, Formats, ISO, Microsoft, Office Suites, Open XML, Standard at 10:49 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Bob Sutor makes a good observation. As we mentioned 3 times in the past fortnight [1, 2, 3], ECMA-OOXML is being warped in all sorts of radical ways. This pretty much makes an admission that MS-OOXML is broken beyond repair.

There were some stories in the blogosphere over the holidays saying that Microsoft was telling some national standards bodies that it was willing to deprecate portions of OOXML in order to satisfy some of the thousands of technical criticisms of OOXML in the JTC1 standards process.

[...]

It’s not uncommon to see some deprecations in versions 2.0 and higher of standards. It could mean one or more of

* “whoops, we goofed”
* “there was a problem with what we said to do”
* “we’ve come up with a better way of doing that”
* “you really don’t want to be doing that”

Remember that no matter how much cruft, binary extensions, operating system-specific appendages and serious bugs Microsoft tries to hide from an already-zombified ISO, OOXML is Microsoft Office, which will not (never ever!) comply with the ECMA specification. As the above shows, Microsoft's prophecy that Office might deviate from the semi-documented OOXML is already materialising.

OOXML is expensive to adopt, it is always paid for, and it is totally insane. That pretty much tells you something about those who vote in favour of OOXML. Additionally, Novell, among others, was virtually bribed to support OOXML, i.e. suppress adoption of the real standard — ODF.

Bad Novell

How Microsoft Profits from GNU/Linux at Our Expense, Thanks to Novell

Posted in Boycott Novell, Finance, GNU/Linux, Microsoft, Novell, Patents, SLES/SLED at 10:30 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Novell and Microsoft piss on GNU/Linux codebase

Here is a timely blast from the past. DisinformationWeek shares something that was already known. When you buy SUSE, you pay Microsoft. In fact, the Novell deal allowed Microsoft to make money from Linux distributions whose vendors did not even have a deal signed with Microsoft. That alone should justify resentment and protest against Novell.

Here is the short article that reiterates this fact.

Evidence is emerging that Microsoft is making money, lots of it, from selling ‘certificates’ for Novell’s SUSE Linux. Microsoft gained the right to distribute the certificates a little more than a year ago under a marketing and technical alliance with Novell.

[...]

So, while Linux — free software that competes with Windows — may still be a “cancer” for Microsoft, the company has found a way to profit from it. That’s a good trick . . . perhaps Microsoft should next enter the pharmaceutical market?

Remember that Microsoft claims ownership of parts of Linux now. It calls that intellectual property, but it won't say what it actually is. Like a coward, Novell sacrificed not only its own soul. It essentially sold the blood of Linux and Free software as a whole.

If you don’t boycott Novell, you might see Linux being forced to pay Microsoft money for those mythical patents which make intellectual monopolies. Don’t let Microsoft so easily subvert GNU/Linux using threats and legalised briberies.

Economist Calls Patents Government-granted Monopolies

Posted in Intellectual Monopoly, Patents at 10:14 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

In my recent interview with Richard Stallman, “government-imposed monopoly” was the term Stallman used to describe a patent. As Glyn Moody points out (citation of a citation chosen for context here), Stallman is not alone.

Copyrights and patents are government granted monopolies. They have their origins in the feudal guild system, not the free market economics of Smith and Ricardo. In fact, at the end of the 19th century, Switzerland and the Netherlands actually eliminated patent and copyright protection, with the intent of promoting free market competition. In spite of their feudal legacy, and their obvious status as forms of protectionism, few economists ever question the merits of the patent and copyright systems.

Make a mental note of that one. We’re looking at some feudal roots. Elsewhere, in yesterday’s news, the abuse continues and patents are still being wrongly called “intellectual property”, which they are not. Patents are patents, so let’s call them what they are. Software patents are much, much worse.

Toshiba last week launched legal action against an Italian disc duplication company it maintains has infringed its intellectual property.

Patent trolling, which is the lowest form of patent system misuse, shows no signs of abatement, either.

Let’s start the new year off with an update on our #1 patent troll from 2007, Global Patent Holdings.

To recap, it filed another patent infringement case on the JPEG-on-a-website patent (5,253,341) on December 5 in Florida.

Long live “government-granted monopolies”?

HOWTO: Pressure All Microsoft Office Users to Embrace OOMXL (Updated)

Posted in Formats, Microsoft, Office Suites, Open XML, OpenDocument, Security at 4:47 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Slashdot has a very eye-opening short article. To give a shortened version:

In Service Pack 3 for Office 2003, Microsoft disabled support for many older file formats. If you have old Word, Excel, 1-2-3, Quattro, or Corel Draw documents, watch out!

Mind the following fact, which was mentioned here quite recently:

It’s only been six months since Microsoft launched Office 2007 at retail. But as of July 1, 2007, Microsoft won’t be making the OEM version of Office 2003 to its PC partners, a k a “OEMs.”

As it would seem based on the fragments above, Microsoft is putting pressure on users of old versions of Microsoft Office. They could soon become victims of the network effect (forced upgrade). Microsoft decided to pull away Office 2003 so that it isn’t available. It then relies on innocent users who might use the default file formats in Office 2007 (a derivative of OOXML).

This ought to be yet another reminder of the role of digital preservation and Microsoft's lack of interest in it.

From the comments in Slashdot (one among plenty):

> Deliberately making it too cumbersome and complex for most people to ever
> work around this, i.e. leaving it technically (but not really practically
> for almost everyone) an option, for now at least gives MS an excuse, while
> still taking a big step towards getting rid of support for those old formats
> entirely, which is not all that unreasonable I suppose for formats greater
> than 10 years old.

Let’s not forget – what is being supported is *software*, ie M$ Office, not a file format.

The current iteration of Micro$oft Office should be capable of opening any and all files created by any prior release of M$ Office, and should be capable of doing so in a safe and secure manner.

If the current iteration of Micro$oft Office is incapable of safely and securely parsing any file created by any prior iteration of M$ Office then surely something is very wrong with Microsoft, and with M$ Office!!

Doesn’t ODF seem like a hugely attractive option all of a sudden?

Update: As we were going to mention yesterday, “security reasons” were merely an excuse that serves this hidden agenda. Rob Weir confirms this now and yesterday, in a different forum, I posted the following older story as an example which is similar:

Software like Parallels Desktop for the Mac or Microsoft’s own Virtual PC for Windows allow multiple operating systems to run simultaneously. When it announced licensing rules for Vista last year, Microsoft said that only Vista Business and Vista Ultimate could run as guest operating systems. The company said virtualization presents inherent security risks and that it hoped by limiting which versions of the OS could act as virtual machines, only sophisticated users and businesses would employ the tactic.

At the time, Microsoft pretended that if you get a version of Windows with more features ‘unlocked’, then suddenly it becomes more secure. This was discussed here several times before.

Watching the Microsoft Money at Play

Posted in Africa, Bill Gates, Finance, Microsoft, Novell, Videos, Windows at 1:23 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Get me into that and goddam, we’ll make so much money!

–Bill Gates, Microsoft (source)

Have a look at the following footage.

Here is the second part of this.

We’re afraid that providing (actually producing) an Ogg Theora version isn’t quite possible here due to copyrights.

”…the Gates Foundation is being (mis)used to buy media companies which then serve Gates and Microsoft.“We covered issues that are associated with the Gates Foundation several times in the past because they cannot be separated from issues that BoycottNovell investigates. This includes effects on media bias. In short, to give you just the gist of the story, the Gates Foundation is being (mis)used to buy media companies which then serve Gates and Microsoft.

We have discussed this issue privately with a person who is knowledgeable in this area and here are some insights that we wish to share publicly. Asked about the video, the person whom we spoke had the following to say:

It’s noteworthy that a couple of the comments attached to each of these videos are supposedly from different users, but the content of these comments is identical. There is also an observant comment which says that the primary reason for the “Gates Foundation” is as a tax shelter for his investments. I would add that the charitable cause and associated good press are only benefits on the side. The observant comment was rated negatively by someone and it has a rating of “-1″.

If this sounds familiar, it should. Microsoft and their ilk have made use of astro-turfers and shills since at least the ’90′s. It started with some “friendly” contacts in the press who were either hypnotised by Gates, Microsoft and their success or just looking for a piece of their advertising money. This expanded to full-blown astro-turfing during the time of the US DOJ vs. Microsoft case.

Asked about whether we should include such material in boycottnovell.com (we were not going to because it is sensitive subject), he remarks:

That’s definitely a borderline case but it’s defencible if you consider that the Gates Foundation’s conduct is a reflection of that of Microsoft. It’s even more defencible if you consider that the Gates Foundation actively helps Microsoft. Frankly, those videos are disappointing but not surprising. Both of these organisations present superficially good images but, when one digs deeper, one finds that they are both amoral and centred on acquiring ever more wealth and power for their heads.

…Further, I seem to recall that, when Gates was the richest man in the world, he said in self-defence that he planned to eventually give away his entire wealth. I wonder if the Gates Foundation is helping him to do that and his wealth is indeed decreasing.

This is merely a integral part of the game which Bill Gates and Warren Buffett are playing (the taxing shell game). It’s a win-win situation to them, but people shouldn’t be as foolish as Bill and Warren need them to be (paraphrasing Groklaw here).

The person whom we spoke to did some further work looking at this. He came up with some conclusive assessment of the Foundation’s goal and means.

A little bit of looking around found a little confirmation. I found in the Wikipedia article on the Gates Foundation that it will shut down 50 years after the death of Bill & Melinda. I’m sure that putting money into the Foundation would qualify as “giving his money away.” I await in the coming years to see Bill’s steady decline in the “richest person” rankings as he gives his money away.

But has it really happened so far? I understand that Gates is still well up in the rankings. He may still be at the top (I don’t really keep track) but, if he is no longer at the top, that may well be because Microsoft has been doing less well in recent years and he’s diversified his investments to safer, slower growth ones. If the Foundation’s endowment has grown recently, it seems to be due more to Buffett than Gates.

It’s also interesting to see in the Wikipedia article that there are some criticisms leveled at the Gates Foundation, one of which is the topic of the video you posted. It has the following to say about the LA Times article about its oil investments:

… In response, the foundation first announced a systematic review of all of its investments to determine whether it should consider divestment from some companies.[42] Later, it revoked this pledge[43] and said it would continue its current practices.[44]

In a May 4 story, the Los Angeles Times again reported a conflict between the foundation investment policies and charitable goals. [17] In this case the issue was Darfur and PetroChina, an oil company in which Gates trustee Warren Buffett …

I didn’t see another criticism that I’ve heard, which is that his donations of computers to libraries and schools are oriented towards Windows. For example, see the following page on “getting technical support for Gates Foundation library computers”. I don’t see Macintosh or Linux systems mentioned there — only Windows systems.

Also of interest, here is a recent article which indicates that the Foundation increases its investments in companies that cause harm.

The foundation made moves in other sectors during Q3, as well, adding shares in Caterpillar and Canadian National Railway, while maintaining stakes in energy giants Exxon Mobil and BP.

Going further back in time, here is the Los Angeles Times article and here is the Foundation’s refusal to review its investment protfolio.

…the Gates Foundation took down their public statement on this and replaced it with a significantly altered version which seems to say that investing responsibly would just be too complex for them and that they need to focus on their core mission: ‘There are dozens of factors that could be considered, almost all of which are outside the foundation’s areas of expertise. The issues involved are quite complex…

Should such complications receive wider media coverage?

Junk Patents Versus Charity (Another Case for a Reform)

Posted in Africa, GNU/Linux, Microsoft, OLPC, Patents at 12:25 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Prompt says 'No'

Back in November we covered the disturbing developments that surround the One Laptop Per Child. This charitable project came under fire not only by Intel and Microsoft, but also by a patent troll. Here is the latest:

I know. You thought I was goofing off partying and drinking in the new year. Not really. I was reading some cynical documents just filed in the LANCOR v. OLPC litigation. Yes, it’s begun in a Nigerian court. LANCOR has actually done it. Heaven only knows it makes me want to drink. Guess what the Nigerian keyboard makers want from the One Laptop Per Child charitable organization trying to make the world a better place?

$20 million dollars.

I kid you not. $20 million dollars in “damages”.

For background and context see the following two articles.

First: LANCOR’s Adé Oyegbola Answers Groklaw’s Questions About OLPC

PJ: Thank you for responding. I think you misunderstand then one thing about OLPC. OLPC is a recognized charity under the law. Selling a laptop for cost does not make them commercial, Ade.

Many of my readers have been asking me, and I hope you do not feel insulted if I ask on their behalf, but is there any connection or have you had any contact with Microsoft or Intel?

Do remember that Microsoft was caught bribing people in Nigeria only a couple of months ago. It did this in order to fight GNU/Linux adoption, essentially by intercepting a done deal. Its practices in Asia (e.g. apparently persuading Thailand to drop its OLPC commitments) tell a little more, not to mention its many OOXML briberies, which are very recent.

Here is the second article to be aware of: OLPC’s Nigerian patent suit being waged by a man convicted of bank fraud

The Boston Globe is reporting that LANCOR, the Nigerian-owned company that has filed suit against the One Laptop Per Child project for patent infringement, is actually helmed by a man convicted of bank fraud. He spent a year in prison.

Some would wish to put two and two together, but we prefer to just present evidence rather than reach any conclusion or openly state an asseration.

In other patent news, Qualcomm continues to suffer. What an ugly ride this has already been [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19].

A federal judge in California ruled on Monday that wireless chip maker Qualcomm Inc (QCOM.O) must immediately stop selling third-generation, or 3G, WCDMA cellular chips that infringe on the Broadcom Corp (BRCM.O) patents.

Customers never rejoice at the sight of another embargo or another unnecessary castration of novel features.

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