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07.27.09

Links 27/07/2009: Fedora 11 Rave, Google Wave Freed

Posted in News Roundup at 6:28 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Protect Your Network with the Linux-based Untangle Gateway

    In the past few months, we’ve discussed (among many other things) ZeroShell. Its a live CD that turns a mundane PC into a router and provides numerous servers and features for your network. Well, now we’re going to discover the Untangle Network Gateway. Another open source solution, it installs onto a PC to help you protect, control, and monitor the online activities of all your small business or home computers.

  • Desktop

    • Why should Linux aim for the desktop?

      It is my personal opinion that Linux should be targeting the desktop. My reasons are that, due to the way the operating system is designed, depending on how the distribution is configured, Linux for the desktop is inherently more stable and secure than the average configured windows desktop installation. Maintenance and support of desktop Linux systems are more straight forward and are easier to remotely maintain without interrupting the end users work. It is harder for amateur malicious programs to gain a foothold in the guts of the operating system. At worst they will just mess up the users home directory, not the core operating system. Program and security updates are automatically managed across all installed programs from the official repositories which leaves less to chance for malicious programs to fall through operating system cracks.

    • 6 Things I Miss About Windows Vista in Linux

      As I go through the daily grind on my trusty Thinkpad, I once in a while notice quirks in Linux Mint / Ubuntu that makes me miss certain small but important conveniences from Windows Vista. I’ve been taking notes, and here’s my list.

      1. Too many reboots. I distinctly remember being able to use Windows Vista for 1 to 2 weeks without ever having to shut down my notebook. The Suspend feature worked great. On Linux Mint / Ubuntu, I probably reboot every two to three days because of the screen going totally blank or my notebook becoming unresponsive. And the most irritating experience is when I come back from lunch to find my notebook had rebooted by itself.
      2. Slowdown in graphics. I honestly believe better graphics makes for a more pleasant and easy-to-use operating system, Linux included. But related to my first point, I notice I have to restart my computer or at least GNOME a few times in a week because Compiz starts slowing down. Whatever the cause for this is, I never had this problem in Windows.

  • Server

    • Zoho’s winning strategy: open source + cloud

      Vegesna: We are completely open-source at the core of Zoho, from the operating system (CentOS) to the database (MySQL) to the application server (Tomcat) to Hadoop for scaling our systems.

  • Applications

    • Life is Better With a Dropbox

      Have you ever gone somewhere and needed some files, only to find that you forgot your flash drive? Well, that can all change with a simple solution: Dropbox. As long as you have a connection to the Internet, your files can be with you wherever you go. Using Windows? No problem. Using a Mac? No problem. Using Linux? Of course, no problem. And soon there will be an application for the iPhone and iPod Touch. Prices are quite reasonable, and they even offer you a free 2GB account that never expires.

    • Multimedia

      • Music Player Review ’09 edition – Wave 1.5

        Adding Songbird and aTunes to the list, with the note that they can’t actually “win” because they aren’t in the Ubuntu repository.

      • Miro Media Player Gets an Overhaul

        I still reach for VLC Media Player when I want an open source player that I know will handle almost any video file format that I throw at it. It’s out in a much overhauled new version as well, and is particularly good for broadcasting video content online. However, the community behind Miro has wisely focused it on playing and organizing video and audio content from all around the web, especially videocasts and podcasts. It really shines at that, especially this new version.

    • Extensions

      • Top 25 OpenOffice Extensions You May Want To Know

        OpenOffice is possibly one among the finest examples on what can be achieved in the world of Free Software. For starters, OpenOffice is an office application suite in the lines of Microsoft Office and is available for Windows, Mac and Linux. The latest stable release is OpenOffice 3.1. You may want to know how to install OpenOffice 3.1 in Ubuntu. Now let us take a look at the list of extensions you could use in OpenOffice.

      • Five Microblogging Extensions For Firefox

        Unless you’ve been living in a cave for the past year, you know that microblogging is all the rage. Web sites like Twitter, Identi.ca, and Laconica are incredibly popular for exchanging snippets of information, chatting with others, and quickly sharing links to interesting online content. It’s really a pain to jump from site to site to read your friends updates or provide your own, so here are five microblogging extensions for Firefox to help you out.

  • Distributions

    • A distro odyssey – looking for the best fit, part 1

      So now I have my system functioning again and able to do what I need. Jaunty will be my base camp, the place I can go back to when/if I run into show-stopping difficulties. Now comes the exciting part: trying new distros and seeing how they compare to this baseline.

    • Reviewed: Fedora 11

      Our verdict: Other distros are in danger of being outbuntu’d by this freedom loving, Gnome-centric star performer.9/10.

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

  • Syntext releases open source XML editor

    Syntext, Inc., a provider in developing software for XML content authoring solutions and related services, recently announced that it has released Serna free XML editor as open source software.

  • 50 Open Source Apps Transforming Education

    While some educators have been quick to grasp the potential and promise of open source software, many others have been hesitant to stray from the comfortable zone of commercial applications. Yet that’s changing.

    More teachers and institutions are now participating with organizations like SchoolForge, the Open Source Education Foundation, and Open Source Schools. These educators are beginning to see that the open source philosophy has the power to transform education in several key ways.

  • Juicing up your web pages can be sweet

    Because the project is entirely open source, Wallis expects others to add useful files which users can just pick up and pop into their own websites. A tame programmer or web developer might save you a little time but this stuff is fairly straightforward, providing you resist the urge to panic or think “this is too techie for me”.

  • Software products: the perfect storm

    Second, open source software is coming out from the realm of geeks into the real world. Many open source products have reached enough scale and maturity to seriously challenge their proprietary software counterparts. Claims by proprietary software firms that open source products suffer from a higher lifecycle cost and lack good quality support appear to be a case of sour grapes given the rapid proliferation of open source products such as Linux and the rise in the number of IT firms offering implementation and support services for open source products.

  • Latest UP Diliman Technopark opens

    At the press briefing, ASTI OIC Peter Banzon said that it was envisioned that the new technopark would welcome locators developing applications on the cutting edge of Open Source technology such as software that rely on the cloud computing model. However, it would also welcome locators developing bread-and-butter applications such as Open Source software for accounting and human resource administration.

    [...]

    Open Source software, such as Linux, belongs to this category. Their developers have built their revenue stream models on after sales services and consultancies.

  • OSCON 2009

    • Could open source have built Silicon Valley?

      In Silicon Valley, innovation is the fertilizer that makes the crops grow. With open source, software is more like topsoil, and those who nurture that soil believe they will prosper longer than those who just throw fertilizer on it.

      Invention is the plant corporations harvest for their profit. Software is the environment on which everyone’s survival depends.

      OSCON, I think, is better off in Portland.

    • OSCON 2009 online
  • Google

  • Government

    • An open source movement in health information?

      Today’s Report of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission, “A Healthier Future For All Australians: Final Report,” makes the e-health system a central plank in the future of health management in Australia.

    • S’pore developers create open source buzz

      Eugene Teo, honorary member of the Linux Users’ Group Singapore (LUGS), said in an interview with ZDNet Asia, that interest among local developers have been moving toward mobile, Web and cloud computing platforms.

  • ‘Open Source’ as PR Ploy

    • Parsing the “open” in Adobe’s Open Source Media Framework announcement

      It’s not necessarily surprising that during the week of O’Reilly’s Open Source Convention (aka OSCON), companies release open source code — just as they often release flashy consumer products during tradeshows to garner the most buzz from contingent news cycles.

      [...]

      Adobe and Microsoft are now engaged in similar forms of open-washing, applying the tastes-great, less-filling label, while doing everything they can to maintain their control and dominance in a given area — further cementing the historic distinction between “free” and “open”.

    • Intuit launches open source community

      Intuit, the makers of popular Quicken and Quickbooks software, today announced the out-of-beta launch of code.intuit.com, an open-source community where users can share information to enhance SaaS apps via the Intuit Partner Platform, announced last month.

Leftovers

  • Censorship/Web Abuse

    • Amazon Faces a Fight Over Its E-Books

      A growing number of civil libertarians and customer advocates wants Amazon to fundamentally alter its method for selling Kindle books, lest it be forced to one day change or recall books, perhaps by a judge ruling in a defamation case — or by a government deciding a particular work is politically damaging or embarrassing.

      “As long as Amazon maintains control of the device it will have this ability to remove books and that means they will be tempted to use it or they will be forced to it,” said Holmes Wilson, campaigns manager of the Free Software Foundation.

    • Amazon Kindle doomed to repeat Big Brother moment

      Yes, Amazon chief Jeff Bezos has apologized for the Orwellian removal of Orwell from digital book readers tucked inside the pockets of American citizens. And yes, the new-age retailer has promised not to repeat its Big Brother moment. But that’s not a promise it can promise to keep.

      [...]

      This uneasy feeling was only exacerbated by the fact that Amazon removed the books out from under Orwell lovers without explicitly telling them it was doing so. There were refund notices sent via email, but nothing more. Many Kindlers were left to wonder why their books had disappeared – while others wondered why there was a refund.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • How it feels to be sued for $4.5m

      Then in summer 2008, I arrived home to find a letter addressed to me. The return address said “Harvard Law School”. Curiously, I opened and read it. “My name is Charles Nesson, professor of Law at Harvard. I caught wind of your case,” it said. “I can be of any assistance, don’t hesitate to call.” I called. Nesson picked up. I said, “Yes, you can be of assistance!” My mom drafted a letter to him, summarising where we were. The opening line read, “Dear Professor Godsend”.

    • Pirate Party’s copyright reform cannon could sink copyleft

      The Swedish Pirate Party’s goal of reducing copyright duration to five years is facing scrutiny from an unlikely critic. Richard Stallman, founder of the Free Software Foundation, fears that reduced copyright terms will undermine copyleft licenses.

    • Diller Calls Free Web Content a ‘Myth, Joins Refrain

      Barry Diller, chairman and chief executive officer of IAC/InterActiveCorp, said Web users will have to pay for what they watch and use, joining the refrain of media moguls who say an era of free Internet content is ending.

    • Newspapers: 180 years of not charging for content

      I have a history lesson worth reading for those who think news should or may have a price online.

      The common discussion among such people these days goes like this: “We’ve always charged people to read us in print, and so people ought to pay something for reading us online, too.”

    • The Free Trade

      One of the biggest challenges which videogames are going to face in the coming years, however, is a slightly more abstract business concept. Ushered in by the digital era – not just by the technology, but by the subtle yet fundamental shifts in consumers’ thinking created by that technology – the concept of Free is slowly gathering pace, and threatens to wash away many of the business models which have supported media industries for a century or more.

Digital Tipping Point: Clip of the Day

Luis Casas Luengo, Director of Extremadura’s Fundecyt foundation 05 (2004)

Digital Tipping Point is a Free software-like project where the raw videos are code. You can assist by participating.

New Index Pages

Posted in Site News at 2:49 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

MANY changes were applied to the Wiki today and new cohesive resources made more easily accessible. For those who wish to see these changes, here is an incomplete summary. Please contribute to the extent possible by adding information and links. The Wiki is still very young (set up in 2009), so a lot of essential work remains undone.

New pages:

Redone pages:

There is plenty more of Comes vs Microsoft coming.

Links Bank Holiday Monday: Schools and GNU/Linux

Posted in News Roundup at 11:44 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Linux Outlaws 103 – It’s a Trap!

    On the massively tardy show for this week, Dan & Fab talk about Microsoft submitting code to the Linux kernel, one-second boot times, Apple screwing with Palm, a cool RTS game that recently went open source and much, much more.

  • Desktop

    • Even a 2 Year Old Can Use Linux

      My son arrived to identify what I was mumbling about and found the same scene. However, to him it was business as usual and he walked in to join Annie.

      I asked him when he had learned to use Linux, to which he replied without hesitation, “Everybody knows Linux.”

      He and Annie just kept playing and trying out some other games to see what I had loaded on the test machine.

      Needless to say, for the next few minutes I just enjoyed the sight of my two kids fiddling with Linux, as if they had been using it for years. I couldn’t resist taking a few photos, and then of course it was time to get back to testing.

      But in my amusement, I realized the significance of what had happened to me personally.

      I realized that all of those years and countless people helping to promote Linux to schools had made a big difference.

    • Why aren’t schools adopting open source?

      I’ve had many a discussion with people in various sectors of the professional world. Nearly every person I spoke with agrees with what I assumed to be a truth: At one point teaching school-age kids Microsoft, and only Microsoft, software was a safe bet. But things have changed. No longer is it safe to assume that every business uses MS software. Although most businesses are still sticking with one form of Windows or another, many of those same businesses are adopting OpenOffice, Firefox, and more as their software of choice. And thankfully for the students (and users of all ages and sorts) OpenOffice has done a great job of creating an interface that anyone used to MS Office will be comfortable with. So the preconceived notion that schools HAVE to teach Microsoft Office is not longer a given truth.

    • Does Linux Have a ‘Safe Mode’?

      The moral to this story is that people often associate the unknown with their problems. Linux was the thing that was different for him and, of course, it was to blame for his problem.

  • Kernel Space

    • Proper Multi-Seat X Support Is On The Way

      While multi-seat computing has been available on Linux for years, it’s often been a chore to setup and required some time. Beyond just being time consuming and an unnecessary hassle, the way of setting up a multi-seat computer through an X Server with multiple nested Xephyr servers is not pleasant. There have been several attempts at improving the multi-seat Linux experience by creating a multi-seat display manager and taking various other steps, but to date this is still a challenge to setup. The good news though is that this may soon change.

  • Applications

  • Distributions

    • Mini-Distro-Review: Tiny Core Linux

      In conclusion, the concept of Tiny Core Linux is an excellent one, and given it is a new distribution on the block I hope to see further development and expansion upon this concept.

    • Ubuntu

      • Launchpad Open-Sourced. Now What?

        Shuttleworth, a former Debian developer, has spent millions of his own dollars funding Ubuntu and by all indications is genuinely committed to free software. If he decides to keep some code proprietary, he’s doing what he truly believes to be in the long-term interests of Ubuntu. But only time will tell whether Canonical’s policies will pay off.

      • Community inertia in Debian and Ubuntu

        Finally, Ubuntu is a branch of Debian. Once a project grows beyond a certain point, it becomes difficult to make major changes on the spot. Major changes rarely come out perfect the first time, so they may need intensive regression testing before they can be considered stable enough even for development purposes. The changes also need to be coordinated with other developers, because they may interfere with their work.

      • Face off with Fedora and Ubuntu Linux

        If you are going to try Linux, Rightardia recommends Ubuntu. You will get up to speed faster with Ubuntu.

      • Top 25 Ubuntu Programs

        I am using Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope Netbook-Remix, but these programs shoudl be platform independent. I will go with the pre-set menus that Ubuntu gives us all.

      • Ubuntu Desktop: Contacts as Indexed Files

        To index progressively the changes as they happen, we should use inotify, this would then pass off the management process to the immediate computer run time. Threaded obviously.

      • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 152

        Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #152 for the week July 19th – July 25th, 2009. In this issue we cover: Karmic Alpha 3 released, Launchpad is now open source, Ubuntu-US-NY is now an approved Ubuntu LoCo team, Focusing on the Launchpad UI, Answer contact can assign questions, Automatically import files to Launchpad using product release finder, Ubuntu Forums tutorial of the week, Kubuntu Translation Days, Ubuntu Podcast #31, and much, much more!

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Google Gives Android Developers a Donut

      According to multiple reports, Google is now offering developers a crack at some Android 2.0 features at the Android code repository. Android 2.0, which was codenamed “Donut,” was discussed at the Google I/O developer conference earlier this year. To listen to what Google had to say, watch the following clip (the Android part starts a couple minutes in).

    • Android Is Still Headed Beyond Just Smartphones

      Earlier this month, when Google announced its Chrome OS and made clear that it is headed for netbooks, the news curbed many of the predictions people were making about the Android operating system’s prospects on netbooks. Google officials made clear that they were steering Android toward smartphones. That hasn’t stalled all of the efforts to bring Android to platforms other than smartphones, though. As PC World points out, device maker Touch Revolution is working on several types of touch-screen devices based on Android, including a line of cutting-edge remote controls for homes. Meanwhile, Japan’s OESF (Open Embedded Software Foundation) continues to push forward with plans to deliver devices running Android as an embedded operating system.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Random musings on GPL and Microsoft

    After all, nobody is forcing anyone to use GPL code in their solutions. Well, at least I haven’t heard of anyone complaining of having RMS threating them with using GPLed code in their solutions or…. So if you don’t like the GPL, then don’t use code released under its terms. Stop wining about how bad the GPL is, do your homework and write your own code instead. I know…. there’s excellent GPL code out there and it’s gonna take time to reproduce it but… if you choose to use it, then abide by its rules. That’s all their creators asked for when they released the code under its terms after all, right?

  • Standards/Consortia

    • Internet Explorer 8 provides best web browsing experience

      Wow! Now it says, “FAIL” in giant letters just to let you know that it does, in fact, fail. It probably says that in the IE7 rendering as well, but it’s difficult to tell what with all the mangled distortion of crap way up there.

    • Another Vendor to Fully Support ODF: GemBox Software

      Furthermore, this demonstrates two existing IT trends. First one is wider adoption of ODF. Second is replacement of old, proprietary document formats with new, XML based, open and standardized document formats.

Digital Tipping Point: Clip of the Day

Luis Casas Luengo, Director of Extremadura’s Fundecyt foundation 04 (2004)

Digital Tipping Point is a Free software-like project where the raw videos are code. You can assist by participating.

Steve Ballmer, 2 Years Ago: Open Source “Not a Business Model We Can Embrace”

Posted in Deception, Finance, GNU/Linux, Microsoft, Quote, Steve Ballmer at 6:22 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Microsoft claims that it’s changing, but to what extent is it willing based on its own words?

Almost precisely two years ago (July 26th, 2007) Steve Ballmer said:

“Open source: open source has been the issue that surrounds us. Could a commercial model like Microsoft compete with open source? And we’ve worked very hard on making the value of a commercial company surpass what the open source community can deliver, because frankly, it’s not a business model we can embrace. It’s inconsistent with shareholder value.”

It is worth stressing that Moodle's plug-in from Microsoft was only intended to increase lock-in on ‘the cloud’ and what Microsoft gave to Linux was a tool for marketing Windows [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. These two ‘contributions’ had to be made Free software in order to enter circulation, so they don’t represent change.

IRC: #boycottnovell @ FreeNode: July 26th, 2009

Posted in IRC Logs at 4:20 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME Gedit

Read the log

Enter the IRC channel now

To use your own IRC client, join channel #boycottnovell in FreeNode.

Antitrust: How Microsoft Used Kickbacks (“Referral Programs”) to Advance Its Inferior Products

Posted in Antitrust, Bill Gates, Courtroom, Finance, IBM, Marketing, Microsoft, Office Suites at 4:12 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

“I’d be glad to help tilt lotus into into the death spiral. I could do it Friday afternoon but not Saturday. I could do it pretty much any time the following week.”

Brad Silverberg, Microsoft

Summary: Antitrust material reveals Microsoft’s way of ‘competing’ against Lotus 123

TODAY’s Comes vs Microsoft exhibit is a very long one. Exhibit PX00928 (1991) [PDF] shows how Microsoft used kickbacks, not just bundling. Let’s go through some bits of the text, which is available in full at the bottom.

Microsoft is very concerned about Lotus 123, on which it says:

The key issues are:
* They are perceived as the spreadsheet leader, not as the “Windows spreadsheet newcomer”.
* They have a “good enough” spreadsheet, and the things that make ours better are not easily appreciated by the CUI user.
* They have a family story that, on the surface, is MUCH more compelling than ours, and which they begining to deliver on. What’s more, they are trying to change the criteria by which customers make buying decisions.

In an E-mail that was even confidential inside Microsoft, Mike Maples writes to Bernard Vergnes and Chris Smith:

>From mikemap Thu Oct 31 15:43:56-1991
To: bernardv chrissm
Subject: Incremental spending for Excel ***Confidential***
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 91 16:43:51 PST

Bill has asked us to look at how we could attach Lotus in the next 6 months by having incremental marketing funds and programs. Do you have any ideas? Could you use some extra marketing fund to direct at excel and against 1237

Our reader calls this “the Lotus attack fund”, claiming that “they’re losing against Lotus 123.” Instead of spending money to make a better spreadsheets program they just spend it on funding “referral programs”, which are a form of kickbacks.

Here is how these kickbacks work:

* Use MS stock as an incentive for recommendation/referral program. Each referral purchase is rewarded with share/fraction of share. Use direct mail to get the message out.

Here are some numbers:

From chrissm Mon Nov 11 11:55:37 1991
To: mikemap
Subject: Re: Incremental spending for Excel ***Confidential***
Cc: bernardv bryann chrissm orlandoa petern stevewe
Date: Mon Nov 11 11:53:59 1991
Mail-Flags: 0000

Mike,
attached is the response from each of the subs wishing to participate in the program.

The grand total comes to close to $ 1 million
_
A summary by sub is as follows;

ARGENTINA ….. $30 K PLUS 20 SAMPLES
VENEZUELA ….. $32K

MS 5043764
CONFIDENTIAL


BRAZIL ……… $130K
MEXICO ……… $85 K PLUS 150 SAMPLE COPIES OF EXCEL
JAPAN ………. NO ADDITIONAL NEEDED. BUDGET SUFFICIENT
TAIWAN ……… $75K
KOREA ………. NO ADDITIONAL NEEDED… BUDGET SUFFICIENT
HONG KONG …… $ 40 K
FAR EAST OVERALL….. NEED REDMOND TO MAKE EXCEL 4 DBCS WORK
A HIGH PRIORITY.NEED MORE MATERIALS FOR TRAINING
CENTERS AND CONSULTANTS…EST $100K
AFRICA/ MIDDLE EAST …. ..$175K
SINGAPORE …… $ 50K
AUSTRALIA …… $250K
=========================
GRAND TOTAL= $967k

In the words of a reader, “they spend close to a million in 1991 to kill Lotus 123.”

Here is another good bit from the exhibit where Microsoft mentions “FUD” at one point:

* 123 /W version IA is still buggy. We need to capitalize on this to drive home the perception that Lotus is really incompetent as a Windows developer.

Moreover:

* Draw Lotus’s out of their silence on 123 W. The longer they are silent, the more likely their ability to ride out the storm.

One reader tells us that this reminds him of “Ballmer’s baiting of Google, e.g. that their web suite isn’t a real office suite.

“In other words,” says the reader, “please needlessly expend energy on the desktop while we ‘innovate’ in the cloud.” That’s the sort of strategy Microsoft is sticking to.

Notice that Orlando Ayala is involved there as well (almost two decades ago). He is still using similar tricks against GNU/Linux, but he is in upper management now.

At least Microsoft is humble. As the exhibit below states: “I think we have a fantastic opportunity with Excel 4.0 to really drive the nails in the coffin of Lotus.”


Appendix: Comes vs. Microsoft – exhibit PX00928, as text


Read the rest of this entry »

Russia’s Antimonopoly Service Targets ASUS, Toshiba, H-P, Samsung and Dell for Potentially Colluding with Microsoft

Posted in Antitrust, Asia, Dell, Europe, Hardware, HP, Microsoft at 3:25 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Russian army cap

Summary: Steps are taken by Russia to prevent abolishment of choice

YESTERDAY we wrote about Windows bundling and recently we wrote about what Microsoft was doing in Russia [1, 2]. The Russian authorities are finally closing in on Microsoft by exploring relationships with OEMs. This is the right approach to take. From the press release:

On 15th July 2009, the Commission of the Federal Antimonopoly Service (FAS Russia) began proceedings in a case against «Асеr Inc.», «ASUSTeK Computer Inc.», «Toshiba Corporation», «Hewlett-Packard Company», « Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.» and «Dell Inc.» for the elements of violating the antimonopoly legislation. In accordance with the Determination of 20th July 2009, the FAS Russia’s Commission, investigating the case, suspended the case until receiving additional evidence. The case will continue on 10th September 2009.

As noted here, this is a dangerous precedence to Microsoft.

Be sure Microsoft will put up a fight, because it will:

1. Make clear to the customer what he pays for and how much he pays for it;
2. Make it virtually impossible to impose its terms to hardware manufacturers;
3. Give customers a real alternative, backed by a major company;
4. Expose the vulnerability of its business model in the 21st century to the shareholders in a way that cannot be misunderstood;
5. Create a dangerous precedent – if here, why not in the US?

The Federal Antimonopoly Service ought to look at recent examples such as ASUS. To name some posts on the subject:

There are many other sets of examples, but the links above refer to just one.

Netcraft Needs to Clean House or Become Irrelevant

Posted in Deception, GNU/Linux, Servers, Windows at 2:52 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Disclaimer: contrary to the cited post (eracc.com), the issue is to be associated with Netcraft’s flawed methods, not “Microsoft shills and/or Microsoft fanboys”.

Netcraft

Summary: Netcraft continues to paint deceiving pictures of the Web

THE issues around Netcraft and Microsoft are ones that we previously touched on in:

It turns out that Netcraft has not sorted itself out yet. Here are the details.

Could it be that Microsoft, Microsoft shills and/or Microsoft fanboys are “gaming” the uptime table at Netcraft? Unless I am misunderstanding something, frankly, I think they are. I was going to show a friend of mine the uptime table at Netcraft to display the ability of Unix and Unix-like operating systems to be stable and reliable.

[...]

Just get enough dedicated people to request sites over and over that run your favored system and you too can have your own favorable Netcraft uptime chart. I think Netcraft needs to rethink how they generate the longest uptimes chart. It is obviously being abused by people who favor Microsoft to falsely show Microsoft operating systems dominate the uptime statistics.

Like all benchmarks, in due time, contenders adapt to them and finesse performance for those particular benchmarks (e.g. acid tests) because they are predictable and well understood. In response, benchmarks need to re-adapt and made more robust. With Microsoft's benchmark frauds, it would be silly to expect fair play.

“Linux infestations are being uncovered in many of our large accounts as part of the escalation engagements.”

Microsoft Confidential

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