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06.29.10

IRC Proceedings: June 29th, 2010

Posted in IRC Logs at 7:21 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

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Links 29/6/2010: New Fedora Project Leader

Posted in News Roundup at 7:04 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

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Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Did I scare any new Open Source users – By John Joshph

    Another initiative from our side was to make the Microsoft IT support guys and companies comfortable with linux . We had started conducting the free workshop on open source solutions targeting them. Last workshop was on Zimbra mailing solution.The workshop was designed in such a way that the attendees(mostly MS guys) after the workshop said to us . They never knew giving mailing solution in Linux was so easy. In this workshops we do not stress to much on ideas behind OS.We show them a solution which they can use, or sell.Here Linux is propagated through this MS IT support guys

  • A Linux Home Entertainment Center

    As I mentioned in an earlier Linux Journal article, I decided to cut the apron strings with my television provider over a year ago. Bye bye, DISH Satelite TV!

    Man, you should have heard them whimper. “But sir, is there anything we can do to keep your business?”

    “No, thanks. I get all of my content off the internet now. Have you tried Hulu.com*? It’s great!” I can be a real jerk sometimes.

  • Server

    • Weather Bureau uses Linux to cut VM licensing

      The Bureau of Meteorology claims to have saved considerable sums on software licensing by embracing open source software during a server virtualisation drive.

      When the Bureau of Meteorology shifted to using server virtualisation, one major benefit for scientists was the ability to deploy individual servers for specialised processing tasks.

  • Graphics Stack

    • Benchmarks Of The Latest Nouveau Gallium3D Driver

      Sadly, the Nouveau driver remains to be just a community effort with no official support from NVIDIA even though the popular GPU company had dropped their open-source 2D driver. As such, the Nouveau driver has not been maturing as quickly as the open-source ATI Radeon driver stack that has more active developers along with official support from AMD. For our testing of the Nouveau Gallium3D driver today, we ran the open-source driver (and then NVIDIA’s binary driver) on a NVIDIA GeForce 8500GT, GeForce 8800GT, and GeForce 9800GTX graphics cards.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • Qt

      • Qt’s Volker Hilsheimer…

        As powerful and comprehensive as Qt is, it requires C++ skills. We are aiming very high with Qt, and Qt Quick came from a desire to open the framework up to even more developers than what is possible now. To do that we needed to build something within Qt that allows developers or UI designers with diverse skill sets outside of C++ – like JavaScript or Flash for example – to use Qt to build nice, rich, touch-enabled UIs .

        Qt Quick works by combining an enhanced Qt Creator IDE, a new easy-to-learn declarative language that will be instantly familiar to many developers (QML) and a new module in the Qt library called QtDeclarative.

    • K Desktop Environment (KDE SC)

      • KDE SC 4.5 RC1- The (well) hidden features

        Hopefully with the porting of the KDE PIM suite of applications to akonadi in 4.5.1, all of the necessary frameworks for delivering on the KDE SC 4.x promise, will be in place. But I don’t think that 4.5 will deliver the full bloom referred to in the release notes. Hopefully the stabilisation of KDE SC 4.5 will lay the foundation for things to bloom fully in 4.6.

      • Successful Spanish KDE Blogger Baltasar Ortega Talks to the Dot

        On June 1st, 2010, KDE Blog, one of the foremost KDE-focused blogs in Spanish, celebrated the publication of its 1500th post. The occasion seemed to be the perfect excuse to chat with its author, Baltasar Ortega, and to ask him a few questions about himself, blogging, and how KDE is going to take over the world. Read on for his insightful and passionate answers.

      • Trinity KDE: KDE 3 Zombified or Resurrected?

        Several weeks ago, I ended a comparison of the KDE 4 and 3 desktops by saying “Unless a project takes over KDE 3 development, sooner or later it may become unusable with the latest generation of computers.”

        What I had missed — free software being a large place where events move at near-light speeds — was that a project had already taken over KDE 3 development. It’s called Trinity KDE, and is organized by Timothy Pearson, who has been releasing Kubuntu releases that use KDE 3.5 for some time. According to Facebook rumor, he has been planning to revive KDE 3 for some time.

      • KDE Accessibility tools

        Linux is certainly available for everyone. And with the right tools, it is even possible to make it available to those with disabilities. Both KMag and KMouseTool makes Linux possible for those who might not have been able to without such tools.

      • Knowledge: A Different Approach to a Database on the Desktop

        Desktop applications for ‘Information Management’ that go beyond conventional card-index style databases are hard to find. The ideas behind such software are perhaps not that well known, so a prototype program, Knowledge, has been developed to put them firmly into the public domain.

    • GNOME Desktop

  • Distributions

    • 8 More Linux Distributions for Web Server

      8 More Linux Distributions for Web Server: I’ve already shared with you a list of some of the best and most well-known Linux distributions used on web servers. However, there are still plenty of excellent server-oriented Linux distros that I failed to mention there. So I think it is important to make a follow up post and bring you another round of Linux distributions for web server.

    • Reviews

      • Review: Puppy Linux Lucid Puppy – With Screenshots

        Puppy Linux. One of the most iconic Linux distros out there. I have played around with them for what seems like ages, and have found reasons to both love and hate them over the years.

        As of recently Puppy has been built from Ubuntu, and I take a look at the newest release…

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat Still Doesn’t Need Desktop Linux

        In a conversation with MSPmentor, a the recent Red Hat Partner Summit, CEO Jim Whitehurst clearly said that his company is not pinning its fortunes on desktop Linux. He made clear that Red Hat will continue to develop and support its desktop Linux offering, but won’t make a substantial push with it.

      • Integral Innovation

        In his keynote speech at the Red Hat Summit in Boston, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst made the case that of the $1.3 trillion USD spent in 2009 on Enterprise IT globally, $500 billion was essentially wasted (due to new project mortality and Version 2.0-itis). Moreover, because the purpose of IT spending is to create value (typically $6-$8 for each $1 of IT spend), the $500 billion waste in enterprise IT spending translates to $3.5 trillion of lost economic value. He goes on to explain that with the right innovations—in software business models, software architectures, software technologies, and applications—we can get full value from the money that’s being wasted today, reinforcing the thesis that innovation trumps cost savings.

      • Red Hat’s Partner Progress: A Reality Check

        Red Hat’s virtualization pitch is pretty simple: The company claims RHEV is more scalable and lower cost than VMware. But Red Hat concedes it has to improve the management tools surrounding RHEV. It sounds like Red Hat eventually hopes to leapfrog VMware with a potent combo (the forthcoming RHEL 6 and RHEV 2.3 releases) over the long haul.

      • Fedora People

        • Jared Smith is the new Fedora Project Leader

          A leadership change is always momentous, and the Fedora Project is no exception to this rule. I wanted to share some thoughts about being the Fedora Project Leader, tell the community about the person who will be taking over that role soon, and to let you know what to expect over the next few weeks and months.

        • Introducing Fedora Project Leader Jared Smith

          Every Fedora release provides an opportunity for renewal and change. Our recent release of Fedora 13, which is being hailed by many as one of our best releases ever, is no exception. As we embark on another exciting development cycle, we also have the opportunity to renew the leadership of the Fedora Project as part of our commitment to change and evolution. In July, Jared Smith will join Red Hat as the new Fedora Project Leader, taking over the role from Paul Frields.

        • First Fedora Design Bounty Ninja identified!

          Congratulations, Jef, on a job well-done! By the way, Jef is a second-year industrial design student from the Netherlands, and this was his first contribution to open source. Also worth noting, Jef has since taken on two other design tickets as well as worked on some mockups for Design Hub, so he is whooping some serious behind (or skulking stealthily about with a Gimp katana or Inkscape nunchucks at the ready, as ninjas prefer to do)!

    • Debian Family

      • Debian vs. Ubuntu: Contrasting Philosophies

        Debian and Ubuntu are distributions that lend themselves naturally to comparison. Not only is Ubuntu a continuing fork of Debian, but many of its developers also work on Debian.

        Even more important, you sometimes hear the suggestion that Ubuntu is a beginner’s distribution, and that users might consider migrating to Debian when they gain experience.

        However, like many popular conceptions, the common characterizations of Debian and Ubuntu are only partially true. Debian’s reputation as an expert’s distribution is partly based on its state a decade ago, although it does provide more scope for hands-on management if that is what you want. Similarly, while Ubuntu has always emphasized usability, like any distro, much of its usability comes from the software that it includes — software that is just as much a part of Debian as of Ubuntu.

      • Rip CD’s to MP3 in Debian

        My portable music player only plays MP3 and WMA format files, so I rip CD’s into MP3. I hadn’t ripped a CD since installing Debian, so coming across this post on the Debian forum, I checked and found that MP3 in Audio CD Extractor was not enabled. Following the instructions in the post, I was able to enable ripping into MP3.

      • Debian Project News – June 28th, 2010
      • Canonical/Ubuntu

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

  • Observation on hiring from open source

    A novice climbed the mountain and asked the guru for advice. The guru said, “when I hire, I want to know you’re a good developer. I am much more likely to hire you if I can see public commits in an open source repository. I love to hire open source developers and recommend you do it too.”

  • Back to Basics: What Is Open Source Software?

    Google’s choice a few weeks ago, to use a modified version of the BSD open-source license for its WebM format and VP8 codec raised the discussion of open-sourcing to a level that it was covered by more than just the tech media.

  • Mozilla

    • Mozilla in Indonesia 2010

      Mozilla and Firefox are in uncharted territory in Indonesia because we enjoy being the dominant browser. Firefox’s share on many of the top Indonesian websites is between 65-75%. It’s not clear exactly why Firefox is so popular (I go into more detail below), but I believe Mozilla needs to be more active in Indonesia moving forward in order to keep the market share that we have today, and to understand why Firefox is as popular as it is for both the Indonesian market as well as other emerging markets (other parts of S. E. Asia and S. America at the very least.)

    • Update: Mozilla Posts Firefox 4.0 Beta 1 Build

      If you have been using a previous version of Firefox 3.7, which now officially becomes Firefox 4.0, you should feel already comfortable with this new version. Mozilla has not posted detailed release notes yet, but there seem to be no major changes from Firefox 3.7a6-pre, with the exception that the browser is running more smoothly and with fewer crashes.

    • Hola. Szia. Guten tag. Alo. Student Reps goes global

      Students around the world love Mozilla’s products and embrace our mission. Our 2,100 student evangelists have a global presence, reaching schools in 77 countries around the world. To more effectively communicate with our student leaders, we are going international with our student guide as well.

  • SaaS or Fake/Obscure Open Source

    • Open Core Is Bad For Your Software Freedom

      When I spoke at the Transfer Summit in Oxford last week, I invited the delegates to join me in reforming the Open Source Initiative (OSI). I repeated the explanation I made here, that OSI needs to be rebuilt in the light of a re-projection of software freedom for a new decade. In articulating the challenges facing open source after ten years of success, I asserted – as I usually do – that “open core” is one of the big challenges facing open source. This surprised some delegates.

      Last week Mårten Mickos, the former CEO of MySQL and new CEO of cloud technology company Eucalyptus, indicated in an interview that he considers open core to be the best model for a new business exploiting open source software. He said

      “We deliver a fully functional cloud with Eucalyptus software. You can download it on a GPL v3 license. But, additionally, we provide enterprise features only if you pay for them … it’s open core,”

    • The Lack Of A Billion Dollar Pureplay Open Source Software Company Shows The Market Is Working Properly

      On that first point, I would argue that tons of companies are, actually, billion dollar open source companies: Google, IBM, Facebook and many others, for example, all rely heavily on open source software and are valued at well over a billion dollars. It’s unlikely that any of the three would be anywhere near what they are today without open source software. It’s just that all of these companies were smart enough not to be in the bad business of selling an infinite good. Instead, they all looked for ways to use an infinite good — for free — to make something scarce massively more valuable. With Google it was user’s attention and all of the information out on the web. With IBM it was services to support enterprise technology. Even Redhat, the company that kicked off this discussion, really makes its money from services and expertise.

  • Oracle

    • Profiting from open source — without selling out

      Zack Urlocker, a board member and executive for several open source companies, points out the trade-off between the degree of sharing and revenue: “Apache has a great license model that enables the wide adoption of open source software, but there have been few significant businesses — none approaching even $100 million in revenue — based on a permissive license model” such as Apache’s.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Junto: overview of concept, philosophy, and components

      Junto is an environment for open discussion, combined with a public backchannel. it’s not about being a platform – it’s more of a meme and a mindset of collaboration and cooperation. Junto was a club started by Benjamin Franklin for mutual exchange of knowledge and information and personal and business development. When I proposed the concept of Junto, it was in that spirit that the community of people who believe “we can’t do it alone” would model the behavior online of what generative dialogue and open innovation looks like.

    • Open Data

      • Speaker interview: Rufus Pollock

        Rufus Pollock, founder, The Open Knowledge Foundation

        How, in your experience, have web technologies been employed to make the world a better place?

        The internet and new digital technologies have had and will continue to have a huge impact on the way that knowledge is disseminated in society. Sharing knowledge more effectively has the potential to improve the world in all kinds of ways — from closing the loop between citizens and public bodies, allowing for greater accountability and improved service provision, to improving large-scale collaboration in science, e.g. on the development of life-saving drugs and treatments. Better knowledge sharing enables us to understand some of the world’s biggest problems — from our changing climate to our troubled economies — and to respond to them more effectively. In addition to these extrinsic merits, digital content can also be intrinsically valuable — such as in the case of classic literary or musical works which have entered the public domain or recordings of lecture courses which anyone can freely listen to and share.

    • Open Hardware

      • Event #3 — Arduino: An Open Source Hardware Success Story

        For the third meeting we’ll be asking the question “what factors contribute to the success of an open source hardware project?”, and using Arduino and derivatives LilyPad Arduino and the concurrency.cc board as the basis for an informal case study

  • Standards/Consortia

    • Growing pains afflict HTML5 standardization

      Listening to marketing messages from companies such as Apple and Google, one might think HTML5, the next-generation Web page standard, is ready to take the Net by storm.

      But the words of those producing the specification show an HTML governance process that can be stormy, fractious, and far from settled down. The World Wide Web Consortium’s return to HTML standardization after years of absence has produced tensions with the more informal Web Hypertext Application Working Group (WHATWG) that shouldered the HTML burden during that absence.

      Some examples of language that’s cropped up this month on the W3C’s HTML Working Group mailing list: “childish,” “intolerable,” “ridiculous,” “shenanigans.” And there’s a concrete manifestation of the divisiveness: The WHATWG and W3C versions of the HTML5 specification, though both stemming from the same source material, have diverged in some areas.

      [..]

      But where will those developers look to find that standard? The W3C, a recognized standards body that includes the participation of Microsoft and carries patent policy that attempts to ease patent-infringement worries?

      [...]

      But where will those developers look to find that standard? The W3C, a recognized standards body that includes the participation of Microsoft and carries patent policy that attempts to ease patent-infringement worries?

      [...]

      The HTML disputes come at a time when the W3C, under the leadership of new chief executive Jeff Jaffe, is trying to reclaim some of its power.

      “There is much new innovation, and the Web will benefit if the community brings their work to W3C,” Jaffe said last week in a blog post, adding that the W3C is trying to become more agile and open.

    • FFmpeg gets its own implementation of Google’s VP8 codec

      Developers Ronald Bultje, David Conrad, and Jason Garret-Glaser are creating a native VP8 video codec implementation for the open source FFmpeg project. The aim of this effort is to bring first-class VP8 support to FFmpeg and demonstrate the feasibility of producing an independent VP8 implementation.

Leftovers

  • In Faulty-Computer Suit, Window to Dell Decline

    After the math department at the University of Texas noticed some of its Dell computers failing, Dell examined the machines. The company came up with an unusual reason for the computers’ demise: the school had overtaxed the machines by making them perform difficult math calculations.

  • Security/Aggression

    • Confidential report reveals ContactPoint security fears

      An independent study on the previous government’s controversial child protection database highlighted significant security and privacy risks.

    • Romford coppers try to stopper young snapper

      Despite fine words from high-ranking police officers, an unpleasant incident in Romford last week suggests that officers on the ground are no nearer understanding or respecting photographers’ rights.

    • EFF delivers HTTPS Not Quite Everywhere

      In the early hours of June 18 the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Tor Project released a beta of a Firefox extension dubbed “HTTPS Everywhere” with the intention of providing encryption of user data when visiting certain sites. According to the official announcement, “HTTPS Everywhere” will provide SSL encryption to sites like Google Search, Wikipedia, Twitter and Identi.ca, and Facebook.

      [...]

      The name “HTTPS Everywhere” is a bit misleading. Besides Google Search, Wikipedia, Twitter and Identi.ca, and Facebook this extension also works on the EFF and Tor sites, Ixquick, DuckDuckGo, Scroogle, other small search engines, the New York Times, The Washington Post, Paypal, and many other sites that offer HTTPS encryption. But that’s hardly everywhere.

  • Finance

  • Censorship/Privacy/Civil Rights

    • Google to go dark in China, Baidu rejoices

      Google Inc. has announced a “new approach” in China after the government said the company could no longer automatically redirect users to the unfiltered Hong Kong site.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality/DRM

    • Net Neutrality Opponents Outspending Proponents More Than 4 to 1

      Companies opposed to Network Neutrality spent more than 4 times as much money on lobbying last quarter than organizations in support of it, according to a report on new hearings on the subject by watchdog organization Sunlight Foundation. Net Neutrality opponents spent $19.7 million in lobbying in the first quarter of 2010 -supporters only $4.7 million.

  • Copyrights

    • EFF Takes On Mass BitTorrent Lawsuits In Court Tomorrow

      As the US Copyright Group continues with its plans to force settlements from thousands of individuals who they claim illegally shared copyright movies using BitTorrent, opposition to their turn-piracy-into-profit scheme grows. Tomorrow the EFF steps up to the mark in a federal court to argue for the breaking up of the lawsuits. If successful they could strike a significant blow to this operation.

    • Canada’s copyright laws show Britain’s digital legislation is no exception

      A few months ago, Britain’s archivists, educators, independent artists and technologists were up in arms over the digital economy bill, a dreadful piece of legislation that ignored all the independent experts’ views on how to improve Britain’s digital economy; instead, it further rewarded the slow-moving entertainment companies that refused to adapt to the changing marketplace and diverted even more public enforcement resources to shoring up their business-models.

      The bill was passed despite enormous public outcry, without real parliamentary debate, in a largely empty house, hours before parliament dissolved for the election. Despite reassuring promises to their constituents, huge numbers of MPs just didn’t bother to show up for work that day, allowing the bill to slip through (my own MP, Meg Hillier, sent me a letter to tell me that she was “concerned” that the bill was up for a vote without debate, but she voted for it anyway).

    • Pirate Bay’s Founding Group ‘Piratbyrån’ Disbands

      In 2003 a group of friends from Sweden decided to found Piratbyrån (the bureau of piracy), a lobbying organization to promote the sharing of information and culture. A few months later the group took a decision that would change the Internet – the launch of a BitTorrent tracker named ‘The Pirate Bay’. Today marks the end of an era with the announcement that Piratbyrån has disbanded.

    • Dutch Public Television Tries BitTorrent Downloads

      The Dutch public broadcasting organization NPO has launched a trial project which will see it publish all recent video broadcasts via BitTorrent downloads and streams. With the trial NPO wants to gauge the demand for BitTorrent downloads, and whether P2P technology can cut down distribution costs significantly.

    • ACTA

      • Developing Country Opposition to ACTA Mounts

        Just as the G8-G20 meetings conclude in Muskoka and Toronto, another round of negotiations on the controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement resumes in Switzerland today. In the aftermath of the last round of discussions in New Zealand, a draft version of the ACTA text was publicly released, temporarily quieting criticism about the lack of transparency associated with an agreement that currently touches on all forms of intellectual property, including patents, trademark, and copyright.

      • Analysis: Why Silicon Valley should fear ACTA

        A group of intellectual property experts have warned that search engines, web hosts and e-commerce sites will be stripped of protections if the proposed draft of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) is endorsed.

      • ACTA negotiators don’t care about the Internet

        La Quadrature du Net, along with access to medication NGOs, met in Luzern with 20 negotiators of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA). No answer was given regarding the concern that ACTA would hinder fundamental freedoms online, by turning Internet operators into a private copyright police. More disturbingly, negotiators showed a profound lack of understanding and competence, close to disdain, regarding Internet and the digital environment.

        [...]

        “The profound disdain of the ACTA negotiators, and their blatant lack of knowledge of Internet and the realities of the digital environment, show how flawed the whole process is. With ACTA, unelected public officials will force private actors into censoring the Internet in the name of copyright. Citizens worldwide must react by holding their government accountable.” concludes Jérémie Zimmermann, spokesperson for citizen advocacy group La Quadrature du Net.

      • ACTA Negotiators Respond To Questions About ACTA; More Of The Same

        Rather than admitting how secret and closed off the negotiations have been, the negotiators are just passing the blame, by saying it’s not their issue to actually engage representatives from civil rights groups and civil societies. Besides, the response is again off-base. If the whole point of meeting with these groups is to understand the concerns of them and their constituents, it should be the negotiators who are seeking out such meetings. Once again, this response makes it clear that the negotiators’ marching orders are not to come up with the best solution for each of the societies and countries they represent, but of a very narrow group of special interests. This is no surprise, but the answer basically confirms that they know this. Very sad.

Clip of the Day

CLUG Talk 14 April 2009 – Keeping Time with Linux (2009)


Microsoft’s Failure in Mobile Technology Shows That Microsoft Has No Promising Future

Posted in Apple, GNU/Linux, Hardware, Microsoft at 11:30 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Stöwer - Titanic

Summary: Microsoft stumbles in mobile phones/devices and its share price too tumbles significantly as its future is questioned by pundits

Vista [sic] Phone 7 is not even out yet and it has almost no applications at all (big mistake for Microsoft to abandon third-party applications compatibility). So why does it receive so much press coverage? It’s not as though Windows Mobile even matters much in the phones space. It seems possible that Microsoft used the leak trick to get some coverage which supposedly resulted from an “accident” (Microsoft does this with Vista 8 at the moment because to put out there Vista 8 screenshots without a supposed ‘leaker’ can send the message that Microsoft to has given up on Vista 7). It’s hard to tell for sure, but Microsoft does use many fake ‘leaks’; it possibly learned this from Apple and we gave many examples before.

There are missing features (even copy and paste) and obstacles, such as the fact that Microsoft is alienating developers. Many large ones have dumped Windows Mobile, at least for now (examples include Mozilla, Skype, and Adobe). Tony Bradley from IDG argues that “Microsoft might be late to the party and have trouble reversing the tide.”

Eric Knorr from IDG publishes his thoughts under two separate headlines (maybe changed by an editor), one being “Microsoft’s embarrassing problem with the future” and the other being “Why Microsoft Can’t Figure Out What’s Next”. From the summary [1, 2]:

When it comes to mobile computing, the cloud, and desktop virtualization, Microsoft can’t seem to shoot straight

We have already covered the fact that Microsoft is sort of bribing mobile developers so that they target Vista Phone 7. The pro-Apple sites call this bribery [1, 2] (“Microsoft Bribing iPhone Developers to Build Windows 7 Games”) and it’s reportedly not working out for Microsoft. The fragmentation [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] sure is not helping and the problem is recognised by more and more sites [1, 2]. Apparently pushing ads is Microsoft’s idea of a ‘killer feature’ [1, 2]:

Microsoft is positioning its upcoming Windows Phone 7 smartphone OS, planned for release this October, as an “ad-serving machine.”

Who would want something like that? Surely not users.

This whole thing is starting to look like another Zune in the making. Our reader Ryan, who used to work at Walmart as an assistant manager, still visits the store and he says that “Walmart has a 16 GB Zune HD. They haven’t sold any in the last 4 months at least. I can tell because they haven’t moved”

Zune is likely to be doomed, but Microsoft depends on its operating system because of the disaster called “KIN” (more on that in a moment). “Bing-Zune integration still not working,” says CNET’s headline and yet again downtime hits the Zune. It suffered a downtime last week and it has become an embarrassment to Microsoft, whose CEO tried to distance himself from the product’s failure. Unsurprisingly, Microsoft’s CEO is not paid so well compared to peers [1, 2, 3] and according to Cory Doctorow:

Aaron Swartz has the news of how the White House is trying to gut a piece of legislation (passed by the House and the Senate) that would be key to reining in CEO compensation in large corporations

The WSJ links to itself (a subsite of sorts, where Kara defends Microsoft) in an article titled “Could a New CEO Fix Microsoft?”

A pro-Microsoft publication goes with the headline “How Vulnerable Is Microsoft?”

Joe Wilcox gives “Five reasons why Microsoft can’t compete (and Steve Ballmer isn’t one of them)” while Matt Asay (Canonical) claims that “Microsoft disqualifies itself from smartphone race”

In the hugely competitive smartphone arms race, there’s only one real certainty:

Microsoft is out. Disqualified. Not competitive.

Why? Because Microsoft failed to tune into its own theme song: “Developers. Developers. Developers.” For a variety of reasons, the company fetished Windows desktop developers to the exclusion of mobile developers and now it’s paying the price.

Just how “not competitive” is Microsoft? Well, last week we aired the rumours that Microsoft had sold just 500 units of "KIN". Microsoft is not denying it yet:

But when taking a closer look at the information that’s available — since Microsoft is unlikely to offer sales numbers that could dispute or confirm the rumor — its easy to see why this tall-tale has legs.

TechFlash’s Microsoft booster Todd Bishop took it upon himself to get some answers and he investigated in a local shop. He wrote:

For starters, if I hadn’t been looking for the Kin, I might not have known it was there. At each of the Verizon Wireless stores I visited, the Kin did have a dedicated area, measuring a few feet across against the wall. But the area was generally overshadowed by promotional areas for Android devices and other high-end phones sold by the carrier.

For those who do not know, TechFlash is still receiving Microsoft sponsorship, but this time around it’s a lot more diluted:

A big thanks to our sponsors for their support: Barokas PR, BDO, Bing, KeyBank, and R2integrated. For additional sponsorship opportunities, please contact Joe Heslet at jheslet@bizjournals.com.

In order to float “KIN” Microsoft has come up with a new and pathetic press release, appealing to children. Microsoft pretends that it’s a niche product for young people, not for stupid buyers.

The price of “KIN” was cut by about 50% (depending on the store) due to abysmal demand and it continues to receive terrible reviews, the latest example being this detailed review from Brighthand:

The bottom line:

Microsoft stated that, with the Kin, they were developing a phone that sits somewhere between so-called “feature phones” that offer the basics and a full-featured, pricier smartphone, but with the Kin Two, they’ve managed to capture the worst of both worlds, often underperforming low-end phones when it comes to capability while charging more than a typical smartphone if you opt for the Zune Pass subscription.

No wonder the management left the project and the company. It’s just a total embarrassment. Open for Business has another new review of “KIN” and it was disappointed, just like everyone else (misguided buyers, not just reviewers whom Microsoft sent a phone).

Sadly, for now this means we would point those in the market for a new Verizon phone to one of the company’s collection of Android devices instead. We wanted to like the KIN, and like the concept car analogy mentioned earlier, many of its ideas are good in theory – they just come up short in practice.

At the expense of Microsoft and other brands, Linux/Android and Apple continue to grow (the Linux-based Android and Apple grow at the fastest pace). Forbes has published “Could Apple Collapse? Not Likely”

This is a response to Henry Blodget’s contention (also published in Forbes) that “odds are increasing that Microsoft’s business will just completely collapse.”

“It’s funny that a Microsoft booster/watcher becomes a Microsoft basher within just a couple of years. Maybe he just cannot ignore the facts anymore.”These articles have some factual basis. Another new one from Henry Blodget is titled “Reason No. 19 Why Microsoft’s Business Is Massively Threatened: Corporate Users Now Want What They Have At Home”

Bloomberg is responding to Blodget and it’s part of the big PR campaign that tries to show Microsoft as professional and invincible. Joe Wilcox, a former editor of the “Microsoft Watch” Web site which has been almost dead for months right after he left it, argues that “Apple revenue will likely top Microsoft during Q2″

It’s funny that a Microsoft booster/watcher becomes a Microsoft basher within just a couple of years. Maybe he just cannot ignore the facts anymore. “Microsoft Volatility Elevated; Shares Near 10-Month Low,” said this financial site last week. Another financial news site says that “Microsoft Is Down 15.77% Since Reporting Quarterly Results 57 Days Ago” and “Microsoft 9.20% Below its May 6th Flash Crash Low of $27.91″ (those are just the headlines).

Unless Microsoft can find a way to evolve for the Web and adapt to mobile technology, its days (or years) may be numbered. It already has an increasing debt.

Inaction From Ombudsman/EU Commission Regarding Microsoft Lobbyists Derailing Public Policy

Posted in Deception, Europe, Microsoft, Standard at 10:11 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

European countries map

Summary: Many months after the original complaint (almost a year) a deadlock is reached and Microsoft gets away with legalised corruption of EU guidelines

LAST YEAR I went through a lot of trouble trying to submit feedback and expose the role played by Microsoft lobbyists in derailing documents which promoted Free/libre software and/or open standards. Thanks to Wikileaks we already had sufficient evidence, but we asked for the evidence to be provided by a verified source, namely the EU Commission. This long journey was covered in posts such as:

  1. European Open Source Software Workgroup a Total Scam: Hijacked and Subverted by Microsoft et al
  2. Microsoft’s AstroTurfing, Twitter, Waggener Edstrom, and Jonathan Zuck
  3. Does the European Commission Harbour a Destruction of Free/Open Source Software Workgroup?
  4. The Illusion of Transparency at the European Parliament/Commission (on Microsoft)
  5. 2 Months and No Disclosure from the European Parliament
  6. After 3 Months, Europe Lets Microsoft-Influenced EU Panel be Seen
  7. Formal Complaint Against European Commission for Harbouring Microsoft Lobbyists
  8. ‘European’ Software Strategy Published, Written by Lobbyists and Multinationals
  9. Microsoft Uses Inside Influence to Grab Control, Redefine “Open Source”

Today we received the following message with a 7-page PDF from the Ombudsman’s Microsoft Exchange server (they are still stuck with proprietary software). The message says:

From – Tue Jun 29 15:04:11 2010
X-Account-Key: account11
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Return-path: <EO@ombudsman.europa.eu>
Envelope-to: [roy]
Delivery-date: Tue, 29 Jun 2010 13:40:27 +0100
Received: from smtp15.europarl.europa.eu ([136.173.62.228])
by blueberry.active-ns.com with esmtp (Exim 4.69)
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for roy@schestowitz.com; Tue, 29 Jun 2010 13:40:27 +0100
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(European Parliament) with ESMTP id <T96908f85e588ad3ee41ddc@SMTP15.europarl.europa.eu> for [roy]
Tue, 29 Jun 2010 14:40:19 +0200
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MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/mixed;
boundary=”—-_=_NextPart_001_01CB1788.3C8C821C”
Subject: Complaint Nr. 1719-2009-(MAM)JF
Date: Tue, 29 Jun 2010 14:40:20 +0200
Message-ID: <44E78AF8B41BA34C8988D3EB5783B2B201C404FE@EMAILLUXSV31.ep.parl.union.eu>
X-MS-Has-Attach: yes
X-MS-TNEF-Correlator:
Thread-Topic: Complaint Nr. 1719-2009-(MAM)JF
Thread-Index: AcsXiDxE1b0lnSc1RryOrWc8/LFItw==
From: “Euro-Ombudsman” <EO@ombudsman.europa.eu>
To: [roy]

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

——_=_NextPart_001_01CB1788.3C8C821C
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset=”us-ascii”
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<<1719-2009-(MAM)JF-S2009-113616.pdf>> =20
Dear Sir,

Please find attached a letter from the European Ombudsman which was sent
to your postal address on 20 November 2009 and returned undelivered on
23 Junbe 2010.

Yours sincerely

The Registry

It’s not clear why it bounced and why it took 6 months to return to the sender. In any event, the enclosed PDF reveals nothing new; the Commission was asked to provide a copy of edits from Microsoft’s lobbyist (Association for Competitive Technology). It never provided this, despite repeated requests. Sending just the final documents is absolutely useless as it says nothing about the process which was not transparent and was also stuffed by multinationals. It’s rather outrageous, but at least we have documented proof of what happened and why the system is broken. More recently, this same broken system derailed the EIFv2 (see coverage below) and it’s going to happen again and again unless something is reformed or the ‘bad apples’ get thrown out. “The more corrupt the state, the more laws,” said Publius Cornelius Tacitus. Replace “laws” with “lawyers”?

  1. European Interoperability Framework (EIF) Corrupted by Microsoft et al, Its Lobbyists
  2. Orwellian EIF, Fake Open Source, and Security Implications
  3. No Sense of Shame Left at Microsoft
  4. Lobbying Leads to Protest — the FFII and the FSFE Rise in Opposition to Subverted EIF
  5. IBM and Open Forum Europe Address European Interoperability Framework (EIF) Fiasco
  6. EIF Scrutinised, ODF Evolves, and Microsoft’s OOXML “Lies” Lead to Backlash from Danish Standards Committee
  7. Complaints About Perverted EIF Continue to Pile Up
  8. More Complaints About EIFv2 Abuse and Free Software FUD from General Electric (GE)
  9. Patents Roundup: Copyrighted SQL Queries, Microsoft Alliance with Company That Attacks F/OSS with Software Patents, Peer-to-Patent in Australia
  10. Microsoft Under Fire: Open Source Software Thematic Group Complains About EIFv2 Subversion, NHS Software Supplier Under Criminal Investigation
  11. British MEP Responds to Microsoft Lobby Against EIFv2; Microsoft’s Visible Technologies Infiltrates/Derails Forums Too
  12. Patents Roundup: Escalations in Europe, SAP Pretense, CCIA Goes Wrong, and IETF Opens Up

Netrunner 2 (Codenamed “Blacklight”) is Released – Ubuntu Without Mono

Posted in GNOME, GNU/Linux, KDE, Mono, Ubuntu at 9:51 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Netrunner-os
The first release of Netrunner

Summary: A Ubuntu-based GNU/Linux distribution which excludes Mono reaches its second release

Netrunner submits: “just dropping a line to say we released the second version of Netrunner. From our website:

Netrunner 2 is re-based from Gnome to KDE!
Yet it still aims to be fully Ubuntu/GTK+/Gnome-compatible!

Netrunner 2: Blacklight features well-known Gnome-apps like nautilus, synaptic and more out-of-the-box:

* Firefox 3.6.3
* installed web browser plugins (Java, Flash)
* OpenOffice Software Suite 3.2
* VLC media player with codecs
* Thunderbird email client
* WINE 1.42
* GIMP paint program
* audacious (winamp-like music player)
* Pidgin
* vuze (filesharing program)
* and even more

All that on top of a well-tuned and easily customizable KDE 4.4 Desktop Environment!

“And of course we still ditched mono completely and installed a lot of software instead,” remarked the lead developer.

Update: Here is a screenshot of the new version (Netrunner 2)

Microsoft Keeps Losing Market Share to Google, Goes Aggressive, Discriminates Against GNU/Linux, and Grabs People’s Healthcare System

Posted in GNU/Linux, Google, Microsoft, Patents, Search, Servers, Windows at 9:43 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Titanic on display

Summary: In order to become “too big to fail” Microsoft is grasping at people’s medical records, sues competitors (using software patents), and offers bribes for people to embrace Microsoft because Google in particular keeps gaining

MICROSOFT is having a hard time and it has begun manufacturing more Vista 8 vapourware (it’s apparently faked as being “leaked” for some extra allure), which is telling because it says Vista 7 is passé (c/f the previous post). Microsoft does this type of thing (bogus numbers too) when morale in the company is low. Microsoft lacks direction in many divisions as presidents and vice presidents leave the company. Last week there was a job swap [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], which is somewhat indicative of strategic misdirection.

Microsoft bolsters a strategy of lawsuits, with a recent example revolving around Hotmail (mentioned beforehand, but still being covered in the news [1, 2]) and other examples involving lawsuits against GNU/Linux (via distributors). These are signs of desperation. Frivolous lawsuits alienate and distract. Ask SCO.

Several months ago Microsoft dumped Linux/UNIX support from FAST (a shot in the foot) and it turns out that Apptus uses this to poach Microsoft customers (a path to other proprietary software). From its new press release:

Apptus, Europe’s leading developer of search and content enrichment services for online directories, today announced that they will offer all users of the FAST Enterprise Search Platform to replace it with their own platform Theca at no cost for licenses. The announcement was made as a response to the spring news that FAST’s present owner Microsoft will abandon all further Unix and Linux platform support for FAST.

Microsoft may be running out of friends, but not just yet. Microsoft has just honoured Accenture, which helped Microsoft in England and sued with software patents. Bad minds think alike.

In the case of Yahoo!, the company avoided Microsoft by all means. It wanted nothing to do with Microsoft before the proxy battle began and Microsoft overthrew the old management, eventually putting on top a Microsoft partner (Carol Bartz). She is driving the company into the ground but in a way that’s at least beneficial to Microsoft.

Yahoo Inc. CEO Carol Bartz faced shareholders at the company’s annual meeting Thursday—18 months into her effort to turn around an unfocused Internet giant eclipsed by Google Inc. and left battered by Microsoft Corp.’s failed takeover attempt.

It was failed, but the bullies eventually got their way as they virtually bought it cheaply and they will pass many users to Microsoft’s engine of lies (biased results by design). Yahoo! might also pass advertisers to Microsoft. What on Earth is this deal? Is anyone watching this covert corporate takeover? Forbes goes along with a deceiving hypothesis and with the headline “How Yahoo Learned To Love Microsoft,” neglecting to mention how the old management was pushed out, only to be replaced by Microsoft partners and former managers. It’s not the same Yahoo! anymore and it puts in jeopardy many people who are being profiled by Microsoft and brainwashed by Microsoft (which provides biased search results).

Here is what Murdoch’s press had to say about a related subject:

A new system to police privacy abuses by companies that track consumers’ Web-surfing habits for ad targeting will be launched in coming months by groups whose members include heavy users of this type of information—Internet companies such as Yahoo Inc. and Microsoft Corp. and advertising companies like WPP PLC.

Apple too is a privacy menace, but that’s a story for another time.

A few days ago we also wrote about rotten things in Telstra, whose CIO has just quit:

Telstra’s chief information officer, John McInerney, has announced he is leaving the company to pursue new opportunities. He has been on leave since April.

Who will replace him? They have already had Microsoft executive staff entering the company’s management.

AOL too is said to be at risk of being taken over by Microsoft [1, 2] and John Dvorak believes it’s a terrible idea. Some days ago he wrote:

Should Microsoft buy AOL?

Microsoft Corp. just seems intent on doing something dumb, such as its earlier attempt to buy Yahoo Inc., so I think this rumor of a takeover of AOL Inc. may be in play. But there could be more to it than meets the eye: a curse!

Microsoft is afraid of Google because it became a threat to it in the Web browsers, operating systems, and office suites space. At the moment, Google is pushing GNU/Linux into the mainstream (maybe Dell desktops/laptops/tablets):

Google’s (GOOG) Chrome operating system will be locked in a market share war with Microsoft’s (MSFT) Windows OS when it’s released later this year. Microsoft has a huge lead because it runs, by some estimates, on 90% of the PCs sold around the world. The success of Windows 7 may help cement that advantage. But the tide could be changing.

Google and Dell (DELL) are discussing a deal to have its Chrome OS put on on the PC company’s laptops. According to Reuters, “We have to have a point of view on the industry and technology direction two years, three years down the road, so we continuously work with Google on this,” Amit Midha, Dell’s president for Greater China and South Asia said.

This is also covered in [1, 2, 3, 4] and many other articles we mentioned last week.

Dell is not hostile towards GNU/Linux, despite that recent debacle [1, 2, 3]. The Consumerist asks, “Did Microsoft Make Dell Take Back Love Letter To Linux?”

It will be interesting to see if Dell chooses Chrome OS (based on Ubuntu GNU/Linux) at the expense of Ubuntu GNU/Linux. The pro-Microsoft press has published the article “How Google Will Defeat Microsoft” and new figures suggest that Google continues to gain at Microsoft’s expense in search.

Experian Hitwise reported that Yahoo’s market share dipped to 14.4% in May, from 15% in the prior month, while Microsoft’s share fell to 9.2% from 9.4%. Yahoo and Microsoft have agreed to combine search operations, in a bid to gain ground on Google.

This is also covered in:

These results are consistent with what we’ve been seeing from companies that Microsoft is not paying while they produce so-called ‘market share’ figures. Microsoft’s partner comScore [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] says the very opposite and lets Microsoft game statistics. comScore should be ignored because with Microsoft money on its table it contradicts the rest of the pack which claims to be measuring the same thing (without receiving payments from Microsoft). This is indeed a complaint about comScore, which is part of the propaganda that the press repeats without investigating and asking key questions (or ask the sceptics what’s wrong with the numbers and with the sources). Murdoch’s press is still airing the same propaganda from ‘research’ firms that are in Microsoft’s pocket. No shame?

“Murdoch’s press is still airing the same propaganda from ‘research’ firms that are in Microsoft’s pocket.”Anyway, Microsoft is “attacking” Google Apps and IDG advertises (in the form of an article, also here for increased exposure) a case study for Live@Edu (do see this leak). It’s claimed to be taking a Google Apps customer, possibly with the usual bribes that Live@Edu offers to those who sell out their colleagues (we acquired leaked documents to show this and there is recent anecdotal evidence).

The truth of the matter is that as much as Microsoft wants to succeed in Fog Computing (Microsoft boosters, press releases, and few others [1, 2] play along), the area is dominated by companies like Google and even Salesforce. The Salesforce lawsuit [1, 2, 3] shows that Microsoft has given up on competing like a technology company and decided to act more like a patent troll. Microsoft’s spat is “the greatest thing that’s ever happened,” says Marc Benioff, the head of Salesforce. He explained it in the context of Microsoft invading other people’s conferences (Microsoft does this to other companies, which just shows what an aggressor it is, like Novell).

Microsoft’s lawsuit against his company hasn’t cowed Salesforce.com chief executive Marc Benioff, judging from his on-stage remarks today.

Benioff spoke in San Jose, Calif. at a launch event for Chatter, the company’s new social networking application for businesses. During that speech, he repeatedly took swipes at Microsoft, noting for example that there were Microsoft representatives handing out fliers outside the event. (On the other hand, Salesforce representatives are a familiar sight outside Microsoft events.)

Microsoft is trying to extract money from Salesforce operations, which run GNU/Linux. This appalling strategy has already worked with former Microsoft executives at Amazon, who pay Microsoft for both GNU/Linux and Windows servers. Microsoft gets paid either way, no matter if people choose Azure, Red Hat on Amazon’s EC2, or Windows on EC2. This is clearly an abuse and it puts in jeopardy a fair market. To make matters worse, Fog Computing potentially gives Microsoft enormous power over people’s sensitive data.

Microsoft hired top lobbyist because it’s trying to control more people’s medical records, this time in the EU/UK as well [1, 2]. With all the typical PR offensives Microsoft is taking more control away from the taxpayers, this time exploiting its relationship with the NHS. According to British news sites [1, 2] and Microsoft boosters like Marius Oiaga, Microsoft it trying to gain greater control over UK healthcare [1, 2] (Canadian healthcare has a similar threat).

This atrocious possibility of giving Microsoft the data of patients is being scrutinised in The Guardian:

The perils of privatised health records

As Microsoft launches its new health records website, ministers must resist the temptation to cut the NHS’s online data service

This whole health lobby is partly backed or assisted by the Gates Foundation, which has just expanded to having London presence (more on that later). Should the NHS let sick people give Microsoft their personal data without an option to opt out? This is a travesty that Canada’s healthcare ought to dodge too.

John Dvorak: Vista 7 Was “a Face-saving Vista Re-do”

Posted in GNU/Linux, Microsoft, Security, Vista, Vista 7, Vista 8, Windows at 7:38 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

John C Dvorak

Summary: As Microsoft runs away to Vista 8 vapourware we take a look at its failure to spread Vista 7 in the market (less than 10% market share in business, almost a year after its release)

John C. Dvorak has not been much of an optimist when it comes to Microsoft. And who can blame him? Earlier this month a former Microsoft executive was alleged to have said that Microsoft should lay off 30%-40% of its workforce. Over the past week we have found no headline at all about Vista (containing “Vista” in the headline) and Reuters says that Dell estimated the percentage of commercial PC users who have updated to Microsoft’s Vista 7 as still in single digits.

This helps in debunking Microsoft's latest spin/lies about ‘sales’ numbers of “Windows 7″ (it’s almost the only thing that made headlines about Vista 7 in last week’s news). About Vista 7, argues John Dvorak in a new column, “it was a face-saving Vista re-do.” Within more context:

This particular series of ads was possibly the biggest blunder the company could have made. It revealed a monumental communications ineptitude. To make things worse, I think that Microsoft still hasn’t realized what a bad idea the whole thing was. What the company did realize, however, was that Vista was not doing as well as it had hoped. Microsoft quickly ramped up Windows 7, selling it as though it was something different. Fact is, it was a face-saving Vista re-do. This time, everything was brilliant and on-time. This put the PC back on track, opening up the opportunity for upgrades without having to worry about “bad” PC systems.

But the thing is, there are more machines now that come preloaded with GNU/Linux. Based on market statistics, many businesss have no ongoing plans of leaving Windows XP, despite Microsoft’s discounts and promotions. Here is one new example of it:

Windows 7 Professional is the Windows 7 SKU targeted primarily at small business users. To get these customers to bite, Microsoft is offering them a $100 Southwest Airlines voucher.

Microsoft is giving away unused licences to brag about fake ‘sales’ numbers (we explained this in detail before and also gave examples). Windows XP SP2 is being pushed off a cliff [1, 2], but it’s a risky bet that potentially leads some customers to competitors such as GNU/Linux. “Microsoft sets out options as XP SP3 nears End of Life,” says the headline of another report.

According to Ian Moulster, Windows product manager for Microsoft UK, Vista and XP users will have several options. “They can move to XP SP3 or to a later version of Vista or they can opt for Microsoft break-fix, which is a low level support. That’s not recommended as a long term solution though.”

So staying with XP is not an appealing option and people who picked Vista get burned. One person wonders, “Is Microsoft Windows in danger of becoming the “XP Mode” of the future app world?” (the lock-in modality persists and there is need for legacy compatibility).

Microsoft Jack (Schofield) writes about the imminent death of XP SP2 (can be replaced by Wine under GNU/Linux in many cases). Schofield is not quite retiring and maybe he was pushed out of the Guardian where he rarely writes anymore. That’s the better explanation we have for the fact he writes for ZDNet UK now.

“Well the initial impression is how much it [Vista 7] looks like Vista. Which I think is…uh…the thing I’m not supposed to say.”

Jack Schofield

Those who still use XP may some day be barred from the Australian Internet because XP will never be secure (Microsoft does not really patch it).

ZDNet Australia has just published a reminder of this:

The Federal Government, alongside the Internet Industry Association (IIA), yesterday launched a code of practice that aims to reduce the amount of zombie-infected computers on the internet.

Zombie-infected computers are PCs connected to the internet that are infected with malware.

It is estimated that 1 in 2 Windows PCs is a zombie PC. In the next post we’ll show (without linking) that Microsoft has begun another round of Vista 8 vapourware. It always means that Microsoft is struggling.

“In the face of strong competition, Evangelism’s focus may shift immediately to the next version of the same technology, however. Indeed, Phase 1 (Evangelism Starts) for version x+1 may start as soon as this Final Release of version X.”

Microsoft, internal document [PDF]

Why and How Microsoft Exchange Should be Replaced by Free/Libre Software

Posted in Free/Libre Software, GNU/Linux, Mail, Microsoft, Servers at 6:53 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Euro

Summary: The exchange rates are good for swapping Microsoft Exchange with something that actually works and is reliable, not just less expensive

A

T A LATER stage this week we’ll show that Gates’ investment arm has just expanded to England with a new office in London. But that’s not the subject of this post, which was sent to us by an anonymous reader.

According to this press release, “ENow Presents at Microsoft UK Headquarters” (more on Exchange lock-in). For those who ever consider building a mail infrastructure with Exchange (which is a lot of trouble not just for administrators [1, 2]), here are the words from someone with a long and painful experience:

MS Exchange keeps breaking, Apple, Android and everyone else take one for the team and take the blame:
http://support.apple.com/kb/TS3398

All the discussion is about portable devices “not working” even though it is MS Exchange that quits. They should all just get over it, that’s what MS Exchange does, it breaks. Eventually they should just learn to shut up and take what Bill has to give them, either by getting used to the fact that they will never get much done tethered to Bill’s Exchange, or by being harassed and brow beat by the Microsoft Insiders for ‘making them look bad’

http://www.kolab.org/
http://www.citadel.org/
http://www.opengroupware.org/

The late, great Zimbra should also get a mention because it is now part of Microsoft’s Yahoo. Ostensibly one of the goals of the hostile take over was to crush Free and Open Source Software developer teams like the one on Zimbra.

There are also calendar servers which integrate well with other systems. Any web designer worth his coffee grounds can hook them together with the mail service:

http://www.bedework.org/
http://andrew.triumf.ca/dingo
http://trac.calendarserver.org/

If plain old mail is what you need, then look no further than these:

http://www.dovecot.org/
http://www.postfix.org/
http://www.exim.org/

If lusers miss some of the traditional features of MS Exchange such as downtime, unreliable connections, lost mail and delayed mail, there are many work-arounds.

* Downtime can be simulated by blocking the mail ports with the firewall for a few minutes every hours. MS Exchange monkeys usually have the Windows box underneath reboot every hour, to help hid instability this takes ten minutes or so each hour.

* Unreliable connections can be simulated by having the firewall drop random packets to or from the mail service. Be sure to just drop the packets, a return will send an icmp message to let the client know and that would not be as slow.

* Lost mail can be configured into the spam filter. Just have it delete 10% – 33% of incoming and outgoing mail. 10% used to be the industry average for MS Exchange but in many deployments that loss has been improved to 20% or even 30%!

* Delayed mail can also be simulated by the firewall or by the spam filter. Just bounce the message back using the spam filter or use the firewall to temporarily block incoming messages.

That way even if you use functional software and leave MS behind, you can still experience the chaos and accusations found in MS shops. A cold-turkey move might be too much for some fragile minds and an occasional round of “didn’t you get the memo?” ought to keep them in familiar territory during the phaseout.

This is coming from someone with first-hand experience. The main reason some people choose Exchange is that they are stuck in a mentality where everything is Windows. Later on we’ll write about the role of schools in this troubling mentality.

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