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TechBytes Episode 10: Microsoft FUD and Dirty Tactics Against GNU/Linux

Posted in TechBytes at 8:19 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz


Direct download as Ogg (1:10:22, 20.5 MB) | Direct download as MP3 (32.2 MB)

Summary: First episode of its kind discussing just one particular topic rather than general news; the show accumulates many examples where Microsoft attacks GNU/Linux

THIS is our tenth episode which is also a special one because we introduce one discussion topic rather than a news roundup. Our regular-to-be Gordon — along with Tim and Roy — speaks about this story of FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt). They go through some past stories where Microsoft is caught spreading FUD or derailing GNU/Linux adoption. As the show is in no way scripted, the discussion is not complete, but many different areas get covered. Tim’s site, OpenBytes, will publish some overview very soon.

RSS 64x64Today’s show ends with “The Pretty Pride Of Russia” by Tom Hickox (published in SXSW 2009 Showcasing Artists). We hope you will join us for future shows and spread the word if you enjoy this show. Also consider subscribing to the show via the RSS feed. If you have an Identi.ca account, consider subscribing to TechBytes in order to keep up to date.

As embedded (HTML5):


Ogg Theora
(There is also an MP3 version)

Our past shows:

Show overview Show title Date recorded
Episode 1: Brandon from Fedora TechBytes Episode 1: Apple, Microsoft, Bundling, and Fedora 14 (With Special Guest Brandon Lozza) 1/11/2010
Episode 2: No guests TechBytes Episode 2: Ubuntu’s One Way, Silverlight Goes Dark, and GNU Octave Discovered 7/11/2010
Episode 3: No guests TechBytes Episode 3: Games, Wayland, Xfce, Restrictive Application Stores, and Office Suites 8/11/2010
Episode 4: No guests TechBytes Episode 4: Fedora 14 Impressions, MPAA et al. Payday, and Emma Lee’s Magic 9/11/2010
Episode 5: No guests TechBytes Episode 5: Windows Loses to Linux in Phones, GNU/Linux Desktop Market Share Estimations, and Much More 12/11/2010
Episode 6: No guests TechBytes Episode 6: KINect a Cheapo Gadget, Sharing Perceptually Criminalised, Fedora and Fusion 14 in Review 13/11/2010
Episode 7: No guests TechBytes Episode 7: FUD From The Economist, New Releases, and Linux Eureka Moment at Netflix 14/11/2010
Episode 8: Gordon Sinclair on Linux Mint TechBytes Episode 8: Linux Mint Special With Gordon Sinclair (ThistleWeb) 15/11/2010
Episode 9: Gordon Sinclair returns TechBytes Episode 9: The Potentially Permanent Return of ThistleWeb 17/11/2010

Links 19/11/2010: GNOME Outreach Program for Women, Rainbow 0.2

Posted in News Roundup at 4:16 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish



  • Server

    • Supercomputing Top500 brews discontent

      Like Hollywood’s Academy Awards, the Top500 list of supercomputers is dutifully watched by high-performance computing (HPC) participants and observers, even as they vocally doubt its fidelity to excellence.

      “The Top 500 [uses] an artificial problem — it doesn’t measure about 80 percent of the workloads” that are usually run on supercomputers, said John Hengeveld, director of technical compute marketing for Intel’s Data Center Group, speaking on the sidelines of the Supercomputer 2010 conference this week. “It is not a representative benchmark for the industry.”

  • Kernel Space

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • Nepomuk is not fast, is instant!

        Everybody that has been a KDE user for the last 2 years knows Nepomuk and its bad reputation, maybe it was desired in the past, but no more. This morning I decided to get my Nepomuk up and running again, and I have to say that it is impresive! just take a look at this video…

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Gnome 2.32.1 released – Here’s looking to 3.x!

        I’ve always loved the Gnome Desktop Environment – and it’s certainly loved by many others.

        After its first release in 1999 it’s certainly come a long way. I have flirted over the years with a few other DE’s (mostly light weight ones) though I always came back to the Gnome, maybe it’s because what I have chalked up the most time with it and therefore feel most at home. One thing is for certain, I never liked KDE and the specs of my PC really never required me to look at a lighter DE out of a necessity.

      • GNOME Outreach Program for Women plans

        This is my first post after I was added to Planet GNOME (although some of my very old posts have already been displayed on the planet), so, hello planet readers!

        I will be part of GNOME Outreach Program for Women working on Cheese and I will have Thiago Souza Santos as a mentor. I’m really happy about this opportunity. I would like to thank GNOME Foundation, Google and Collabora for sponsoring this, Marina for organizing it and Daniel Siegel for helping me through application and giving me the great ideas to work on.

  • Distributions

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Phones

      • Nokia/MeeGo

      • Android

        • Woz: Android will eventually beat the iPhone [Update]
        • Steve Wozniak: Android will be the dominant smartphone platform
        • Did Google Arm Its Own Enemies With Android?

          Google was surely celebrating recently when Gartner reported that Android handsets outshipped Apple’s iPhone by close to a 2:1 margin. Given Apple’s head start in the market, it certainly is an impressive feat. But Google may regret the strategic choices that have led to this victory over Apple. To achieve the “win,” Google may have unwittingly created and trained a mercenary army of hardware manufacturers, willing to sell themselves to the highest bidder—whether that be Google, Baidu or Bing.

          There is no doubt that Google understands the importance of the mobile web. A large part of Google’s future will rely on advertising revenue driven by mobile devices, which is likely a key reason why Google decided to go into competition with its one-time ally, Apple.

        • It’s Gonna Be an Android World and We’ll Just Live in It

          While it’s been dawning on us for some time that Android is a beast, each day seems to bring new confirmation that the monster shows no signs of letting up. Android mobile ad impressions drew even with iOS for the first time, according to Millennial Media (PDF). The largest independent ad network said Android OS is tied with iOS with a 37 percent share of ad impressions. That’s a big change from last month, when iOS represented 46 percent of impressions while Android grabbed 29 percent.

        • Did Google Arm Its Own Enemies With Android?

          Google was surely celebrating recently when Gartner reported that Android handsets outshipped Apple’s iPhone by close to a 2:1 margin. Given Apple’s head start in the market, it certainly is an impressive feat. But Google may regret the strategic choices that have led to this victory over Apple. To achieve the “win,” Google may have unwittingly created and trained a mercenary army of hardware manufacturers, willing to sell themselves to the highest bidder—whether that be Google, Baidu or Bing.

          There is no doubt that Google understands the importance of the mobile web. A large part of Google’s future will rely on advertising revenue driven by mobile devices, which is likely a key reason why Google decided to go into competition with its one-time ally, Apple.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Free Software Parable

    “What’s in this food?”

    “You’ll like it. Just eat it.”

    “I want to know what’s in it.”

    “That is none of your business. It’s healthy. Eat it.”

    “Healthy? By whose standards?”

    “Our standards. Trust us.”

    “I trust my judgement, not yours. I demand to know what I’m putting in my body. I paid for the food. It belongs to me. I will analyze it myself.”

    “We have patents on the chemicals, machines, and processes that made the food. We have copyrights on the formulas and algorithms needed to make the food. You cannot examine it without our consent, which we do not give.”

  • Open source ‘community’ doesn’t exist

    Unfortunately, this is a sub-culture that won’t go away. The result is that there’s no real community, and this is because ‘community’ is too loose a term to describe the many different kinds of people who use open source software.

    It’s a word that may help the open source propaganda machine, but it doesn’t help the sustainability and growth of free software. There is no such thing as a single, homogeneous Linux group.

    It’s a term that implies a shared goal and some kind of kinship, when there is none. It’s a term that implies cooperation and cohesion, when there’s just too much conflict and disagreement for this to happen.

    Instead, there are disparate groups of individuals, businesses and enterprises, as with any other operating system.

    Each group may contain those noble elements of kindness that have helped to make Linux such a success, but to describe the entire collection as a community is wrong.

  • Open thread: How do you describe open source to the uninitiated?

    It happens all the time. You’re at a party, someone asks about your work, and yet again, you have about 45 seconds to describe one of the greatest innovations in human history.

    There’s the public utility metaphor. The shared infrastructure “like a bridge or a road” idea. Waterworks. Rural electric co-op’s.The car with the hood welded shut. The Wikipedia analogy. The scholarly tradition. Libraries. The scientific method. Bucket brigades, quilting bees, and barn raisings. Seed banks and sustainable agriculture.

  • First user test data synchronization between CiviCRM and Oracle transaction system at De Goede Woning

    For our project at De Goede Woning we have been developing a data synchronization process between CiviCRM and their main transaction system in Oracle (comparable with an ERP). Some data for a contact (first name, middle name, last name, gender and birth date), phones, emails and addresses will be common between the two, so a change, create or delete in CiviCRM will have to be synchronized with the main transaction system and vice versa.

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Rainbow 0.2 is here!

        In the spirit of releasing early and releasing often – we are proud to bring you version 0.2 of Rainbow – an experimental Firefox add-on from Mozilla Labs that exposes audio and video recording capabilities to web pages.

      • Mozilla Open Data Visualization Contest – Data is Now Available!

        Two weeks ago the Mozilla Metrics Team, together with Mozilla Labs and the growing Mozilla Research Initiative, announced our first Open Data Visualization Competition. Today, we are excited to release the data sets for this competition!

      • Mozilla Open Data Visualization Competition – Data is Now Live!

        Two weeks ago Mozilla Labs, together with Mozilla Metrics team and the growing Mozilla Research Initiative, announced our first Open Data Visualization Competition. Today, we are excited to release the data sets for this competition!

        These data sets come from Mozilla’s own open data program, Test Pilot. Test Pilot is a user research platform that collects structured user data through Firefox. Currently, over 1 million Firefox users from all over the world participate in Test Pilot studies, which aim to explore how people use their web browser and the Internet in general

      • Mozilla Open Data Visualization Contest – Data is Now Available!

        Two weeks ago the Mozilla Metrics Team, together with Mozilla Labs and the growing Mozilla Research Initiative, announced our first Open Data Visualization Competition. Today, we are excited to release the data sets for this competition!

      • Community interviews: Tom Ellins (TMZ)

        At Mozilla we have an amazingly strong community that really makes up the core of the project. However, the incredible work of our core contributors is often not visible to the rest of our community. At SUMO we want to change that. Inspired by Matthew Helmke’s great interview series, we started to interview different members of our SUMO community to give you a glimpse into their life and work. In this installment we will hear from Tom Ellins, also known as tmz on IRC. Tom is a long time contributor, helping countless of Firefox users in live chat sessions.

      • The State of Mozilla

        Total assets as of December 31, 2009 were $143 million compared with $116 million at the end of 2008, an increase of 23 percent. Unrestricted net assets at the end of 2009 were $120 million compared with $94 million in 2008, a 28 percent increase. The restricted assets remain the same as last year: a “tax reserve fund” established in 2005 for a portion of the revenue the Mozilla Foundation received that year from the search engine providers. As noted last year, the IRS has opened an audit of the Mozilla Foundation. We do not yet have a good feel for how long this process will take or the overall scope of what will be involved.

      • State of Mozilla and 2009 Financial Statements
      • Mozilla Labs Night “Gaming Special” – Agent 008 Ball Presentation

        October’s Mozilla Labs Night “Gaming Special meetup was a fun and informative evening to learn more about how to build games with Open Web technologies. One of the speakers at the event was Kevin Moore from Pixel Lab. Here is the video we captured of him talking about Agent 008 Ball, an HTML5-based game.

  • SaaS

    • Cloud Computing 101, p2

      A different categorization of clouds is private vs public. Private simply means that the cloud infrastructure is built in-house behind the firewall. For example you could turn your corporate datacenter into a private cloud. The benefits being, you gain better efficiency and datacenter utilization across different departments as well as being able to provide an elastic and fast response to your enterprise’s departmental IT needs. Should you want to start playing with a private cloud solution, Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud is a good start.

  • Databases

    • Comparing MySQL and Postgres 9.0 Replication

      Replication is one of the most popular features used in RDBMS’s today.


      As was previously stated, for many application use cases, both Oracle’s MySQL and PostgreSQL replication will be an equally good choice. The best way to determine which is right for you is to download both and put each through a comprehensive evaluation.

  • Education

    • Frontiers in Education: A recap

      A number of folks from the Teaching Open Source community had a panel at the Frontiers in Education 2010 conference, which is attended by college and university professors interested in improving engineering education. The panel’s main thesis was that participating in FOSS communities was one way to give students a better educational experience.

  • Licensing

    • Contributor Agreements Say Your Contribution Is Unwelcome

      The conversation around LWN’s coverage of Michael Meeks’ talk at the Linux Plumbers Conference (sadly paywalled until now but available today and worth reading all the way through) provoked interesting comments. The subject of the discussion is LibreOffice and the code ownership issues which provoked the fork.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Law, the internet and society

      Changes in law and technology, largely invisible to the general public and widely misunderstood by policymakers in the public and private sectors, are having a fundamental impact on our society. The aim of this unit is to provide an appreciation of how the internet paved the way for an explosion of innovation. You will explore some of the changes in the law and internet technology that have resulted from the reaction to that innovation. You will also consider the implications of these changes for society.

    • Open Data

      • Developers

        The blockers are:

        * closed public data
        * procurement
        * change

        Developers are indeed talented, and worthy of enormous academic respect – such as people reserve for scientists or those people on CSI. And yes, there are some developers who are so excited and driven by their talent that they will more than happily talk for hours, or work for a while – for free – explaining why they love their subject and how they could revolutionise the way the world works. Just as there are those who know how to code and do that as a day job, are brilliant and talented but it is a job and no more, and those who push and grow their talent to become super-developers, world-renowned futurologists and/or billionaires.

      • The British Library’s National Bibliography is Open! Join in the party.

        Open Streetmap has 250,000 volunteers. There are already lots of volunteers creating openly accessible bibliographic entries [1].

        How many books do YOU have on your shelves? Are they in the catalogue? Let us know if this excites you.

  • Standards/Consortia

    • Tippr Proposes “Open Deal Format”, A Standard For The Group Buying Industry

      Tippr, which provides white-label services for group buying, is proposing a new potential technology standard for the group buying industry today, dubbed the “Open Deal Format” or ODF. The company is inviting interested parties, which include group buying service providers, publishers and social networks, to a meeting in Seattle next month.


  • Twitter’s @Ev: Ad Money Good, Facebook Blocking Bad

    Twitter’s Evan Williams reminded the Valley Wednesday that Google isn’t the only company being stymied by Facebook’s stranglehold on user identity.

    Journalist John Battelle publicly asked Williams if Facebook would ever import Twitter’s firehose of data.

    Williams shot back, “You’ll have to ask Mark that. You missed your opportunity,” referring to Batelle’s interview with Zuckerberg just 24 hours earlier on the same stage in San Francisco at the Web 2.0 Summit conference.

  • Twitter Calculates Reputation Scores for Each User
  • Twitter Has A (Secret) Reputation Score For Every User

    Whoah. Onstage at Web 2.0 Summit, Twitter founder Evan Williams revealed, when asked by interviewer John Battelle “How do you pick ‘Who to Follow’?,” that Twitter has a private reputation score for every user.

    According to Williams, Twitter’s “science and math people” have systems which gauge who you follow and who the people you follow follow and try to find ‘Who to Follow’ relevance in that overlap. He didn’t make it clear how individual user reputation score was measured.

  • A Look at the Kind Heart of One of the Most Influential Communities on the Internet

    Reddit.com, the popular news aggregator and social media site owned by Condé Nast Digital, has become quite a powerhouse of social and cultural clout in recent years. Founded in 2005 by Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian, the site was originally intended to be much like other social news forums. Contributors submit links to stories, or they can post original content. Other users then comment on the stories, and discussion ensues.

  • O’Brien: A dark trend runs through this year’s Web 2.0 tech summit

    The names of the culprits are familiar, and include Apple, Google, Facebook and Amazon.com. Each has assumed a dominant position in their respective markets — mobile, search, social networking, e-commerce — and are focused on how to defend their turf while infiltrating their rivals’ territory.

    We, the consumers, are caught in the crossfire. We’re likely to see fewer new products (like Twitter) and more services aimed mainly at locking us into the new Internet titans (I’d count Facebook’s new message service in this category).

  • Have we lost common sense over social networking sites?

    When Bill NyeBill Nye popularly know as Science Guy collapsed, witnesses tweets. Bill Nye, collapsed on stage before reaching the podium at a presentation at the University of Southern California, witnesses instead of coming to his aid pulls out their electronics and tweets it.

    Have we became so infatuated with electronics and the social networks until we forget common sense, helping someone in trouble?

    Reports show Twitter revealed a virtual play-by-play account of the incident. One student wrote, “Bill Nye tripped on his computer cord while speaking at USC, was out for abt 5 secs, got back up, spoke w/ slurred speech and fainted.”

  • Fox News outs Beatles as ‘Manchester’s favorite mopheads’

    FoxNews.com has got its knickers in a twist about the birthplace of some pop band called the Beatles.

  • Top Trends of 2010: Content Farms

    The Web has always rewarded quantity more than quality, but over 2010 this truism became even more pronounced with the growth of Content Farms. These are companies which create thousands of pieces of content per day. Much of it is in the form of how-to articles and is often referred to as “evergreen” informational content, because it’s relevant for much longer than news.

  • Will China’s 1999 Moment Bail-Out Some Valley VCs?

    Yes, China is taking over the world. Or at least the Internet.

  • How China swallowed 15% of ‘Net traffic for 18 minutes

    In a 300+ page report (PDF) today, the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission provided the US Congress with a detailed overview of what’s been happening in China—including a curious incident in which 15 percent of the world’s Internet traffic suddenly passed through Chinese servers on the way to its destination.

  • China denies ‘hijacking’ internet traffic

    US report claims Chinese telecoms company had access to 15% of global traffic, including military emails, for 18 minutes

  • Some numbers from the Sita Distribution Project
  • Some Stats on Sina Weibo

    Sina’s popular Twitter-like microblogging service Sina Weibo (Weibo means microblogging in Chinese) is becoming one of the most exciting product to Sina, and also to China’s app developers. In first China Weibo Developer Conference held in this Tuesday, over 2000 people attended it.

  • Science

    • Squealing on My Bacteria and Virus Overlords

      I hope I don’t get into trouble squealing on my bacteria and virus overlords. For reasons I will show later, I think that bacteria and viruses control our bodies even more than our brains do.

      Consider first that bacteria make up between 2 and 9 pounds of our body weight. This number doesn’t fluctuate that much.

      Viruses fluctuate more. When you have a cold, obviously there are more viruses than when you don’t. So we can’t say exactly how many pounds viruses add to this equation.

  • Security

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • How to Fly Without Airport Security!

      The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) have recently imposed new methods of inspecting travelers. These new methods include full body scans and intrusive pat-downs that some liken to being molested or groped. If a traveler refuses to have high resolution nude images taken of their body, their second option is to be inappropriately touched. This new groping technique includes children, the elderly, the injured, and even pilots. These rules and the TSA’s methods have made air travel a painful reminder that George Orwell’s 1984 was only off by 26 years or so.

    • TSA plans modest changes to ‘virtual strip searches’

      An Internet-fueled backlash against air traveler screening is growing amid signs that the Transportation Security Agency will consider slight changes to its controversial new procedures.

      TSA administrator John Pistole said today that the agency will be “announcing some new policies” in the “near future” that will change the screening process for pilots, who have protested being forced to choose between a “virtual strip search” or an invasive pat-down a few minutes before they’re handed the controls of a 975,000-pound kerosene-fueled missile in the form of a jumbo jet. (See our previous coverage.)

    • The TSA: Stupid, Owned, or Complicit?

      I have long been in Bruce Schneier’s camp, thinking that the TSA is a joke: nothing but security theater.

    • White House Says Child Soldiers Are Ok, If They Fight Terrorists

      The phenomenon of child soldiers, like genocide, slavery and torture, seems like one of those crimes that no nation could legitimately defend. Yet the Obama administration just decided to leave countless kids stranded on some of the world’s bloodiest battlegrounds.


      A thumbs-up for child soldiers from the pen of President Obama? Whitehouse spokesperson P.J. Crowley explained it was a strategic decision to ease the 2008 law. The rationale is that on balance, it’s more effective for the U.S. to keep providing military assistance that will help countries gradually evolve out of the practice of marshaling kids to the battlefield, rather than isolating them.

    • Lawsuit: Airport search indecent

      An Amarillo woman is suing the federal government for intentional infliction of emotional distress after Transportation Security Administration agents allegedly humiliated the woman when her breasts were publicly exposed during an “extended search” two years ago at a Corpus Christi airport.

    • Another TSA Outrage

      It’s probably important to mention that we were ALL carrying weapons. Everyone was carrying an M4 Carbine (rifle) and some, like me, were also carrying an M9 pistol. Oh, and our gunners had M-240B machine guns. Of course, the weapons weren’t loaded. And we had been cleared of all ammo well before we even got to customs at Baghram, then AGAIN at customs.

      The TSA personnel at the airport seriously considered making us unload all of the baggage from the SECURE cargo hold to have it reinspected. Keep in mind, this cargo had been unpacked, inspected piece by piece by U.S. Customs officials, resealed and had bomb-sniffing dogs give it a one-hour run through. After two hours of sitting in this holding area, the TSA decided not to reinspect our Cargo–just to inspect us again: Soldiers on the way home from war, who had already been inspected, reinspected and kept in a SECURE holding area for 2 hours. Ok, whatever. So we lined up to go through security AGAIN.

      This is probably another good time to remind you all that all of us were carrying actual assault rifles, and some of us were also carrying pistols.

      So we’re in line, going through one at a time. One of our Soldiers had his Gerber multi-tool. TSA confiscated it. Kind of ridiculous, but it gets better. A few minutes later, a guy empties his pockets and has a pair of nail clippers. Nail clippers. TSA informs the Soldier that they’re going to confiscate his nail clippers.

    • ‘Naked’ scanners fooled by creased clothing

      Controversial “naked” body scanners currently being tested at Hamburg’s airport are constantly malfunctioning due to folds in passengers’ clothing, broadcaster NDR reported on Tuesday.

    • Jimmy Wales: “If I Had Some Information, The Last Thing I Would Do Is Send It To Wikileaks”

      There is definitely some bad blood between Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales and Wikileaks, the controversial organization which posted thousands of pages of classified Iraqi War documents. On the Charlie Rose last night, towards the end of his interview, Wales says, “If I had some information, the last thing I would ever do with it is send it to Wiikileaks.”

      He prefaced that remark by noting that he has “mixed feelings about Wikileaks.” People with information about wrongdoing in open societies should have the opportunity to make that information public. His concern is the way that Wikileaks chose to do that without regard for the safety of people “who are not the wrongdoers.” ” I think they should be slower in releasing things,” he says.

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • Oil shock warning to government from UK business

      An industry taskforce has called on the government to act to protect the UK economy against a new threat of rising oil prices.

      A consortium of British business, including retailers Kingfisher and transport group, Stagecoach, say the UK must prepare for the next oil shock.

    • New Zealand Orcas Captured Surfing in Gigantic Waves

      The newest Giant Swell that arrived to the shores of New Zealand Brought unlikely visitors.

      The Orca Whales came into the waves along the coast and rode them like a veteran surfer.

    • Feds’ Transgenic-Salmon Review Ignores Big Picture

      When the Food and Drug Administration announces the fate of the AquAdvantage salmon, the first genetically modified (GM) animal ever considered for commercial consumption, they may have considered only a fraction of their decision’s consequences.

      So far the FDA has focused on whether or not the salmon are safe to eat or might escape and breed with wild fish. They haven’t yet considered how GM salmon could affect, for better or worse, public dietary habits or the fallout of a boom in fish farming.

  • Finance

  • Censorship/Privacy/Civil Rights

    • MPAA Dismisses COICA Free Speech Concerns

      MPAA chief Bob Pisano wrote an op-ed piece that appeared in today’s TheHill.com, evangelizing the highly suspect legislation “The Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act”. Slyck has covered the potential perils of the COICA, as have many other pro-democracy organizations (such as the EFF), as the details of a potential Internet and free speech filter come to the United States.

      The big problem with COICA is that it gives tremendous amounts of power to the US Attorney General to shut websites down with little more than filing a complaint with the local district court that has jurisdiction over the registrar’s address. Sure, there’s some judicial review, but how often will the courts disagree with the Department of Justice when they wave the banner of copyright infringement? We just don’t know, which makes this bill all the more frightening.

    • Judiciary Committee Approves Internet Censorship Bill
    • MPAA Boss Defends Censorships With Blatantly False Claims

      What the First Amendment does protect is speech. The law does already allow takedowns of infringing content. But COICA goes beyond that. Rather than — as the First Amendment requires — narrowly tailoring any takedown or injunction to the actual infringing content, it orders the entire site taken down prior to any trial. That’s a classic situation of prior restraint, where the specifically infringing content is not specified and narrowly taken down. Instead, it’s using a shotgun to try to remove a bandaid.

    • Wyden Threatens To Block Online IP Bill

      Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., Thursday threatened to block legislation aimed at curbing piracy and counterfeiting on foreign Web sites, saying the bill is a heavy-handed solution to the problem.

      “It seems to me the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act as written today, is the wrong medicine,” Wyden, the chairman of the Finance International Trade, Customs, and Global Competitiveness Subcommittee, said during a hearing on international trade and the digital economy. “Deploying this statute to combat online copyright and infringement seems almost like a bunker buster cluster bomb when really what you need is a precision-guided missile.”

    • Giving Every Person A Voice

      When I started blogging back in 2003, I would tell everyone how awesome it was. A common refrain back then was “not everyone should have a printing press.” I didn’t agree then and I don’t agree now. Everyone should have a printing press and should use it as often as they see fit. Through things like RSS and Twitter’s follow model, we can subscribe to the voices we want to hear regularly. And through things like reblog and retweet, the voices we don’t subscribe to can get into our readers, dashboards, and timelines.

    • Long Live the Web

      The Web is critical not merely to the digital revolution but to our continued prosperity—and even our liberty. Like democracy itself, it needs defending

    • Guest post: Clegg re-affirms his commitment to Civil Liberties

      In a keynote speech at the Political Studies Association/Hansard Society Annual Lecture on Tuesday evening, Nick Clegg spoke of the protection of civil liberties as being one of the core elements of the modern British Constitution.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality/DRM

    • UK regulator Ofcom lobbies Brussels against net neutrality

      Lobbyists from the UK regulator Ofcom have been active in the European Parliament, against net neutrality. How can this be consistent with their role as regulator, and their duty to promote the ability of citizens to access and distribute content, applications and services?

      According to sources in the European Parliament, lobbyists from Ofcom have been calling in person on MEPs recently to discuss the issue of net neutrality. In particular, it is understood that Ofcom opposes a principle of net neutrality being built into EU law.

    • Internet Neutrality Principle
    • The Next Front: Net Neutrality

      There was good news for Digital Britain last week when the High Court agreed to review the Digital Economy Act following a petition by BT and TalkTalk. After the legislation was rushed through Parliament in the wash-up this spring and seemed to be moving inexorably toward enforcement, this was an encouraging development for those of us who believe that the Act’s copyright infringement provisions are both disproportionate and detrimental to technological innovation in the UK. Enforcement of the Act will now be delayed for at least a few months (rumour has it that Ofcom will even delay publication of its Initial Obligations Code, which was expected in the last few weeks, until after the judicial review process has taken place), and depending on the outcome of the review it’s very possible that the whole Act will have to go back to Parliament and, with our and others’ pressure, receive due consideration this time around.

    • Peter Gabriel joins voices backing net neutrality in UK

      The UK government’s plans to abandon net neutrality threaten British business startups and if taken up elsewhere could undermine democracy, says Peter Gabriel, the influential musician and technology entrepreneur who has backed a number of successful internet companies.

      “I feel very strongly about it,” said Gabriel, who has invested in a number of companies, including Bath-based The Filter and On Demand Distribution (OD2). “Freedom of access [to information online] is going to be an important battleground. It’s vital to a free and open democracy: [net neutrality] serves everybody.”

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • James Murdoch: Hoping All Media Businesses Act Like Pay TV

      The more the interview went on, the more I realized that Murdoch appears to view much of the media world through that lens, and seems to saying that, in the end, the media world will end up like a giant pay TV system, with a big subscription. I think this is more wishful thinking, rather than where the internet is actually heading, and treating the internet that way will almost certainly result in failure — such as with his paywall experiments.

    • Copyrights

      • Legal Attack on Internet Music Storage Threatens ‘Safe Harbor’ Rules for Online Businesses

        New York – In a legal battle over Internet music storage that could impact innovation and free expression on the Internet, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Public Knowledge, and other public interest groups asked a federal judge in an amicus brief Tuesday to protect the “safe harbor” rules for online content in EMI v. MP3Tunes.

      • p2pnet talks with Operation Payback

        In a world where there’s no honour or pride, where lies, bribes and deceit are the normal tools of daily business and politics, an assembly of Anonymous netizens is saying We’ve had enough.

        Under the Operation Payback banner, they launched a series of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks against the the US Copyright Office, Hollywood’s MPAA, Big Music’s RIAA and BPI and other ‘trade’ groups, and the jackal-like lawyers using copyright to extort ordinary people.

      • Anti-Piracy Lawyers Knew They Targeted Innocent Victims

        Davenport Lyons, the law firm which pioneered the lucrative file-sharing pay-up-or-else scheme in the UK, will head off to Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal proceedings next year. According to details just made available, among other things Davenport Lyons partners were responsible for knowingly targeting the innocent and relied on unreliable evidence in doing so.

      • Canadian Heritage Minister inadvertently damns his own copyright bill

        Michael Geist sez, “Canadian Heritage James Moore appeared on public television yesterday to defend his copyright bill and to oppose a new levy system. In doing so, he made the case for why the digital lock provisions in the bill are so problematic. According to Moore: ‘When I buy a movie, I’ve paid for the movie. To ask me to pay for it a second time through another device – and to assume that I’m doing illegal copying, to assume that I’m being a pirate, to assume that I’m thieving from people because I happen to own an MP3 player or a BluRay player or a laptop, I think treats consumers unfairly.’

        “While Moore was thinking of the prospect of additional payments through a levy, the words apply equally to the digital lock provisions that make it an infringement for consumers to circumvent locks in order to watch the movie they’ve purchased on a second device. In fact, in some instances – for example, DVDs with non-North American region codes – it involves infringement for merely trying to access the content for the first time.”

      • Canadian Heritage Minister James Moore on How Copyright Can Treat Consumers Unfairly

        According to Moore:

        When I buy a movie, I’ve paid for the movie. To ask me to pay for it a second time through another device – and to assume that I’m doing illegal copying, to assume that I’m being a pirate, to assume that I’m thieving from people because I happen to own an MP3 player or a BluRay player or a laptop, I think treats consumers unfairly.

      • ACTA

        • A Peek Inside the EU’s Digital Inner Circle

          Another area I explored with Whelan was ACTA. Although this didn’t come under the Digital Agenda umbrella directly, it obviously has major implications for it. Not surprisingly, he offered the standard EC line that ACTA won’t require any changes in EU laws, and it’s true that some of the more peremptory language in the drafts has been replaced by phrases that give more leeway to the signatories. But he did point out that there are several copyright initiatives underway or imminent whose thinking may well be influenced by ACTA, so we will need to make sure plenty of input is provided when these are announced.

Clip of the Day

Partnering with Red Hat: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6

Credit: TinyOgg

Links 19/11/2010: GNOME 2.32.1 Released, Debian GNU/Linux Recruits Women

Posted in News Roundup at 3:23 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish



  • Desktop

    • Could the Windows Comparison Game Hurt Linux?

      Competition is good, blogger Robert Pogson told Linux Girl.

      “If we cannot out-perform that sad imitation of an OS that M$ produces, GNU/Linux should be shut down,” Pogson asserted. “In my experience, GNU/Linux has out-performed M$ since 2000 because GNU/Linux did not crash and was much easier to manage and cost less.”

      Of course, “we should check our rear-view mirrors occasionally to see what the competition is doing,” he added. “I don’t see MacOS as much competition since it does not run on the same hardware by decree, so there is no proper way to compare.”

    • French Gendarmerie switch 85,000 PC’s to Ubuntu and save €€€

      The police force has been able to tailor Ubuntu Desktop to meet its exact requirements. Gendarmerie Commandant Jean-Pascal Chateau says: “We have a lot of personnel who work in the field. The fact that Ubuntu Desktop is so easy to use is a huge benefit. Agents can personalize their desktops to fit their needs. That means that they can access the same desktop environment no matter which workstation they log in from.” He adds: “Now staff are more motivated and we’ve reduced costs and introduced solutions that better match our needs.”

  • Server

  • Ballnux

    • Samsung Galaxy Tab source code released

      Samsung has released the open source portions of the Galaxy Tab operating system and made them available for download. Of course, much of their software isn’t open source, so don’t expect to see everything in the code. It is very refreshing to see manufacturers quick to comply with the license agreements, and my hat’s off to Samsung for this.

    • Video Face-Off: Android Galaxy Tab vs. the iPad
    • Everything you need to know about the Samsung Galaxy Tab

      Next to the Apple iPad, it may be the most anticipated tech product of 2010. You could even claim that a big part of its anticipation is actually due to the iPad. Of course, I’m talking about the Samsung Galaxy Tab, the first major Android slate to give the iPad a run for its money in the touchscreen tablet market.

    • Samsung Galaxy Tab review

      Although the Tab’s diagonal screen size is only 2.7 inches smaller than that of the iPad’s, the device itself is nearly half the size and weight – in short, it’s a much tidier little package. Though not as slim as perhaps we’d have liked, the ability to operate the Tab single-handed and drop it in our back pocket is a massive advantage in terms of overall usability.

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • KMyMoney 4.5.1 stable version is out

        The KMyMoney Team is pleased to announce the release of KMyMoney version 4.5.1.

        This version contains several fixes for bugs found in 4.5.0 since it was released almost three months ago as the stable release for the KDE Platform 4.

      • Polishing
    • GNOME Desktop

      • GNOME Shell – Then And Now (Or How Unity Has Influenced It)

        I the past I have commented on how GNOME Shell’s redesign is heading towards what Canonical’s Unity looks like currently. Well, today a reader, Frederico Araújo, left a very interesting side-by-side comparison of GNOME Shell during its initial stage and now. He also added comparison with Unity. It is a very interesting comparison and we thought we’d share it. Do leave your thoughts in the comments.

      • 7 Brilliant GNOME GTK Themes

        GNOME Shell is the future of GNOME desktop and its already evolving quite beautifully. You might want to check out our collection of breathtaking GNOME Shell themes too.

      • GNOME 2.32.1 released

        The first update to GNOME 2.32 (and my own first release) is now available. It provides bug fixes, translation updates and the usual care and kindness that our brave GNOME developers and contributors deserves to details.

      • GNOME 2.32.1 released

        The GNOME Release Team have issued version 2.32.1 of the GNOME desktop for GNU / Linux and Unix, the first maintenance update to the GNOME 2.32 series. According to GNOME developer Luca Ferretti, the latest stable release includes a variety of bug fixes, translation improvements and minor updates to the included GNOME packages, such as the Empathy instant messaging app and the Evolution mail client.

      • OpenRespect: It’s About Time

        I will admit that, despite Bacon’s arguments to the contrary, OpenRespect is coming across as a defensive move on behalf of Bacon’s employer, Canonical. Canonical has been the target for a lot of frustration from the broader community lately, some of it perhaps deserved, and some perhaps not, so it’s a reasonable assumption that the Ubuntu Community Manager might want to deflect.

      • Make the GNOME panel font bold, italic, bigger, smaller etc
      • 10 Incredible Icon Sets for Ubuntu/GNOME

        Elementary project is one of the most talked about and actively developed open source project meant to provide much needed finesse to Linux desktop. Download Elementary Icon Theme. Also, check out beautiful Elementary theme for Ubuntu as well.

      • Beautify Ubuntu Desktop Window Border with Emerald Themes

        If you want to decorate your window border, you can try following installation and setup.

  • Distributions

    • Pardus

      I think I will stick with Pardus on this laptop, for a while, and see how it goes. If I ever get around to my long term plan of upgrading my parents’ computer from Windows XP then Pardus could be a strong candidate for that too. It’s impressive.

    • Announcing Bodhi Linux

      You may have noticed the blog has been rather quiet the last couple of weeks, this is because I have been working on a project. Last month I posted details about an E17 LiveDVD I was working on that was modeled after PinguyOS. It weighed in at a 1.4 gig download that was jam packed with every application you might ever use. It was also slightly crude in some aspects (such as the Enlightenment desktop it contained was compiled and installed from source).


      The Bodhi is built from an Ubuntu 10.04 minimal disc, but you will notice it does contain some Ubuntu 10.10 features. Backported via the Bodhi Repository, are the 2.6.35 kernel and the newer Ubiquity installer. Also enabled by default are the Ubuntu partner repository, Medibuntu, and GetDeb.

    • Reviews

      • A Linux server OS that’s had 11 years to improve

        Review: SME Server is pretty much the original ready-rolled server distribution. Although it has changed hands – and names – a few times, it’s been around since 1999, when it was known as e-Smith, a name you’ll still see in a few places.

    • Red Hat Family

      • RHN Satellite 5.4, the second analysis

        My first analysis and the first experiances of RHN Satellite 5.4 have been very good, I was quite excited.

        I also was very happy to be able to sync the rhel-x86_64-server-6 channel on the newly upgraded master satellite. First tests on test systems registered to the master (=staging) Satellite have all been successful.

      • Linux, Open Source & Ubuntu: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Is Ready for Heavy-Duty Computing
      • Red Hat Educates Professors About Open Source

        Provider of open source solutions, Red Hat, expanded its outreach to introduce open source into the computer science curriculum at leading colleges and universities. The company is a member of Teaching OpenSource ( News – Alert) community and acts as its catalyst. It sponsors Professors’ Open Source Summer Experience (POSSE) workshops.

      • Red Hat Enterprise Linux and the Trickle-Up Effect

        The announcement of a royal wedding is a cause for excitement among loyal subjects, but it’s also an opportunity for assorted tea-towel vendors, commemorative plate makers and many other people to make a great deal of money off the back of it.

        And so it is with enterprise server operating systems. Last week’s release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 6.0 generated much excitement from its loyal customers. Many of Red Hat’s partners are hoping the release will provide them with an opportunity to make a great deal of money off the back of it, too. Although the RHEL 6.0 server OS includes numerous significant new features — a new hybrid 2.6.32 kernel; support for more cores and memory; better reliability, availability and serviceability (RAS) capabilities; the ext4 file system by default; and so more — it was hard to discern that from the clamor of Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) hardware partners preparing to make money by selling more of their lovely server boxes and associated services.

      • Red Hat sizes up NZ for 2011 growth

        Channel growth is encouraging open source vendor Red Hat to consider establishing a local office next year. Sydney-based Max McLaren, Red Hat’s ANZ general manager, says growth in its business here would justify the investment but it’s too early to treat it as definite. “We’ve always had aspirations to open an office in New Zealand. It’s just a question of when.”

        In September Red Hat posted global revenue and operating income increases of more than 20 percent over the previous year, and McLaren says local growth echoes that of the company overall.

      • FLOSS Weekly 142: CentOS

        Hosts: Randal Schwartz and Dan Lynch

        CentOS is an enterprise-class Linux distro derived from sources freely provided to the public.

        Guest: Karanbir Singh for CentOS

      • Fedora

        • Quality journalism

          At the end of the last week the FOSS news exploded with titles about Fedora and Wayland, in many cases going as aggressive as “Fedora to ditch X.org for Wayland” and “May bring Wayland Fedora 15″, all of them based on an insightful post made by ajax, the X.org maintainer in Fedora, but most of the time letting out relevant details as “eventually”, “not usable default”, “something you can play with” or “don’t have a timeframe”.

          The result was a flood of posts, comments, dents, twitts and so, many of them based only on partial titles and raving about how awesome Wayland is going to be, now that Red Hat will put resources behind it (that’s really jumping to a conclusion!). Net effect: the community moved focus from singling out Canonical for they anti-community perceived Wayland announcement from a couple of weeks ago. That’s good relations with the press! And that’s spinning!

        • Quick update on my upgrade to Fedora 14

          This is why, folks, everyone always recommends just going for a fresh install. Upgrades always require a bit more work.

        • Spotlight on Linux: Fedora 14

          So, if you’re in the market for a new or additional Linux distribution, Fedora can most assuredly fill the bill. Many think of Fedora as a distribution for more advanced users, but it can fit into just about any routine.

    • Debian Family

      • Debian GNU/Linux 5 “lenny” [Review]

        Debian GNU/Linux 5 is highly recommended to people who want a robust system which simply works. If you are running a server, or otherwise need a platform which doesn’t keep changing, Debian 5 is a brilliant choice. If however you want a more up-to-date system, it is preferable to use one of the many Debian-based distros such as Ubuntu, or use Debian testing.

      • Debian Trying to Recruit More Women

        The Debian Women project is beginning training sessions to encourage more women to participate in the nuts and bolts of Debian development. Alexander Reichle-Schmehl (Debian spokesman, event organizer, and developer) said in a recent press release that “the main goal of this initiative is to encourage more people, and specifically women, to contribute to Debian while introducing them to different aspects of the Debian Project.”

      • Benchmarks Of Debian Etch, Lenny & Squeeze

        With Debian 6.0 “Squeeze” set to be released in the coming months, we have decided to run a set of benchmarks looking at the performance of Debian 6.0 across different sub-systems relative to the performance of Debian 5.0 “Lenny” and Debian 4.0 “Etch” to see how this new release may stack up.

      • Canonical/Ubuntu

        • Respect Freedom, Not Pragmatism

          Having just discovered this “openrespect” thing, I have to say I find the whole idea rather sinister. It seems to me that Jono Bacon is endorsing a sort of moderation, or more bluntly, censorship of criticism, in order to silence those who oppose pragmatic concessions that undermine our ideals.

          Here’s one thing he can start doing right away: spend a little less time respecting corporate thugs like Microsoft, and a little more time respecting our Freedom.

        • Ubuntu’s Feature Friction
        • Ubuntu: Innovative or reckless?

          Ubuntu chief Mark Shuttleworth is making some bold and potentially risky decisions about the future of Ubuntu Linux.

          It’s been almost a year since Mark Shuttleworth relinquished the reins at Canonical, stepping down as CEO to take a more hands-on approach in the company that is the backer of the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Judging by the various sharp turns Ubuntu has taken in the past year his steerage is starting to have an effect.

        • The monospace is coming

          In contrast to a proportionally spaced font a the characters in a monospace occupy all exactly the same width. In the past monospace type was used on typewriters, and more recently in some specialised printing environments such as Credit Card embossing, or ticketing. Today, monospace fonts are primarily used within a programming environment working on terminal windows. The monospace font answers the need for clear code structuring and predictable line lengths. Using monospace fonts allows the programmer to immediately spot a mis-typed character or double space, any of which would prevent the code from compiling as expected.

        • Living with Linux: installing and using Ubuntu Netbook Edition

          There’s no way I’d revert to XP now, because Ubuntu does everything I need my netbook to do in roughly half the time.

        • No Maverick PPA For Unity

          There was consensus in the porting team around this. Of course, if anyone in the community wants to take the time to make a Maverick PPA, run with it, but it is felt that the resources are better spent focusing on Natty right now. I agree with this too.

        • Slew of New Business Tools Coming to Ubuntu

          If you use Ubuntu in your company, you’re already familiar with its many advantages for businesses. But guess what? You ain’t seen nothin’ yet, as they say.

          Particularly in the wake of the release last month of Canonical’s user-friendly Ubuntu 10.10, or Maverick Meerkat, partners have been virtually lining up outside the company’s door to help deliver business tools with high-level commercial support.

        • Flavours and Variants

          • The Perfect Desktop – Linux Mint 10 (Julia)

            This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint 10 (Julia) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Linux Mint 10 is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 10.10 that has lots of packages in its repositories (like multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, Google Earth, etc.) that are relatively hard to install on other distributions; it therefore provides a user-friendly desktop experience even for Linux newbies.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Multi-touch in Ubuntu using Kinect

      I’m not quite sure how this incredibly slick proof-of concept (i.e. hacky first version) video showing off multi-touch in Ubuntu using Microsoft’s recently launched Kinect hardware passed us by, so props to yo2boy for sending it in.

    • Linux distros advance on the networking front

      Wind River announced that Arkoon Network Security will use Wind River Linux to develop its FAST 360 family of network security devices. Meanwhile, Wind River rival MontaVista Software announced it has joined the OpenSAF Foundation, which promotes the high availability middleware integrated into recent releases of MontaVista Linux Carrier Grade Edition.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • AniWeather, Display Weather Conditions In Firefox

        What’s the weather like today? If you want to answer that question you will have to either find it out by yourself, for instance by stepping outside, by asking other people or with the help of weather reports. AniWeather displays weather conditions in the Firefox web browser, unobtrusively. I did not see the weather conditions directly in the browser after installation. That’s usually caused if the add-on places them in a toolbar that is hidden by default. In this case the icons were displayed in the Navigation Toolbar which is hidden in my Firefox installation.

      • Mozilla millions still 86% Google cash

        Google still provides 86 per cent of Mozilla’s revenue, according to the open source outfit’s latest financial statement.

        On Thursday, Mozilla released its audited financial statement for 2009, and as in previous years, an unnamed search company is listed under “concentrations of risk.” In 2008, Google accounted for 91 per cent of Mozilla’s revenues, so the risk has dropped. But 86 is still a very large number.

      • The State of Mozilla

        Mozilla has filed its audited financial statements for 2009. This is the perfect time to look at the state of the Mozilla mission, our successes, our opportunities and our challenges.

  • Oracle

  • CMS

    • LCDTV.net – New Online Magazine Using Drupal 6

      LCDTV.net is an online magazine dedicated to LCD TV information and LCD TV Reviews. It employs several journalists to stay up to date with the latest technology news related to LCD televisions, has a large database of the latest TV specifications, and offers enthusiasts the opportunity to write in-depth TV reviews receiving full byline credit getting paid for their efforts.


    • GNU Robbo 0.66

      GNU Robbo is a free open source reimplementation of Janusz Pelc’s Robbo for the Atari XE/XL which was distributed by LK Avalon in 1989.

    • Cateia Games Are Coming To GNU/Linux !

      But since then Cateia Games developed a new engine which games can be easily ported to GNU/Linux.

  • Programming


Clip of the Day

Partnering with Red Hat: Performance, Reliability and Scalability

Credit: TinyOgg

IRC Proceedings: November 18th, 2010

Posted in IRC Logs at 2:45 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz




#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

#boycottnovell-social log

Enter the IRC channels now

RAND Mobbyists, Grupos de Presión, y los Astroturfers IP de Microsoft en 2010 (Bruselas)

Posted in Deception, Europe, Microsoft, Patents at 2:34 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

18th century text

Resumen: Las tácticas brutales utilizados por Microsoft para promover su régimen,donde se tiene que pagar por el software libre, incluso en lugares como Europa, donde las patentes de software son, en principio, ilegales.

“Kudos to Spain for not allowing Microsoft to impose his agenda of dominion by control over it & the whole Europe,” says Eduardo Landaveri, who has another translation for us, this time of last night’s post about Microsoft’s continued lobbying for software patents in Europe (see the original English version).

“The same goes to India,” added Landaveri. “By doing this they’re shaking off the last shackles of Colonialism.

“But let us continually be alert because the dark forces of tyranny with complicity of corrupt politicians, and the easiness of the misinformed public make entire counties fall into it.

“Like Ruben Blades said: “Search the depth and its reason, remember we see the faces but no the hearts”

“Just because Microsoft have erased any competition on the United States doesn’t mean that they have to do the same on Europe, India, Latin America y Africa. Its minions have names like Association for “Competitive” Technology as though they would like to compete when indeed Free Market means for them the obliteration of EVERY competitor not by doing better products but to destroy them and it’s last weapons besides its money are software patents.

“Finally, let us not forget that “The best regional software patent protection is the COMPLETE elimination of software patents”

“Europe wake up! The saga hasn’t ended yet!

Or in Spanish:

“Felicitaciones a España por no permitir a Microsoft imponer su agenda de control y dominio sobre ella y toda Europa.

“Lo mismo ocurre a la India. De esta manera se está sacudiendo las pasadas cadenas del colonialismo.

“Pero vamos a estar continuamente alerta, porque las fuerzas oscuras de la tiranía con la complicidad de políticos corruptos, y la facilidad con que el público mal informado pueden caer en su juego.

“Al igual que Rubén Blades, dijo: “Buscar el fondo y su razón, recuerda que se ven las caras pero nunca el corazon”

“El hecho de que Microsoft ha borrado toda competencia en los Estados Unidos, no significa que tienen que hacer lo mismo en Europa, India, América Latina y África. Sus secuaces tienen nombres como la Asociación para “Competitiva” Tecnología como si quisiera competir, cuando en realidad libre mercado significa para ellos la destrucción completa la competencia , no por hacer mejores productos, sino por destruirlos y sus última armas, además de su dinero son las patentes de software.

“Por último, no olvidemos que “La mejor protección regional de patentes de software mejor regional es la eliminación CoMPLETA de todas las patentes de software”

“Europa despierta! La saga no ha terminado aún!

translation of last night’s post is available in PDF and ODF format, as well as the following version.

“EL consenso que Microsoft está cada vez menos una empresa de tecnología (productos muchos menos) y cada vez más un troll de patentes y su vez un movimiento político, se va consolidando cada vez más. A medida que más y más productos de Microsoft desaparecen[http://techrights.org/wiki/index.php/Microsoft_-_Dead_Divisions_or_Products], la empresa se califica como un TROLL DE PATENTES (entidad no practicante) en más áreas en las que sólo extorsiona a la competencia que ganó.

Para que Microsoft sea más eficaz como un troll de patentes, Microsoft tendrá que modificar algunas leyes. Microsoft no puede hacer esto directamente, porque sería que criticado por intentarlo. Así que Microsoft contrata y financia a varios grupos (lobbyists) que hacen la presión por él. Se han escrito más de un centenar de puestos (posts) con ejemplos de este tipo de actividad, ya que esperamos documentar y trazar un mapa de los vectores de presión (que a su vez los debilita o, a veces les obliga a nymshift).

El programa Microsoft du jour está empujando el RAND, “Razonable y No-Discriminatorias” licencias en Europa. Microsoft aparentemente no pudo hacerlo en la India[http://techrights.org/2010/11/16/india-swpats-and-rand/]. Ahora quiere engañar a la opinión pública en Europa. Simon Phipps, un británico, acaba de explicar por qué RAND es “no tan razonable”[http://blogs.computerworlduk.com/simon-says/2010/11/rand-not-so-reasonable/index.htm]. Es un ensayo decente nueva en este viejo tema:

Justo, razonable y no discriminatorio – seguro que todo tiene que ser cosas buenas? RAND suena tan bien, y ha estado apareciendo en todo tipo de noticias últimamente. Es una parte clave en la negociación de licencias de patentes que se aplican a las normas, y que significa “razonables y no discriminatorias”, palabras tan excelentes que es difícil de criticar. A veces se muestra como razonables y no discriminatorias, con “JUSTO” FRAND adelante haciendo que suene muchísimo mejor, o como RAND-z, con la z (zero) que indica que todo lo que los términos de licencia se van a tener un billete de cero libras de precios adjunta. Como sin no va a costar nada. Suena tan maravilloso.

RAND aparece en las normas y procedimientos de la mayoría de las organizaciones de normalización y de hecho hace un gran trabajo en la mayoría de ellos. Es mucho mejor que la alternativa, en la que los titulares de patentes puedan obtener por licenciar sus patentes al precio que pagará cada víctima, o hacer la norma casi imposible de implementar por cualquier persona u organización que ellos no deseen que sea capaz de hacerlo de forma selectiva reteniendo una licencia. Usted puede entender por qué un grupo de estándares preferiría el mandato de RAND, razonables y no discriminatorias o RAND-z, dadas las alternativas.

Por supuesto, está la cuestión obvia de por qué un cuerpo de estándares permite que algo se convierta en un estándar en primer lugar, si una de las empresas que contribuyen a ella, posee una patente sobre una técnica esencial para que la ejecute. Recuerden el OOXML.

Simon Phipps dice a Carlo Piana (otra persona que representa los intereses de Europa no de Microsoft,): “¿Quieres apostar sobre cuánto tiempo será antes de que consiga un comentario troll?”

Bueno, ¿adivinen qué? Sí, no pasó mucho tiempo para mobbyist Microsoft Florian [http://techrights.org/2010/08/27/fake-representation-of-foss/] para someter un comentario troll promoviendo RAND, como es su costumbre[http://techrights.org/2010/09/01/msft-florian-promoting-swpats-rand/]. Su posición sobre este tema es prácticamente idéntica a la del grupo de presión que Microsoft Zuck lidera (asi como sus secuaces) [http://techrights.org/2010/08/26/microsoft-lobbyists-for-rand/]. ¿Cúan previsible debe haber sido para Simon Phipps? Probablemente sabía exactamente quién haría con el primer “comentario troll”. Simplemente mencionan RAND y mobbyists y pronto aparecerán. Casi cualquier pieza contra el RAND está interrumpido/trolled por mobbyists contratados por Microsoft que no sea él, pero eso es lo que debemos esperar dado los miles de millones de dólares de Microsoft tiene en juego. Profesionalmente hablando, Florian es todo acerca de Microsoft (. NET, nunca el uso de GNU/Linux, orgulloso Vista 7 usuario, mientras que se hace pasar por una persona de software libre que se opone a las patentes de software). En una palabra CINISMO con mayúsculas. Vamos a llegar a más de esto en un momento.

“RAND describe un superconjunto de los comportamientos. Algunos requisitos RAND llevan a términos de RF (Libre de Regalías). La existencia de contraejemplos triviales donde los estándares RAND tienen implementaciones GPL, Licencia Pública General [http://www.gnu.org/licenses/licenses.es.html#GPL] permite a los trolls desacreditar esta posición “.

Glyn Moody también se involucra en este debate (en Identi.ca). Él le dice a Bradley Kuhn (FSF), por ejemplo: “en general, sí, pero [RAND] un ser elaborado de manera anormal para ser compatibles.” Kuhn no muy de acuerdo. Para Phipps, escribe: “Puedo haber leído mal. Mi abstracto era: “a veces, RAND funciona para el software libre, pero por lo general no lo hace.” “No estoy de acuerdo con la sútil diferencia.” Para Moody Phipps y luego escribe:”. Es difícil conseguir los desarrolladores del software libre seguir las sútiles differencias de licencias de patentes, por lo que ayudan las simplificaciones, ala “# # = RAND problemática” [...] mi maestro de primer año de CS , dijo: “Tenemos que mentir un poco aquí”, en las sútiles differencias necesarias requisitos, pre-requisitos que no teníamos. Similarmente aquí, Phipps dice a Kuhn: “RAND describe un superconjunto de los comportamientos. Algunos requisitos RAND llevar a términos de RF (Libre de Regalías). La existencia de contraejemplos triviales donde los estándares RAND tienen implementaciones GPL, Licencia Pública General, permite a los trolls desacreditar esta posición “.

“Mira lo que hizo con la mobbyist Nancy Gohring, que cubre mayormente Microsoft desde hace años.”El mobbyist a continuación habla mal de Android, difundiendo información errónea sobre una demanda vertical contra Samsung y LG, (cerró todos los comentarios en su blog después de haber estado expuesto y reprochado varias veces por los comentaristas, para que nadie pueda corregirlo donde él guía a los periodistas con su masivo correos electrónicos). Se la caracteriza como una demanda contra el Android [http://news.priorsmart.com/vertical-computer-systems-v-interwoven-l3pZ/], aunque es ligeramente más complejo que eso. Pero no importa la exactitud. El mobbyists sabe que lo que se trata es de confundir a la gente que no saben mejor, haciendo declaraciones absurdas que pueden capturar incautos transeúntes que pasan por curiosidad.

Mira lo que hizo con la mobbyist Nancy Gohring, que cubre mayormente Microsoft desde hace años. Ella tomó como tarea una historia de IDG, y posiblemente fue alimentada por uno de los seudo-personales E-mails de Florian[http://www.infoworld.com/t/intellectual-property/android-faces-another-patent-attack-291] (que personaliza mensajes idénticos que envía en masa a muchos periodistas, mientras se presenta como un opositor de las patentes de software). Gohring escribió:

“Android se enfrenta a una nueva amenaza con una demanda que Vertical Computer Systems presentó el lunes en contra de Samsung y LG.”

Vertical se basa en que algunos teléfonos de Samsung y LG basados en Android infringen dos de sus patentes que describen los sistemas para la generación de aplicaciones. En la demanda, presentada ante la Corte de Distrito de EE.UU. para el Distrito Este de Texas, Vertical nombra el LG Aliado, cuatro modelos de Samsung Galaxy y el Galaxy de Samsung Tablet PC como los productos que utilizan “sus” tecnologías patentadas.

Ella entonces se une al mobbyist, que esta envíando correos eléctronicos en masa a los periodistas para obtener su versión de la historia sea la que se cuenta (y es en en general Linux hostil). No sabemos a ciencia cierta si Gohring fue alimentada por el mobbyist, juzgando por la forma en que está escrita (con su propia introducción falsa a sí misma), es muy probable que sí sea el caso. Él continúa fingiendo que está en contra de las patentes de software porque se trata de cómo un lobbyist debe presentarse a sí mismo a los periodistas (para tener credibilidad, aunque sea falsa, al igual que frente a un monopolio, pretendiendo hablar en nombre de las pequeñas empresas). Este desgraciado no tiene verguenza tampoco escrúpulos. No apreciamos su enfoque activo-agresivo con los periodistas, donde los presiones (con mensajes no solicitados en su mayor parte) para obtener que su versión de la historia sea la que se cuenta. A continuación, se jacta de ello, como si hubiera citado de forma espontánea para ser más exactos o perspicaces . Por otra parte, sólo así es como los grupos de presión en el trabajo en general. La Asociación por Tecnología “Competitiva” ACT tambíen funciona así. Son medios subversivos de comunicación, que tratan de influir en la opinión pública. El mobbyist también copia y paga mucho dinero por publicar comentarios idénticos o casi idénticos en muchos sitios y foros, como Slashdot, Ars Technica, y LWN. Como de costumbre, recibió la ayuda de Dana Blankenhorn, a quien conoció hace unas semanas. Blankenhorn nos menciona de una manera negativa [http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-source/how-much-patent-trouble-is-google-really-in/7800?tag=mantle_skin;content] porque se niega a escuchar a muchos otros autores de software libre que en repetidas ocasiones le han desenmascarado a Florian. El debe leer los comentarios de Florian con más cuidado y reflexionar. Tal vez algún día se dará cuenta y admitir que él tambíen fue engañado.

De todas formas, no sólo la mobbyists están promoviendo activamente RAND en este momento. Vean el nuevo calendario de IP 2010 [http://www.premiercercle.com/sites/ip2010/agenda_day1.php] y desplácese hacia abajo para ACT, los grupos de presión RAND (con las patentes de software en el interior). En “6C Patentes Software, Open Source” se encuentra “Jonathan Zuck”, que pretende representar a Bélgica (¿a quién esta engañando realmente?).

Glyn Moody dice [http://opendotdotdot.blogspot.com/2010/11/can-you-feel-tension.html] que “la Comisión Europea y la Oficina Europea de Patentes quieren explorar” tensiones “entre las normas de las Tecnologías de Informatica y Comunicaciones y las patentes” (en referencia a la presente [http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/sectors/ict/standards/extended/ict-ipr-conference_en.htm]). Con razón se pregunta (en Identi.ca), “no se decide?”

Se puede decir con sólo su marco: se trata de “una conferencia para abordar algunas cuestiones específicas en materia de patentes y normas de las TIC Tecnologías de Informatica y Comunicaciones”. Las TIC son en su mayoría sobre software, y sin embargo el software no puede ser objeto de patente “como tal”. Así, en cierto sentido, esto debería ser una conferencia trivial que dure unos cinco minutos. El hecho de que no se muestra es adonde nos estan llevando: hacia la aceptación y la promoción de las patentes en las normas europeas, incluidas las de software.

Eso no es realmente sorprendente, dado que es la organización – la Comisión Europea y la Oficina Europea de Patentes (OEP). La Comisión Europea siempre ha sido un gran fan de las patentes de software, y es muy poco probable que la OEP pueda participar con una conferencia que dice: “ustedes saben, * realmente * no necesitamos todas estas patentes en nuestros estándares.”

Por supuesto, el resultado opuesto – que las patentes son tan indescriptiblemente deliciosas que tenemos que tener el mayor número posible de ellas en nuestras normas europea de las TIC – deben surgir de manera natural y orgánica. Y así para garantizar que resultan naturales y orgánicos, tenemos unas pocas empresas seleccionados que participan al “azar”.

Este es un tipo de debate falso (como el que nos encontramos en el cambio climático) está convocando a la polémica falsa en la que mobbyists y grupos de presión trabajan tan duro para crear. Ellos quieren distraer con preguntas que debería ser triviales y en su lugar poner la desinformación en el centro de todo.

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