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05.31.11

Still No Commitment to OpenSUSE, Just Proprietary Software From Attachmate

Posted in GNU/Linux, Microsoft, OpenSUSE, SLES/SLED at 11:45 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

A Microsoft Gold-certified Partner (Attachmate) remains a proprietary software company

Glass

Summary: Microsoft’s partner, Attachmate, still refrains from commenting on GNU/Linux efforts that are not being taxed by Microsoft; proprietary products from Novell are seemingly unaffected

TECHRIGHTS returns to its normal schedule after an extended weekend (Bank Holiday in the UK). We have been looking into more Novell news recently, only to find more of the same trends that we discussed earlier this month, namely that staff is leaving and OpenSUSE gets no commitment of substance. The official site speaks of progress, but there is really not much of it except profiles and other more distracting, off-topic bits of news or something on the borderline between SUSE and OpenSUSE (the gap is blurred a bit sometimes). Notice what Attachmate continues to say about SUSE. There is no mention of OpenSUSE, still. The new manager of SUSE expresses commitment without mentioning OpenSUSE even once.

The VAR Guy was particularly curious about Hawn’s views on SUSE Linux. The reason: During Attachmate’s discussions to potentially acquire Novell, SEC filings indicated that the initial dialog did not include buying Novell’s SUSE Linux business. But Hawn says Attachmate was simply reacting to Novell’s initial strategy — which involved potentially selling Novell’s assets in pieces to multiple bidders. Says Hawn: “Our desire from the outset was, if possible, to acquire the whole company.”

Sascha Manns continues to deliver some news while the OpenSUSE brand gets weakened for the following reason: “It became quickly apparent to me that while the service was called “openSUSE Build Service” the name didn’t give enough due credit. The build service’s capabilities meant so much more than simply creating a tool for the openSUSE distribution.”

This has not been a problem for over a year, has it? Why it is being renamed at such a late stage? Not a healthy sign for this trademark.What is Attachmate going to do?

Novell is generally no more (as an independent company). Attachmate has shelved its pertinent part where it saw that as suitable and threw the rest — including Mono — out. Nonetheless, some YouTube accounts continue to spew out Novell promotion, not just SUSE promotion which is at least a live product.

Parts of Novell that are still being advertised are characteristically proprietary, Vibe for example [1, 2, 3]. These three video and about a dozen more from “Novelldemo” are the type of stuff coming from Novell, which still sells and promotes proprietary software [1, 2, 3, 4]. SUSE for Novell is a carrier with which to sell Novell’s proprietary addons, not just proprietary software from third parties (largely a strategy at Red Hat and Canonical).

Speaking of SUSE, there is this new Dell video about its Novell alliance with Microsoft. It does not mention patents or any sneaky language like that and we have wondered about it for almost 4 years.

Remember that buying SUSE means paying Microsoft. It means paying a lot more than HTC pays Microsoft for Android, perhaps ten times as much.

Links 31/5/2011: Linaro Milestones, Ricoh Makes Linux Tablets

Posted in News Roundup at 5:46 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Linaro

    • Linaro: Now a Year Old, the Linux Effort Begins to Deliver

      It was just about a year ago that IBM, Samsung, ARM and others formed Linaro, the not-for-profit organization that aims to make it easier for developers to use Linux on ARM-based devices, and over the past few weeks the group has made several announcements that reveal some of the fruits of its labors.

    • Linaro Non-Profit is Rapidly Hitting Embedded Linux Milestones

      For years, many Linux users wished for it to achieve a level of success on the desktop that in never did achieve; however, a funny thing happened on the way to that state of affairs: Linux succeeded off the desktop. Linux is growing very rapidly on servers, and already powers much of the server infrastructure behind the Internet and many corporate networks. Linux is also gaining traction as infrastructure within mobile operating systems such as Android, and the cloud-centric OS Google Chrome. One remaining non-desktop arena where Linux does very well is in embedded systems and applications. On that front, Linaro, a non-profit organization concentrating on embedded Linux, is maturing.

  • Audiocasts/Shows

  • Kernel Space

    • Linus says “absolutely nothing” changes in Linux 3.0
    • New Linux 3.0 kernel, same as the old kernel

      After noodling it around for a while, Linux kernel maintainer Linus Torvalds has decided to shift the version numbering from the 2.6 kernel scheme to a 3.0 version scheme, the first significant change to the kernel numbering system since 2004.

      It’s a change that’s been a long time coming for many kernel developers, and one that will inevitably bring hype.

    • Linus Torvalds Approves Linux 3.0 RC1

      Nearly 20 years after Linus Torvalds’ first Linux post and after 39 major releases for the Linux 2.6 kernel, the OS inventor signed off on Linux 3.0. The new kernel is now available as RC1.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • The Compositing Modes of KDE Plasma Workspaces Explained
      • Plasma Active: Quick Catch-Up!

        We’ve been a bit quiet lately around the Plasma Active farm. This is mostly due to us being rather busy, both with technical as well as organizational tasks. On the technology front, things continue to plow forward at a very brisk pace with Contour shaping up with every passing day and libplasma2 (a big part of the Plasma Quick track) zipping ahead nicely.

      • libplasma2

        The motivation for these changes is based on the history of the library, which grew over the last couple of years in response to changes in Qt (the biggest being the arrival of QGraphicsProxyWidget which was first used in the KDE Platform 4.2 release) and the needs of the increasingly sophisticated applications using libplasma.

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Configure Your Gnome 3 Desktop With Gnome Tweak Tool
      • Eye Candy : Faenza – Gnome Icon Theme
      • Ready for Gnome 3.2? Welcome back the weather applet!

        After the world clock, its time for another feature that is added to the 3.2 arsenal of the ‘awesome’ desktop. This time its one of the most requested features of gnome 3.0 that people complained about again and again. Yes, the gnome shell gets a replacement for the weather applet that is missing from the new version our favourite desktop.

      • GNOME 3 in Fedora 15: A Case of Acclimatisation and Configuration

        When I gave the beta version of the now finally released Fedora 15 a try, GNOME 3 left me thinking that it was even more dramatic and less desirable a change than Ubuntu’s Unity desktop interface. In fact, I was left with serious questions about its actual usability, even for someone like me. It all felt as if everything was one click further away from me and thoughts of what this could mean for anyone seriously afflicted by RSI started to surface in my mind, especially with big screens like my 24″ Iiyama being commonplace these days. Another missing item was somewhere on the desktop interface for shutting down or restarting a PC; it seemed to be case of first logging off and then shutting down from the login screen. This was yet another case of adding to the number of steps for doing something between GNOME 2 and GNOME 3 with its GNOME Shell.

      • GNOME 3! My experiences so far…

        The big news with GNOME right now is the official release of GNOME 3.0 happened on April 6, 2011. This UI is slick. Majorly slick. The Activities menu gives you an incredibly quick and intuitive overview of everything you have open, a bookmarks bar, and all your workspaces. Before you realize what happened, you’re viewing the window you need on a new workspace and you’re ready to go. If you are used to a little more customization, it can be hard to get used to at first. I’ve found that I have had to change the way I use the computer somewhat to use it efficiently, and train myself to actually work differently. I suppose this is true of any new interface, but it is still a bit of a shock.

      • Elections 2011: fostering the GNOME commercial ecosystem
      • Mixing the old and the new

        A lot has been written on GNOME 3 and, truth be told, I don’t have the digital horsepower (yet) to run GNOME 3 to give an adequate assessment. I think I get what they’re trying to do and, to be honest, I’m not sure I agree with the direction GNOME is taking here.

        Juan Rodriguez is taking the proverbial bull by the horns and has initiated a project called BlueBubble, which marries GNOME 2.32 to the newly released Fedora 15, “breaking the least amount of packages possible.”

  • Distributions

    • A Fun Weekend with AntiX!

      After my antiX installation, I’ve been exploring my new system and I have to say that, as they call it, it is “lean and mean”!

      I still have to adapt my KDE mentality to the Rox/IceVM enviroment of this distro, but so far I’ve managed to find all the applications I’ve needed. Besides, it’s a great brain exercise…routines kill neurons! :P You see, I’m even posting this on antiX!

      [...]

      Oh, one of the best things of antiX is that, in my case, it does not take much CPU usage…actually, it seems it barely uses it. The most it has used so far is about 20%

    • Red Hat Family

      • Fedora

        • The Perfect Server – Fedora 15 x86_64 [ISPConfig 3]
        • Fedora 15 Lovelock is not my love – Review

          Fedora 15 is a different story altogether. It’s a distro designed for power users, adorned with a toyish desktop that simply ruins everything. Slow and ineffective, just the opposite of what Fedora has always been.

        • Sometimes the bleeding edge cuts

          Of course once in a while there are some painful hickups. Gedit had been crashing for me since the upgrade to FC15, so I decided to run a yum upgrade this weekend. It grabbed an updated gedit along with some other stuff. Gedit now seems more stable, but unfortunately a lot of other stuff stopped working. Most critically it seems NetworkManager is down and out, so I had to fall back to the trusty old ‘ifup’ command to get online. Also it seems docking station support got an accidental axe in the back, because if I connect my laptop to the docking station, both screens just go black now.

        • Project BlueBubble

          Building on the previous post, I decided to make a ‘clean’ implementation of Gnome 2.32 for Fedora 15 (And beyond!). Specifically for those of us who have already updated, and dislike the new experience.

          Project BlueBubble aims to bring Gnome 2.32 packages in a Fedora-15 compatible way, breaking the least amount of packages possible. It’ll be a repository you can set up, and just “yum install gnome-desktop-classic”to get up and running. The only catch? It’s either Shell or Classic, a lot of packages conflict, but I’m trying my best to allow Gnome-Classic with Gnome 3.0 packages like gedit and totem.

        • Fedora 15 Review | LAS | s17e01
        • Small happy things: Fedora 15 and Bluetooth

          It’s always nice to write about something positive, so I thought I’d just say a quick thanks to whichever mystery person improved Bluetooth support for my Sony Vaio Z (VPCZ1) in the upstream and Fedora kernel revisions between 14 and 15. I have a Bluetooth mouse and also use Bluetooth tethering with my phone. In Fedora 14 kernels, it never quite worked well enough; the mouse would work at first but would not wake up again as soon as it went idle, and tethered data connections were similarly unreliable, the flow of data would just seem to stop after a while.

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Thoughts on inverted jellyfish, or my week with SimplyMEPIS 11.0
        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • How Unity, Compiz, GNOME Shell & KWin Affect Performance

            Those that follow my Twitter feed know that over the weekend I began running some benchmarks of the various open-source and closed-source graphics drivers. But it was not like the usual Phoronix benchmarks simply comparing the driver performance. Instead it was to see how each driver performed under the various desktops / window managers now being used by modern Linux installations. In this article are the first results of this testing of Unity with Compiz, the classic GNOME desktop with Metacity, the classic GNOME desktop with Compiz, the GNOME Shell with Mutter, and the KDE desktop with KWin. These configurations were tested with both the open and closed-source NVIDIA and ATI/AMD Linux drivers.

          • Ubuntu 11.10 “Oneiric Ocelot”: 11 Great Features You Can Expect to Find

            In the past few weeks, we have covered a lot about Ubuntu 11.04 as well as its controversial Unity interface. However now, it’s time to take a look at the future of Ubuntu, which is 11.10. Despite being a standard release, Oneiric Ocelot, the upcoming version of Ubuntu will include many important changes. With the somewhat unexciting response Ubuntu Natty received after its release, the onus is now on developers to make sure Ubuntu reaches its 200 million users goal as early as possible.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Tasting some Peppermint Ice

              Lately, I’ve been running into a bit of a problem. My main laptop is getting old. I’ve had it for over four years and while it’s definitely not ready for the scrapheap, I’ve really begun to outgrow it. Either that, or maybe my computing needs are morphing. More details about that another time …

              Seeing as how more and more of my work is moving into the so-called cloud, I’ve been investigating some alternatives to standard desktop Linux distributions — for example, Joli OS. But instead of falling back on the familiar, I decided to try something different. And for me that was Peppermint Ice.

              You can read more about it here. Suffice it to say that Peppermint Ice fairly lightweight and designed for people who use Web-based applications. It uses Openbox as the window manager and, like Joli OS, Web apps launch in a browser window that lacks all the usual adornments and cruft that comes with a browser. There are some applications installed on the hard drive, too; you can get more desktop applications if you need them.

              [...]

              Overall, I’m quite impressed with Peppermint Ice. It’s fast, lean, and easy to use. It didn’t take long to adapt to using the Web for most (if not all) of my work. My only complaint is that the version of Chromium that comes with Peppermint Ice is a bit out of date. A small problem, but one I’m sure would be remedied by doing a full install and update.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets/MeeGo/Qt

      • Laptops,
        ASUS Eee PC X101 runs MeeGo, costs only $200 (video hands-on!)

        The latter model will come out at the groundbreaking price of just $200. Check out its scarlet construction in the gallery below or jump past the break for our video hands-on.

      • Asus Eee PC X101: $200 netbook that will run MeeGo Linux or Windows 7

        Asus is getting back into the Linux netbook game with the introduction of the Eee PC X101. The company is positioning the new netbook as a thin and light model, measuring just 0.7 inches thick and weighing just 2.1 pounds. Those figures aren’t exactly revolutionary, but they do mean that the new netbook will be thinner and lighter than the original Asus Eee PC 701 which was launched in 2007.

      • A QML Presentation System

        When I was preparing for Qt Developer Days last year, I started out with an unnamed tool to create my presentation and was annoyed with some of its shortcomings. At the time, I decided to do my slides in QML instead, partially to learn it a bit better and partially because I thought it would be kinda cool. I have since then simplified it a bit and by now I have something that I personally find useful, so maybe someone else will too. It’s all QML and JavaScript, so no compilation required.

      • Ricoh Announces Enterprise Device With Tablet Features

        The tablet runs a version of Linux, and its support for advanced scripting language allows developers to write customized forms that can be viewed through a web browser interface.

      • Elaine Negroponte on Computer Usage in Schools

        Back in February, we reported that in OLPC Thailand, XO Students Show No School Improvement. The post was quite controversial – generating the response Roger Siptakiat on OLPC in Thailand on the official OLPC blog.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Events

    • Open Source In Action at CeBit – stand N04

      Australia’s Open Source Industry Association (OSIA) will be showcasing lead examples of “open source in action” at this week’s CeBit conference in Sydney. The OSIA stand N04 will display a selection of local open source solutions and is highlighting three member companies:

      Pretaweb- PretaWeb is a specialist in development and top tier support for scalable, high availability web content management solutions built using Plone, one of the largest and most dynamic open source projects in the world. PretaWeb has developed and support Plone powered feature rich websites, intranets, mulit-site and e-government shared web platforms for major clients such as the NSW State Transit Authority, Greens Party, CSIRO and O’Brien Glass Industries.

Readers’ Picks

Clip of the Day

Linux GUI Programming with Ruby


Credit: TinyOgg

Microsoft Does Not Respect Users’ Choice

Posted in Microsoft at 5:00 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Microsoft on Chrome

05.30.11

IRC Proceedings: May 30th, 2011

Posted in IRC Logs at 8:21 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

#boycottnovell-social log

Enter the IRC channels now

IRC Proceedings: May 29th, 2011

Posted in IRC Logs at 8:14 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

#boycottnovell-social log

Enter the IRC channels now

Links 30/5/2011: Linux 3.0 is Coming

Posted in News Roundup at 7:45 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • GNU/Linux in USA

    The fact is, GNU/Linux works everywhere for everyone and the whiners’ claim that GNU/Linux is flawed is only based on lack of appearance on retail shelves. What are they going to do next year when more machines running Linux are on the shelves than that other obsolete OS? Even the USA, the strongest user of that other OS can see the benefits of using FLOSS and .

  • Kernel Space

    • Just what is Linux mascot Tux doing in a TV cereal commercial? [Video]

      Reader Dexter S. was watching TV when a commercial for ‘Fruit Loops’ cereal flashed up on his screen with a rather familiar face in tow…

      Although fleeting, the gaudy animated commercial for an overly-sugared cereal appears to show Tux, the official Linux mascot, displayed rather prominently for a split second or so.

    • Linux 3.0-rc1

      Yay! Let the bikeshed painting discussions about version numbering begin (or at least re-start).

    • Graphics Stack

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • My KDE Experience

        A few weeks ago I wrote a review of Gnome 3 (With stuff I hated and stuff I liked separated). Since the ‘hated’ one was viewed many times more, I decided to write about the good, the bad, and the ugly about KDE 4.6.3 in a single post.

        As a hardcore GNOME user, switching over to KDE felt weird. Not in a bad way, but I kept on bumping into things that GNOME did different (Not better, different) and kept missing some of GNOME’s defaults.

  • Distributions

    • New Releases

    • Gentoo Family

      • Music made with Gentoo, and some modding

        Tonight’s experiment, this time with mlr + the smyth rhodes samples from another track I created. Performed on a monome 128, in Gentoo Linux.

        [...]

        The picture is a screenshot of my working environment: mlr + JACK Timemachine + QJackCtl + JACKrack + monomeserial. Linux is amazing.

    • Red Hat Family

      • Fedora

        • Fedora 15 Xfce review

          Final Thoughts: There are lots more about Fedora 15 that I have not covered in this review. Because those are the same across the Fedora editions, I will save them for a review of the main edition, which should be published some time next week. Specific to this Spin, I think the developers should have spent more time in customizing the default Xfce desktop. On a modern desktop operating system, somethings are expected to work out of the box. Unfortunately, on the Xfce Spin of Fedora 15, the most basic of those do not. I hope, Fedora 16 Xfce will provide a better, out-of-the-box user-experience.

        • Fedora (KDE) System Spotted Running Maya 3D on ‘Doctor Who Confidential’

          Maya is shown running with a bunch of terminals open. But Maya? May be remotely. Is Maya is available for Linux? (Just Found, It is indeed available.)

        • My Green Fedora

          I’m not a Fedora user at all. I grew up (so to speak) in the Ubuntu camp, and while I’ve never really embraced the Red Hat sphere, it certainly never lost points for me.

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • The bzr-beta-ppa Ubuntu PPA for Beta Users has moved

            As the final step of consolidating all of the official Bazaar PPAs on Launchpad under one Launchpad team, the Bazaar Beta PPA formerly found at https://launchpad.net/~bzr-beta-ppa/+archive/ppa has moved to live under the main ~bzr team at https://launchpad.net/~bzr/+archive/beta. If you are a user and tester of Bazaar beta releases via this PPA, you will need to update your APT sources.list lines – you can see the new sources.list lines under the “Technical details about this PPA” section at the above link.

          • The Five Pillars Of Ubuntu Server 11.10

            - Ubuntu Orchestra
            - Ubuntu Ensemble
            - Ubuntu Server for ARM
            - Making Ubuntu Server the Best Cloud Infrastructure OS
            - Making Ubuntu Server the Best Cloud Guest OS

          • Canonical Chief Designer Hits the Road

            Ubuntu’s head designer, Ivanka Majic, is leaving for an extended motorcycle trip through America, and whether she will return to Canonical remains unclear.

            In a blog post, Majic says that she plans a three month honeymoon with her ​​husband, traveling via motorcycle from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. “I am taking what I believe is officially called ‘a career break’,” she writes.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Bodhi Linux 1.1.0 Review

              Bodh Linux, is a Ubuntu-based distribution, that uses enlightenment as its window manager. Bodhi 1.1.0 is based on Ubuntu 10.04 and is aimed at being relatively easy to use and easy on hardware resources, while at the same time, allowing the system to be very customisable.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Phones

      • Android

        • Magazine publishers eye Android, finally

          Android may rule the smartphone market but when it comes to magazines Android users are sorely neglected

          Android may well be the most dominant smartphone operating system available. It may also be the OS with the coolest apps. However, there is one area in which Android users are sorely neglected: magazines.

          Take a look around the web. Most of the best magazines already offer an iPad-based subscription to their publications. Apple has been quick to try and lock publishers and readers into its iTunes platform.

        • 50 Paid Android Apps Worth the Price
        • Learn Android online … Free training

Free Software/Open Source

  • Events

  • Web Browsers

    • Future Of 3D Is Free: WebM, HTML5 And Firefox

      YouTube has announced that users will be able to watch WebM encoded 3D videos using HTML 5 on Firefox 4. It’s yet another milestone in making the web free of non-free technologies such as Adode Flash and H.264.

      3D is becoming immensely popular. When you walk inside any electronics store here in Europe, you see the TV section dominated by 3D TV sets. In addition to TV sets 3D ready devices are also increasing their foot prints. Desktop and notebook users can also enjoy the power of 3D with Nvidia’s cards.

    • Mozilla

      • Mozilla And Google Going After Browser Memory

        Both Mozilla and Google have recently highlighted a more visible and detailed view of the memory that is consumed by a browser as well as content.

        As we are moving more and more to an Internet that is featuring applications in your browser, it will also be more important to make effective use of available memory on a client system. Mozilla and Google are leading an awareness campaign directed at developers to highlight a problem that could reveal a performance bottleneck.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • Updates on the Foundation

      Some time has passed since we announced that we reached the goal of our 50.000 € fundraising challenge. In the meantime, we’ve updated you on our legal process via this blog, and so I’d like to post another update on where we stand and what our roadmap is.

  • Business

    • Cutting into open source business models with a sharp knife and a squeeze
    • Univa Unifies Grid Engine and Eucalyptus Clouds

      Univa (www.univa.com) the Data Center Optimization Company, today announced it has partnered with Eucalyptus Systems to enable organizations to seamlessly integrate Eucalyptus on-premise cloud management software into their Grid Engine compute environments. This enables organizations using Grid Engine to fully exploit the benefits of dynamic, scalable and self-serve cloud systems within the backbone of their production compute and data analysis infrastructures.

    • Semi-Open Source

      • Public Beta!

        We are making an open source release of the Acunu Storage Core under GPL v2 at the same time as this beta release. If you want to look at the source code, learn, explore, critique or extend what we have done, please go right ahead. You can find our more about the open source distribution here.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Free software campaigner Richard Stallman cancels Israel lectures due to Palestinian pressure

      The American software freedom activist Richard Stallman has cancelled a lecture that he was scheduled to give at Tel Aviv University due to pressure from the Palestinian Authority.

      The funding for his trip came from the Palestinians who invited him to lecture for them, Stallman wrote in a letter explaining the cancellation.

    • Palestinian pressure causes Linux founder to cancel Israel visit

      “I am sorry for the disappointment that I have caused,” wrote Stallman.

    • Richard Stallman at the Senate
    • Behind the scenes of the new GNU mailing list server

      The GNU list server is a monster machine serving lists.gnu.org, lists.nongnu.org and a few other domains. Every day, it spools out over 1 million messages for 2700 mailing lists. Until April 11, our venerable list server was an 8-year old Fedora Core 2 (!) box equipped with 6 high-speed SCSI drives organized in two RAID packs to maximize I/O bandwidth. These drives were incessantly cranking every day, as Mailman forwarded incoming posts to thousands of subscribers over a saturated T1 uplink at the FSF headquarters.

      [...]

      …with well-tuned EXT4 file systems running on a RAID-1 array of solid-state drives and a second array of fast hard-drives.

  • Project Releases

    • Gnumeric 1.10.15 aka “TBD” is now available.

      The Gnumeric Team is pleased to announce the availability of Gnumeric version 1.10.15. This version requires the concurrently released Goffice 0.8.15. We also recommend the recently released Libgsf 1.14.21.

  • Public Services/Government

  • Licensing

  • Programming

Leftovers

  • Apple

    • Samsung Bites Apple: Wants To See iPad3, iPhone 5 Design

      It’s not even the secret design of the upcoming products which Apple builds with the help of communist China in their sweatshops where suicides are common due to controversial working conditions. We are talking about the ‘old’ Apple products which are already obsolete.

    • Apple Wants Access To Samsung’s Android Devices

      The same Apple that sent a SWAT team to a journalist’s house confiscating his IT equipments just because he published details about an upcoming iPhone. Instead of going after the one who stole the phone Apple went after a journalist.

      Apple is known for arm-twisting. The draconian, secretive Apple which displayed such aggressiveness in that prototype case now seeks that Samsung should hand-over product samples, packaging, and package inserts to the Galaxy S2, Galaxy Tab 8.9, Galaxy Tab 10.1, Infuse 4G, and 4G LTE or “Droid Charge.”

    • Italy Thinks Apple Is Ripping Off Customers On Their Warranties [AppleCare]

      #
      Piana, who was directly involved in what he calls the “first wave” of disputes from the Italian Antitrust Authority over paid extended warranties, says they see it as making the consumer pay for something they are already guaranteed by law.

  • Security

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • Russia’s occupation of Georgian territory must end

      t is a little under three years since the Russian Federation’s invasion of the Republic of Georgia which claimed the lives of more than 400 innocent civilians.

      While the conflict has received little international attention of late, the ongoing Russian occupation of Georgian sovereign territory remains one of Europe’s bloodiest running sores. As I write, 20 percent of Georgia’s territory in Abkhazia and South Ossetia remains under the control of the Russian army.

      Standing on the line of occupation between the area under the control of the Georgian central government and the breakaway province of South Ossetia, the view is much the same as any other picture-postcard scene from the Caucasus.

    • Patriot Act surveillance provisions extended in nick of time

      The US Congress, racing the clock and rejecting demands for additional safeguards of civil liberties, passed a bill on Thursday to renew three expiring provisions of the anti-terrorism Patriot Act.

      Barack Obama, who is in Europe, signed it into law shortly before the provisions were set to expire at midnight. A White House aide said he used an “auto pen”, which replicates his signature.

      Obama acted shortly after the Republican-led House of Representatives and the Democratic-led Senate approved the bill overwhelmingly. It passed the House, 250-153, hours after it cleared the Senate, 72-23.

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • Phantom Efficiencies: US Economy Still Running Very Slow

      The problem remains, however, that in order to carry debt loads both public and private the US is still very dependent on strong industrial growth to generate revenues, and support wages. Accordingly, in the near term less energy inputs into the US economy more immediately aligns with less output. In other words, a more efficient economy is slowly being born. But until then, we will struggle with the transition. | see: US Average Annual Total Energy Consumption 1975-2010.

    • Speculator Ghosts in the Oil Machine
  • Finance

    • Fed Gave Banks Crisis Gains on Secretive Loans Low as 0.01%

      Credit Suisse Group AG, Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc each borrowed at least $30 billion in 2008 from a Federal Reserve emergency lending program whose details weren’t revealed to shareholders, members of Congress or the public.

      The $80 billion initiative, called single-tranche open- market operations, or ST OMO, made 28-day loans from March through December 2008, a period in which confidence in global credit markets collapsed after the Sept. 15 bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.

      Units of 20 banks were required to bid at auctions for the cash. They paid interest rates as low as 0.01 percent that December, when the Fed’s main lending facility charged 0.5 percent.

    • Former Senator Judd Gregg to Join Goldman Sachs

      It’s been a good month for government regulators going to join the companies they regulate. On May 11, Comcast announced Meredith Baker would leave the FCC to join its board, after she approved its merger with NBC Universal a few months earlier. Today, the news is about Judd Gregg, the former three-term Republican senator from New Hampshire, who is going to work for Goldman Sachs.

    • William Black on Wall Street fraud

      Former banking regulator William Black speaks about rackets and fraud in the financial sector. He says Wall Street’s fraudulent CEOs looted with impunity, were left in power, and were granted their fondest wish when Congress, at the behest of the Chamber of Commerce, Fed Chairman Bernanke, and the bankers’ trade associations, successfully extorted the professional Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) to turn the accounting rules into a farce.

    • Oppenheimer Analyst Fadel Gheit Thinks Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley Are Market Manipulators, Need The Government To Open A Can On Their Asses
    • Lock ‘em up

      Former Tory peer and leader of Essex County Council Lord Hanningfield has been found guilty of expenses fraud. Jail’s too good for him, says Shane Greer

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

  • Censorship

    • Oregon Senator Wyden freezes second Internet censorship bill

      A U.S. Senator from Oregon has once again taken a stand against his own party to defend what he sees as the inherent right to free speech on the Internet, placing a hold on a bill that could force search engines and Internet service providers to block websites deemed to be “infringing” on copyrights.

      The Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act — or “PROTECT IP” for short was part of a second attempt to pass provisions of the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA), which failed to clear Congress during its last session thanks to a parliamentary maneuver by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR).

  • Privacy

  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • A Hippocratic oath for the internet

      That is the message I would like to bring to the e-G8 summit on the internet gathered by French President Nicolas Sarkozy this week in Paris.

      I am apprehensive about a meeting of government and industry that begins with the presumption that they wield authority over the internet, the people’s internet. Cory Doctorow decided not to attend, declaring it a “whitewash” for regimes that are at “war with the free, open net.” Perhaps that’s the right decision. Given the chance to go, I decided to witness it up close and say what I have to say so at least I can say I said it. And that is this:

      The internet was born open, free, and distributed. As conceived and built, all bits are created equal. It must stay that way. Sarkozy called this meeting to discuss the growth of the internet. It will grow only if it is open and free.

    • At the eG8, 20th century ideas clashed with the 21st century economy

      Sarkozy drew an explicit line between countries that keep the Internet up and those that closed it down, as Egypt did during the critical moments of its revolution this winter. “The free Internet today marks the difference between a dictatorship and a democracy,” said Sarkozy, noting “those who have tried to close the network have sided with the dictatorship.”

      To portray Sarkozy’s speech as a glowing endorsement of the Internet’s promise for humanity would be misleading. He asserted a strong role for government, given the power that our connectedness now brings. Sarkozy has referred to the Internet as “a territory to conquer” in the past, a position that Electronic Frontier Foundation founder John Perry Barlow made clear he opposed.

      “Now that the Internet is an integral part of most people’s live, it would be contradictory to exclude governments from this huge forum,” said Sarkozy. “Nobody could nor should forget that these governments are the only legitimate representatives of the will of the people in our democracies. To forget this is to take the risk of democratic chaos and hence anarchy.”

    • Telco missteps, overreach leading to Dutch net neutrality law

      Big news out of the Netherlands this week, where a government minister announced plans to guarantee network neutrality by law. If Parliament approves the amendment to Dutch telecommunications law, and it expected to do so, it would become one of the first countries in the world to legislate against Internet providers who want to charge more for using particular applications or services.

    • Mubarak’s $90M ‘phone bill’

      A CAIRO court has fined Hosni Mubarak and two ex-ministers $90 million for “damaging the economy”.

  • DRM

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • PayPal Sues Google Over Mobile Payment Secrets

      Google Inc. was sued by PayPal Inc., the fastest-growing unit at online marketplace EBay Inc. (EBAY), over claims it misappropriated trade secrets from PayPal’s mobile- payment business.

      Osama Bedier, a former PayPal executive now at Google, stole PayPal’s confidential information, the company said in the lawsuit filed yesterday in state court in San Jose, California. Stephanie Tilenius, another ex-PayPal executive now at Google, violated contractual obligations by recruiting Bedier, PayPal said.

    • Trademarks

      • Trademark Squatters 0001 – OutbackZack

        Trademark Squatters have become a huge problem in the last couple of years. The value of a mark in commerce is immense, but often marks are not registered, with the owner depending upon common law recognition of rights.

        Trademark Squatters take advantage of inability of government agencies to check the truthfulness of statements made when a mark is registered, and the lack of sanctions for lying under oath. Most especially the lack of sanctions means that there is no effective action taken against Trademark Squatters.

        The Government Agency which supposedly exists to protect the Mark Owner instead protects the Mark Squatter against the Mark Owner. When ownership is finally settled at great cost to the Mark Owner, the Mark Squatter walks away unscathed, with the profits that he or she has accrued from his or her actions, ready to do it all again, against some other unsuspecting Mark Owner.

    • Copyrights

      • Senate panel approves controversial copyright bill

        A U.S. Senate committee has unanimously approved a controversial bill that would allow the U.S. Department of Justice to seek court orders requiring search engines and Internet service providers to stop sending traffic to websites accused of infringing copyright.

        The Senate Judiciary Committee approved the Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act, or PROTECT IP Act, which would also allow copyright holders to seek court orders requiring payment processors and online ad networks to stop doing business with allegedly infringing websites.

      • The Access Copyright Backlash: Writers Union of Canada Calls for Collective Licensing Reform

        Last week’s series of posts on Access Copyright (transactional licensing, economics of the collective, future reforms, all three posts in single PDF), which examined the astonishing lack of transparency behind the copyright collective and the small percentage of revenues that are ultimately distributed to Canadian authors, resulted in a large number of private emails from authors expressing gratitude for the posts and venting enormous frustration. The concerns with Access Copyright broke out into the open this weekend at the Writers’ Union of Canada annual general meeting as the TWUC passed a motion recognizing the lack of control over how licensing revenue is managed and the inability of Access Copyright to represent creator interests. As a result, the TWUC plans to investigate operational separation of creators’ and publishers’ interests in collective licensing.

      • The Major Labels Think That They Own The Independent Artists – Do They?
      • It’s the law

        Not content with that, we then make it perfectly legal for the accuser to hand in false claims and allegations.

        How could we make that law better? Easy: by making it impossible for you to challenge or to defend yourself against the accusations.

        The above refers of course to that hobby horse of mine, the new Copyright Act that kicks in this September.

Clip of the Day

NVIDIA Project Kal-El Demo: Glowball


Credit: TinyOgg

05.29.11

Links 29/5/2011: KDE 4.7 Previews, MeeGo With Wayland Likely

Posted in News Roundup at 9:14 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • If Microsoft made Linux
  • Heart of Linux – part 2
  • Heart of Linux – part 3
  • Audiocasts/Shows

  • Kernel Space

    • Linux mainline contains all the Xen code bits for Dom0 and DomU support

      After a relatively long road traveled with a few bumps along the way, as of yesterday, Linus’s mainline tree (2.6.39+) contains literally every component needed for Linux to run both as a management domain kernel(Dom0) and a guest(DomU).

      Xen has always used Linux as the management OS (Dom0) on top of the hypervisor itself, to do the device management and control of the virtual machines running on top of Xen. And for many years, next to the hypervisor, there was a substantial linux kernel patch that had to be applied on top of a linux kernel to transform into this “Dom0″. This code had to constantly be kept in sync with the progress Linux itself was making and as such caused a substantial amount of extra work that had to be done.

    • Graphics Stack

      • Is AMD Open-Sourcing Something Next Week?

        Some Linux users seem to think that next week, Advanced Micro Devices will be open-sourcing — something — relating to their graphics stack. Firmware? ATI Avivo? OpenCL / Stream work? UVD unit specifications?

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • XMonad: a tiling window manager

      It’s an intelligent window manager written in Haskell whose ‘main’ peculiarities is to automatically position windows without overlapping. Xmonad has several advantages (which i found on the homepage of the project): tiling windows, minimalism, stable (and having tried hard, I can confirm), extensibility, many features (for example, supports xinerama), simple, supported .. .

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • KDE Commit Digest for 22 May 2011
      • Five cool KDE widgets for your desktop!

        With all the hype around Unity and Gnome 3, KDE fans might be having a lousy time and feel ignored. We are bored with those two anyway ;-). Its time for a change. KDE fans rejoice!! KDE has many very cool and useful widgets which you can add on your KDE desktop or in your taskbar. Lets have a look at the top 5 widgets.

        [...]

        Great plasmoid for tracking your system processes. In this widget you’ll get six segments – CPU monitor, HDD status, Hardware info, Network monitor, Memory status and Hardware temperature.

      • The Underlying KWin Improvements In KDE 4.7

        Now that the first KDE SC 4.7 beta is available, Martin Gräßlin, the lead developer of the KWin, has blogged about some of the underlying improvements made to the compositing window manager for KDE during this development cycle. Of course, most Phoronix graphics junkies will already know what’s changed based upon previous articles, but here’s an overview for those not caught up to speed.

      • Plasma Compositor and Window Manager in 4.7

        With the first Beta for KDE Plasma Workspaces 4.7 out of the door it is time to look back what we achieved in the last half year for the KDE Plasma Compositor and Window Manager. Personally I think this will become a very great release with hughe improvements for our users. The best about it is, that users should not even notice that anything changed at all. Almost everything we did is under the hood improving performance, stability and rendering.

      • KDE 4.7 – A First Look At Beta 1

        In my view, 4.7 is looking like it’s going to be a solid release. Nothing earth shattering in there, just delivering more polish, refinement and (in the case of akonadi) promises made some time ago.

  • Distributions

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • The Cauldron is Bubbling!

        Will the Cauldron bubble for a long time, or will magic fade away?
        Will this distribution bedazzle a simple computer user who, following a star like one of the Magi, came to the world of Linux to discover a different reality?
        In three days, will we see a magical light?

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat (RHT) Could Fall Through $42.42 Support Level
      • Red Hat gives executives raises

        Red Hat, the Raleigh software company with a booming business, gave its top executives modest annual raises this week.

        CEO Jim Whitehurst’s base salary rose to $775,000, for example, a 3 percent increase, Red Hat reported Friday in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. Chief Financial Officer Charlie Peters and others got similar raises.

      • Fedora

        • Fedora 15

          As usual, the odd number release is what I update to. I don’t know what it is, it just seems like even when multiple new huge features that the odd releases go smoother. Prior to my joining the QA team, this was the case, all the way back to FC1 (of course, I did skip FC2 because I didn’t realize it had been released until after FC3).

          I’ve been running Fedora 15 for about a month now, and I think it’s great. I love the new features, even Gnome 3. The only thing that really doesn’t seem to provide me any real improvement is systemd. systemd’s parallelization is only a real benefit on multi-core hardware, which does not apply to my graying machine. That said, I’m not going to knock it like some folks seem to be doing.

          [...]

          How does it compare to Ubuntu 11.04? Well, besides having newer technology, Fedora lacks the little things in Ubuntu that mommick me for dear life.

        • Intel Sandy Bridge On Fedora 15 Is Decent

          For those Intel “Sandy Bridge” hardware customers that may be trying out the recent release of Fedora 15, the experience is decent and is in much better shape than the troubling support in Ubuntu 11.04. It is not in tip-top shape as there are some recent optimizations in the Linux kernel and Mesa that haven’t landed in Fedora 15 (at least not yet in the form of an update), but it’s suitable overall.

          Installing Fedora 15 (x86_64) to the HP EliteBook 8460p that Intel sent over had went very well. This notebook is being used for per-commit Intel Linux driver benchmarking, but prior to that I’ve been running a few other Linux SNB tests under different environments. This Hewlett-Packard notebook has an Intel Core i5 2520M CPU, 160GB Intel SSD, 4GB of system memory, and Intel HD 3000 graphics.

        • Fedora 15 KDE: When New Old Is Better Than New New.

          But Fedora is not GNOME-only oriented system. It features several “spins” with different desktop environments: KDE, LXDE, XFCE. Actually, there are some other spins for specific purposes, but that is not part of our today’s discussion.
          Having used different distros for some time, I still prefer KDE to any other desktop environment. That’s why I could not pass by opportunity to try Fedora’s KDE spin.

    • Debian Family

      • Changes to Ruby in Debian (and Ubuntu)
      • Derivatives

        • SimplyMEPIS 11 – My First Experience with MEPIS, Ever

          I thoroughly enjoyed my time with MEPIS 11. If I was in the market for a new KDE 4 centric distribution it would be a strong contender. It has a helpful community and good documentation. It’s got several graphical tools that make administration painless and comes with wireless drivers through Ndiswrapper, multimedia players that have not been crippled, the necessary codecs and Adobe Flash preinstalled. It benefits from access to a huge range of packages through the Debian repositories, enhanced by the additional repositories MEPIS offers. As such it could appeal to users relatively new to Linux just as much as it could appeal to old hands who just want a functional system quick, tired of the rigmarole of having to set up everything by hand. This sounds similar to the user base of PCLinuxOS and Mint.

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) end-of-life reached on April 30, 2011.

            This note is just to confirm that the support period for Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) formally ended on May 1, 2011 and Ubuntu Security Notices no longer includes information or updated packages for Ubuntu 9.10.

          • Ubuntu Power Users: first meeting

            The Ubuntu Power Users Community had a meeting on Thursday, May 26, 2011 at 17:00 UTC in the #ubuntu-meeting channel. This was the first meeting of this new community, and we had many things on our agenda: the organization of the team, the team logo/branding, the overall team goals and purpose, our long term goals and the goals for the Oneiric cycle. Although we discussed many topics, we didn’t manage to talk about everything we originally planned.

          • Problems Open Doors To Solutions

            The folks who have reached out to me that I described at the beginning of this blog entry have faced these kinds of challenges, and I would like to encourage everyone to view these challenges as an awareness of problems that now allow us to make today the first day of the solution. This not only puts us in a better mental state (process the problem sucks, working the solution is far more empowering), but I think it also demonstrates a positive personality trait about constantly striving for self-improvement. It is also a very attractive attribute from a career perspective.

          • ShuttleworthDon Quixote Tilting at FLOSS

            Mark Shuttleworth doesn’t get FLOSS, the concept. He gets FLOSS as a business, but doesn’t understand that an essential element is that Free Software remains Free.

          • Look Out, Future: Ubuntu CTO Matt Zimmerman Joins Locker Project & Singly

            After seven years as the Chief Technology Officer of the world’s leading Linux distro Ubuntu, Matt Zimmerman announced today that he’s leaving that position to join a technology project we said was “aimed directly at the future of the web” when we wrote first about it earlier this year: open source personal data locker platform The Locker Project and its corporate counterpart, Singly.

          • Why I’m excited about joining Singly
          • Issue #49 is out for the taking!
          • Canonical and Ubuntu Needs to Settle Down

            I am not averse to changes. I like experimenting with new applications and features every now and then. I have no problem with that. But that is not the case with majority of Computer users out there. For them, Computer is just a tool to get things done in a much faster and efficient manner. The sooner Canonical realize this, the better.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • The Lubuntu 10.04 Experiment

              On my “middleweight” PC, having been dissatisfied with Linux Mint 9 LXDE, I decided to try Lubuntu 10.04. This is Ubuntu with the lightweight LXDE desktop, and is claimed to run in a Pentium II with 128 MB of RAM (though 160 MB is required for the standard installer). Unlike version 10.10, 10.04 will also work with older “i586″ (Pentium I and AMD K6) CPUs.

              Installation went smoothly. I was already familiar with the LXDE desktop from my testing of Linux Mint; it’s a good basic GUI that should be reasonably familiar to any Windows or Linux user. The default set of applications for Lubuntu is remarkably similar to Linux Mint 9 LXDE, except that Lubuntu offers the Chrome browser and Sylpheed for email.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • MeeGo Could Switch Over To Wayland This Year

      Even since Canonical decided that they are planning to ditch X.org and are planning to switch over to Wayland, I have been quite excited about the possibilities of Wayland. Today, we have more Wayland related good news – MeeGo might switch over to Wayland before the year ends.

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • As netbook sales fall, Intel will slash Atom pricing

        Intel will respond to falling netbook sales by slashing the price of its upcoming “Cedar Trail” Atoms, bringing the cost of complete devices below $200, reports say. The 1.86GHz Atom N2800 and 1.6GHz Atom N2600 will both sport dual cores, while TDPs will be 3.5 and 6.5 Watts, respectively.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Does Amazon “owe” open source? Maybe a little

    When most people look at Amazon, they probably see a retail giant that’s constantly growing and reaching into new markets. But at the core of almost all of Amazon’s success is open source — yet you rarely see Amazon participating and contributing. What’s up with that?

    Glyn Moody raised this point on Wednesday, and I have to say he’s spot-on. Moody compares Amazon and Google — companies of similar size, that both depend heavily on Linux and open source. Yet Google is an active participant and contributor in open source, and Amazon largely sits on the sidelines.

    Consider, for example, the Linux kernel. Amazon uses tons of Linux, not only to power all the servers that it uses for retail but also for Amazon Web Services — and in its own Kindle device, which is by all accounts selling like hotcakes. But Amazon doesn’t turn up in the top 20 kernel contributors. (Google does, though a bit lower than one might think — just after Samsung and Oracle.) Why isn’t Amazon more active?

  • Open source used to be the John Lennon of computing
  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Mozilla Intros Website Permissions Manager In Firefox 5; More Power To The User

        The internet has two faces to it. One is that it is becoming more and more complex day by day and the second is the fact that this complexity is underlying because if you look at it this way – The Internet is simplifying a lot of things for users these days. Well, with all this happening one question arises is that how secure is the user on the Internet? Privacy issues have been one of the most debated topics on the web ever since Facebook was under fire for it’s complex user privacy options.

        [...]

        There is some work still remaining about this new Website Privacy manager such as a more polished UI and addition of more granular controls plus the incorporation of features like “always access securely” (HSTS).

      • Get a Sneak Peek of Firefox 6

        Mozilla on Friday flipped what’s to become its Firefox 6 browser over to the Aurora channel where it’s now available for download and testing. The Aurora channel is where Mozilla offers up early builds with the “newest innovations” before they make the jump to beta, and then eventually released as a final build.

      • Firefox Aurora Jumps To Version 6

        I’m probably not the only user who thinks that the increase in Firefox builds has made it difficulty to keep up to date with the latest features and improvements. Just like Google Chrome, it has gotten to a point where I’m less interested in keeping track of the development progress. The main reason for that is that it requires more work to stay up to date with development of all different channels.

      • All New FireFox 5
  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • 4 LibreOffice Splash Screens Worth Checking Out

      Alternative LibreOffice splash screens. If you don’t like the default LibreOffice splash screen or if you just want to try something new, here is a collection of 4 LibreOffice splash screens for Ubuntu with installation instructions.

    • Developer Interview : Rob Snelders
    • Real-Time Ready

      Java has long been one of the central technologies of enterprise applications. The speed and scalability of the JVM, in particular, have endeared it to large IT organizations. But today, companies need more than just fast performance; they are increasingly searching for deterministic, real-time performance.

      Determinism in this sense means that a given action will occur within a fixed time interval, such as delivery of a stock quotation within some number of microseconds. Historically, Java has not been used to fill that role, because of some early design decisions in the platform. However, new options and new technologies are enabling IT organizations to use Java for both standard business needs and situations where deterministic, real-time requirements must be met.

  • Business

  • Funding

    • Moodlerooms Inc., a Baltimore startup, raising $1.5 million

      Moodlerooms Inc., a company that got its start in Baltimore’s Emerging Technology Center incubator, disclosed with the SEC today that it is raising a $1.5 million round of investment in the form of debt and unsecured promissory notes that will turn into equity.

  • Standards/Consortia

    • OpenFormula Success!

      After years of work, the world is making a step forward to letting authors own and control their own documents, instead of having them controlled by office document software vendors.

      Historically, every office document suite has stored data in its own incompatible format, locking users into that suite and inhibiting competition. This lack of a free and open office document format also makes a lie out of archiving; storing the bits is irrelevant because formats change over time in undocumented ways, with the result that later programs often cannot read older files (we can still read the Magna Carta, but some powerpoint files I created only 15 years ago cannot be read by current versions of Microsoft Office). Governments in particular should not have their documents beholden to any supplier; important government documents should be available to future generations.

      Thankfully, the OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) Technical Committee (TC) is wrapping up its update of the OpenDocument standard, and I think they are about to complete the new version 1.2. This standard lets people store and exchange editable office documents so they edited by programs made by different suppliers. This will enable real competition, and enable future generations to read the materials we develop today. The TC has already approved OpenDocument v1.2 as a Committee Specification, and at this point I think the odds are excellent that it will get through the rest of the process and become formally approved.

Leftovers

  • A computer is not a toaster!

    Now today’s mobile telephones are thousands of times more powerful, yet all this power is utilised for nothing more than useless electron spinning. Today’s modern computers are way over powered for what they are used for and their real capability and potential is hidden away from the average person, bringing it down to, in those persons eyes, the same class as the humble kitchen toaster.

  • Health/Nutrition

    • Flu Warning: Beware the Drug Companies!

      In February 2009, a spike in influenza cases was detected in hospitals around Mexico City. Mexican government officials sent samples of throat cultures from patients to the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Canadian National Laboratory in Winnipeg, whose scientists found a new version of the H1N1 influenza virus, named for the type of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase molecules on its surface that enable it to spread within the body.

      The discovery of what came to be known as “swine flu”—because pigs were the original source of the virus—aroused enormous concern in public health circles. The 1918 flu pandemic that killed tens of millions of people globally was also caused by an apparently new version of H1N1 influenza. Although other H1N1 viruses had been circulating in US populations for more than thirty years,

Clip of the Day

Bloppers VideosChistosos.net


Credit: TinyOgg

BBC Bribed by Bill Gates

Posted in Bill Gates, Deception at 3:58 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Microsoft BBC

Summary: The BBC receives $20 million from Bill Gates, despite the fact that the BBC is supposed to stay independent and unbiased by operation on taxpayers’ money for taxpayers’ benefit

BBC PRIDE is sinking to new lows as the BBC, which is occasionally running Gates columns, is now also accepting money from him. This may help explain why the BBC is defending Microsoft whilst also accepting staff from Microsoft UK to run the BBC. It is supposedly for taxpayers in the UK, who will pay to be brainwashed by Gates under the disguise of “unbiased” news not tainted by influence of money and instead sponsored largely by taxpayers. The channel/site will probably be doing more whitewash for Gates and for Microsoft, the company which broke the law, especially now that the “Gates Foundation has given BBC $20 million to “shape” stories on maternal, child health,” to quote one journalist who used to do PR-disguised-as-press for the Gates Foundation and has since then defected, perhaps realising that he was part of the problem, not the solution.

The Puget Sound Business Journal’s Clay Holtzman reports that the Gates Foundation made its largest ever donation to a media organization, the BBC, in December but didn’t publicize the $19.9 million grant.

More information can be found here. Why did they keep it secret? They must have been embarrassed.

“…the foundation serves as a lobbying slush fund to remove criticism of Microsoft, portray the abuser Gates as a hero, and also helps companies he invests in…”This is distorting and lobbying. It’s characterised as goodwill, but it actually helps Gates and his buddies sell patents, glorify themselves, and gag some more publications which will have to be nice to Gates and to Microsoft (this is where money comes from, why bite the hand that feeds?). As one reader put it the other day, the foundation serves as a lobbying slush fund to remove criticism of Microsoft, portray the abuser Gates as a hero, and also helps companies he invests in (by “shaping” coverage and pressuring politicians). Techrights takes this issue very seriously as it is no longer just about software; it is about ethics and it is about the death of the watchdog press. Kristi Heim, for example, usually boosted Gates agenda, but after pieces like this she got laid off. Nowadays, Gates can gladly eliminate voices he does not approve. Having paid many large publications to police their coverage, the editors are under pressure to secure those funding sources.

We will probably revisit the subject at a later date. Thankfully, as we have not had much time to keep track of the Gates Foundation (several site interviews coming and we are also uploading hundreds of TechBytes videos, which will become WebM), it seems like one of our editors might be able to help. So keep an eye on this site for good things to come.

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