EditorsAbout the SiteComes vs. MicrosoftUsing This Web SiteSite ArchivesCredibility IndexOOXMLOpenDocumentPatentsNovellNews DigestSite NewsRSS

10.02.11

Links 2/10/2011: More Android Tablets, Protesters — Not Bankers — Arrested at Occupy Wall Street

Posted in News Roundup at 11:44 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

    • Deja Dup, the backup simple and fast is served

      Today we talk about Deja Dup, the tool I used to make a backup of files before the upgrade of my Lubuntu at release 11.04 (most probably this arrive a little late, but the program is worth a blog post) . It is indeed a great software to create backups (so that it’s part of the standard packages in Fedora 13 and if everything goes in the right way it will also be added to Ubuntu 11.10), but the reason for the post is not just that, a large plus of Deja DUP is its extreme ease of use, it takes a couple of clicks to configure it and save our precious documents, even “in the cloud”.

    • Transmission 2.33 Review
    • Instructionals/Technical

    • Games

      • ZOD Engine – Game Review

        Today we’ll take a look at a remake of the classic game Z. Z was a real strategy pc game by Bitmap Brothers launched in 1996. It is about two armies of robots (red and blue) battling to conquer different planets.

        The remake it’s Zod Engine is an open source remake written in C++ using the SDL library and available for Linux/ e Windows.

        The Zod Engine is a multiplayer oriented game where as Z is a single player oriented game. Here you will be able to for the first time do things such as play games against multiple bot players, or play the original levels with friends helping you on the same team.

  • Distributions

    • New Releases

      • DoudouLinux Gondwana update 1

        For the peopel that don’t know what’s doudoulinux, this it is not a new distribution, but a Debian tailor-made for children, the designer Jean-Michael says that is usable by children two years old.

        And in fact by starting this live meta-distro you get a rich and colorful menu from which childrens can choose what to play or learn.

    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

      • Linux Mint Debian Update Pack 3 Released

        I noticed yesterday evening that one of my systems running Linux Mint 201109 Gnome was offering to install Update Pack 3. This morning I see the release announcement for it. This is going to be particularly good news for some users with very new hardware, because it upgrades to Linux kernel 3.0. On my HP dm1-3105ez, for example, this means that it now includes the driver for the Ralink 5390 WiFi adapter. Of course, there are a lot more changes and improvements in this update. If you have been running the normal distribution with Update Pack 2 installed, it will probably install something like 480 updates.

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Oneiric Ocelot (Ubuntu 11.10) Launching October 13th In A Shroud Of Mystery

            Lion and Windows 8 may be stealing their share (and then some) of the spotlight, but that’s not to say that other operating systems are just sitting on their laurels. Ubuntu, perhaps the most popular flavor of Linux for the consumer world, is about to release their newest version. Oneiric Ocelot is on the edge of launch, with Ubuntu 11.10 arriving October 13th.

          • Ice Cream Sandwich, Jaunty Jackalope, and other bizarre code names
          • Award-winning Airtime releases new packages for Ubuntu & Debian

            Airtime 1.9.4 has been released with new DEB packages for Ubuntu and Debian that keep installations automatically updated with the latest version. Airtime is Sourcefabric’s open source radio software for scheduling, automation and remote station management via any web browser. It can be downloaded free from www.airtime.sourcefabric.org

          • Ubuntu eyes speedier releases

            The pace of technology change has always been fast, but now even technology companies are feeling the pinch.

            There was a time when new software updates were released years after one another. Then that changed to releases that were released months apart. Today more and more software companies are putting their foot down and accelerating releases to an almost weekly basis.

            Google releases new Chrome versions faster than most people can keep up. Version 14 of the increasingly popular browser was released this week as a stable release. Already version 15 and 16 are well into development. By the end of the year both of those may have been released formally and version 18 will be in sight.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Teach your router new tricks with DD-WRT

      With each passing year, hardware devices grow less dependent on proprietary components and more reliant on open source technologies. Network routers are among the main beneficiaries of this trend, especially those that can support a variety of third-party open source firmware projects. One variant, DD-WRT has become a common out-of-the-box option for many routers, but also exists in stand-alone implementations that can be placed on routers that support it. Hundreds of routers can run DD-WRT firmware, including nearly 100 Linksys models alone.

    • Phones

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • ThinkPad Tablet holds its own against iPad in enterprise, says review

        Lenovo’s 10.1-inch ThinkPad Tablet is a reasonable alternative to the iPad 2 for enterprise users, says this eWEEK Labs review. This capable Android “Honeycomb” tablet offers business-focused extras like built-in enterprise software, full-size ports, and an effective digitizing pen.

      • India Gets a $35 Tablet: Is the U.S. Next?

        The Amazon Kindle Fire promises a lot of great features, including free cloud storage, an innovative Web browser and access to all of Amazon’s multimedia services, but the most eye-catching part of Wednesday’s announcement was the price point: The device will cost just $200, far less than the $500 base price of the iPad 2.

        That’s hardly the cheapest tablets can get, though. The Indian government has announced that a long-awaited $35 tablet intended for students will be coming out next month.

      • Sony Tablet S review

        It has taken two years for Sony to enter the tablet market, and in that time every manufacturer and their budget Taiwanese spin-off have colluded to fill the tablet market with dross.

      • 12 best Android tablets in the world

        Some have ten-inch screens, others seven, and there are big differences in battery life, processing power and on-board RAM. So while we wait for the likes of the Asus Eee Pad Slider, Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7 and Amazon Kindle Fire, let’s see what the current best tablets are…

Free Software/Open Source

  • Google open sources JavaScript testing tools

    Google is open sourcing one of its key JavaScript testing tools in an effort to get developers to speed up web applications.

    Google JS Test is used internally on the V8 JavaScript engine using in Chrome. Google has attributed much of the speed increases it claims for the browser to the performance of the V8 engine, and the company is clearly hoping this will improve matters further.

  • Google open sources JavaScript unit testing framework

    On the Open Source at Google blog, Google has announced the release of JS Test – the JavaScript unit testing framework that it uses in-house – as an open source project. The tests run on Google’s V8 JavaScript engine, the same open source JavaScript engine used in Google’s Chrome web browser. In developing JS Test, the creators of the framework were inspired by googletest, an open source framework for writing C++ unit tests.

  • X2Contacts Emerges From Stealth With Open Source Beta Release
  • A Few Sparks of Open-Source Virtualization

    VMware dominates the virtualization market and is likely to do so for some time. Why, then, does an intrepid band of tech firms continue to put stock in open-source technology?

  • Twitter Storm: Open Source Real-time Hadoop
  • The Apache Software Foundation Announces 10th Anniversary of Apache Lucene
  • Events

    • Looking to JavaOne 2011 with Apache expert Rob Davies

      JavaOne 2011 will be a novel experience for some, but Rob Davies is an old hand at the event. Last year was the first time in ten years that Davies, now CTO with FuseSource, missed the conference. He’s often been a speaker or presenter on Apache projects, especially Apache Camel, and other open source development issues. Still this year promises to be a new experience even for him, because last year was also the first year that Oracle had taken the reins of JavaOne.

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox 8 Beta arrives with Twitter search

        As expected following the arrival of the stable version of Firefox 7, Mozilla has announced the release of version 8.0 of Firefox into the web browser’s Beta Channel. Available for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux, Firefox 8 Beta is based on the Gecko 8 engine. According to the Releases wiki, it is scheduled to arrive in a stable production-ready form on 8 November.

      • Firefox Aurora for Android likes big buttons and cannot lie

        While some solid changes to JavaScript rendering and other under-the-hood code have landed in the latest Firefox developer’s build, the bulk of what’s new focuses on the second version of the recently introduced Android version of Aurora. Aurora 9 for Android includes some big interface changes designed to improve its usability on tablets, support for native camera apps, faster start-up times, and broader language support.

  • SaaS

    • Experimentation, Open Source and Big Data

      More than ever, today intelligent businesses are trying to make sense of millions of tweets, blog posts, comments, reviews, and other form for unstructured data. The obvious question becomes, “How?”

    • Revolution speeds stats on Hadoop clusters

      Revolution Analytics, the company that is extending R, the open source statistical programming language, with proprietary extensions, is making available a free set of extensions that allow its R engine to run atop Hadoop clusters.

  • Databases

    • Google VP backs open database processing tools

      Basho CEO Don Rippert suggests that Riak’s openness means that developers have been able to, “More easily build and maintain powerful business applications on top of our platform.” He also says that, “Riak has already proven its stability, ability to scale and provide absolute fault-tolerance in a highly distributed deployment.”

  • Education

  • Healthcare

    • Open Source and EHRs: A proven reality and invaluable opportunity

      The marriage between open source technology and electronic health records is at first blush, greeted by many with skepticism regarding robustness and efficacy. In truth, persistent myths obscure an intriguing reality: Open source EHR systems are not only possible but already in place.

  • Semi-Open Source

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

  • Public Services/Government

    • NASA’s open source space applications challenge

      NASA, the US space agency, is organising an international open source application competition next year which it hopes will deliver a new generation of software to address global issues. The agency plans to liaise with other space agencies to create the International Space Apps Challenge that will encourage “scientists and concerned citizens” to create new solutions using open technology, open data and open source.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • WMMNA: Open Source Biological Art

      Hackteria is a collection of Open Source Biological Art Projects started in 2009 by Andy Gracie, Marc Dusseiller and Yashas Shetty. They have since been joined by Anthony Hall, Urs Gaudenz, and a growing community of people keen on making experiments and developing their own projects in the field of biological art and science.

    • The New World of Open-Source Mentoring

      Kathleen Lim wanted to move up the learning curve. At 24, she had just been promoted to billing operations manager at Box.net, a $10.7 million cloud-computing company in Palo Alto, California. It would be her first management job at her first postcollege employer. Box.net also wanted her to strengthen its collections department, not previously a focus. “I was looking for guidance, from best practices to how to structure my team,” says Lim. “And there was this curiosity about what else is out there. How do other organizations do it?”

    • Open-source R&D advocates prep $150M cancer drug project

      After watching the cost of drug research escalate year after year with only a small annual crop of new drug approvals to point to, a number of the Big Pharma companies have begun to question all the fundamentals of the grossly inefficient game. And one of the biggest assumptions–that you have to keep your drug IP carefully sequestered behind a legal firewall of patents–will be put to the test by a new project being hatched by some of the leaders of the open-source research movement in biopharma.

  • Programming

    • Engine Yard’s PaaS adds support for JRuby

      Engine Yard, a San Francisco-based company that provides a Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) solution for Rails applications, has announced that developers can now use JRuby, the Java implementation of the Ruby scripting language, in the Engine Yard cloud. Other supported Ruby implementations include CRuby (Ruby MRI), which was written by Ruby creator Yukihiro Matsumoto, and Rubinius. It is no surprise that support for JRuby has been added, as three of the four main JRuby developers are employed by Engine Yard.

    • A Look at Phabricator: Facebook’s Web-Based Open Source Code Collaboration Tool
  • Standards/Consortia

Leftovers

  • Finance

    • Hundreds of Occupy Wall Street protesters arrested

      More than 700 people from the Occupy Wall Street protest movement have been arrested on New York’s City’s Brooklyn Bridge, police say.

    • Occupy Wall Street protests grow amid Radiohead rumour

      An estimated 2,000 people have gathered in Lower Manhattan, New York, for the largest protest yet under the banner Occupy Wall Street.

      Demonstrators marched on New York’s police headquarters to protest against arrests and police behaviour.

    • SEC finds ‘apparent failures’ at credit rating agencies

      The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has discovered “apparent failures” at 10 credit rating agencies.

      It said it was concerned that the agencies – including Standard & Poor’s (S&P) and Moody’s – were not making timely and accurate disclosures or managing conflicts of interest.

    • Wall Street’s unwelcome warriors hang on to protest

      All are anti-Wall Street protesters, but with barricades and swarms of police officers in front of the New York Stock Exchange the closest they can get to their target is Liberty Street, a good three streets away.

      An online activist group called Adbusters organised the gathering and the word spread through social media.

    • In pictures: New York mass arrests

American Duopoly (Apple and Microsoft) Fights Korea With Patents

Posted in Apple, Asia, GNU/Linux, Google, Microsoft, Patents at 11:22 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Seoul besieged again

Seoul Plaza

Summary: A look at Apple’s and Microsoft’s relationship with Samsung (one of the two major Korean companies in this area) and what we can learn from it

SAMSUNG is a hardware giant located at a nation that thrives in production of goods. Samsung is about an order of magnitude larger than Apple, at least in terms of workforce. Not so long ago Samsung surpassed Apple in terms of certain sales and became the largest distributors of Android (even if taxed by Microsoft), amongst other things. It painted a large target on Samsung’s behind, so Microsoft wanted more “royalties” and Apple sought embargoes one country at a time (fortunately there is no global patent system, at least not yet). The strategy has not been particularly useful to Apple; ever since it started suing Android companies using patents (starting with HTC) there has been a great deal of blowback, even from US-based carriers. Apple started alienating too many existing and potential partners, which would be harmful in the long term. At the end of last month we saw Apple taking a small step back (withdrawing patent claims) and now it is complaining about Samsung’s patents. Apple got a little scared and removed patent allegations, so now it seems to be more afraid of Samsung’s own patents. Just remember who started all this confrontation. Apple started it, whereupon pundits said that Apple must have been out of its mind. Some days ago it was reported that Apple significantly reduced its iPad orders; maybe Samsung just won’t help make these. By suing its own producers, Apple made a foolish decision. Microsoft took a different approach with its longtime partner Samsung and to cite Muktware, it did not try to get ridiculous trademarks or manufacture fake 'evidence' to block Samsung’s products. Instead Microsoft tried turning Android/Samsung devices into its own. Here is an article to be aware of:

Apple has been misuing its deep pockets and abusing the legal system to weaken competition. There is good news for competitors, the USPTO has rejected Apple’s trademark claims over ‘multi-touch’. Apple applied for the trademark in 2007 when it launched its iPhone. The USPTO rejected the trademark on the basis that the term is too generic or broad. Apple also holds a trademark on AppStore, a term used for app stores. There is an ongoing legal battle between Apple and Amazon over the use of this genetic term.

Apple is not much of a producing company. It’s a design, marketing, and branding company. This is why it tries so hard to restrict use of vocabulary, product appearance, etc. Apple even hired Viagra experts for this task. The manufacturers of “Apple”-branded products could just do it equally well themselves, a lot more economically too.

“The scenario makes is rather obvious that software patents are a major danger to coders.”Then there is Microsoft, which used to be a monopoly expert (removing choice from the market by crime and underhanded tactics) and has recently become more of a patents aggressor because people fought for choice (more on that in an earlier post). Microsoft is still trying to figure out how to make a profit from other people’s work and in the process it resorts to racketeering, collusion, secret deals, and old partners like Samsung (interesting take), which are all just a convenient way to get around having to face Google. This whole situation is fascinating because, assuming Microsoft can turn patents into its major cash cow, the market for software development will just die a little more. It will become a market of patents, just as Microsoft’s patent troll once envisioned it. Rather than write software (code) people will write words and then extort everyone who writes code implementing an abstract description of it. The scenario makes is rather obvious that software patents are a major danger to coders.

In a truly bizarre article whose headline resembles old propaganda for software patents (“Software Developers Must Be Properly Rewarded”) the case is being made based on the Samsung-Microsoft ‘deal’. If this illustrated anything at all, it is that software patents have absolutely zero value to Korea. It is only secret trade agreements that can somehow make Korea fall on its sword and fall for software patents.

Samsung is now paying Microsoft for something it never made, not even in code, passing the cost to customers, who will in turn reward Microsoft rather than Google. How does that encourage software development? The developers are not being paid.

To use the words of one blogger:

Microsoft has a large advantage in its quest to go after and collect royalties from those that it deems necessary as a direct threat. Microsoft has risen up with full force against Android, just after Windows Phone 7 started to appear. Coincidence? I don’t think so. Most recently it was announced that Microsoft had an “agreement” with Samsung, yet another manufacturer of Android devices. This agreement? It’s been rumoured that Samsung will need to pay close to $5 to Microsoft for each Android phone manufactured and sold. And so this is one side of the blade that Microsoft is swinging all around. Microsoft is using its vast array of patents to frighten phone manufacturers into paying royalties, in order to avoid being sued. Ingenious? Yes, because there’s another side of the blade that didn’t occur to me until recently. Samsung, being a manufacturer of Android devices, could manufacture devices for other operating systems as well, including Windows. Why not? If Microsoft is going to charge Samsung a set fee for each Android phone, yet allow Samsung to manufacture and sell Windows phones with no fees, what incentive would there be for Samsung to continue manufacturing Android devices? Not too many at the rate things are going. The only thing keeping Samsung interested in Android is the market demand for devices that run the Android OS. So Microsoft has two sides to their blade, they swing it to either side and they win. And Google? They seem to be defenseless at the moment while vendors of its software are being bullied by Microsoft.

This is an observation we made over 4 years ago, just after the signing of the Novell deal. The patent deal between Samsung and Microsoft is also over 4 years ago. This is helping non-practising ‘industries’, making developers devalued while “Increas[ing] in demand for Trained Patent Professionals” as this new article puts it:

In India, software is protected under the Copyright Act and not the Patent Act (as in many western countries). However, Indian IT companies have filed patent applications for their software in other parts of the world and these companies continue to seek non-software patents in India. Many of them have also filed business method patents in U.S. As Indian IT companies restructure their operations for high value service offerings, they are focused on innovation and intellectual property generation and protection in India and abroad.

The passage of jobs from engineers to lawyers (who serve a protectionist agenda) is a sad reminder of a society where the rich get richer and smart, honest people get thrown aside. The rise of terms like “Intellectual Property” in the news tells us that there is a strong push to indoctrinate the public all across the world to “respect IP”. Cablegate is full of examples that demonstrate it (we shall dive into more of that later this year).

Microsoft to Struggle to Force People to Buy Windows

Posted in Europe, GNU/Linux, Microsoft at 10:26 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Poor puppies!

Puppy

Summary: Action in France shows Microsoft’s grip on OEMs eroding, leaving room for GNU/Linux instead

JUST over a week after Microsoft got caught trying to use the boot sequence to boot the competition out of the way (eliminating the ‘curse’ of competing, e.g. with excuses and lies), there is still coverage about it and possibly legal action. Microsoft is extremely unlikely to get away with it, which is why we didn’t feel the need to cover it all that much. Several years ago we wrote about French OEM-related actions — public protests striving to stop the forced sales of Microsoft Windows along with new computers. Although not much happened since these actions were reported some years ago (we covered the issue in early site posts about OEMs), it was clear that Microsoft already struggled to sell the story about lack of choice being of benefit to the customer.

AFUL and the FFII took further action some months ago and brought the issue to EU politicians who did express some interest in taking real action. Whether related to this or not, there is a breakthrough in France.

“France getting ready to eliminate forced purchase of OS,” writes someone in USENET about this new report which says: “Amendments to France’s draft law on ‘reinforcing consumers’ rights, protection and information’ have been proposed with the purpose of putting an end to bundled hardware/software sales, the French advocacy organisation for free software and open standards APRIL announced on 27 September 2011.

“AFUL and the FFII took further action some months ago and brought the issue to EU politicians who did express some interest in taking real action.”“Bundled hardware/software sales, APRIL explained, consists of an anti-competitive commercial practice that prevents consumers from purchasing a computer without having to pay for pre-installed software. The public discussions on the draft law at the National Assembly (the lower house of Parliament) started on Wednesday 28 September 2011.

The poster cites Cablegate and asks: “What is Microsoft, a third rate software company, to do but contact the US embassy and complain so that the US embassy can go trolling the French on behalf illegal Microsoft industrial support.

“Nothing is too sacred for Microsoft including interfering in the self determination of the French nation through use of US diplomatic services.”

“Best news I’ve read in a while, but then this Bill still has to pass, and you can be guaranteed Sweaty [Ballmer] is filling his grease gun and violin case as we speak,” writes Homer. “Assuming France can resist Microsoft’s inevitable “lobbying”, this is good news for the whole of Europe, not just France, since even if the rest of Europe doesn’t adopt the same policy then we can all just buy our PCs from France – Windows Tax-free.

“If the PCs landed in France first, then it can be shipped to anywhere in EU by a third party and make a heck of a saving when sold in markets and and small shops,” wrote the original poster again. “The thing that is most worrying that could scupper this legislation is still what the US diplomats are doing behind everyone’s back acting on the orders of Microsoft to interfere in French self determination.”

Bristol Council Claims it Chose Microsoft for ‘Security’

Posted in Europe, Free/Libre Software, Microsoft at 10:24 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Bristol coat of arms

Summary: The laughing stock of the security world is said to have been favoured because it bought some expensive certifications

A FEW months ago we wrote about a bizarre dodge from Free software [1, 2], which happened after everything seemed finalised. No proper explanation was given and those involved were questioned about the sudden change of heart (with the suspicion that something nefarious had happened). Only months later, under persistent pressure from the public and from investigative journalists, we finally see this apparent excuse, which goes like this: “It has been considering a number of open source email solutions, but Bristol City Council confirmed to eWEEK Europe UK that none of them have the necessary government security accreditation to enable the council to use them.”

Is this the same reasoning which they gave to those companies? Is this an afterthought? An excuse? Being blessed by some expensive process (that carries no liability either) does not actually make the software more secure. It is not as though when Microsoft software gets cracked the certificate plays any role and somehow gives another target to point the finger at. This smells like dishonesty and since the White Houses uses Drupal and GNU/Linux, this claim holds no water, either.

There are many new examples of insecure proprietary software, one of which came last week from Novell on Windows. To quote:

“Unfortunately, a problem has been discovered with this file, which can potentially result in a system crash in certain circumstances.

The problem has been fixed, and the Client software has been re-released as Novell Client 2 SP1 for Windows (IR9a), available at:

http://download.novell.com/Download?buildid=rSUN_TTVSf0~

Please remove the (IR9) build, and use the (IR9a) version instead. We regret the inconvenience.

Thank you.”

How would certification have resolved such an issue? It wouldn’t have. In practice, Microsoft software and proprietary software are not secure, they are just more secretive and expensive.

The tale of Bristol has been followed quite closely by Mark Ballard, who writes about excuses such as the above (excluding all Free software in one fell swoop, pretending that Microsoft is the only secure option) in the following text:

Bristol City Council’s open source push has suffered another series of set-backs that point a finger of blame at CESG, the cyber security arm of government intelligence unit GCHQ.

Leaders at the local authority claim that the need for CESG security certification of e-mail systems effectively means the council has no choice but to buy Microsoft.

Senior Cabinet Office IT leaders have been asked to help as Bristol’s faltering open source strategy, still showing little progress after a year, highlighted problems besetting the coalition government’s own open source policy.

What a sham. As many other governments use Free software quite happily, this concern has little or no validity. It is a good excuse though — like one an employer uses to reject a candidate for reasons that are not technical/skills-related but qualifications-related.

In other news of interest, “U.K. Liberal Democrats urge open source,” but given the story of Bristol it seems like lip service. From the article:

The British government should ensure it owns all software code it pays for and should share that code for free within the public sector, says a policy paper adopted Sept. 20 by the Liberal Democrats party, the minority partner of the two-party ruling coalition forming the United Kingdom’s government.

In addition, the paper urges the British government to embrace collaborative software development along the lines of models on display at GitHub, an open source software project hosting website.

Someone should tell the Lib Dems that Bristol rejects British firms that offer Free software in favour of proprietary software from a foreign company with criminal history — software that the British public overpays for and has no control over.

Australia at Software Patents Risk

Posted in Australia, Patents at 10:09 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Bull fighting

Summary: The battle against software developers in Australia rages on, most recently with debates over software patents

THERE IS an important new development in the continent of Australia, which has been a key location/battleground involving the patentability of software [1, 2, 3] while trilateral elites seek to take the patent system global, imposing their patent monopoly on every single human on this small planet.

Many patents in the US impede free thought and expression, not creation. The restrictions typically have a 20-year lifespan. According to this new article, “Australia reviews tier-two software patents” and to be more specific:

The Federal Government may consider excluding software from its second-tier patent system to better align Australian patents with those of trading partners like Japan and Korea.

In February, Innovation Minister Kim Carr asked the Advisory Council on Intellectual Property (ACIP) to review the innovation patent system, which replaced the petty patent system almost eleven years ago.

Innovation patents required a lower degree of inventiveness than standard patents but were granted for a maximum of eight years, instead of the standard 20.

In an issues paper released last month (pdf), ACIP raised concerns that the innovation patent system may be incongruous with the intentions of the Government’s ‘Raising The Bar’ reforms.

.
We wrote about Korea’s patent situation earlier on and we also showed how Japan pressures China to become a slave of Western (or Japanese) patent monopolies. There is clearly a war of dominance going on and it is waged in the back rooms by people in suits (they are not scientists). We shall write more about Korea in the next post.

RSS 64x64RSS Feed: subscribe to the RSS feed for regular updates

Home iconSite Wiki: You can improve this site by helping the extension of the site's content

Home iconSite Home: Background about the site and some key features in the front page

Chat iconIRC Channels: Come and chat with us in real time

New to This Site? Here Are Some Introductory Resources

No

Mono

ODF

Samba logo






We support

End software patents

GPLv3

GNU project

BLAG

EFF bloggers

Comcast is Blocktastic? SavetheInternet.com



Recent Posts