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01.20.12

Links 20/1/2012: Linux Survey, Linux 3.3 RC1

Posted in News Roundup at 9:47 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Server

    • Poll: Linux’s big data guzzling worries melt away

      Concerns about using Linux on servers to crunch huge data workloads are evaporating, according a survey.

    • Despite whacking Windows, Linux gets too little respect

      After more than a decade of Linux vendors trying to grow into the enterprise — and Red Hat, the poster child for Linux, approaching $1 billion in annual revenue — it’s easy to presume that Linux is pervasive in businesses. It is, but as the Linux Foundation’s enterprise survey finds, there are still barriers to overcome. The survey also shows new data showing Windows — not Unix — as the primary operating system being migrated to Linux.

    • Linux Continues to Grow in the Enterprise – Is Anyone Surprised?

      Nearly every year that I’ve been writing about Linux, I’ve seen at least one report (if not more) showing that Linux adoption is on the rise.

      The latest example came this week from the Linux Foundation. Yes, their data is self-serving, but the trend is clear and it has been for the last decade.

  • Audiocasts/Shows

  • Kernel Space

    • Linux 3.3-1 out – merge window closed
    • Responses To The Linux Desktop Security Problem

      Just about 24 hours ago I spread the news about a major vulnerability in X.Org / XKB that makes it trivial for anyone with physical access to a Linux-based desktop system to easily bypass any screensaver lock whether you’re using GNOME, KDE, or most other desktop environments. So what’s changed in the past day?

      Well, many people have confirmed this problem is widespread if running X.Org Server 1.11 or newer. This is affecting users right now of Gentoo Linux, Arch Linux, Debian Wheezy, Fedora 16, users of the Xorg-Precise testing stack for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, and other distributions updating their X stack in the past few months. It doesn’t matter if you’re using GNOME or KDE or one of the lighter-weight alternatives like Xfce. With a few hits at the keyboard (e.g. CTRL+ALT+Keypad-Multiply) the screensaver lock is rendered useless.

    • Download Linux Kernel 3.3 RC1 Now

      Linus Torvalds announced last evening, January 19th, that the first Release Candidate version of the upcoming Linux kernel 3.3 is available for download and testing.

    • Graphics Stack

      • Bettering Radeon Gallium3D Performance With PCI-E 2.0

        While it will not take you up to the speeds of the Catalyst driver, besides the 2D color tiling patches, there are a few other outstanding features not yet enabled-by-default in the open-source Radeon graphics driver that can yield some performance boosts. One of these other features is enabling PCI Express 2.0 support within the Radeon DRM.

      • Bumblebee Has Tumbleweed For NVIDIA Optimus On Linux

        Bumblebee 3.0 “Tumbleweed” has been released as an updated (and unofficial) way of handling NVIDIA Optimus technology under Linux.

        Optimus, the NVIDIA technology that’s becoming found on an increasing number of notebooks as a means of dynamically enabling a discrete GPU on the notebook for maximum performance only when needed and to be turned off otherwise to conserve power, has been troubling on Linux since its inception. NVIDIA doesn’t officially support Optimus under Linux, so the Linux development community is left to do what they can to support this growingly-popular feature.

  • Desktop Environments

    • GNOME Desktop

      • GTK+ 3.4 For Multi-Touch May Come In GNOME 3.4

        Now that X Input 2.2 with Multi-Touch is merged into X.Org Server 1.12, which will be released by early March, it’s time for the tool-kit and application developers to take advantage of the support. It looks like GNOME will be on the ball this time around with GTK+ 3.4 looking to handle multi-touch.

      • Basic Chemistry on the GNOME Desktop

        I’ve realized I’ve missed out on a huge area of computational science—chemistry. Many packages exist for doing chemistry on your desktop. This article looks at a general tool called avogadro. It can do computations of energy and gradient values. Additionally, it can do analysis of molecular systems, interface to GAMESS and import and export from and to several file formats. There also are lots of options for generating pretty pictures of your totally new molecule that you hope will revolutionize the chemical industry.

      • Mutter 3.3.4 Released
  • Distributions

    • New Releases

      • Toorox 01.2012 “GNOME”

        A new version of the “GNOME” – Edition of Toorox has been finished featuring the recent stable GNOME 3.2.1. Some gnome-shell-extensions has been added to give the user the old fashion of a window panel and a classic app-menu. The Linux kernel 3.1.6-gentoo as basis and also included: Xorg-Server 1.11.3, Mesa 7.11.2, LibreOffice 3.4.3, Thunderbird 9.0.1, Firefox 9.0.1, Wine 1.3.37

    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu TV is Coming. Will it Find Success Among the Masses?

            By now you’ve probably heard Canonical’s big announcement out of CES 2012: Ubuntu is coming to your TV (or so Canonical hopes). But what’s received less attention amid all the fanfare is the role of Unity, the Linux desktop environment on which the new TV interface is based. Since Ubuntu TV could have important, if surprising, ramifications for Unity, here are some observations to keep in mind.

            For the sake of civility, I won’t get back into the debate on Unity’s merits relative to GNOME Shell, KDE or any other Linux desktop environment. Suffice it to say, though, that — as we’ve seen in abundant clarity here on this site — Canonical’s decision to replace GNOME with Unity was more than a little contentious for many users.

          • Out of the Gate, Ubuntu TV Is Drawing a Mix of Criticism and Praise

            At the CES show in Las Vegas earlier this month, Canonical showed off Ubuntu TV, as we reported here. You can take a gander at it at the Ubuntu TV site, via a video. It’s a new interface that integrates television and movie content on an open source platform that Canonical hopes will win developers over. The interface is based on Unity, the controversial interface that many Ubuntu users have wrestled with. In the days since the arrival of Ubuntu TV, some interesting hands-on reports and criticisms have arrived, but there is no question that this will be one of the big open source stories of 2012.

          • Three Ways to Tweak Ubuntu Linux’s Unity Desktop

            The Unity desktop environment that was recently made default in Ubuntu Linux has been nothing if not controversial, as has the alternative GNOME 3.

          • Ubuntu 10.04 Lives! Go Back To The Future With Lucid Lynx

            Does Oneiric have you down? Is your hardware not up to snuff? Well, what are you going to do about it? Ubuntu 10.04 is almost 2 years old now, but you can teach it the electric slide even if all it know how to do is the funky chicken. Here is a short and simple guide for bringing Ubuntu 10.04 into 2012.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Raspberry Pi demos Model B computer’s AirPlay capabilities (video)

      Just a few days after announcing that production of its Model B Linux computer is underway, Raspberry Pi has now unveiled a preview of what its single board device can do when combined with AirPlay. In a video published this week, a Raspberry Pi developer demonstrated how to stream content from an iPad to the ARM-based Model B, using only an HDMI-equipped TV and an AirPlay app. It’s as seamless as dancing cows are beautiful. Still no word yet on when this $35 will begin shipping, but in the meantime, be sure to check out the demo video, after the break.

    • Phones

      • Android

        • To Clean Up Android Smartphones, Take A Cue From PCs

          My Android phone has something in common with my desktop PC. It’s riddled with junk. Apps I didn’t install and can’t get rid of, “skins” that make my phone slower and less stable, and who knows what else—all contributing to the fractured headache that has become life with Android.

          The devices we’re forced to use feel like textbooks that have been through five different sets of grubby hands before we even use them.

          With my PC, it wasn’t so bad. A few hours of uninstalling and I had all that factory-loaded fluff out of the way. But my phone was another, much more painful story. I say it’s high time we were offered some choices in this regard.

        • INSIDE Secure Introduces Open NFC Stack for Google Android 4.0
    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Ultrabooks, Tablets and the Space Between

        Ultrabooks may be targeting part of the tablet market, but using a tablet is a different experience than using a thin notebook computer. Meanwhile, convertible and hybrid form factors are gaining traction, and accessories can be used to add full-sized keyboards to tablet computers. Is there a form factor on which the mobile computer market is converging?

Free Software/Open Source

  • The making of open-source software

    Nicole Kobie reveals how software such as Ubuntu, LibreOffice and Firefox is made – and how you can get involved

  • 10 New Open Source Projects You May Not Know About

    With so many open source software projects under way at any given moment, it can be difficult to keep tabs on all that’s going on.

  • ForgeRock Updates Java-Based OpenIDM

    ForgeRock, the company formed last year by former Sun Microsystems executives to steward the open-source access management and federation server platform project known as OpenSSO, has released version 2.0 of its OpenIDM identity management offering.

  • Google Sky Map development ends, app goes open source

    If you’re a fan of Google’s augmented reality astronomy app Google Sky Map, I’ve got good news and bad news for you. Google announced that major development on the app has ended, so there will be no more major official releases from the company. On the plus side, they’ve decided to release the open-source code for Sky Map, so given enough developer interest it should be around for quite some time.

  • Events

    • Friday at the Southern California Linux Expo

      BUILD A CLOUD DAY: Mark Hinkle leads Build a Cloud Day, an all day session, in the Carmel room beginning at 9 a.m. The all-day session will teach users how to build and manage a cloud computing environment using free and open source software. The program is designed to expose attendees to the concepts and best practices around deploying cloud computing infrastructure.

      JUJU CHARM SCHOOL: Jorge Castro and Clint Bynum host a session in the Marina room at 2:30 p.m. It’s an event where juju experts answer questions about writing your own juju charms. The intended audience are people who deploy software and want to contribute charms to the wider devops community to make deploying in the public and private cloud easy.

  • Web Browsers

    • Chrome

      • Hands on: building an HTML5 photo booth with Chrome’s new webcam API

        Experimental support for WebRTC has landed in the Chrome developer channel. The feature is available for testing when users launch the browser with the –enable-media-stream flag. We did some hands-on testing and used some of the new JavaScript APIs to make an HTML5 photo booth.

  • Public Services/Government

  • Openness/Sharing

Leftovers

  • U.S. losing high-tech jobs, R&D dominance to Asia

    U.S. companies are locating more of their research and development operations overseas, and Asian countries are rapidly increasing investments in their own science and technology economies, the National Science Board (NSB) reported this week.

  • Two Years After “Citizens United,” Amending the Constitution is Essential
  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • More than Half of the EU with Restrictions to Net access. What will Neelie Kroes Do?

      Paris, January 20th, 2012 – La Quadrature du Net sent EU regulators evidence from the platform Respect My Net that in more than 14 EU Member States, telecoms operators engage in illegitimate restrictions of their customers’ Internet access. Such evidence shows that EU Commissioner Neelie Kroes’ “laisser-faire” approach on Net neutrality amounts to allowing operators to blatantly violate their users’ freedom of communication. Now is the time for the EU Commission to start working on stringent measures to enforce Net neutrality all across Europe.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • DOJ Gives Its Opinion On SOPA By Unilaterally Shutting Down ‘Foreign Rogue Site’ Megaupload… Without SOPA/PIPA

        If you’ve been paying attention to the MPAA/US Chamber of Commerce/RIAA claims about why they need PIPA/SOPA, a key argument is that they need it to go after these “foreign rogue sites” that cannot be reached under existing US law. Among the most prominent sites often talked about is Megaupload — which accounts for a huge percentage of the “rogue site traffic” that the US Chamber of Commerce and other bill supporters love to cite. However, it certainly appears that the US Justice Department and ICE don’t think they need any new law to go after people in foreign countries over claims of criminal copyright infringement. As lots of folks are currently digesting, the Justice Department, along with ICE, have shut down the site and arrested many of the principles (with the help of New Zealand law enforcement) and charged them with massive amounts of criminal copyright infringement.

      • EU Politicians Send Letter To US Congress Warning Of ‘Extraterritorial Effects’ Of SOPA And PIPA

        Since SOPA and PIPA are US bills, the focus has naturally been on the US response to them – notably in the list of major sites that participated in the blackout, or who have otherwise protested against the proposed legislation. But it’s important to remember that the whole rationale of these new laws is tackling copyright infringement outside the US.

      • McConnell Calls for Senate Dems to Shelve PIPA, Study and Resolve ‘Serious Issues’ With the Bill
      • The Internet Strikes Back: Anonymous Takes Down DOJ.gov, RIAA, MPAA Sites To Protest Megaupload Seizure

        I’ll have a more detailed look at the Megaupload indictment tomorrow (there are some really ridiculous claims in there, but also some evidence of bad actions on the part of Mega, which isn’t too surprising). However, even if you’re 100% positive that Megaupload was a bad player in the space, you have to question both the timing and the process of completely taking down the site/company the day after practically the entire internet rose up to protest the threat of similar takedowns under SOPA/PIPA. For them not to think the reaction would be fast and furious shows (yet again) just how incredibly, ridiculously, out of touch with the internet the DC establishment is.

      • Joe Biden Picked An Interesting Day To Raise Money From Silicon Valley…

        Where was VP Joe Biden during yesterday’s big SOPA/PIPA blackout? Apparently he was cruising around Silicon Valley for cash from tech CEOs. Biden, of course, has been seen as the White House’s key man in supporting Hollywood efforts to pass ever more draconian copyright laws. One would hope that the various tech CEOs he met with spent some time showing him how their websites were blacked out in protest. From the article linked above, Biden spoke about a variety of topics during prepared remarks… but said nothing about SOPA/PIPA (or, at least the reporter didn’t mention it). Given the White House’s existing statements concerning the bills, he’d probably be limited in what he can say anyway… but is this a sign that Biden might finally realize that his previous actions were so damaging to the part of the economy that is developing innovation and actually creating jobs?

      • Crowd Cheers Loudly As All Four GOP Candidates Say No To SOPA/PIPA
      • US internet laws could be used to attack NZ websites

        As the British Wikipedia site goes dark for 24 hours to protest American internet piracy laws, web experts are warning the laws could be used to attack New Zealand websites.

        Wikipedia plans to go dark on Wednesday, US time, and Google and other websites are also planning protests to voice their concern over legislation in the US Congress intended to crack down on online piracy.

      • Brad Feld: Why SOPA and PIPA must be stopped

        In the last 30 days, there has been a loud and clear backlash against two bills – SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) and PIPA (Protect IP Act). SOPA is the House version of the bill; PIPA is the Senate version of the bill. For starters, I must emphasize that I agree that online piracy is a real problem — and, as an author, I deal with it all of the time — and that it is important to look for appropriate solutions.

      • SOPA and PIPA laws would affect Canadians if passed
      • Michael Geist’s website went dark to protest U.S. restrictions on Internet

        Yesterday my website, michaelgeist.ca, went dark for 12 hours with thousands of posts replaced by a single page warning against proposed U.S. legislation called the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect Intellectual Property Act (PIPA). My site was not alone as the online protest included some of the Internet’s most popular sites, including Wikipedia, Craigslist and Reddit. It is nice to be in good company, but taking an academic site committed to open access to information offline on a day when thousands came visiting anxious to learn more about copyright and the Internet was not a decision to be taken lightly.

      • SOPA Opera

        SOPA is a culmination of years of corruption orchestrated by the copyright cartel. The victim is the public, whose elected officials became more concerned about campaign funding from Hollywood than about justice.)

      • You Moved Mountains

        On January 18th, 13 million of us took the time to tell Congress to protect free speech rights on the internet. Hundreds of millions, maybe a billion, people all around the world saw what we did on Wednesday. See the amazing numbers here and tell everyone what you did.

        This was unprecedented. Your activism may have changed the way people fight for the public interest and basic rights forever.

        The MPAA (the lobby for big movie studios which created these terrible bills) was shocked and seemingly humbled. “‘This was a whole new different game all of a sudden,’ MPAA Chairman and former Senator Chris Dodd told the New York Times. ‘[PIPA and SOPA were] considered by many to be a slam dunk.’”

      • MegaUpload: Copyright Industry At War Against Monsters of its Own Making

        The takedown1 of MegaUpload from the Internet shows a global attempt to control and censor the Internet, as illustrated by PIPA2 in the US, and the ACTA3 agreement worldwide. Conducted outside of the US territory and without even a court ruling, this case makes clear how disproportionate and violent is the war waged in the name of an obsolete copyright regime.

        The huge profits made by the editors of MegaUpload through the centralizing of copyrighted works are barely defensible. MegaUpload is a direct by-product of the war conducted against peer-to-peer non-market sharing between individuals. After promoting legislation that boosted centralized sharing sites, the same lobbies now declare a war against them.

      • SOPA/PIPA protestors finally heard; votes delayed indefinitely
      • Department of Justice shutdown of rogue site MegaUpload shows SOPA is unnecessary

        A strange confluence of events brought the question of how to deal with online piracy to the forefront of the American consciousness this week. Protests against the anti-piracy bills, SOPA and PIPA, were the major news of the day on Wednesday, with blackouts of big sites across the web. The very next day, MegaUpload, one of the largest sites allegedly enabling piracy on the internet, was shut down as the result of a two-year FBI investigation.

      • SOPA Protests Sway Congress: 31 Opponents Yesterday, 122 Now

        Yesterday the Internet cried out in protest of SOPA-PIPA, and congress heard us loud and clear. At the beginning of Janaury 18th, there were 80 members of congress who supported the legislation, and 31 opponents. Now, just 63 support SOPA-PIPA, and opposition has surged to 122, according to ProPublica.

      • Sopa and Pipa bills postponed in US Congress

        The US Congress has halted debate on two contested anti-online piracy bills.

      • PIPA Vote Canceled, Senator Leahy Not Amused

        PIPA is crumbling, Senator Harry Reid has announced that next Tuesday’s vote on the Protect-IP Act has been canceled. He is now talking compromise, saying, “There is no reason that the legitimate issues raised by many about this bill cannot be resolved.” And, “We made good progress through the discussions we’ve held in recent days, and I am optimistic that we can reach a compromise in the coming weeks.”

      • ACTA

        • Will the EP Development committee betray billions of people?

          Regarding compatibility with current EU law, the acquis, see our FFII note on the Legal Service’s Opinion on ACTA. Only by consistently overlooking known issues it is possible to claim that ACTA is compatible with current EU legislation.

Links – quick SOPA/PIPA update, Hanford, UEFI, and Apple owns your work.

Posted in Site News at 5:08 pm by Guest Editorial Team

Reader’s Picks

  • Linux Foundation Report Shows Growing Linux Adoption Rates in the Enterprise

    Management is interfering less and techs at big businesses want their freedom and performance as much as anyone else.

  • Why UEFI secure boot is difficult for Linux

    I wrote about the technical details of supporting the UEFI secure boot specification with Linux. Despite me pretty clearly saying that this was ignoring issues of licensing and key distribution and the like, people are now using it to claim that Linux could support secure boot with minimal effort. … We can write the code required to support secure boot on Linux in a minimal amount of time – in fact, most of it’s now done. But significant practical problems remain, and so far we have no workable solutions for any of them.

    The key distribution looks like the nastiest of the issues. If there’s no certifying authority and you can’t run without signed code, everyone will have to sign everything themselves before installation or distributions will have to carry binaries for each and every key. The practical dificulties of “custom mode” are also a significant concern. The Register’s summary raises the ARM lockout but repeats Microsoft’s talking points about lockdowns magically making Windows safe and stable.

  • Hardware

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • NYPD and Pentagon to place mobile scanners on the streets on NYC

      According to MIT’s Technology Review, the THz waves used by the scanners “unzip double-stranded DNA, creating bubbles in the double strand that could significantly interfere with processes such as gene expression and DNA replication.

      This is a version of the dreaded porno scanners used in airports. The thing can undress you at 16 feet.

    • The nationwide repression of mass protests in the US was accompanied by a nationwide attack on news reporters.

      If police forces nationwide seem to be taking similar steps against the Occupy movement, it’s not a coincidence: Police chiefs in cities with occupations going on have been getting together to discuss strategies and tactics, including via conference calls organized by the Police Executive Research Forum, an association of law-enforcement officials.

      Reporters of all political stripes around the country were kept away from protests, harassed and arrested by thuggish and taunting police officers. Some were pepper sprayed and injured.

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • Problems plague cleanup at Hanford nuclear waste site

      several senior engineers cited design problems that could bring the plant’s operations to a halt before much of the waste is treated. Their reports have spurred new technical reviews and raised official concerns about the risk of a hydrogen explosion or uncontrolled nuclear reaction inside the plant. … “the design processes are cut short, the safety analyses are cut short, and the oversight is cut short. … We have to stop now and figure out how to do this right, before we move any further.”

      Criticality issues at this stage are shocking.

  • Finance

    • Everything You Need to Know About Wall Street, in One Brief Tale

      Jeffrey Verschleiser is one of the biggest assholes in the entire world! … Whenever any right-wing loon, or Bloombergite, tries to tell you the mortgage crisis was caused by the government forcing the poor banks to lend to broke black people, please direct them to this passage. The banks not only wanted to give out these loans, they wanted to give them out at the speed of light. They wanted to crank them out so fast that their own auditors literally couldn’t read the writing on the loan applications.

  • Censorship

    • SOPA Opera Update: Opposition Surges

      When we first launched SOPA Opera, few members in Congress – besides the bills’ co-sponsors and its initial opponents – had made their opinion known on the proposed laws to regulate the Internet. That changed on Wednesday.

      The split is not as good as the graph makes it out because 41 of the 101 opposition leave open a vote for a modified version of PIPA or SOPA – so one of these nasty bills can still pass. Everyone knows there’s huge popular opposition now.

    • With MegaUpload Down, Who’s Next? RapidShare? SoundCloud? DropBox?

      Forget SOPA and PIPA, apparently the US Federal Government doesn’t need new legislation in place to shut down major file storage sites and lock millions of users out of their file lockers. The bigger question, then, is who’s next? … It’s the new war on drugs. The plan is to have taxpayers foot the bill and then attack websites … MegaUpload’s downfall was that they seemingly promoted the sharing of copy-written material. … [and] actively hiding the fact its users shared illegal content … The case of TVShack and Richard O’Dwyer is slightly different. … the young British student is now facing extradition to the US for simply linking to sites hosting illegal content. … a crime which could land him in a US jail for five to ten years under pre-SOPA and PIPA laws.

      It’s like mp3.com all over again, except this time the bullies will throw foreign site owners in US jails. The charges against MegaUpload are also contradictory. If the site was concealing and deleting rather than promoting music and movies owned by jerks, the jerks should have been happy. Michael Mozart accuses big publishers of promoting copyright infringment, will the DOJ shut down CBS and friends?

    • Kim Dotcom explained the MegaUpload business model before he was arrested, From Rogue To Vogue: Megaupload and Kim Dotcom

      I think what really happened is that UMG realized how powerful our message was, how potent it would become, and how positively it would affect Mega’s image. From rogue to vogue. They decided to stop us at all costs … UMG knows that we are going to compete with them via our own music venture called Megabox.com, a site that will soon allow artists to sell their creations direct to consumers and allowing artists to keep 90% of earnings. … We have a solution called the Megakey that will allow artists to earn income from users who download music for free. Yes that’s right, we will pay artists even for free downloads.

      That is exactly like mp3.com. The shutdown is not about “piracy” it’s about eliminating competition.

    • EFF: No more back room deals — Users must have a voice in governing the Internet

      MPAA Chairman Chris Dodd gave an interview to the New York Times yesterday, in which “Mr. Dodd said he would welcome a summit meeting between Internet companies and content companies, perhaps convened by the White House, that could lead to a compromise.” … there is no need to assume that legislation is necessary. As we discuss the future of the Internet, all stakeholders, including the people who use Internet services and consume (and create and share) movies and music, must have a seat at the table. The internet is too important to be debated, dissected and possibly disabled in a private meeting.

    • Wikipedia shows traffic uptick during SOPA protest

      Some people predicted that the blackout would harm Wikipedia’s reputation. The opposite happened.

    • India OKs censoring Facebook, Google, Microsoft, YouTube

      The Indian government has given the green light for the prosecution of “21 social networking sites.” The list features 10 foreign-based companies, and could affect websites provided by Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, and YouTube.

      Techdirt reported on this several weeks ago. The case has received official sanction from more levels of government and represents a real threat now.

    • Senat postpones PIPA vote.
  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • Battling Internet Censorship: The Long War

      We must be prepared to battle censorship on the Internet as a matter of our everyday lives. … Educational campaigns explaining why the battles against Internet censorship are so crucial must continue on our sites, and in our other personal and professional communications as well, every single day.

  • DRM

  • Copyrights

IRC Proceedings: January 19th, 2012

Posted in IRC Logs at 7:28 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

Enter the IRC channels now

Links 20/1/2012: Linux Foundation Report, KDE 4.9 Previews

Posted in News Roundup at 6:25 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Linux Is Reaching New Heights in Enterprises, Study Finds

    Global economic woes may continue to dampen spending forecasts for IT departments around the world, but that isn’t stopping large companies from adding more Linux servers to their operations.

  • Linux Foundation Report Shows Growing Linux Adoption Rates in the Enterprise

    The latest report shows a 40% decrease in technical issues cited among respondents since the 2010 report. “Twenty-two percent fewer respondents cite perception by management as an issue, and 10% fewer say there are no issues at all impeding the success of Linux,” the report says. Further, more than two-thirds of respondents consider Linux to be a more secure operating system over the alternatives.

  • Server

  • Kernel Space

    • Graphics Stack

      • X.org screensaver bypass found
      • NSA releases security-enhanced Android

        The U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) released a security-enhanced version of Android based on the hardened SE Linux, featuring stricter access control policies. SE Android restricts the system resources available to an Android app regardless of user permissions, blocking malware such as the “GingerBreak” exploit at six different steps during execution, says the NSA.

  • Applications

    • Poor Mans GoogleEarth

      In my last blog, I mentioned that I had gone in and made changes to our thin client build to accommodate running NX sessions along with local RDP. We had another thin client project scheduled for 30-45 days in the future and because I was already in the code it was the best choice to just finish it and roll out all features at the same time.

    • Proprietary

      • Is Steam Finally Coming to Linux?

        A job posting from Valve has sparked new speculation that the developer might be bringing their popular Steam service and library of Source engine games to Linux.

        The listing, for a Senior Software Engineer, states that one of the position’s responsibilities will be to “port Windows-based games to the Linux platform.” As Valve’s games are exclusively available through their Steam storefront, the logical conclusion is that Valve is planning to bring the entire service to Linux at some point in the near future.

    • Instructionals/Technical

      • Setting up a talking clock easily in Linux
      • DIY: Quick and easy Samba print server setup
      • fuk the kit you will love
      • Beginning Linux – Part III

        Now you’ve got Ubuntu installed and running, you’ll have probably noticed there are one or two things missing. Things like MP3 playback and decoding, support for certain audio formats, Microsoft fonts, Java runtime playback, Adobe Flash, and the ability to play (and rip) DVDs.

        The reason this stuff’s missed out from the default install is that it’s either proprietary — meaning the source code is controlled by a third party and you have to agree to their terms and conditions in order to use it — or it’s subject to copyright restrictions, or, in some countries (notably the US), there may be legal issues surrounding its use. (You can find more about this stuff here.)

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • KDE 4.9 to Get a New Widgets Explorer

        As you might have heard, KDE is, more or less, getting a whole new rewrite again. Some folks may read (or write) that with dread given how the last rewrite went for users there for a while. However, perhaps we should take a look at some of the good things instead. One that’s come to light recently is a brand new widgets explorer.

      • Calligra Words style selection combo
  • Distributions

    • Gentoo Family

    • Red Hat Family

      • Fedora

        • Review: Fuduntu 2012.1

          Fuduntu used to be based on Fedora, but then several months ago the lead developer announced that it would fork and maintain an independent codebase. This would serve two purposes: one would be to provide stable rolling releases, and the other would be to maintain GNOME 2 as long as possible. Indeed, Fuduntu uses not MATE, but good old GNOME 2.32.

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Review: Aptosid (Install and First Impressions)

          I’ve installed Debian here and there on different computers in the last seven or so years that I’ve been using Linux. I almost ended up being a Debian person, but the Fedora book at the bookstore was more comprehensive, so I was set along the Red Hat path. On the one hand, I’ve often envied Debian both for its ease up upgrades and for its stability. On the other hand, I like having the latest stuff. KDE 4.8 is about to come out and I’ll be restless for the next few months before it makes its way into Fedora. So Debian’s never quite been for me. I’ve heard a lot about Aptosid (formerly Sidux) which turns Sid (the unstable repo) into a usable distro. Of course, Ubuntu does this along with a little extra polish, so I figured I’d see what Aptosid’s up to.

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Do Fewer Spinoffs Signal a Waning in Ubuntu’s Popularity?

            Even if you don’t run Linux, chances are good you’ve heard of Ubuntu. You’re probably also familiar with its official cousins: Kubuntu, Xubuntu and the like. But there’s another subset of the Ubuntu ecosystem that gets less play — namely, the medley of unofficial spinoffs built by third parties. Although little discussed, the trends surrounding these distributions that hide in Ubuntu’s shadow reveal a lot about the open source channel more broadly.

          • Unity’s Dash to Ditch Giant Shortcuts

            Not a fan of the 8 giant shortcuts in the Unity Dash? Ubuntu 12.04 might just present you with something different…

          • Full Circle Podcast Episode 28 A Year in Comedy
          • Development Update
          • Ubuntu 12.04 May Get Rid of Useless Dash Shortcuts

            I have been using Unity since they day it came out with alpha of Ubuntu 11.04. One thing I never understood was the purpose of those 8 giant shortcuts in the Dash. I wrote about it in my first review. I still don’t know and have never used any of those 8 shortcuts. I wanted to get rid of them and put something more useful. It seems Ubuntu 12.04 will fix that too. As we reported earlier that with 12.04 we may get some more customization of Unity, the chances are that we may also get rid of those 8 icons and be replaced with something more useful.

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

  • Cyborg lawyer demands software source

    Lawyer Karen Sandler’s heart condition means she needs a pacemaker-defibrillator to avoid sudden death, so she has one simple question: what software does it run?

  • Open Source Still The Biggest Enterprise Software Threat

    Cloud is not the biggest threat to enterprise software companies like Oracle (ORCL), Microsoft (MSFT) and SAP (SAP).

  • Still don’t think open source hurts commercial software? Guess again
  • Databases

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • New LibreOffice Ubuntu versions

      LibreOffice 1:3.4.5-0ubuntu1 has just been uploaded to oneiric-proposed too to be SRUed (it is exactly the same as the ppa version, except for the changed version).

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

  • Public Services/Government

    • Q&A: NASA’s Sean Herron and William Eshagh on code.nasa.gov

      On Jan. 4, NASA added to its growing collection of open.nasa.gov websites with the launch of code.nasa.gov. The site aims to be a “community hub” by providing access to current NASA open source projects, information on

      its open source release process and a forthcoming forum for project collaboration.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Open Access/Content

      • FLOSS Body of Knowledge

        As courses, certificates, and curricula are created, it’s valuable to bring together people who are working to develop and deliver this material into a community where we can jointly define a central body of knowledge related to free, libre, and open source software. That goal has led me to take the first step toward creating this body of knowledge, termed FLOSSBOK. The initial outline, intentionally very brief, can be found on our FLOSS Competency Center site.

    • Open Hardware

      • Open-Source Robot to Perform Surgery

        A new surgical robot called the Raven—originally developed by the army for battlefield surgery—is light and relatively inexpensive. It also runs Linux, an open-source software, so that different medical institutions can adapt the machine to different ends while sharing advances they find along the way. Harvard wants to use the machine to operate on a beating heart by compensating for the heart’s motion. Scientists at Berkeley will try teaching the robot to operate autonomously by mimicking surgeons.

Leftovers

  • How important is virtualization to commercial UNIX customers?
  • Finance

    • Bank of America Hopes to Improve its Image

      With its stock scraping bottom at just over $6.00 a share, its image reeling from a failed attempt to to stick its customers with a $5.00 per month debit card fee, and accusations of thousands of fraudulent foreclosures, Bank of America is undertaking another effort to improve its image. Heading up the makeover attempt is Anne M. Finucane, BofA’s Global Strategy and Marketing Officer. Ms. Finucane knows better than most the depths of the trouble BofA is in.

    • Returning to Simplicity

      The modern world depends on economic growth to function properly. And throughout the living memory of every human on earth today, technology has continually developed to extract more and more raw material from the environment to power that growth.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • How Timbaland Got Away With “Copyright Theft”

        So basically, if you’re a famous American, in a contract with a big American record company like the Universal Music Group, you’re entitled to copyright protection, but if you’re a little guy from Finland who writes chiptunes, you’re just a “freakin’ jerk” that American’s can plagiarise from with complete impunity.

      • SOPA backer reassures his troops: “Facts will overcome fears”
      • SOPA Protests: Results And Aftermath
      • SOPA a controversy against the Open Source world
      • SOPA protest by the numbers: 162M pageviews, 7 million signatures
      • Politicians Backing Off From SOPA And PIPA

        The big website blackout is paying off with a total of 18 U.S. senators publicly their withdrawing support of the controversial Protect IP Act (PIPA) in the last 24 hours. Let’s name some these belatedly good men who have finally come to their senses; Theres’s Sen. Marco Rubio (Rep, Florida) Lee Terry (Rep-Nebraska) and Ben Quayle (Dan’s boy, Rep, Arizona) Sen. Kelly Ayotte (Rep-NH), Sen. Marco Rubio (Rep-FL), Sen. Roy Blunt (Rep-MO), Sen. John Boozman (Rep-and Sen. Ben Cardin (D-MD). Has someone been telling these guys that they’ll be censoring themselves as well with this act?

        Rubio puled out as a co-sponsor of PIPA in the Senate, while Terry and Quayle said they were pulling their names from the companion House bill, SOPA. In a posting on his Facebook page, Rubio noted that after the Senate Judiciary Committee unanimously passed its bill last year, he had “heard legitimate concerns about the impact the bill could have on access to the Internet and about a potentially unreasonable expansion of the federal government’s power to impact the Internet.”

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