EditorsAbout the SiteComes vs. MicrosoftUsing This Web SiteSite ArchivesCredibility IndexOOXMLOpenDocumentPatentsNovellNews DigestSite NewsRSS

09.30.12

Links 30/9/2012: Slackware 14.0 is Out

Posted in News Roundup at 11:26 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • 9 things to consider while migrating from Windows to Linux

    1. Linux is not windows

  • Linux Event TV: One-on-One with Open Source Visionaries

    Linux Foundation events are studded with Linux and open source community leaders, as well as some eccentric personalities. What better place than one of these events to sit down and talk to the people who are making innovation happen in software development and cloud computing?

    We took advantage of this unique opportunity at LinuxCon North America where we were able to talk to folks like Amir Michael of Facebook and the OpenCompute project; Josh Berkus with PostgreSQL; Sam Ramji, former Microsoft executive and today VP at Apigee; Erica Brescia, CEO at BitRock; and Joe “Zonker” Brockmeier of CloudStack, among others. We asked each of these insightful people what they’re working on, what inspires them about Linux and open source software, and to which technologies or trends they’re paying particular attention.

  • The Linux Setup – Emmanuel Revah, Systems Administrator/Web Developer
  • Poll: Which Linux board would you use to create your next project?

    Recently, we compared Raspberry Pi, Allwinner and CuBox Linux hardware boards. Then, some folks from our open source community shared with us their experiences with Raspberry Pi and Makey Makey. There is much enthusiasm over turning ordinary items into new inventions and doing mundane tasks in completely new ways.

  • $99 Parallella supercomputer appears on Kickstarter

    The launch of the Raspberry Pi has been a huge success story, and promises to get cheap computers into the hands of kids and hobbyists around the world. But it has also had another effect–it has inspired others to look into alternative methods of developing cheap computing platforms.

    One company taking inspiration from the Raspberry Pi Foundation is Adapteva, which focuses on semiconductor technology and has developed a very efficient multicore microprocessor architecture. Now they intend to use that architecture to offer up a $99 supercomputer with the help of Kickstarter.

  • Parallella, A $99 Supercomputer Running Ubuntu

    The Parallella is a new pocket sized computer based on the Epiphany multicore chips developed by semiconductor start-up Adapteva.

  • The automotive industry accelerates its Linux commitment

    The automotive industry took a major step forward in its commitment to open source yesterday, as announced by the Linux Foundation. The Automotive Grade Linux Workgroup (AGL) is a new group that will facilitate industry collaboration for Linux development.

    Major automotive companies like Jaguar Land Rover, Nissan and Toyota are some of the first carmakers to participate in AGL. Other members include Aisin AW, DENSO Corporation, Feuerlabs, Fujitsu, HARMAN, Intel, NEC, NVIDIA, Reaktor, Renesas, Samsung, Symbio, Texas Instruments Incorporated, and Tieto.

  • Linux Nonsense

    To sound this clever yourself, check out the aptly named nonsense. In essence, nonsense is a clever generator of, well, nonsense. Just extract the archive bundle into a directory of your choosing and you are ready to go. No compiling and no nonsense (pardon the circular reference). Nonsense is a Perl script that works with a collection of templates. If you look in the directory you just created, you’ll see an executable file called nonsense and a number of data files as well as a few HTML templates.

  • Desktop

  • Audiocasts/Shows

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • I still need Xfce’s Gigolo, even in GNOME

      I get why they called it Gigolo. It’s the Xfce utility that “mounts anything without complaining.”

      The things it mounts include ftp and sftp over the network, WebDAV and Windows shares. I’d rather not use it at all, but in Xfce’s Thunar file manager, you still need Gigolo to access these remote filesystems.

    • GNOME Desktop

  • Distributions

    • Hanthana 17 Screenshots
    • blackPanther OS – A nice-looking distribution

      This distribution we chose to show you today sure is an interesting combination. According to their Distrowatch page, it’s a combination of features from Mandriva, on which is based, Fedora and Ubuntu, and can be used at school, work or home. Are these rather bold statements true? Stay tuned to find out. You don’t need to have any special knowledge, just 10 minutes of your time is all we’re asking. If you have questions on how to try blackPanther or you already tried it and have an opinion, please visit our linux forums and share!

    • Video Review: Voyager 12.04

      After reading a comprehensive review at dedoimedo.com on the latest release of Voyager 12.04 I decided to do a short video review of this Linux OS Distribution. I chose to install this distribution to my hard drive. I have always been a great fan of Xubuntu, so I was excited to see what Voyager would look like and compare it’s performance to Xubuntu.

    • Finnix Linux 105 Review – Command Line to the Rescue

      Finnix is a live CD rescue distro, and it’s one for the CLI-junkies because it doesn’t come equipped with a desktop.

    • 5 highly rated Linux OS distributions

      First released in 1991 by Linus Torvalds, Linux is an open-source operating system derived from the UNIX OS. The philosophy of such open-source operating systems is that they are community-driven; Linux evolves to meet the demands and wishes of its users. There are many great Linux distributions to choose from, each boasting their own advantages and niches. Some designed to be very user-friendly, others intended to give power users greater control over their systems. Here are five of the most highly rated Linux distributions on offer today.

    • Epidemic 4.0 Screenshots
    • New Releases

      • Slackware 14.0 is Finally Here

        Slackware 14.0 is has been released. A post on slackware.com said, “the long wait is finally over and a new stable release of Slackware has arrived!” The official announcement said, “We are sure you’ll enjoy the many improvements.”

      • Superb Mini Server 2.0.0 Is Based on Slackware 14

        The developers behind the Superb Mini Server (SMS) Linux server operating system proudly announced earlier today, September 18th, the immediate availability for download of the Superb Mini Server 2.0.0 release.

    • Gentoo Family

    • Red Hat Family

      • Fedora

        • Multiseat computing can feed a multitude

          The ancient alchemists tried to turn iron into gold. While they didn’t succeed, they did leave us with a wonderful metaphor. Last week I experienced something akin to alchemy when I installed Fedora 17 onto a donated Dell Dimension 3000 tower computer.

          I then created two extra users for this computer, grabbed some spare USB keyboards and USB mice, and plugged an extra keyboard and mouse into each of two Plugable multiseat devices (which sell for $65 each). With bated breath, I plugged each Plugable device into a USB port on that free computer. Voila! Like magic, a computer that had no value to someone else suddenly turned into a fully-functioning three-seat computer.

        • Fedora 18 Alpha out now!

          Get your first taste of the Spherical Cow, and help test the new features expected to come to Fedora 18, such as a new Hot Spot feature and updated Samba

        • Fedora 18 Alpha KDE Live CD Screenshot Tour

          The Alpha release of the upcoming Fedora 18 (Spherical Cow) Linux operating system has been announced earlier today, September 18th, featuring KDE 4.9.

    • Debian Family

      • My Raspberry Pi experience with Debian-based Linux distribution Occidentalis

        It’s an ominous name for an ominous fruit: the black raspberry. As the owner of a new Raspberry Pi, I realized that I was going to have to, at some point, open the box and do something with it.

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu Open Week 2012: 24th – 26th October

            Canonical announced today, September 18th, that the Ubuntu Open Week for Ubuntu 12.10 (Quantal Quetzal) will take place between 24th and 26th October, 2012, on the usual Ubuntu IRC channel, #ubuntu-classroom.

          • Canonical Ties Ubuntu Server Development to OpenStack

            Along with RedHat, Rackspace and many others, Canonical has been steadily marrying its cloud strategy to the open source OpenStack platform. In February of last year, we discussed how Canonical was deepening its relationship with OpenStack, and it has kept doing so. Now, in a new blog post, Canonical’s Mark Baker notes that Canonical has released the Cloud Archive for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Server, an online software repository from which administrators can download the latest versions of OpenStack, for use with the latest long-term support (LTS) release of Ubuntu.

          • Everpad Integrates Evernote With Ubuntu Unity (AppIndicator, Lens)
          • New Cinnamon 1.6 Release Adds 2D Session, New Applets And More Customization Options

            Cinnamon, the GNOME Shell fork used by default in Linux Mint 13 (Cinnamon Edition), has reached version 1.6, getting many new features: a new 2D session, workspace OSD, new applets and lots more!

          • Multi-Tasking in Ubuntu

            Ubuntu 12.04 includes a desktop interface that is a strong departure from previous versions. One of the most striking differences upon logging into the system is the launcher. The launcher is a vertical bar that, by default, resides along the left side of the screen. It is similar to the dock in Mac OS X and aims to make your user experience more efficient and intuitive.

          • Ubuntu 11.04 reaching end of life

            Canonical has reminded folks that Ubuntu 11.04 will no longer be supported after October 28th, 18 months after its launch

          • Goodbye Ubuntu 11.04

            Dear Ubuntu users, the time has come to say goodbye to the Natty Narwhal release of the popular Ubuntu operating system, Ubuntu 11.04, as on October 28th it will reach end of life.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Bodhi 2.1.0 Screenshots
            • Pear Linux 5 review

              Pear Linux is a desktop distribution based on Ubuntu, but unlike its parent distribution, which uses the Unity desktop interface, Pear Linux features a modified GNOME Shell called Pear Shell decked out to look like a MacOS X desktop. Not that it is a succeeded, but it is good attempt. Apple has nothing to worry about. The latest edition is Pear Linux 5. Code-named Sunsprite, it is based on Ubuntu 12.04, using (Linux) kernel 3.2.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Adapteva announces Raspberry Pi competitor

      Semiconductor start-up Adapteva has announced plans to create an open-source experimentation board with a massive amount of parallel processing power, and it’s found a novel way to raise the funds it needs: Kickstarter.

    • Phones

      • Open webOS 1.0 lands 28

        Following the roadmap laid out back in January, HP has delivered Open webOS 1.0 to the masses as planned. Last month saw the release of two betas, one for desktop Linux and the other for assorted devices thanks to OpenEmbedded integration, and today we’re seeing the finalized versions of each. Improving on the last go around, the OpenEmbedded version (Open webOS OE) now has a user interface to match the the Linux-style Open webOS Desktop, which itself has the same user interface as webOS 3.0 on the HP TouchPad.

      • Tizen 2.0 Alpha SDK With Source-Code Released

        An alpha release of the Tizen 2.0 SDK with source-code was released this week.

      • Android

        • 10 Best Android apps this week

          The flow of notable new Android apps quietened down a bit on the Google Play store this week, which is why this post has dropped down to a list of 10 rather than 20 – see the note at the bottom for a bit more on that.

        • Android control code issue affects almost all manufacturers

          An Android control code vulnerability originally reported as a Samsung problem in fact appears to affect most smartphones and UMTS tablets running Ice Cream Sandwich (version 4.0.x) or earlier versions of Android. Google updated the dialling software code in version 4.1.1 so that control codes are no longer executed automatically.

        • Hacking for Fun: Programming a Wearable Android Device

          A look at Recon Instruments’ MOD Live Heads-Up Display and the ease of creating and programming useful, on-person computing devices.

          If you had the chance to watch (or were even one of the lucky attendees at) the Google I/O 2012 opening keynote, you may recall the exciting moment when Sergey Brin proclaimed the arrival of the Google Glass prototypes to the attendees. Alas, Glass prototype pre-orders cost a cool $1,500 for some future delivery date. This led many developers, including me, to reassess their desire to build an Android-centric, HUD-based application.

        • Apple’s Wozniak Hopes IPhone Photos Beat His Samsung Galaxy’s
        • Android Powered Desktop Announced By Motorola Mobility

          Motorola Mobility has just launched a fairly interesting Android powered computer over in China that hosts a ton of different home entertainment options. The “HMC3260″ boasts of a 18.5 inch LED touchscreen that will be able to play TV shows, movies, games, browse the web, and with it being powered by Android, it will be able to run Android apps as well. Motorola had apparently partnered up with a cloud service provider called WASU to load the Android computer up with content.

Free Software/Open Source

  • The new software hygiene: Declare a license or risk losing participation

    I had the privilege of working with David Tilbrook almost 25 years ago. He was the first person with whom I ever worked that clearly articulated proper software construction discipline for collaborative endeavours and captured a summary of it under the title, Washing Behind Your Ears: Principles of Software Hygiene.

    David articulated these practices pre-World Wide Web. We weren’t yet living in a world where the Web had so completely removed the friction of time and space from sharing and collaborating on software that even the early Internet enabled.

  • FTL Debuts on Linux, Joins Diaspora In Top-Tier Space Sims
  • Events

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox’s birthday present to us: Teaching tech titans about DIY upstarts

        As mainstream users came to equate Internet Explorer’s logo with the Web, Microsoft worked to lock in its advantage with increasingly proprietary technology like ActiveX. It surely would have done so, too, but for the seemingly futile Mozilla browser, née Firefox. Born in the ashes of Netscape’s failed browser business 10 years ago this month as Phoenix, Firefox 1.0 is arguably the most important technology developed in the last 50 years.

      • Introducing the 2012 Mozilla Festival: making, freedom and the web

        This year’s Mozilla Festival will gather more than 800 passionate people with diverse backgrounds and skill-sets. The goal: push the frontiers of the open web, learn together, and make things that can change the world.

  • Databases

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

  • CMS

    • Joomla 3.0: Major version jump for the open source CMS

      The Joomla developers have released version 3.0 of their open source CMS. The major version jump is justified as Joomla 3.0 offers many new features along with standard templates for the web site and administration interface that comply with the responsive web design guidelines, producing good results on large screens as well as on mobile devices. The basic Joomla platform was updated to version 12.2 and the web-based install has been reduced to three steps and is now simpler to use. It also includes several sets of sample data that are now available during installation.

  • Healthcare

  • Business

    • Semi-Open Source

      • 70,000 Transactions Per Second With NGINX

        It is good to have your architectural decisions validated by someone else, even better when that validation blows you out of the water. If you’ve chosen to go with NGINX for your load balancing needs, give yourself a pat on the back. WordPress.com made the same decision, and is now pushing 70,000 transactions per second and over 15 GBs through their NGINX load balancers, as explained by a guest post on High Scalability by Barry Abrahamson from Automattic.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • GNU Spotlight with Karl Berry (September 2012)

      To get announcements of most new GNU releases, subscribe to the info-gnu mailing list: http://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/info-gnu. Nearly all GNU software is available from http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/, or preferably one of its mirrors (http://www.gnu.org/prep/ftp.html). You can use the url http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/ to be automatically redirected to a (hopefully) nearby and up-to-date mirror.

  • Project Releases

    • PHPUnit 3.7 and related tools arrive

      Developer Sebastian Bergmann has released new versions of his PHPUnit utility and related tools. The open source unit testing framework for PHP has been updated to version 3.7.0, while the PHP_CodeCoverage, PHPUnit_MockObject and DbUnit components were made available as version 1.2.0.

    • Xen 4.2 Releases
  • Public Services/Government

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Tears of Steel: Fourth Official Blender Movie Released!

      Blender movies have always amazed us all with its interesting little stories and sophisticated visual graphics. While Elephants Dream was of sci-fi kind with mind-bending ideas and graphics, Bug Buck Bunny was a light-hearted comedy. The third one, Sintel, also had splendid graphics to back-up its unique storyline (watch all the official Blender movies till date). Tears of Steel is different though. It is not a full-fledged end-to-end animation movie per se like its predecessors. Tears of Steel is more like a normal movie with impressive visual effects.

    • Coding for good: Highlights from the open source humanitarian movement
    • World’s first Arduino flashlight ships soon

      Following a highly successful Kickstarter project and over a year of development, HexBright, billed by its creator as the “world’s first open source Arduino flashlight,” is now in production with initial shipments planned for December.

    • Using open source for disaster response planning

      Peak hurricane season is always a reminder that natural disasters are never easy to handle. If there’s anything we can take away from them it’s that planning and preparedness can save the lives of those risk. The World Bank and OpenGeo find themselves at the unique cross section of disaster management and enabling technology. OpenGeo’s software is built to share information on on the web, which is a critical component of any disaster management plan. Various implementations of our software have been used to facilitate strategic disaster management planning.

    • Creative Commons applied to government, business, and journalism

      For people wanting to learn about Creative Commons and its application in different sectors, there is a sea of materials available online. In particular, Creative Commons international affiliates create a huge number of educational resources that cross language and cultural boundaries.

      A few weeks ago, I wrote a post about my work sorting through some of these resources to identify some of the best, focusing on Creative Commons license use for public sector information, for publishing content on a variety of digital platforms, and for generating revenue. As promised, today I’ll highlight some of the resources I’ve discovered.

    • Free books and reports on open innovation, co-creation, and crowdsourcing
    • Coding for good: Highlights from the open source humanitarian movement

      HFOSS, Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software, is a movement inspired first by the December 2004 Asian tsunami, and then by other humanitarian needs in the health, civic, finance and academic sectors (especially for women and people of color).

    • Open Data

      • Open source music-making lab resonates in the Congo

        In July this year, two UNC-Chapel Hill professors trained 16 motivated Congolese students in the art of beat making. They called their group The Congo Beat Making Lab and collaborated with Yole!Africa to strengthen a larger goal they all share: to connect people (including musicians) around the world.

        Apple Juice Kid (professor, producer, DJ, and drummer) and Pierce Freelon (professor and MC), developed the Beat Making Lab curriculum at UNC-Chapel Hill to connect students with music and students with students. They took this curriculum to Goma, Democratic Republic of the Congo and the results were remarkable—this short documentary features a full song and video the group produced using free, open source music-making software.

      • Open data: Is there a business case?

        It’s very easy to ascertain that ‘open is good’, but is there a clear business case for opening up your data? That’s been a key question at the Open Knowledge Festival in Helsinki, and not one with easy answers.

      • Humble Indie Bundle 6 Brings Torchlight To Linux, Ubuntu
      • Humble Indie Bundle 6 has been presented
    • Open Hardware

      • LinuxCon: Open hardware for open hardware

        Open hardware platforms like the Arduino have turned device development into a hobbyist enterprise in recent years, but the $20 price tag of a microcontroller board seems a lot less tantalizing when one adds in the costs of testing and debugging it. At LinuxCon 2012 in San Diego, David Anders addressed this issue and offered some guidance on finding and selecting tools for open hardware development, the majority of which are open hardware themselves.

  • Programming

    • Announcing My New Powered-by-Perl Projects

      While Onyx Neon still occupies a lot of my attention, I’ve been working with a local company called Big Blue Marble to develop small web-based businesses. This has taken me through a crash course in things like search engine optimization and statistics that I hadn’t figured I’d ever need to know.

      (Half the fun of small business is realizing that there’s something you should have started doing months ago, that no one available has any experience with it, and that one of you has a week to get to a basic level of competence with it before you move on to the next crisis. The other half is realizing that the next time you tackle a problem like this, you’ll be that much better at it.)

    • JSR 310′s Date and Time API added to JDK 8

      JSR 310, the long-running Java Specification Request for a date and time API to replace the existing complex and hard to work with date and time support, has been added to the feature list for OpenJDK 8 and Java 8. Expected to arrived in January 2013′s milestone 6 release, the inclusion of JSR310 in Java 8 is the result of work done over the summer to simplify and refine the API so that it could be included.

    • Slashdot, SourceForge, FreeCode sold to jobs site company

      Slashdot has been sold again. Dice Holdings, the company behind the Dice.com career site, announced today that it had purchased Slashdot, as well as the SourceForge and FreeCode websites, from Geeknet for $20 million in cash. According to a statement from Geeknet—the company formerly known as SourceForge, VA Software, and VA Linux—the sale price was approximately equal to what the three sites have brought in over the last year.

  • Standards/Consortia

    • Five major stardards organizations speak out

      Earlier this month, the IEEE, Internet Architecture Board (IAB), Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), Internet Society, and World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) signed a joint agreement to affirm and adhere to a set of principles that establish what they call The Modern Paradigm for Standards.

      For those who have lived in the technical standards world, you will find nothing overtly revolutionary in the Paradigm affirmed by these leading standards development organizations (SDOs). Indeed, the principles appear almost boilerplate from prior descriptions of voluntary, industry standards.

    • W3C presents draft of browser Web Cryptography API

      The W3C web standards consortium has presented a first Public Working Draft for integrating a Web Cryptography API into browsers. The JavaScript API will provide features such as hashing, key generation and verification, as well as encryption and decryption. For example, it will enable web applications to check a user’s identity in more secure ways than are currently possible between browsers and HTTP servers.

Leftovers

  • Buford Krispy Kreme to Celebrate International Talk Like a Pirate Day

    Shiver me timbers! If it be doughnuts ye be craving, head to yon Buford Krispy Kreme on Sept. 19 and jabber like a pirate.
    Krispy Kreme is celebrating the international Talk Like a Pirate Day by giving away a free doughnut to anyone who comes into the store and talks like a pirate. Anyone who dresses in full pirate regalia will get a dozen free doughnuts.

  • Finance

    • Still No Position Limits on Speculation for Goldman Sachs

      Two Associations (the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association and the International Swaps and Derivatives Association) sued the CFTC stating that position limits on the number of contracts would damage their business. A federal judge ruled against the CFTC.

      It is passing strange that those who brought down the financial system in 2008 still cannot see why they should be regulated so that another crisis will be averted.

  • Censorship

  • Privacy

  • Civil Rights

    • Patdown Assault Trauma Syndrome: fear, shaking, sleeplessness, nightmares, and flashbacks

      As one reads the letters from victims of TSA patdowns released last week, strong patterns emerge. Nearly every letter uses one of these turns of phrase: demeaning, degrading, dehumanizing, humiliating, violated, traumatized, sexually assaulted.

    • Don’t Think Different: Apple Adds Straitjacket Mode to iOS

      Business iPad users beware. Your halcyon days of loading whatever the heck you want onto your tablet may be coming to an end.

      Apple is set to introduce a couple of new features that will give corporate IT new ways to lock down the iOS 6 operating system, which powers the iPad and the iPhone, according to Zenprise, a mobile device management company that was briefed on the features by Apple.

IRC Proceedings: September 23rd-September 29th, 2012

Posted in IRC Logs at 10:42 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

IRC Proceedings: September 23rd, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 24th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 25th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 26th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 27th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 28th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 29th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

Enter the IRC channels now

IRC Proceedings: September 16th-September 22nd, 2012

Posted in IRC Logs at 10:02 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

IRC Proceedings: September 16th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 17th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 18th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 19th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 20th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 21st, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 22nd, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

Enter the IRC channels now

IRC Proceedings: September 9th-September 15th, 2012

Posted in IRC Logs at 9:15 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

IRC Proceedings: September 9th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 10th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 11th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 12th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 13th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 14th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 15th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

Enter the IRC channels now

IRC Proceedings: September 2nd-September 8th, 2012

Posted in IRC Logs at 8:38 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

IRC Proceedings: September 2nd, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 3rd, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 4th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 5th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 6th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 7th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 8th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

Enter the IRC channels now

IRC Proceedings: August 26th-September 1st, 2012

Posted in IRC Logs at 7:39 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

IRC Proceedings: August 26th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: August 27th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: August 28th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: August 29th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: August 30th, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: August 31st, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

IRC Proceedings: September 1st, 2012

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#techrights log

#boycottnovell log

GNOME Gedit

GNOME Gedit

#boycottnovell-social log

#techbytes log

Enter the IRC channels now

After the Apple-Samsung Ruling

Posted in Apple, GNU/Linux, Google, Microsoft at 4:55 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Samsung Galaxy S2

Summary: An overview of articles and some observations about Apple’s assault on Android

THE vanity of Apple has been made much easier to see in light of reports that a billion dollars are not enough for bogus allegations. As Forbes put it: “I’m not surprised that this is what they’re thinking, it’s just interesting to see the point being made openly. This isn’t a fight about who sells what telephone hardware: it’s a fight about who gets to dominate the future ecosystem.

“Every so often we get to a break in a technology. When the incumbents find themselves faced with disruptive insurgents. Examples abound: the move from horses to cars meant that those providing energy for transport found that their incumbency protected them not one whit. For that energy for travel moved from hay and oats, or perhaps teams of horses, to the provision of petrol. So there was no value any longer in that supply chain that provided horses, hay and oats. And no incumbency value either: that you had such a chain, that an insurgent would have to spend a lot of capital to build one, didn’t help you either.”

Apple’s aggression against Free software goes quite a way back; tax on libre platforms can be imposed indirectly with distant oversight from influential people like Steve Jobs and in turn tax platforms that are price-sensitive. As one reporter put it: “The Raspberry Pi Foundation answered those pleas on Friday, revealing that it has struck deals that allow individuals to buy the licences if they want to add them to the H.264 support baked into the Raspberry Pi’s hardware.”

This is why patents on software are so probematic. They elevate costs or impede distribution of innovative products. Apple not only wants a tax; it seeks embargoes that will not work because “The weird verdict in the Apple vs Samsung case has opened a Pandora’s box – the more the foreman is talking to the press the more inconsistencies we are getting to know. This disclosure makes Apple’s victory look like a soap bubble. However, there is one clear win for Samsung. The jury did not find the ‘banned’ Galaxy Tab 10.1 infringing upon any of Apple’s patents.”

Anger is being directed at Apple for turning to a hypocritical battle (Apple shamelessly copies designs, still). None of it comes at no cost and the decision against Samsung is in doubt [1, 2] after apparent trial incompetence. Samsung says that the trial “Was Not Fair; Jury Messed Up,” as Pamela Jones put it. In another post of hers she writes: “This is in the believe it or not category, but the foreman in the Apple v Samsung trial is *still* talking about the verdict and why the jurors did what they did. And the more he talks, the worse it gets for that verdict.

“Gizmodo asked him to sit today for live questions. And believe it or not, he did it. And when asked if the jury was ever asking whether or not a patent should have issued, he claims that they never did because that wasn’t their role and the judge told them to assume the patents issued properly and not to second guess that determination.”

One author criticises — as we did many times before — the ITC, which often plays a role at the behest of US-based corporations. Timothy B. Lee writes: “If you follow the smartphone patent wars, you’ve probably heard of the International Trade Commission (ITC), which seems to get dragged into every high-profile patent dispute over the devices. Just this month, Motorola asked the ITC to ban various Apple products from the US, and the ITC separately ruled that Apple doesn’t infringe some Samsung patents. But how did this obscure Washington bureaucracy become a major front in the patent wars?”

The combination of agencies like the ITC and USPTO helps protect American business from competition; it is nothing to do with justice and innovation but it’s about business interests.

Google is not too rattled by the latest ruling as Apple was not the first with such a GUI. Here is an example of misdirection:

  • Time for Android to radically change the UI

    No matter how we feel about the total victory handed to Apple against Samsung in the landmark patent infringement case recently concluded, it is what it is. The court ruled that many functions of Android are too similar to those of iOS protected by patents. It also found that the look and feel of Samsung’s device interfaces, and Android’s by association, also infringe on Apple’s patents.

The problem is the patents. They should not have been granted. The Apple-Samsung case was talked about by many, but not many saw what happened in Asian courts. With a global patent office this may all be different, but for now we just have a US ruling favouring the US side with a lot of coverage in the US press. The FSF and Google published some responses amid pressure from the outside world. Google enjoyed victory against Oracle’s claims, but this one is a bit of a pain — some controversial ruling that might not even matter. Richard Hillesley thinks that the Apple vs Samsung case helps signal the time to “fix this patent farce”. The lawyers expect to see an appeal and as Andy Updegrove put it: “Now that the jury has given Apple almost everything it asked for in its infringement suit against Samsung, what should we expect to happen next? I think it’s a given that Samsung will appeal. Given the damages awarded and the obvious determination of Apple to defend its patents, Samsung has little choice but to press forward wherever it can in court.

“This doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s ultimate goal is to prevail through litigation, because it will constantly be running into existing and new Apple patents for so long as they remain competitors in the marketplace. Ultimately, what should make the best sense for Samsung is to negotiate the most comprehensive patent cross license with Apple that it can, and maintaining a full court press throughout the world’s legal venues is the best way to ensure that it can get the best terms possible in such a license.”

Dr. R. Keith Sawyer says that innovation loses. To quote his column: “As a scholar of creativity and innovation, I believe it’s too easy to get a patent and too easy to defend a patent. This blocks innovation because patent holders are allowed to prevent others from building on and improving their patents. That’s a problem because ‘innovation is incremental; every new step forward always builds on a long chain of prior innovations.’ If any one link in the chain is allowed to block all future enhancements, then innovation stops.”

Apple’s hyped-up products (like the hypePad) are getting ridiculed and their chances of beating Android are seriously doubted by some. To quote SJVN: “I hate to break it to you, but the new iPhone 5 is not going to be the second coming of Steve Jobs; it’s not going to give the economy a big push upward; nor will it be the best phone ever. It’s just going to be a new smartphone.

“The real news, which has been written on analyst walls around the world for months, is that Android phones continue to out-sell iPhones by a wide margin. For all the hype, for all the hysteria, iPhones come in second to Android.”

Microsoft has no chance in this area and when it comes to tablets too, Android is far more attractive an option. As SJVN puts it: “I mean seriously. Asus, a mid-range computer vendor, wants $599 for a Nvidia Tegra ARM-powerd Windows RT tablet? The Windows 8 tablet with an Atom processor for $799? Oh, and if you want a keyboard for either one, it will cost you an extra $199!?

“Come on! My Nexus 7, the best tablet I’ve found to date, cost me $250. A totally maxed out iPad 3 runs runs $829. I’ll take either of those in a New York minute over a Windows 8 tablet at those prices.”

There is also a report about the realisation that Apple is overhyped. It says that “[a] school which spent a fortune “upgrading” its teachers from their laptops to Apple iPads and TVs has admitted it made a big mistake falling for the hype.

“According to PC Pro, the unnamed school’s headmaster was seduced by a scheme that allowed all the school’s staff to replace their laptop computers with an iPad 2.

“At first, staff, who knew nothing about technology, were thrilled at the prospect and jumped at the chance of exchanging their laptop for an iPad.

“Now they are finding that the whole thing was a little hasty and there is a black cloud hanging over the staff room which has not been seen since they banned smoking there.”

It is quite irresponsible to use Apple in schools because the users are denied control of the device, or, to quote how Apple would like to put it: “A new patent, granted to Apple, could prevent academic cheating, cinema interruptions, but also see areas of political protest activity ‘ring-fenced’ disabling phone and tablet cameras.”

It is good that Apple has a monopoly on it as fewer companies will try to implement such hostile features (or “antifeatures”) that work against the users. Why would people want to pay for such a thing?

It is being alleged that Apple did not invent anything. Even a former Apple executive says so. To quote: “As Apple (AAPL) prepares to launch what by all accounts will be the most successful device it has ever built — and just a few weeks after the company was awarded more than $1 billion in damages when Samsung (005930) was found to have infringed on its IP — an article penned by a former Apple executive questions exactly what Apple’s role is in the consumer electronics industry. Jean-Louis Gassee, who came very close to becoming the president of Apple in the late 1980s before being ousted by CEO John Scully and Apple’s board, claims that while Apple’s success in the industry cannot be disputed, its perception as an innovator is open to discussion.”

Microsoft boosters such as Jon Brodkin latch onto the case to spread FUD against Android. This is all that the duopoly can do against Android now. Innovation was never on Apple’s side.

EPO Decides to Listen to Anti-Patents Stance, USPTO Censors It

Posted in Europe, Patents at 4:14 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

USPTO building

Summary: Fear of the truth is alleged at patent offices although excuses are being made

According to the head of the FSFE, the is an ongoing debate at the EPO and dissenting voices are heard for a change. As put in words: “On Tuesday, I went to Amsterdam to talk about “How Software Patents Are Delaying The Future” (pdf, 79kB), on a discussion panel organised by the European Patent Office. The other people on the panel were patent attorney Simon Davies and Ioannis Bozas, a patent examiner at the EPO. The panel was moderated by James Nurton of Managing IP. Despite our very different views on the subject, we had very friendly and informative conversations before, during and after the panel.

“For the EPO, organising this debate was something of a gamble. They’re widely criticised for their practice of awarding patents on computer programs, and the debate tends to get rather heated. While I couldn’t disagree more strongly with the way they do things at the EPO when it comes to software, I give them credit for putting this debate together. It was also refreshing to hear Ioannis state clearly that the EPO grants patents on software, as long as the program makes a “technical contribution” – that’s somewhat clearer than the line about “computer-implemented inventions” we’ve mostly seen the EPO employ so far.”

According to this, the USPTO prevents staff from even getting exposed to patents-hostile sites, calling them “Political/Activist Groups”.

“Well this is bizarre,” writes Mike Masnick. “Jamie Love from KEI was over at the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for a meeting about “global negotiations on intellectual property and access to medicine.” The meeting itself was held in a room that it uses for the USPTO’s Global Intellectual Property Academy (GIPA), and there is free WiFi for people to use. Love tried to log onto his own website… and found that it was being blocked as a “political/activist group.”"

We previously complained about the EPO censoring/deleting comments it did not agree with. Now that the patent system is destroying innovation and people realise this all over the world, the patent offices have reasons to be scared about the truth coming out, especially if it reaches the ears of patent clerks.

« Previous entries Next Page » Next Page »

RSS 64x64RSS Feed: subscribe to the RSS feed for regular updates

Home iconSite Wiki: You can improve this site by helping the extension of the site's content

Home iconSite Home: Background about the site and some key features in the front page

Chat iconIRC Channels: Come and chat with us in real time

New to This Site? Here Are Some Introductory Resources

No

Mono

ODF

Samba logo






We support

End software patents

GPLv3

GNU project

BLAG

EFF bloggers

Comcast is Blocktastic? SavetheInternet.com



Recent Posts