01.29.14

Copyright Law Still All About Protectionism, Needs Revision

Posted in Intellectual Monopoly at 3:04 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: News about the negative impact of copyright on the Web

THE WAR on sharing benefits a great deal from the death of net neutrality, which apparently now permits ISPs to throttle particular protocols [1] (based on stigmas), even here in Europe. The copyright law may soon change in the European Union (with input from people [2] and progressive parties [3]), but for the time being we see even “progressive” or “liberal” countries such as Sweden acting like [4] the US [5] when it comes to copyright. It’s irrational zeal. As Muktware illustrated some days ago [6], other business models need to be adopted because Moby, a five-time Grammy Award nominee, is now moving to a Creative Commons-like model (free sharing as a core principle). The real problem with today’s enforcement of copyright law is that it is trying to protect a dying business model, not to create new business opportunities. It’s all about protectionism.

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. Is Your ISP Messing With BitTorrent Traffic? Find Out

    For more than a decade Internet providers have slowed down BitTorrent transfers for traffic management purposes. Today we look at fresh data from the Google-backed Measurement Lab, which provides new insight into the BitTorrent throttling practices of ISPs all over the world. The data show that many ISPs still interfere with file-sharing traffic, but to varying degrees.

  2. A Rare Invitation To Help Shape European Copyright Law

    Back in May last year, we wrote about how the European Commission’s “Licences for Europe” initiative had turned into a fiasco, with public interest groups and open access supporters pulling out in protest at the way it was being conducted. The central problem was the Commission’s attempt to force everything into the straitjacket of copyright licensing, refusing to allow alternative approaches to be discussed.

  3. You Can Make A Difference in May

    As you will be aware, this year is a big one for the party – we have the European Parliamentary elections coming up this May. The European parliament is vital to many of the issues we care about – from mass surveillance, copyright reform, international cooperation, to transparent trade agreements.

  4. Swedish Public Television Claims Copyright Publication Rights To Everybody’s Sports Photos If Posted On Twitter

    Well, this is a new one. Swedish Public Television just posted legal terms and condition as to what they are allowed to do when others are posting sports photos from the Winter Games in Sotji on Twitter. In terms of the worst copyright monopoly bullshit I’ve seen, this ranks pretty high.

  5. MPAA & ICE Confirm They Interrogated A Guy For Wearing Google Glass During A Movie

    We wrote earlier about the guy who told the story of being pulled out of a theater in the middle of a movie for wearing Google Glass (turned off), which he wears all the time, because he got prescription lenses installed on the device and uses it as his regular pair of glasses. As we noted, there were some oddities in the original story, including references to the FBI and “The Movie Association,” neither of which made sense.

  6. Moby tries creative commons like model

    There is no rocket science to the fact that it is tough for most musicians to make a living based solely on album sales and streaming revenues. In fact the major amount of money that these artists make comes through touring and merchandise. But Moby, a five-time Grammy Award nominee, has a slightly different approach towards making and distributing music.

Head of GCHQ Eliminated, But the Hydra Remains Alive and Harms Lives

Posted in Law at 2:41 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: The Open Rights Group and others are challenging the gross practice of surveillance (pre-requisite of censorship, espionage, torture, and assassination) for political ends

Britain’s Open Rights Group (ORG) may soon provide evidence against the GCHQ, whose head is said to have just been metaphorically chopped off (breaking news). For the uninitiated, GCHQ plays a role in assassination by drones — a highly-controversial practice which the NSA is a major player in (with the CIA doing the execution). This breeds a lot of hatred/contempt towards the US and Britain all around the world. Charges were recently pressed by British victims or their relatives, but the UK government tends to dismiss those (cover-up). A government that’s “just” by virtue of being a government and a police force that’s “lawful” by virtue of upholding subjective laws are both symptoms of tyranny. GCHQ also plays a role in selecting people to be tortured, even in the UK (although in secrecy, with secret courts, as that helps hide something that’s inherently illegal).

We live in an awkward world right now. It seems acceptable for the government to attack Web sites/computers of activists, whereas if activists attack sites of wealthy people who harm society they go to prison for a very long time [2].

In Europe, as it turns out [3], torture by the CIA is indeed happening and the US Department of ‘Justice’ is actively trying to hide illegalities relating to this [4]. How can these governments expect people to obey the law when these governments themselves grossly violate the law? John Kiriakou, the man who blew the whistle on illegal torture by the CIA, is still in prison, whereas those who promote and engage in illegal torture are free [5]. People who support Kiriakou’s positions are now being characterised as “dangerous” [6]. Amazing! This is freedom of speech?

Speaking of dangerous, as “Obama’s drone war hits its fifth year” [7] we now see that the CIA wants to continue to occupy a country just so that it can continue to assassinate people in a neighbouring country [8-11], especially using drones. This is aggressive imperialism, not even colonialism. Fortunately, however, reformed people (some of whom left high positions in the US Army) protest against drone strikes [12] because the strategy is counter-productive [13] and it leads to serious ethical issues [14] (automating an assassination). After the latest assassination by drone [15] the Russian propaganda press asks: “Can other countries bomb USA like it bombs Somalia and many others?”

Of course not, but it’s called American exceptionalism and we in Britain should play no role in it. GCHQ should distance itself from the NSA (which ironically funded GCHQ at the expense of US taxpayers through black budget). We need to restore Britain’s reputation as valuing human life and human rights. Anything else would be counter-productive because the UK has become somewhat of a laughing stock in Russian media (Britain has historically bashed the Soviet system, claiming oppression and poor record on human rights).

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. Open Rights Group and impact litigation

    I’m writing this blog today ORG has an unprecedented opportunity to make a difference to the world’s digital future — a chance to argue before the European Court of Human Rights in coalition with Big Brother Watch and English PEN, in a crucial case over GCHQ’s lawless program of indiscriminate, total Internet surveillance.

  2. Wisconsin man sentenced for participating in Anonymous DDoS

    A man from Wisconsin was sentenced for participating in a DDoS (distributed denial-of-service) attack by hacker group Anonymous on a Kansas company.

    Eric J. Rosol, 38, is said to have admitted that on Feb. 28, 2011, he took part in a denial of service attack for about a minute on a Web page of Koch Industries — Kochind.com, using software called a Low Orbit Ion Cannon Code, which was loaded on his computer.

  3. On CIA Prisons, Poland Sold Out for ‘Pathetically Little’ (Gazeta Wyborcza, Poland)

    Roman Imielski defends the implied consent of Polish authorities on CIA prisons. Well, I understand: the war on terrorism, the support of an ally, and joint operations in Iraq. Also: patriotism, national security, and the defense of democratic freedoms. But why did our U.S. ally sucker punch us on this occasion?

  4. DOJ challenges journalist’s claim to CIA interrogation report

    The US Department of Justice (DOJ) has moved to dismiss a case arising from investigative journalist Jason Leopold efforts to obtain documents from a congressional oversight report of the US Central Intelligence Agency’s (CIA) detention and interrogation program.

    At the heart of the case is a report by the US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI) into the CIA’s former detention and interrogation program.

  5. Bureau of Prisons Considers CIA Whistleblower John Kiriakou’s ‘Letters from Loretto’ on Firedoglake to Be Dangerous
  6. CIA whistleblower Kiriakou’s letters from prison on Firedoglake blog “dangerous,” says Bureau of Prisons

    Kevin Gosztola at Firedoglake: “The Bureau of Prisons, with a little assistance from the Central Intelligence Agency, have been engaging in a ham-handed attempt to stop former CIA officer John Kiriakou from sending letters from prison, according to a recent letter from prison.”

  7. Obama’s drone war hits its fifth year
  8. Our quagmire in Afghanistan

    All through the movie I kept asking myself, “Why?” What are these men fighting for? Once, I knew the answer. After Sept 11, 2001, I wanted to wipe out al-Qaida and kill its Afghan hosts, the Taliban. Even before the terrorist attack, reports of the Taliban’s treatment of women — stonings, public executions in the soccer stadium, etc. — and the beheadings of men convinced me they simply had it coming: Send in the Marines.

    But American fighting units have been there since 2001. The initial mission was completed long ago: the destruction of al-Qaida in Afghanistan. The Taliban and their allies remain, but unlike al-Qaida, they are indigenous and, seemingly, undeterred. They apparently have an unlimited supply of suicide bombers (who are these people?), and they continue to inflict mayhem on Afghans and foreigners alike. Earlier this month, the Taliban struck a Kabul restaurant with a Western clientele and killed at least 21 people. The attack by gunmen was preceded by a suicide bombing.

  9. Afghan exit seen as peril to CIA’s drone mission
  10. US exit from Afghanistan concerns CIA

    American intelligence agencies are concerned about Afghan President Hamid Karzai’s decision to not sign a controversial security deal with the United States, Press TV reported referring to a report.

  11. Peace activist raises awareness of drones

    A peace activist and retired Navy commander told a Salem group Sunday that America’s secretive combat drone program is illegally killing innocent people, mentally torturing survivors and is negatively changing the way people live.

    Leah Bolger, of Corvallis, gave her speech at the monthly Salem Fellowship of Reconciliation meeting. She visited an area of Pakistan she said experiences frequent drone strikes and spoke with victims and survivors.

  12. Drone strikes have crashed weddings, schools, funerals and rescuers. When will it end?

    Nabila’s drawings are like any other nine-year-old’s. A house rests besides a winding path, a winding path on which wander two stick figures. Tall trees, rising against the back drop of majestic hills. Clouds sprinkled over a clear sky.

    Nabila’s drawings are like any other nine-year-old’s. With one disturbing exception.

  13. Should a robot decide when to kill?

    By the time the sun rose on Friday, December 19th, the Homestead Miami race track had been taken over by robots. Some hung from racks, their humanoid feet dangling above the ground as roboticists wheeled them out of garages. One robot resembled a gorilla, while another looked like a spider; yet another could have been mistaken for a designer coffee table. Teams of engineers from MIT, Google, Lockheed Martin, and other institutions and companies replaced parts, ran last-minute tests, and ate junk food. Spare heads and arms were everywhere.

  14. US missile strike kills senior al-Shabaab leader in Somalia

    Official spokesman for the Somali federal government Ridwan Haji Abdiwali said Somali National Security Minister Abdikarim Hussein Guled confirmed the death of senior al-Shabaab leader Ahmed Mohamed Amey, who is believed to be the same al-Shabaab commander named in local news reports as Ahmed Abdulkadir Abdullahi, also known as “Iskudhuq”.

  15. Can other countries bomb USA like it bombs Somalia and many others?

    The missile attack of U.S. drones on Somalia that came out of the blue over the weekend showed that U.S. ” doctrine of exceptionalism” allows to violate international law, bomb foreign territories and kill suspects without trial. Accordingly, other countries have a right to bomb the U.S., haven’t they?

The Latest FOSS FUD Revolves Around Fakes and Bogus Arguments

Posted in Free/Libre Software, Security at 2:07 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: How Free/Open Source Software (FOSS) gets discredited over “security”, based on something which has nothing to do with FOSS and more to with human error or social engineering

THE reports from IDG make it sound as though FileZilla is a security threat [1,2] when it fact it is fakes that are a threat, as Sean pointed out to counter these allegations [3].

Yesterday we took note of the trend and two days ago we gave some examples of security-flavoured FUD against Android, of which there is plenty these days (and even today). Some of it is correctly being characterised as platform-agnostic [4]. This sometimes requires user intervention [5] or social engineering [6], so there’s a lot more to be taken into account. When the OpenSSL project got compromised some weeks ago it was actually the fault of a weak password [7,8], but some of the media spread FUD about OpenSSL itself. Weak passwords are a common human error [9] and those who don’t encrypt E-mails that contain passwords (they should!) only have themselves to blame [10,11]. To get an example of real vulnerability, consider Apple’s Safari storing passwords in plain text [12]!!! GNU/Linux, by contrast, facilitates strong encryption and has protection against all sorts of attacks [13-14].

Blaming FOSS for issues that relate to social engineering is a common FUD pattern these days (like blaming Android for users installing malware they download outside repositories), but the real security issues are back doors like Microsoft’s, security flukes like Apple’s, and data leakage through so-called ‘clouds’ (which are typically promoted by proprietary software players, tightly connected to the crack-leaning NSA).

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. FileZilla warns of large malware campaign
  2. FileZilla warns of large malware campaign
  3. FileZilla, Other Open-Source Software From ‘Right’ Sources Is Safe

    A basic tenant of open-source software security has long been the idea that since the code is open, anyone can look inside to see if there is something that shouldn’t be there.

  4. Java-based malware driving DDoS botnet infects Windows, Mac, Linux devices

    The cross-platform HEUR:Backdoor.Java.Agent.a, as reported in a blog post published Tuesday by Kaspersky Lab, takes hold of computers by exploiting CVE-2013-2465, a critical Java vulnerability that Oracle patched in June. The security bug is present on Java 7 u21 and earlier. Once the bot has infected a computer, it copies itself to the autostart directory of its respective platform to ensure it runs whenever the machine is turned on. Compromised computers then report to an Internet relay chat channel that acts as a command and control server.

  5. Yahoo users exposed to malware attack

    Users clicking on some ads are redirected to sites armed with code that exploits vulnerabilities in Java and installs a variety of different malware.

  6. Password Security Requires Multiple Layers of Protection

    The gist of the story is that “123456″ is now the most commonly used weak password—surpassing the use of the word “password.”

  7. No hypervisor vulnerability exploited in OpenSSL site breach

    The OpenSSL Project confirmed that weak passwords used on the hosting infrastructure led to the compromise of its website, dispelling concerns…

  8. OpenSSL site defacement involving hypervisor hack rattles nerves (updated)

    Code repositories remained untouched in the December 29 hack, and the only outward sign of a breach was a defacement left on the OpenSSL.org home page. The compromise is nonetheless rattling some nerves. In a brief advisory last updated on New Year’s Day, officials said “the attack was made via hypervisor through the hosting provider and not via any vulnerability in the OS configuration.” The lack of additional details raised the question of whether the same weakness may have been exploited to target other sites that use the same service. After all, saying a compromise was achieved through a hypervisor vulnerability in the Web host of one of the Internet’s most important sites isn’t necessarily comforting news if the service or hypervisor platform is widely used by others.

  9. 7 sneak attacks used by today’s most devious hackers
  10. 10,000 Top Passwords

    Back when I wrote Perfect Passwords, I generated a list of the top 500 worst (aka most common) passwords which seems to have propagated quite a bit across the internet, including being mentioned on Gizomodo, Boing Boing, Symantec, Laughing Squid and many other sites. Since then I have collected a large number of new passwords bringing my current list to about 6,000,000 unique username/password combos, including many of those that have been recently made public*.

  11. All Your Internet Are Belong To Iceland*

    All that being said, and given that the Luddite solution of forsaking the Internet may not be terribly practical, this is another reason to encrypt technical data that you are sending by email even if the recipient is a U.S. person firmly planted on U.S. soil. No, the encryption isn’t a defense to the violation, but it is at least a mitigating factor. Remember, as I posted last May, that the U.S. military thinks it can put ITAR-controlled technical data on a Chinese satellite if it’s encrypted; so if you don’t have anything else to say in your defense when an email with export controlled data accidentally wanders through Lithuania, you will at least have that. And maybe one day in the distant future, BIS and DDTC will admit that the Internet exists and that encryption works.

  12. Older Versions of Safari Store Login Info in Plain Text

    Older versions of Safari for Mac store unencrypted user login credentials in a plain text file, according to security firm Kaspersky (via ZDNet). Safari saves the information in order to restore a previous browsing session, reopening all sites, even those that require authentication using the browser’s “Reopen All Windows from Last Session” functionality.

  13. Quantum crypto pitches for data centre links
  14. Linux Is the Only Way to Protect Against Potential Sound-Transmitted Malware

Snowden Nominated for Nobel Prize, Europe Moves Away From NSA, Surveillance ‘Reform’ Revolves Around Useless Figures (Update: Head of GCHQ Steps Down!)

Posted in News Roundup at 1:29 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Change is coming from Internet hacktivism, leaks, and dissemination of important information about those with extraordinary power and/or wealth

Nobel for Peace

Europe

  • Edward Snowden Speaks in Half-Hour Televised Interview
  • NSA industrial espionage

    In the wake of the recent ARD inter­view with Edward Snowden, here are my com­ments on RT yes­ter­day about the NSA’s involve­ment in indus­trial espi­on­age…

  • NSA scandal: Germans hold out for ‘change they can believe in’

    It is difficult to imagine how a significant rift in trans-Atlantic relations could emerge without the involvement of Germany, the European Union’s most populous, financially solvent and politically powerful member.

    It continues to host tens of thousands of American troops on its soil, and with its impeccable capitalist credentials, track-record of dutiful political decision-making, enviable manufacturing base and ability to criticize English-speaking nations in their own language, Germany is always able to make a good case for its views on the international stage.

  • NSA privacy fears driving business back to UK hosting providers

    The exposure of US National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance practices by whistle-blower Edward Snowden has resulted in UK businesses worried about privacy removing their data from US hosting providers and moving it back to British servers.

    That’s according to Lawrence Jones, CEO of internet hosting company UKFast, whose customers include the NHS and British Cycling. He says British firms want to store data in Britain in order to prevent the US government from snooping on customer information.

  • AT&T CEO: met European officials, NSA affair affecting business

    AT&T Inc Chief Executive Randall Stephenson met with several European officials last week to discuss the U.S. spying scandal, which is affecting the telecommunications company’s business, he said on Tuesday.

    Some European reports had speculated that Stephenson’s meetings in Europe were focused on AT&T ambitions to buy Vodafone Group Plc.

Surveillance Through “Apps”

“Transparent” Mass Surveillance

Effective Reaction

Update (Just in)

  • Britain Says Head of GCHQ to Step Down

    Britain announced Tuesday that the head of GCHQ, the secret eavesdropping agency that has come under scrutiny following leaks by former US analyst Edward Snowden is to stand down.

Links 29/1/2014: Games

Posted in News Roundup at 4:40 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Links 29/1/2014: Applications

Posted in News Roundup at 4:39 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • Tbricks supports Linux
  • With B1 Archiver, No Need to RTFM

    Archiving tools typically are intimidating and confusing. Even those with GUIs often require an investment of time to figure out how to use them. B1 is very intuitive. Almost every action can be executed through keyboard shortcuts. The menu row at the top of the app window has only three drop-down categories: File, Commands and Help. The dialog boxes that open from the menu are well designed and easy to use.

  • Stream and Share Your Media with PlexWeb

    I freely admit that I wish Plex was open source. Thankfully, however, its proprietary code does’t mean Linux users are excluded.

  • 5 Of The Best Programming Editors Under Linux [2014]

    When NodeJS made its debut in open source market, around 4 years ago, everyone knew what was going to follow. Programmers loved it at first sight, used it and evolved it. The idea of having a JS client, that talks to a JS server and stores data in a JS database ( document databases ), was quite attractive and people adapt it at once, in every case, right or wrong.

  • Make Peace with pax

    pax is one of the lesser known utilities in a typical Linux installation. That’s too bad, because pax has a very good feature set, and its command-line options are easy to understand and remember. pax is an archiver, like tar(1), but it’s also a better version of cp(1) in some ways, not least because you can use pax with SSH to copy sets of files over a network. Once you learn pax, you may wonder how you lived without it all these years.

  • Essential LaTeX Tools

    LaTeX is a document preparation system and document markup language for high-quality typesetting. The system was originally developed by Leslie Lamport in the early 1980s. LaTeX is based on Donald E. Knuth’s TeX typesetting language. Lamport says that LaTeX “represents a balance between functionality and ease of use”.

  • mpck: Seemingly misnamed
  • rbash – A Restricted Bash Shell Explained with Practical Examples

    Linux Shell is one of the most fascinating and powerful GNU/Linux powered tool. All the application, including X, is built over shell and Linux shell is so powerful that the whole Linux system can be controlled precisely, using it. The other aspect of Linux shell is that, it can be potentially harmful, when you executed a system command, without knowing its consequence or unknowingly.

  • Azul Systems extends Zulu to support Java 6 and major Linux distributions
  • The Future of OpenShift and Docker Containers

    A few months ago, Docker (then dotCloud) and Red Hat announced a partnership to collaborate around Docker, the excellent container management solution for Linux. At the time, the OpenShift team was heads down working on our 2.0 release, but we were already thinking about how we could use Docker to take application development and deployment on OpenShift to the next level.

Links 29/1/2014: Instructionals

Posted in News Roundup at 4:37 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

01.28.14

Censorship Has Taken Over the Web. Now What?

Posted in Law at 5:18 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Everyone is a child in his/her parents’ bedroom now

Summary: Commentary about the state of censorship on the Web, and even the Internet as a whole (e.g. protocol blocking)

IN THE Western media we are pressured to think of ourselves as vulnerable, innocent children, drowning in a World Wide Web of violence, scams, paedophilia, terrorism, and “esoteric” material, including that ‘horrific’ thing which is sexuality. We are told that the governments need to protect us from the ‘evils’ of the Web, even though the Web has been fine and was expanding for many years even without censorship and so-called “protections”. Thanks to the manipulative influence of corporate media, we are accustomed to hearing about censorship in Russia, China, and the Arab world (which we are supposedly in war with, or so we’re told). Even Western allies in the Arab world are big Internet censors, not to mention the West itself. Saudi Arabian [1] or Turkish Web censorship [2] are still making the news, whereas in Holland there’s reversal of a domain-level ban [3] imposed by some overzealous ISPs and those who pressure them (quite famously in the UK, even without any legal process). This is the latest development in the saga of British censorship which wins public support using the “protect the children” line but is actually being used to block sharing sites (corporate interests served) [4,5]. They can also claim that inappropriate bans are a “mistake”, an “error” [6], and when people express themselves freely on the Web they can even be arrested by British police [7], then held in custody for nearly a year. So much for free speech, eh? In Estonia, even commenters in sites (anonymous in some cases) can lead the way to censorship, not by Web site maintainers [8] but by the state [9]. This is appalling.

In north America, book-burning makes a comeback [10,11] and blocking at ISP level (with no oversight) a legitimate practice [12], so our friends across the Atlantic are still ahead of the curve when it comes to censorship. Remember just how many domains got seized (not only blocked) with no trial. This is even worse than blocking. It’s not filtering, either. Remember when Wikileaks cutoff was attempted at domain level, host level (Amazon), and even ISP/network level (parts of US networks banned Wikileaks).

The Web is becoming a sordid mess of censorship, no matter where one lives. There’s no escaping censorship these days.

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. Sites Blocked By Smartfilter, Censored in Saudi Arabia

    The moral, it seems, is that if you want an example of a censored web site to stick in people’s minds, it either has to be a forgivable error, or an insane vindictive dick move — because in either of those cases, people will understand why it happened. The vast swaths of censored websites on the spectrum in between, the ones for which there is no rational explanation for the blocking, go ignored.

  2. Parliament urged to rejected draconian Internet bill

    Reporters Without Borders is very concerned about an Internet bill that is to be debated by the Turkish parliament in Ankara in the coming days. Registered by a ruling AKP member in mid-December as proposed amendments to Law 5651 on the Internet, it would allow website blocking without a court order and mass surveillance of Internet users.

  3. ISPs No Longer Have to Block The Pirate Bay, Dutch Court Rules
  4. Inside Default Web Blocking – Part 1

    After sustained government pressure, 3 of the 4 major UK ISPs now offer web filtering products to their customers.

  5. Inside Default Web Blocking – Part 2

    Most commentators have ignored the programme to switch these filters on by default. To their credit, ISPs tried resisting calls for filters ‘by default’ – only BT is to introduce the feature for new customers later in 2013. There remains a level of ambiguity as to whether ISPs will implement filtering by default for existing customers as requested to by Claire Perry.

  6. How to complain about mobile filtering over-blocking

    The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) is now involved in how mobile internet filtering works. In this post we explain what role they have and how you should be able to get over-blocking problems fixed.

  7. Chris McCann jailed over PC murders comments

    A man from Glasgow has been jailed for 290 days over a message on his Facebook page which mocked the murder of two police officers in Greater Manchester.

    Chris McCann, 30, claimed a friend had posted the comments the day after PCs Nicola Hughes and Fiona Bone were shot dead by Dale Cregan in September 2012.

    At Glasgow Sheriff Court, he admitted a breach of the peace by allowing them to appear and remain online.

  8. On Accountability

    Speaking personally, I have never, ever, switched off comments on my blog posts or deleted posts. Even when the Internet has seemingly come to get me, or when the press pick up on something and are critical, or when I have made a mistake and felt embarrassed at the outcome…I have never switched off comments and never deleted a blog post. This is because I feel I should be and I am accountable for my words.

    For me, this is an ethical issue; in the same way I won’t go and re-write or edit a blog post if I get criticism for it (outside of minor grammatical/spelling fixes). My posts are a time-capsule of my thinking at that point in my life.

  9. Civil Society Calls on the ECHR’s Grand Chamber to Overturn Delfi v. Estonia Ruling

    Last October, the European Court of Human Rights issued a ruling against an Estonian news portal (“Delfi”), making the platform liable for defamatory comments posted by third users. This ruling threatens to encourage privatised censorship and to severely undermine public debate online. From a legal perspective, as NGO Article 19 wrote at the time, “this judgment displays a profound failure to understand the EU legal framework regulating intermediary liability. In addition, it conveniently ignores relevant international standards in the area of freedom of expression on the Internet”. Many organizations and companies all across Europe have sent the following letter to the ECHR’s president to support Delfi’s appeal to the Court’s “Grand Chamber”, which still has the power to overturn this dangerous ruling.

  10. Health Canada scientists setting up unofficial libraries as national libraries fail

    More from the Canadian Harper government’s War on Libraries (see also: literally burning the environmental archives). Dave writes, “Health Canada scientists are also facing difficulties with government controlled libraries. It takes an insanely long time for them to receive any materials due to third-party delivery companies; they’ve started opening up their own unsanctioned libraries and have started taking advantage of external sources (industry and universities). This is turning into an insane story. There’s obviously demand for the material within government circles, but policy and cuts are making it impossible to access, resulting in statistics of diminished use, which results in more cuts.”

  11. Health Canada library changes leave scientists scrambling

    Health Canada scientists are so concerned about losing access to their research library that they’re finding workarounds, with one squirrelling away journals and books in his basement for colleagues to consult, says a report obtained by CBC News.

    The draft report from a consultant hired by the department warned it not to close its library, but the report was rejected as flawed and the advice went unheeded.

  12. How the FCC screwed up its chance to make ISP blocking illegal

    The commission can still put ISPs under its thumb, but it may not want to.

« Previous Page« Previous entries « Previous Page · Next Page » Next entries »Next Page »

RSS 64x64RSS Feed: subscribe to the RSS feed for regular updates

Home iconSite Wiki: You can improve this site by helping the extension of the site's content

Home iconSite Home: Background about the site and some key features in the front page

Chat iconIRC Channels: Come and chat with us in real time

New to This Site? Here Are Some Introductory Resources

No

Mono

ODF

Samba logo






We support

End software patents

GPLv3

GNU project

BLAG

EFF bloggers

Comcast is Blocktastic? SavetheInternet.com



Recent Posts