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02.18.14

Embedded Computing/Devices Leave Windows in the Dust

Posted in GNU/Linux at 9:53 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: A roundup of recent developments in the lesser-visible side of the computerised world

MICROSOFT is inherently an x86 company — x86 being an area where Linux now extends its footprint. Microsoft could never truly adapt to architectural change, partly due to dependence on ISVs and partly due to the source code being secret. Monoculture and monopoly (not to mention crimes such as bribery) are all that Microsoft had going for it.

ARM has a new performance-centric chip [1] and devices like Raspberry Pi [2] or BeagleBone [3] (both ARM-based) help remind us that there’s no room for Windows outside the ever-narrowing realm of x86 (Intel recently announced massive layouts and so did IBM while selling its x86 businesses to China). Android and Linux have a lot to do with it. Many people now buy non-x86 computers (smartphones and tablets), so this trend is likely to accelerate. Dell, despite the Microsoft connection, is leaning towards Android devices [4] and OpenPandora, a Linux-powered handheld gaming console, makes a comeback [5,6] (with a TI OMAP 5 dual-core processor).

Meanwhile, the Internet of Things seems like it’s Android/Linux-bound [7,8,9] (Windows is not even mentioned). Sadly, the Internet of Things often means intrusive surveillance and some of this Linux domination makes it into murderous and privacy-infringing drones [10]. Setting aside these ethical matters, Linux sure is doing well and it is rapidly taking over everything, especially devices. GNU often gets included in all the above, but not always.

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. ARM Announces The Cortex-A17

    ARM’s Cortex-A17 is for 32-bit mid-range devices and ARM claims it should offer around 60% better performance than the Cortex-A9. ARM is expecting Cortex-A17 devices to be shipping next year while the IP will be made available to partners this quarter.

  2. Does the Raspberry Pi work with Windows? – Your tech questions answered

    If you require a Windows computer, however (for example, if its primary use is going to be office tasks with some light programming), it’s hard to recommend anything close to that price point. This is because Windows is a much more bloated operating system and requires higher system specifications to operate and run well. You also have to be careful that you aren’t buying a Windows RT device, as you won’t be able to run your own code without some more setup and, even then, you’ll be limited to which languages you can write.

  3. BeagleBone Black: The Sub-$50 ARM Linux Board

    The BeagleBone Black has been one of the popular low-cost ARM development boards in recent months for budget-minded hobbyists due to its $45 price-tag, being Linux friendly, and support for powering off a USB cable. While it may be a cheap ARM development board, is its performance too dauntingly slow?

  4. Dell Wyse Cloud Connect launches for $129 (Pocket-sized thin client)

    Hook up a display and power source and the Cloud Connect will load up an Android 4.1 Jelly Bean-based operating system. It’s hardly the first Android TV stick to hit the streets. But it’s one of the first from a major PC maker — and certainly the first to feature tight integration with Dell’s virtualization and cloud software including Wyse Cloud Client Manager, support for VMWare, Citrix and Microsoft virtualization solutions, and PocketCloud personal cloud services.

  5. DragonBox Pyra open source mobile game console to pick up where OpenPandora left off

    It’s been a few years since a group of developers started working on an open source handheld gaming device called the OpenPandora. A lot’s changed since the original designs were drawn up, and now one of the developers has announced plans for a new device which should offer the kind of performance you’d get from a high-end phone or tablet in 2014. It just happens to be built on a much more open design.

  6. Open source gaming with the DragonBox Pyra

    According to Liliputing’s Brad Linder, the platform will be equipped with 2GB of RAM, a 1920 x 1080 pixel resistive touchscreen display, WiFi, Bluetooth, dual SDXC cards, a full-sized USB port, micro and mini USB ports, configurable notification lights, HDMI output, a backlit QWERTY keyboard and PowerVR SGX544 graphics.

  7. Which operating system will colonise the Internet of Things?

    If Android were to lead in the race to colonise the IoT, there would still need to be deep (perhaps kernel level) customisation features applied for the wildly different device types.

  8. The Age of “Commonalities” has Arrived

    Last year saw the public launch of a number of efforts that convincingly illustrate the fulfillment of this prediction. One of them, called the AllSeen Alliance, is focused on making the long-heralded “Internet of Things” a reality and is already making rapid progress in pursuit of that goal.

  9. Open IoT SBC runs Linux and Android on Cortex-A9

    The “Revolutionizing the Internet of Things” (RIoT) single board computer is designed for a variety of Internet of Things (IoT) and other low-power embedded applications, says Newark Element14, a Chicago based distributor owned by Premier Farnell. Premier Farnell recently launched an ARM9-based EDM6070AR-01 SBC and HMI system. Both the RIoTboard and the EDM6070AR-01 are backed up by the company’s Element14 developer community, and supported with open source code and full schematics.

  10. Medical Device dev platform runs Linux on DaVinci SoC

    Now, the company offers a new medical-focused Andromeda Reference Platform based on two new COMs running the first two SoCs called the DM816x SOM and DM814x SOM. Like the earlier modules, which have been used in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), the two new Linux-based COMs are also available separately for volume runs, according to eInfochips Corporate Marketing Manager Dhaval Shah.

Big Milestones in the World of Android/Linux

Posted in GNU/Linux, Google at 9:34 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Important new developments that show the rapid growth of the Linux-based Android operating system

ANDROID hardly needs to prove itself anymore. It has become somewhat of a de facto standard and its domination is assured for the time being. Suffice to say, Android has been a thing for the Linux Foundation to brag about. Android is a myth buster. It helps bust the myth that Linux somehow “failed”. Android smartphones shipment is said to have just crossed 800 million [1].

Android is now going after Windows’ turf, expanding more and more to x86 [2] and even running Windows applications natively [3] (Android is already being put on some desktops). Remember Microsoft’s “Surface” (the one before the failure which was a portable device)? Well, a 46-inch touchscreen coffee table now runs Android [4], not Windows (prior Microsoft’s “Surface” there were numerous that ran GNU/Linux). Linux is clearly ahead of the game and for robotics Foxconn is now turning to Android [5]. It’s not just about tablets [6] and smartphones anymore [7,8] (Android clearly dominates these areas). With Chromebox out [9] from large OEMs such as Acer [10] it sure seems like the future is very Android-centric, and by extension Linux-powered.

Android is one of the greatest things that ever happened to Linux, but it’s not to be confused with freedom. A lot of advocacy work remains to be done. High morale is highly justified.

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. Android Smartphone shipment crosses 800 million

    The year 2013 has seen smartphones cross an important milestone. The global smartphone shipment hit the billion mark for the first time, with 800 million contributed by Android. It is clear that Android dominated the smartphone market with Apple’s iPhone shipments maxing out at 153.4 million. These stats are according to data published by IDC on Wednesday.

  2. Android-x86 4.4 review – first Release Candidate

    Android-x86 4.4 RC1 review is a review of the latest development release of Android-x86, a port of Android designed to run on computers powered by Intel and AMD x86 processors, including netbooks and laptops and all-in-ones.

  3. Wine On Android Is Making Progress, Running Solitaire

    Last year was the last time we had a chance to talk about Wine on Android for running Windows programs on Google’s mobile operating system. While it’s not quite mainline yet, Wine on Android has been making much progress and can now run Windows’ Solitaire game on your Android device.

    Wine leader Alexandre Julliard provided a status update at FOSDEM last weekend for Wine on Google Android. The Wine on Android project is still focused upon supporting Windows binaries on Android for both Intel x86 and ARM devices.

    Julliard shared that they now have working support for Android’s Bionic C library, cross-compilation is supported for Wine on Android with both i686 and ARM architectures, and there’s a basic graphics driver using the desktop mode.

  4. 46-inch touchscreen coffee table runs Android

    Ideum is prepping an Android 4.1 version of its 46-inch, Intel Core i7-based Platform 46 Coffee Table, featuring 3M’s 60-touch, capacitive HD touchscreen.

  5. Google and Foxconn partner on robotics, report says

    The Taiwanese manufacturer is reportedly helping to carry out Google’s “vision for robotics,” and in return, Google will help the manufacturer deploy robotics in its factories.

  6. Google Nexus 8 rumored for April-end launch

    A recent report by DigiTimes said: “Google has been developing an 8-inch tablet to avoid price competition in the 7-inch segment for launch at the end of April with initial shipments of two million units, according to Taiwan-based supply chain makers.”

  7. Moto G on sale for $99 from US Cellular without contract
  8. Moto G goes on sale on Flipkart starting Rs. 12,499

    Motorola’s Moto G is trying to prove that budget Android Phones do not need to compromise on quality. Moto G takes design cues from it’s premium (costlier) sibling, the Moto X. It has good looks and reviews also state a very good build quality. It runs an almost clean version of Android 4.3 KitKat (Upgradeable to Android 4.4), with no bloatware, or fancy custom skin.

  9. Beep: a Chromecast like streamer for your speakers

    Beep is a new startup by Googlers, which has unveiled ‘Beep’, a device which takes audio streams from your Android device and plays them on the speakers it is attached to. Most latest high-end speakers have inbuilt streaming functionality, but many previous generation but decent music systems lack that feature and ‘Beep’ aims to solve that problem.

  10. Asus’ sleek new Chromebox adds industry and functionality for only $179

Non-Android Mobile Linux: Jolla, Tizen, WebOS and Firefox OS Gain Momentum

Posted in GNU/Linux, Google, LG, Samsung at 9:14 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: A quick look at some recent developments involving mobile Linux that’s not Android

LINUX and GNU are taking over the mobile world. Not only the Google-run Android (US-centric) is capitalising on GNU (founded in US) and Linux (centered in Portland). This is an international effort to capitalise on Free software, challenging proprietary systems like Blackberry’s and Apple’s, not only Android, which has been exceptionally surveillance-friendly.

The England-based Canonical (London-based offices) has Ubuntu for mobile devices, the Finland-based Jolla (former Nokia staff) has a promising operating system that’s a huge success in Finland and is very liberal even in the hardware sense [1], Korean giant Samsung is working on Tizen with new backers [2,3] (although none has pledged actual devices [4]), so Samsung is not focused just on Android, and LG (the other Korean giant) pushes WebOS [5]. Then there is Geeksphone, which incorporates Firefox OS but only alongside Android [6].

All these efforts ought to remind us that Linux and GNU are international endeavours that increase sharing, choice, diversity, etc. It’s not all about Android and there is no “monopoly” here, as some Microsoft- and Apple-friendly ‘journalists’ have been trying to insinuate recently. There are Android-derived alternatives such as CyanogenMod, and Google is not shunning them [7] unless they cause security risks [8].

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. Mobile Customization Gets Boost with Jolla’s The Other Half

    The dream of customizing mobile devices with 3D printed modules took another step forward this week when Jolla opened sales of its promised “The Other Half” customizable backplates for Jolla smartphones. The Finnish company has even posted an SDK to let developers construct their own 3D printed backplate designs for the phone, which runs the Linux-based Sailfish OS.

  2. ZTE, Sprint, SoftBank join open source Tizen OS development
  3. Tizen adds members, teases UI

    Tizen has always been the presumed heavyweight among the new crop of mobile Linux operating systems, yet it has increasingly seemed more like a wispy shadow. Now, despite growing signs that Samsung’s first Tizen phones may not ship until late 2014, and doubts whether the company will put much effort behind the OS now that it has made peace with Google, the Tizen marketing push has cranked up for the upcoming Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. This week, the Tizen Association industry group that supports the Linux Foundation hosted Tizen project, announced 15 new members for its partner program.

  4. Tizen teasing continues as new members join but none pledge devices
  5. LG pushes WebOS into digital signage

    LG is launching a new line of “all-in-one” digital signage systems that run the Linux-based WebOS, including new HTML middleware for app development.

  6. Geeksphone’s dual-boot Android Firefox OS device coming next week

    Spanish smartphone maker Geeksphone has revealed more details on its forthcoming dual-boot Android and Firefox OS device.

  7. CyanogenMOD developer demos Android Mirroring to Chromecast

    Well, Google had warned not to use preview SDK to write apps as it was in initial phase. Dutta has an AllCast app which allows one to stream quite a lot of local content to Chromecast. Now since Google has released the SDK and opened Chromecast to 3rd party developers there are immense possibilities – and Dutta is back. He has teased users with an app which can mirror the Android screen on Chromecast cast.

  8. Google to banish mobe-makers using old Androids: report

    Android Police is claiming to have received a copy of a Google memo, stating that Google Mobile Services certification will no longer be available to any device submitted by an operator running anything less than Android 4.2.

Patents ‘Reform’ Debate Still Controlled by Corporations, Price of GNU/Linux Servers at Stake

Posted in Patents at 8:49 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Revisiting the largely-warped patent debate, which focuses on desires of corporations and continues to leave Free software vulnerable

WHEN big corporations say they are against the NSA they don’t mean what we, mere mortals, assume they are saying. To corporations the issues are seen very differently; they’re not bothered about privacy at all, they are only concerned with how much money they make and how customers perceive their privacy policies. Well, the same goes for patents.

When Susan Decker is writing for the corporate press (Bloomberg) she is serving the same media that regularly misuses the propaganda term “Intellectual Property” and elevates monopoly. It’s fake concern. Decker is of course just focusing on patent trolls (the small ones), not big trolls like Microsoft or even the problem with patent scope (e.g. software patents). This whole debate about patents got warped by corporations, especially last year ,and we lost interest in covering it anymore. To speak about trolls and focus/obsess over them it to merely serve the corporate propaganda. Activism and grassroots movements got co-opted by plutocrats; no wonder FFII is no longer active.

“This won’t do anything against real trolls,” iophk explained. “Those are just paper companies with no assets to confiscate.” Notice how Microsoft Nokia-fed patent troll MOSAID brags about growth, saying it “Doubles In Size”.

To speak about trolls without talking about those who give them patents (like Microsoft gave patents to Vringo, which then attacked Google) totally misses the point. “Nor does it address the root problem of software patents themselves.”

Rackspace, which is one of the few US companies (of considerable size) that fought back against software patents, has just had its CEO ‘retiring’ [1], which doesn’t bode well for proper resistance. IBM, the architect of OIN, is rapidly shrinking [2,3] (not just outsourcing), which also can affect its GNU/Linux servers endeavours [4]. Servers are an area where GNU/Linux is dominant [5] and companies like Rackspace do exceptionally well (we recently covered the policy of releasing code as Free software at Rackspace). IBM recently sold its x86 server business to the Chinese (x86 servers still matter [6]) and at HP servers are now made which are GNU/Linux-only [7] (no Windows support). Google, the world’s biggest GNU/Linux user (Google is bigger than Amazon, Salesforce and others), has been coming under the most legal cases over patents involving Linux, Chrome OS, Android etc. Some GNU/Linux servers, such as the ones at Amazon, are already being taxed by Microsoft — a trend we must counter as a matter of priority. Tackling patent policy would be the simplest solution. This is probably the most important issue facing Free software today.

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. Rackspace Doubles Down on OpenStack as CEO Retires
  2. IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as ‘slaughter’ and ‘massive’
  3. “Slaughter House”: First Person Accounts Of How IBM Just Fired Thousands Of Workers Across India

    A week ago, the Dell dude warned that it’s going to be a layoff “bloodbath” as the recently LBO-ed firm began firing 15,000. Now it’s IBM’s turn.

    According to WRAL Tech Wire, the company which has underperformed Wall Street’s expectations for many quarters, has begun “cost-rationalizing” terminations in India – the country that hosts some 100,000 of IBM’s employees and where IBM reportedly employs the greatest number of workers. The unit targeted is the Systems Technology Group which is the troubled hardware group selling its low-end x86 server business to Lenovo for $2.3 billion and where Big Blue’s executives have launched “Resource Action”, also known as “rebalancing” but best known as mass, across the board terminations where by some estimates up to 13,000 of IBM’s 434,000 workers are set to be let go.

  4. IBM Power Development Platform Emphasizes Linux ISVs

    Access to Power Systems servers for business partners, primarily independent software providers (ISVs), has been revamped with improved tooling for Linux-oriented ISVs bringing that development arena up to par with what has existed for IBM i and AIX developers for some time. This particular partner program, which is now called the IBM Power Development Platform (PDP), was formerly known as the Virtual Loaner Program. It was established in 2003 to encourage ISV development projects and provide a cloud-based test environment for companies developing and enhancing applications.

  5. Has Linux Conquered the Cloud?

    The only challenge left for Linux to fully conquer the cloud is in the private and hybrid sectors. Private cloud technology like OpenStack is pushing Linux kernel-based virtual machines, or KVMs, on the compute side and challenging VMware’s position, asserted Turk.

  6. Futuremark Develops Servermark Benchmarking Tool For Linux-Based x86 Servers

    Today, Futuremark is expanding into the enterprise space with Servermark, which the company says is “a new benchmark that will enable IT professionals in businesses large and small to accurately measure and compare the performance of servers.”

  7. FIRST LOOK: HP takes giant leap in server design

    Another interesting wrinkle: Only Linux distributions are supported: Red Hat, CentOS, Fedora, and Ubuntu. No Windows.

War on Everything (Minds, Lawyers, Journalists, Gamers, Surfers, Foreigners)

Posted in News Roundup at 8:02 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Categorised outline of news from yesterday evening and so far today

Honours

War on Journalism

  • U.S. press freedom rank plummets
  • US Press Freedom Threatened

    First Amendment rights matter most. Without them all other freedoms are at risk. Post-9/11 policies threaten them.

    Bush waged war against them. Obama escalated it. He promised transparency, accountability and reform. He called whistleblowing “acts of courage and patriotism.” He said one thing. He did another.

    Press freedoms are endangered. An October Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) report discussed Obama and the press.

    Journalists say he’s waging war on dissent. He exceeds the worst of George Bush. He’s heading America on a fast track to tyranny.

War on Free Thought/Reading

Surveillance in Video Games

  • Secret Surveillance: How to fly under the NSA’s radar

    “Now even when you’re just recreationally playing video games, you can’t have fun either. You have to be careful what you say. You don’t want to say a word that can flag you and you get a visit from a law enforcement officer or something,” Marmolejo said.

  • Report: Valve anti-cheat scans your DNS history

    Valve is looking at your browsing history right now, if a recent report is to be believed. It seems that the company’s Valve Anti Cheat system (VAC) reportedly looks at all the domains you have visited, and if it finds that you’ve frequented hack sites, who knows what actions it will take.

War on Lawyers

  • Edward Snowden’s Lawyer Claims Harassment from Heathrow Airport Border Police

    Jesselyn Radack, a human rights lawyer representing Edward Snowden, has claimed that she was detained and questioned in a “very hostile” manner on Saturday by London Heathrow Airport’s Customs staff.

    Radack told civil liberties blog Firedoglake that she was taken to a room to be questioned by a Heathrow Border Force officer who showed very little interest in her passport documents but subjected her to questioning about whistle-blowers Edward Snowden, Bradley Manning and Julian Assange.

  • ‘Why Have You Gone to Russia Two Times in Three Months?’—Heathrow Customs Agent Interrogates Snowden Lawyer
  • Snowden’s Lawyer Interrogated By UK Authorities At Heathrow Airport

    She was “stone face cold” during the interrogation but afterward was shaking and in tears. “How did he know to bring up those names?”

    This blatant attempt to intimidate Snowden’s lawyer, who was informed that she was on an “inhibited persons list,” comes in the wake of news that a US law firm was spied upon as it advised the Indonesian government in a trade dispute with Australia. It confirms that for the US and UK governments, nothing is exempt from their total surveillance, not even information traditionally covered by attorney-client privilege.

Australia

NSA Leadership

  • Outgoing NSA director: ‘It’s not our mission’ to spy on everyone in the world

    The National Security Agency (NSA) will send its recommendations for where to store telephone metadata records to President Obama later this week, the outgoing NSA director said Friday in a speech defending his agency’s surveillance tactics. General Keith Alexander, who is retiring as NSA director next month, did not say where he thinks the data should be held. President Obama recommended on January 17th that the government stop holding Americans’ phone call records, but pushing the data out to either telephone companies or to a third party are both seen as having significant drawbacks.

  • Clapper admits NSA should have been ‘transparent from the outset’ on surveillance

    The Director of National Intelligence has admitted that, in hindsight, the US intelligence community would have been smarter to disclose some details about how telephone records belonging to millions of Americans have been collected for years.

Partisanship

  • Hang together against NSA spying

    Last June, on behalf all Americans, I filed two class action lawsuits against President Barack Hussein Obama, Attorney General Eric Holder, NSA Director Keith Alexander, the National Security Agency (NSA), the Department of Justice (DOJ) and federal Judge Roger Vinson of the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC), who authorized and issued an illegal order allowing the NSA to intercept and collect so-called telephonic and Internet metadata on nearly the entire U.S. citizenry. Metadata allows the government to access and track the most intimate details of a person’s private and professional life.

  • NSA unites right, left ends of political spectrum
  • NSA Surveillance Exposes Political Party Divisions

Drones

  • Iowa Land Of…. Reaper Drones And Hellfire Missiles?

    There will be drone legislation introduced in the Iowa legislature addressing privacy and surveillance issues. How much more ought we be concerned with the killing of civilians (a fate much worse than losing privacy) done with the dollars, and in the name of, Iowans.

  • Obama’s itchy trigger finger on drone strikes: what happened to due process?

    The once-extraordinary circumstances required for the US to assassinate a human being have become all too ordinary

  • Air Weapons: Hellfire Crushes The Competition

    In service since 1984, the American AGM-114 Hellfire missile has not only proved enormously useful in the war on terror, it has also defeated numerous efforts to replace it with something better. It didn’t help that an improved Hellfire, Hellfire II, appeared in 1994 and over 30,000 have been produced so far. These have been the most frequently used American missiles for over a decade, with over 16,000 fired in training or (mostly) combat since 2001.

Militarism

Torture

  • Imprisoned CIA Whistleblower Threatened with ‘Diesel Therapy,’ Suffers Shakedowns for Talking to Press

    The federal correctional institution of Loretto, Pennsylvania, where former CIA officer John Kiriakou is serving a thirty-month jail sentence, appears to be scrambling to find any way they can to stop him from sending letters from prison. He has written another letter that details what seem to be clear acts of retaliation.

    Since August of last year, Firedoglake has been publishing “Letters from Loretto,” by Kiriakou, an imprisoned whistleblower who was the first member of the CIA to publicly acknowledge that torture was official US policy under the George W. Bush administration. He was convicted in October 2012 after he pled guilty to violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act (IIPA) when he provided the name of an officer involved in the CIA’s Rendition, Detention and Interrogation (RDI) program to a reporter. He was sentenced in January 2013 of this year and reported to prison on February 28, 2013.

    Firedoglake has been publishing Kiriakou’s “Letters from Loretto” since the summer of last year. In fact, the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) considers copies of Kiriakou’s letters to be a danger to the Loretto prison: a threat to the “security, good order or discipline of the institution” or “to the protection of the public” or a document that “might facilitate criminal activity.”

    In Kiriakou’s most recent letter from prison, written on February 10, he reports a threat allegedly made by a “senior prison official,” who told him months ago that officials have discussed putting him in “diesel therapy” for the rest of his sentence.

Coup

  • Colorful past behind Libyan ‘coup maker’

    On the same day, former military chief Major General Khalifa Hifter called for the parliament and government to be suspended, in an announcement some described as a coup attempt.

    [...]

    It is quite interesting that the newspaper chose to place Hifter’s “ridiculous” coup in an Egyptian context. There is a more immediate and far more relevant context which the newspaper and its veteran correspondents should know very well. It is no secret that Hifter has had strong backing from the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) for nearly three decades.

  • Is US Supporting Oligarch Coup Attempt In Venezuela?

    Venezuela is a country engulfed in myth in the US media. It is almost impossible to get the truth from corporate media outlets. Indeed, Venezuela may be the most lied about country in the US media. Sadly, groups that had been previously trusted like Human Rights Watch have joined the anti-Venezuela propaganda campaign and their reports on the country have been rebutted in great detail. In this current round of misinformation, the presence of propaganda against Venezuela also been evident in the social media.

    The misinformation in the United States is because Venezuela is the lynch pin of the movement of Latin America away from US domination. Further, the oligarch class in Venezuela continues to control much of the media and big business interests. They are able to have a big influence on the economy, create scarcity of key goods and can impact the value of Venezuelan currency by flooding Venezuela with off-market US dollars. The oligarchs lost big in recent municipal elections and have lost national elections to Chavez and Maduro repeatedly. Not only is Venezuela a challenge to US hegemony in the Americas, it is a challenge to big finance capitalism. It has rejected the corporate-based neoliberal economics that the US is pushing throughout the world to the detriment of most people and the benefit of the wealthy. For all these reasons Venezuela is a top target of the United States and the oligarchs in Venezuela.

Police

  • Farmers Rise Up Against Agribusiness, Face Down Riot Police in Brazil

    Thousands of farmers marched on Brazil’s capital Wednesday in the face of riot police, tear gas and rubber bullets, demanding justice for the millions of landless farmers they say have suffered for years under the country’s agricultural policies.

    The farmers, organized by the Landless Workers Movement (MST), numbered around 16,000 in the streets of Brasília where they were confronted by riot police in the city center as they headed towards the presidential palace.

    Many of the MST protesters today are angry that President Dilma Rousseff is backtracking from the policies of the past two administrations and allowing “agro-business to undercut chances of land reform.”

  • Ex-cop acquitted of killing homeless man chased out of restaurant by angry residents

    If a recent night out at Denny’s is any indication, public life may not go back to normal any time soon for one California police officer even after being acquitted of murder.

    Former Fullerton, California, police officer Manuel Ramos was one of two officials accused of beating a homeless schizophrenic man named Kelly Thomas to death back in 2011. Thomas was beaten and tasered multiple times during the confrontation, which left him in a coma. He died five days later in a hospital bed.

  • Father trying to stop family fight beaten to death by Oklahoma cops

    A Valentine’s Day outing turned tragic for one Oklahoma family who claims five police officers beat their father to death during a confrontation outside a local movie theater.

    The death is currently under investigation, and three police officers have been placed on administrative leave as the probe unfolds.

    The incident occurred February 14 in Moore, Oklahoma, when an argument erupted between Nair Rodriguez and her daughter Lunahi. Nair slapped her daughter during the dispute and ended up leaving the theater. When Luis Rodriguez chased after his wife in a bid to stop her, law enforcement officials intervened and asked for his identification.

Links 17/2/2014: Games

Posted in News Roundup at 5:31 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Links 17/2/2014: Applications

Posted in News Roundup at 5:29 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • Suricata 2.0rc1 Available!
  • NoMachine 4.1 Release Announcement
  • Open Source VoIP: What is Linphone?

    Linphone was the first open source software to use the session initiation protocol (SIP) with VoIP. The open software has voice, video and messaging features that can be used with any SIP VoIP operator. And because of its open source nature, it can be distributed for free.

  • FFmpeg & Libav Add H.265 Encoder Via x265

    FFmpeg and its forked Libav have each added an H.265 / HEVC encoder today to their respective code-bases.

  • 10 snazzy music production tools for Ubuntu/Linux
  • Linux Design Tools: High-end Design on a Low-end Budget?

    While the world’s best commercial graphic applications come with packed with features, they also come with a price tag many find hard to justify.

    Though there are plenty of less expensive alternatives, the simple truth is: It’s hard to get cheaper than free.

    Today we’re going to look some of the free, open source graphic apps available, and see if they are a viable replacement.

    If you are currently unfamiliar with the abundance of free open source graphic apps now available, you may well be missing out.

    The best open source graphic applications on this list are comparable in quality to their leading commercial equivalents.

Links 17/2/2014: Instructionals

Posted in News Roundup at 5:28 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

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