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03.03.14

News Roundup: Rights and Politics

Posted in News Roundup at 11:38 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Today’s headlines, including Ukraine analysis, the return of drone strikes, and views from Venezuela

Assassination

Ukraine

Intervention

  • Tom Hayden on the crisis in Venezuela

    The American Congress and public are becoming used to street protests overthrowing elected governments regardless of the issue of national sovereignty. “Humanitarian intervention” in the affairs of other nations means willfully ignoring sovereignty where egregious human rights abuses are at stake and no negotiations are possible. The argument is somewhat attractive up to the point where it revives the Law of the Jungle. In the case of Venezuela, not only sovereignty but representative democracy are at stake, in a region which only recently began to shed the US-supported rule of oligarchs and generals.

  • Venezuelan Open Source Software Communities Condemn Media Manipulation

    In any case, we want to remind the owners of the business known as Zello.com that Venezuela is a sovereign and independent nation, and just as they are obliged to work with law enforcement agencies in the US when their network is used by someone to commit crimes, they should work together with the Venezuelan government to block the network of terrorists issuing messages that encourage violence and endanger the lives of Venezuelan citizens.

    Why should Venezuela allow any foreign company to break our laws and promote terrorism with impunity, especially at a time that are actively destabilizing our political and economic system? What would you do if a known terrorist who lives outside the United States used the network to promote aggression against the lives of public officials and promote terrorist attacks in your country? What would the US government do, or any other country do, if a group of people used a Venezuelan company to encourage US citizens to make weapons to attack and kill others, and try to destabilize and overthrow their government?

    [...]

    We repudiate the negative mainstreaming efforts underway by international media against Venezuela, and we exhort them to better inform themselves about the facts. We exhort the free software, hardware, knowledge and culture community around the world to research what’s really happening in our country and urgently ask the end of violent attacks by Venezuelan right wing factions, pushed and promoted by the US government.

  • In the TV spy show ‘The Americans,’ the CIA has to approve the scripts

    On the FX show The Americans, Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys play Philip and Elizabeth Jennings, a typical suburban couple in the 1980s. Two kids, nice house, they run a travel agency together. They’re also spies for the Soviet Union, moles sent to live among us. And their kids have no idea.

Surveillance

  • VIDEO: Bruce Schneier on the NSA

    When it comes to domestic surveillance and metadata collection, Schneier firmly believes that the Federal Bureau of Investigation is the right agency to handle that data. He noted that the FBI already has domestic security capabilities and is responsible for the national fingerprint database. “The FBI is where we have laws and we have transparency,” Schenier said.

  • Brazil, EU Take Pride In Temporarily Avoiding The NSA With New Joint Undersea Cable Run

    To pretend the NSA lacks the ability to simply tap this new cable run, nab that same data at any of a million interconnection points, or just get it handed to them by other intelligence agencies is perhaps either naive, a bit of political salesmanship for the project, or both. Still, it’s another instance of how the NSA revelations have significantly tarnished international/U.S. relations, resulting in a large number of countries making it a point of pride to avoid using U.S. technology. That’s not going to be particularly great for U.S. industry, and we’re likely only just seeing the tip of the iceberg.

  • NSA revelations may let jailed terrorists challenge their convictions
  • DOJ Still Ducking Scrutiny After Misleading Supreme Court on Surveillance

    Our recent history shows that we cannot rely solely on the government’s word, even if it is operating in good faith. The lack of transparency about this obvious misrepresentation is cause for concern. Was this alleged oversight confined to Section 702, one of many controversial surveillance authorities? Or is that merely the tip of the iceberg? Lawyers have an ethical obligation to speak with candor to tribunals, especially when representing the government. Amazingly, Verrilli has managed to remain silent throughout this controversy. It’s past time we heard from him directly.

  • Anti-NSA services on the rise: Encryption technology to leave no data trail for spying

    The National Security Agency’s snooping on email traffic and phone records has prompted a cottage industry in products meant to keep spies out of their customers’ business.

    Among the companies promoting devices at this year’s RSA technology-security conference in San Francisco, which attracts thousands of corporate executives, is Silent Circle. The company said its Blackphone, which is based on the Android operating system, will leave no unshielded records of calls, text messages or data storage for spies to obtain and mine.

  • NSA in the bluff as it tries to cover data truth

    The American security agency has claimed it’s not been collecting personal information of phone and internet users, but the Yahoo revelations have exposed the violation of individual privacy

  • Even Trade Talks Are Not Safe From Spying – OpEd

    A couple of weeks ago, it was revealed that American and Australian spy agencies had been monitoring the law firm Mayer Brown while it was representing the Indonesian government in trade talks with the United States. The revelation made it clear that those two governments, and probably many others, have not limited themselves to spying on terrorist groups and other criminal enterprises, but have extended their activities to include trade discussions.

  • An end to warrantless email searches?

    Legislation in the House that would end the warrantless searches of email records is gaining steam.

    Privacy advocates had grown frustrated in recent months as Senate legislation that would curtail the email powers of law enforcement was thrown off track amid revelations about National Security Agency surveillance.

Privacy

Civil Rights

  • ‘Trigger-happy’ Israeli army and police use reckless force in the West Bank
  • The Challenges of a Digital World to our Security & Liberty, Yvette Cooper MP

    British Labour Party remains the party of Internet spying and censorship. They gave us RIPA, they gave us DEA, and they want to do it again.

    My Labour MP, Meg Hillier, is the architect of the plan to issue national ID cards and voted for the Digital Economy Act. She’s in a safe seat, so voting against her is a fairly meaningless act, but I plan on doing so.

    With Tories and Labour both committed to a digital agenda built on ubiquitous surveillance and unaccountable censorship, we could really do with a decent alternative.

    Once, I believed that might be the Libdems, but their party leadership whipped them to vote for (seriously) a system of secret courts.

Animal Rights

Links 3/3/2014: Games

Posted in News Roundup at 8:41 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • Valve Games On AMD Foss Drivers

    Hey Linux gamers, got some good news for the AMD users . It’s pretty common knowledge Nvidia users get some good drivers at the trade-off of binary blob drivers (or not, depending on your ethics) and that AMD are often left in the dust, but how can open source drivers change that?

  • Planetary Annihilation Now In Gamma Phase With Major Patch, New GOL Video For You
  • Door Kickers Squad-Based Strategy Releases Alpha 9
  • Steam Family Sharing now open to public

    The announcement came over the Steam Community Boards, where it was announced that the Family Sharing feature is now available to the general public. Through this feature, a single user can share his/her entire Steam Library with up to five family members over ten different devices. Once the members are authorized, they can play any or all of the game through their own accounts. The achievements, saves and other related records achieved by the gamer will be tied to the gamer’s individual account using cloud saves.

  • Steam Hardware Survey Changes, Now Split Per-Platform

    Something to note is that it doesn’t show the lesser represented distro’s, I for example use Manjaro which isn’t shown.

    So, to look back on January Linux was actually on 1.34%, not 1.11%!

  • February 2014 Steam Hardware Survey Shows Linux At 1.3%

    According to the latest figures published by Valve for their “Steam Hardware Survey”, they put the percent of Linux gamers on Steam at 1.30%.

  • Many Linux Games To Look Forward To In 2014

    So Linux has a lot of games now, with plenty more still to come this year as it’s early days yet, but I have decided to list a few you really need to keep an eye on. Since we post so much news nowadays I feel that it is a good time to reflect on what we have still yet to come, so you don’t get lost in a sea of Linux games.

  • GOL Cast: Catching Phantoms And Poltergeists In GhostControl Inc.
  • Nothing To Hide, A Game Of Anti-Stealth & It’s Open Source

    I have tested the game and it runs really well on Manjaro, it’s very odd, but the premise is really funny. I love how it all looks like status updates on a social networking site.

  • Linux Gamers Have More Choices Than Ever

    After a number of years of remaining woefully behind other platforms, Linux is starting to be a gaming platform to take seriously. Late last year, I covered comments from Lars Gustavsson, a creative director for EA Digital Illusions CE (DICE), the Electronic Arts studio that does the Battlefield series, on the topic of Linux games. He had told Polygon that DICE would love to delve into Linux games, and that what Linux really needs is a “killer game.” Now, as 2014 is underway, Linux gamers actually have a lot of good choices.

  • Do Linux gamers have too many options now?

    My feeling is that the answer is clearly no, and frankly it’s very refreshing for Linux gamers to have different options at all. I remember the days when it was very hard to find games for Linux and I’d never want to go back to that. Ever. It was a miserable time if you used Linux and wanted to play games.

  • Shadowrun: Dragonfall now available on PC, Mac and Linux

    Shadowrun Returns today receives its first full-length campaign expansion with Shadowrun: Dragonfall from developer Harebrained Schemes. A 12+ hour campaign set in the city of Berlin awaits with new features.

  • Portal 2 released for Linux

    Today, a beta version of Portal 2, one of the most successful game titles poduced by Valve and generally one of the most successful computer games, has been released for Linux. While the first Portal has been available on Linux for a year now, Valve was working on other titles for Linux, like Left 4 Dead 2, Dota 2 or the new game consoles “Steam machines”, before releasing Portal 2 for Linux.

  • Cricket Audio now available for Linux

    Cricket Audio allows app developers to quickly add sound to their apps with just a few lines of code. It can play sounds directly from memory with low latency, or stream them from storage media, and is designed specifically for mobile games, with highly optimized code and low, predictable memory usage. It also works on Windows, OS X, and now Linux, so it can be integrated into authoring tools.

Links 3/3/2014: Applications

Posted in News Roundup at 8:39 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Links 3/3/2014: Instructionals

Posted in News Roundup at 8:36 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Snowden Leaks Confirm That Microsoft Xbox is Target for In-House Camera Surveillance, Not Just Chat Surveillance

Posted in Microsoft at 8:25 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Stasi

Summary: Revelations based on hard documents, clearly stating policy and intent, remind everyone that no product of Microsoft is safe from criminal scooping

THANKS to the leaks from Edward Snowden, we now know for sure that Skype is a spy and Xbox Live is under surveillance.

As mentioned briefly in our daily links, even Kinect is now a target. To quote one article about the subject, “GCHQ identified Kinect as possible snooping tool; Microsoft denies all knowledge” (the same can be said about Skype, which the NSA spies on and seemingly stores videos from).

Coverage about it (e.g. [1,2]) is already being warped or marginalised by Microsoft boosters [3]. There are lots of denials and “damage control” from Microsoft (usually prepended or appended to articles, obviously at the request of Microsoft), which serves the NSA with bad or non-existent encryption (as other leaks showed). Xbox One makes it even worse and we can now assume that it too will be a target of surveillance, as we correctly predicted last year. The same can be said about Nokia phones and it is now confirmed by the Finnish media that Microsoft spies on users of Nokia phones. “Oddly,” says Christine Hall, “at just about the same time that Nokia’s announcing the arrival of a phone running open source Windroid, the folks in Redmond are pushing some more FUD, saying that FOSS users are nothing if not dissatisfied with their use of open source. As reported by Katherine Noyes on LinuxInsider, this latest FUD attack was mounted by Microsoft blogger Alexbuk, who wrote of the UK’s proposal to mandate the use of ODF.”

We are going to revisit that latter item later this month. In the mean time, however, let us remember that almost everything which comes out from Redmond (Microsoft and Amazon) is tainted with surveillance capabilities. Not only so-called ‘terrorists’ are targetted. Microsoft has become an espionage company. Business ties explain why.

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. British Big Brother Is Watching?
  2. Microsoft Kinect Almost a Spy Tool for British Intelligence – Update

    It’s not just the NSA that’s caught with their authoritarian pants around their legs. Apparently, the British have been up to it too. According to The Guardian, not only has the British intelligence agency GCHQ been storing massive amounts of webcam footage, but it also considered using the always-on Microsoft Kinect as well.

  3. Smile, Kinect users. The Brits may spy on you with your camera.

If Ford Wants Open Source Community, It Should Embrace Neither Microsoft Nor Blackberry

Posted in GNU/Linux, Microsoft at 7:14 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Ford should avoid Blackberry’s QNX OS and instead go for a Linux-based OS

LAST WEEK we wrote about rumours that Ford was leaving Microsoft (the company’s key automobile partner for years). There are now some reports about it [1], which makes it look like more than a rumour. Ford was Microsoft’s biggest and perhaps only supporter when it comes to automobiles, so it must be a huge loss for Microsoft and perhaps the end of Microsoft’s escapades inside people’s cars (Microsoft has many problems others than that, even at the core business). What’s baffling, however, is the choice of Blackberry’s QNX OS; it’s proprietary, unlike Android, Linux, and all those massively-popular options for car operating systems (which can be tailored to the needs of pertinent companies large or small).

There are reports at the moment about Ford trying to appeal to the “Open-Source Community” (not necessarily software). One article said that “OpenXC, essentially an API to a car, is a combination of open-source hardware and software that lets enthusiasts extend their vehicles with custom applications and pluggable modules. It uses standard, well known tools to open up a wealth of data from the vehicle to developers.”

The problem is, unless Ford uses an Open/Free system that developers can tinker with (not just at API level), it will never attract much interest. Ford would be wise to move towards a Linux-oriented system (and not BSD-based but closed). Since we are only in the rumours stage, there is still room for change in judgment. Ford executives should explore a relationship with the Linux Foundation.

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. Why Ford is dumping Microsoft for Blackberry’s QNX OS

    Ford is reportedly set to replace the Windows-based Sync platform in its cars with an open-source based system used by several other automakers.

Embedded Linux News Roundup

Posted in GNU/Linux at 6:52 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: News about Linux devices and embedded Linux, categorised for easier digestion

Raspberry Pi

  • Raspberry Pi marks 2nd birthday with plan for open source graphics driver

    That “blob” is the closed source driver code that the Pi requires today. “In common with every other mobile graphics core, using the VideoCore IV 3D graphics core on the Pi requires a block of closed-source binary driver code (a ‘blob’) which talks to the hardware,” Upton wrote. “Our existing open-source graphics drivers are a thin shim running on the ARM11, which talks to that blob via a communication driver in the Linux kernel. The lack of true open-source graphics drivers and documentation is widely acknowledged to be a significant problem for Linux on ARM, as it prevents users from fixing driver bugs, adding features and generally understanding what their hardware is doing.”

  • A birthday present from Broadcom
  • Get Quake III running on Raspberry Pi using Broadcom’s open-source GPU drivers, earn $10K

    Broadcom has released open-source drivers and documentation for the graphics processor that’s used in the Raspberry Pi microcomputer, among other devices.

    “To date, there’s been a dearth of documentation and vendor-developed open source drivers for the graphics subsystems of mobile systems-on-a-chip (SoC),” Eben Upton, a Broadcom technical director and Raspberry Pi Foundation cofounder, wrote in a blog post. “Binary drivers prevent users from fixing bugs or otherwise improving the graphics stack, and complicate the task of porting new operating systems to a device without vendor assistance.”

  • Broadcom Open-Sources VideoCore IV 3D Graphics Stack

    In celebrating two years that Raspberry Pi has been around, Eben Upton has announced today that they are open-sourcing their OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0 graphics stack for the Broadcom VideoCore IV 3D graphics subsystem and it will help the Raspberry Pi with having a truly free graphics stack.

  • Android for All: Broadcom Gives Developers Keys to the VideoCore® Kingdom

    The community of open source mobile developers around the world are a vocal bunch – and here at Broadcom we’ve heard their call.

    To date, there’s been a dearth of documentation and vendor-developed open source drivers for the graphics subsystems of mobile systems-on-a-chip (SoC). Binary drivers prevent users from fixing bugs or otherwise improving the graphics stack, and complicate the task of porting new operating systems to a device without vendor assistance.

    But that’s changing, and Broadcom is taking up the cause.

  • A Nicely-Built 40-Core Raspberry Pi Cluster

    Raspberry Pi super-computing clusters have been attempted before, but usually they don’t turn out as nice as this new one that’s comprised of 40 Raspberry Pi boards inside of an acrylic chassis.

  • Teachers panicking over new computing curriculum

    Raspberry Pi director of Educational Development Clive Beale questioned whether the DfE is doing enough. He said, “I’m really worried it hasn’t been taken seriously enough.”

  • Raspberry Pi: giant hacks for a tiny board

    Usually there are two ways to look forward to buy a Raspberry Pi: first, think about a strange thing to make, and then go to the website; or second, buy the Raspberry Pi board having no idea of what you are going to do with it. Usually, I buy things and only after that I go through the Internet in search of inspiration and creative use cases for my new toys. That was the case with my first Raspberry Pi board: everyone seems to be able to put together his tiny PC with some parts (monitor, mouse and so on), a CPU and a lightweight Linux distribution, but what can we do that is totally crazy, mind-blowing and problem-solving?

Legato

Rikomagic

PicoScope

  • Embedded World: PicoScope gets Linux software

    Pico Technology has released a beta version of the PicoScope 6 oscilloscope software for Linux.

    This is intended to support the use of Linux in the scientific and educational fields.

    The PicoScope 6 application runs on a PC to create oscilloscope, FFT spectrum analyser and measuring device functions.

  • Pico scopes now run Linux

    Users can save captures for offline analysis, share them with other PicoScope for Windows and PicoScope for Linux users, or export them in text, CSV and Mathworks MATLAB 4 formats. The only additional hardware needed is a USB oscilloscope.

  • A USB scope for Linux fans

    USB oscilloscopes are popular – only that the marketable supply is focused almost exclusively to Windows platforms. Pico Technology now redeems the growing flock of Linux users by offering such a software that runs under their preferred operating system.

Cortex

Linaro/Yocto/Enea

Misc.

The Continued Occupation of US ‘Trade’ by Microsoft- and Monopolies-backed Entities Like BSA

Posted in Intellectual Monopoly at 6:20 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Corruption in the process which synthesises draconian laws whose only purpose is to protect monopolies, including the copyright monopoly

“Nice animation,” calls it Glyn Moody, “makes bias clear” (referring to this visualisation). So it seems like the BSA is now officially well inside the insidious panels that try to take everything from the public and pass everything to few plutocrats, under the guise of “free” “trade”. The Hill described the latest addition, namely Robert Holleyman, as “a former software trade group lobbyist for a top trade office.” President Obama has just nominated him, which shows what side Obama and Biden are really on. There is already interpretation of the news [1], which in many people’s views helps show (yet again) that policy around copyright, patents, etc. has nothing to do with public interests. Suffice to say, the corporate media does not cover this [2] (or hardly ever does) and only few voices of reasons do give it coverage in the corporate media [3]; they even slam the TPP, albeit too gently. Here in the UK, some shamelessly-named “Intellectual Property” Office [4] continues to distract from a policy which favours public interests, leaving it to sites that British ISPs are blocking by default (TorrentFreak, or the people’s voice, is not allowed) to speak some sanity [5-10] and also cover [11] the latest case of abuse of copyrights [12-15] (Professor Lessig has just won).

When it comes to copyrights, patents and all those other plutocrats-leaning laws, just remember that there is a war being fought against the people, ensuring that everything that’s ours if no longer ours, using some pixie dust which is draconian laws. We are never really part of making those laws; lobbyists of companies make up these laws, sometimes in secret. This massive injustice rarely receives press coverage because owners of the media have vested (multiple but aligning) interests.

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. Revolving Door: Obama Nominates Copyright Maximalist Lobbyist To Deputy USTR Position

    We recently highlighted the massive problem of the revolving door between the USTR’s office and various patent and copyright maximalist organizations. One example of this was Victoria Espinel, a former USTR official (and then IP Enforcement Coordinator — better known as the IP Czar), who went on to become the head of the Business Software Alliance (BSA), the maximalist lobbying/trade group that is basically a voice for Microsoft, IBM and Adobe’s copyright maximalist positions. Espinel’s predecessor in the job was Robert Hollyeman, who lead the BSA for two decades, during which time it became well known for its preposterous studies equating every infringing copy to a lost sale.

  2. As TPP Opposition Soars, Corporate Media Blackout Deafening

    Opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership—dubbed ‘NAFTA on steroids’—is receiving unprecedented popular opposition and nearly no news coverage by major outlets

  3. No Big Deal

    And you know what? That’s O.K. It’s far from clear that the T.P.P. is a good idea. It’s even less clear that it’s something on which President Obama should be spending political capital. I am in general a free trader, but I’ll be undismayed and even a bit relieved if the T.P.P. just fades away.

  4. Government response to consultation on EU copyright rules
  5. RapidShare Stops Washington Lobbying Efforts and Regains Pirate Stamp

    Popular file-hosting service RapidShare has stopped its lobbying efforts in Washington. The company invested over a million dollars in recent years to upgrade its image, an effort that initially paid off. However, just a few months after RapidShare’s lobbyists left Washington and despite huge changes to the company’s operations, the U.S. Government has now rebranded the service as a notorious market.

  6. RIAA Accuses Grooveshark of Making Piracy a Job Requirement

    In the long-running case of the RIAA versus music-streaming service Grooveshark, the major labels have this week asked the court for summary judgment in their favor. They claim that Grooveshark’s founders instructed employees to upload as much infringing content as possible, even making that a job requirement. Evidence proving greater levels of infringement was subsequently destroyed, the labels say.

  7. Why YouTube’s Automated Copyright Takedown System Hurts Artists
  8. Why Is The Copyright Monopoly Necessary, Anyway?

    The copyright industry is amazing at pretending the copyright monopoly has always been there in its current form. But international copyright monopolies didn’t exist in practice across the Western world before 1989.

  9. Google Downranks The Pirate Bay in Search Results

    Google is downranking The Pirate Bay’s website in its search results for a wide variety of queries, some of which are not linked to copyright-infringing content. Interestingly, the change mostly seems to affect TPB results via the Google.com domain, not other variants such as Google.ca and Google.co.uk.

  10. World’s Largest BitTorrent Trackers Suffer Prolonged Downtime

    The two largest BitTorrent trackers on the Internet have been down for a few days, and will remain offline for another week. The tracker owners are performing maintenance and replacing hardware to cope with the billions of connection requests they get each day. Interestingly enough, most casual BitTorrent users are completely unaware of the prolonged downtime.

  11. Lawrence Lessig Wins Damages For Bogus YouTube Takedown

    Law professor, Creative Commons co-founder and advocate for copyright reform Lawrence Lessig has agreed to receive damages from an Australian music label. Without considering fair use Liberation wrongly had some of Lessig’s work removed from YouTube and threatened to sue – it didn’t go well.

  12. Label Threatening Larry Lessig With Insane Infringement Claim Over Fair Use Video Caves In, Pays Up

    Last summer, we wrote about what appeared to be a suicidal Australian record label, Liberation Music, which issued a DMCA claim (after first having a disputed ContentID claim) on a classic presentation by famed professor (and copyright/fair use expert) Larry Lessig, in which he discusses fair use and creativity, using as an example, some clips that made use of the song “Lisztomania” by the band Phoenix. Liberation holds the Australian (not US) rights to that song, but still went DMCA crazy. Lessig filed a counter-notice and Liberation (again, apparently having no idea what it was doing) sent Lessig a letter saying that it would be filing a copyright infringement lawsuit against him if he didn’t retract his counter-notice. The whole thing was bizarre. It was as if whoever was doing all of this at Liberation Music was unaware of basic copyright law, the concept of fair use, how the DMCA works and (most importantly) who Larry Lessig is. In response, Lessig did the appropriate thing and filed for declaratory judgment and (more importantly) sought damages under section 512(f) of the DMCA, the nearly toothless clause of the DMCA that lets victims of bogus takedowns seek damages. As we’ve been pointing out for years 512(f) is almost entirely useless because courts almost never enforce it — and we hoped that with such a clear cut case, we might finally get a good 512(f) ruling on the books.

  13. Australian music label Liberation to pay damages to Harvard professor Lawrence Lessig in copyright battle

    An Australian music label has agreed to pay damages to a Harvard law professor after it threatened to sue him for using a popular song in a YouTube video lecture.

  14. A Win For Fair Use After Record Label, Copyright Lawyer Settle

    An Australian record label that threatened to sue one of the world’s most famous copyright attorneys for infringement has reached a settlement with him.

    The settlement includes an admission that Lawrence Lessig, a Harvard Law School professor, had the right to use a song by the band Phoenix.

  15. Phoenix Side With Lawrence Lessig On “Lisztomania” Fair Use Lawsuit

    LL’s video was, of course, in defense of free-use and used my video as an example (my original video that once had millions of views and is now stuck in a reuploaded YT purgatory, but I’ll get to that). My little bad-quality joke of a video spawned a life of its own in numerous live-action remakes, which is incredible. And Lessig – a Harvard copywright lawyer – was using it in speeches as an example.

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