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Patent Trolls and the Rise of Non-Practicing Parasites Not Just in the US But Also in Europe

Posted in America, Europe, Patents at 11:16 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

It’s already happening right here in the UK…

Carnegie Mellon University

Summary: The role played by patents, increasingly bolstered by self-serving patent maximalists, outweighs actual creativity, innovation and production which patents were, in principle, supposed to encourage and advance

PATENT trolls are a huge problem, but the corporate media, owned and/or influenced by large corporations, does not pay attention to the fact that patent trolls almost always use software patents. Therein lies the bigger problem. It’s the core problem. Software patents should never have existed in the first place, as evidence always served to show that they would be counter-productive.

Here we see a new article from the British mass media, which was summarised this week (just a couple of days ago) as follows: “Apple has been told to pay a hefty fine to a small company for patent infringement. So why aren’t we celebrating the victory of a ‘David’? Because the little guy is a ‘patent troll’, stifling innovation by abusing the system, says Rhodri Marsden” (he says nothing about the nature of the patent/s or Apple‘s own patent aggression, including its 6-year patent war against Linux/Android).

As we put it earlier this month, "VirnetX Case Against Apple Shows Not the Problem With Patent Trolls But With Software Patents."

In other news, as noted here yesterday, “IV [Intellectual Ventures] Invention Fund Teams with Fraunhofer in Europe” (Fraunhofer is a notorious actor when it comes to software patents in Europe).

The EPO-funded bloggers wrote a puff piece for Intellectual Ventures, the world’s largest patent troll. This trolls-funded mouthpiece (also EPO-funded) went with the headline “The Intellectual Ventures invention fund teams up with Fraunhofer in major move into Europe”. UPC would help more such trolls penetrate Europe, giving jobs to patent lawyers who profit from an increase in litigation, or “patent warming” as the FFII’s President calls it.

Who would more likely settle with patent trolls? Take a guess. It’s European SMEs, which make up a lot of the industry here (we don’t have Googles and IBMs here, except for branches of these US firms). It makes SMEs a very attractive bunch of targets for trolls, especially in Europe. To quote United For Patent Reform (from the other day): “Did you know patent trolls are disproportionately hurting smaller, more vulnerable firms?” There is a valuable reference there with additional information and it links to this paper (published less than a year ago by James Bessen et al). Wall Street, i.e. the big businesses well past their IPOs (and with massive legal departments of their own) promotes or at least defends patent trolls in its press. Is anybody surprised by this?

“Software patents should never have existed in the first place, as evidence always served to show that they would be counter-productive.”The Computer and Communications Industry Association, which is funded by big businesses, now focuses on universities — not aggressors like Microsoft or Apple — as the problem.

“‘Innovation’”, wrote in response this one person, “is a piece of paper you can sue others with?”

“Warped mentality,” added this anonymous person.

The context for this misdirection must be reports about CMU, which not only attacked anonymity (undermining Tor for the US government) but also attacks practicing companies using patents. As WIPR put it: “Carnegie sued Marvell at the US District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania in 2009, claiming the company had sold billions of chips using the technology.”

This is likely to become a sort of ‘tax’ on products that almost everyone buys. See parts of a longer discussion with Patent Buddy about the funding of US universities and how it now relates to such legal battles over patents. “Carnegie Mellon,” as it was put at one stage, “has transformed US universities in[to] patent trolls” (link to CMU).

“These days in the US,” Patent Buddy told me, “patent attorneys make about as much as engineers.”

What about the externalities? They’re everyone except patent lawyers.

“It makes SMEs a very attractive bunch of targets for trolls, especially in Europe.”The response to him was that “in a better world they should do another more useful job.” And on it goes (details in Twitter)…

Looking at some press coverage we find that, based on the formal statement, “Marvell Technology Group Ltd. (NASDAQ: MRVL), a global leader in integrated silicon solutions, and Carnegie Mellon University, a private research university, today announced that, pursuant to a court-ordered mediation, the Company and University have settled their patent infringement lawsuit. The parties have resolved the case on mutually acceptable terms, including an aggregate payment by Marvell to CMU of $750 million, with no ongoing royalty payments.”

Here is what patent maximalists wrote: “Court-ordered mediation ends in $750m agreement to settle the seven-year-long patent infringement lawsuit between Marvell Technology Group and Carnegie Mellon University” (see CMU background).

“CMU does not actually produce anything.”This is not a software patent, but the issue here is different. CMU does not actually produce anything. The source of CMU’s funding, as noted above, is also relevant to this. From an economic perspective, the public only loses.

Incidentally, as pointed out by the FFII’s President the other day, “Olimex [is] forced to file software patents are required in order to get EU funding,” which is an “insane waste of public money” (it can also be used to tax the public later).

Here is the relevant bit of a blog post published two days ago:

This gives amazing opportunities to Bulgarian companies to become globally competitive.

Unfortunately the most interesting area the innovation is burden with most paperwork and some things which are totally unacceptable with our Open Source way of thinking. For instance one of the requirement is to fill file patents for the innovation, which to protect the EU investment in your company. Looks logically, but this effectively cut off all companies which work with Open Source Technologies.

What is the EU coming to? Is it trying to impede a FOSS spirit and a sharing culture by urging people to get software patented, despite the rules (as per the EPC) not allowing it? Something sure is rotten at the EPO, which urgently needs to be fixed.

A Preview of Injunctions/Raids Heaven in Europe With the Unitary Patent (Continent-Wide Bans and Embargoes by Patent Lawyers)

Posted in America, Asia, Europe, Patents at 10:18 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

No safe haven for European SMEs, which may be innocent but not affluent enough to prove it in a so-called ‘unitary’ court

Croatian flag
Whose regime is the EU striving to imitate?

Summary: Injunctions and raids in the United States (increasingly affecting small Chinese companies as well) serve as a reminder of the increasingly-aggressive borderless patent regimes (like the Unitary Patent Court)

ONE of our arguments against the Unitary Patent Court (UPC) is that it would not only increase damages, affecting a lot more European companies (as the accused/defendant/extorted for settlement), but that it would also cause bans on products from Europe, especially products that come from small companies that don’t have a legal department. China’s SIPO, as we showed here many times over the past year, increasingly adopts a USPTO-like model (where patent quantity, not quality, is emphasised, leaving all the actual examination work for courts to deal with at the price/cost/expense of thousands of dollars per day) and there are product bans too, based on EPO-funded media. It brags about “quick injunctions” as if banning a product before properly engaging in juridical review/overview is somehow great (it’s great for patent lawyers).

Last month we showed how a Chinese company had its products confiscated by a bunch of goons when they went to an expo in the US (CES) [1, 2, 3]. US Marshals raided a booth at a notoriously high-security (military-grade) event. Now, as it turns out, the process was somewhat of a sham. TechDirt explained it with the headline: “Remember How US Marshals Seized All Those ‘Hoverboards’ At CES In A Patent Dispute? The Company Has Now Dropped The Case” (probably because it lacked merit).

“Last month we showed how a Chinese company had its products confiscated by a bunch of goons when they went to an expo in the US (CES).”“Back in January,” explained TechDirt, “we wrote with some concern over the news that US Marshals had seized a bunch of one wheel scooters that everyone wants to call hoverboards, even though they don’t hover. The case involved a US company, Future Motion, that had gotten a lot of attention (and a utility patent and a design patent) on such single-wheel balancing scooters. Future Motion then sued a Chinese firm, Changzhou First International Trade Co., that was making a product that certainly looked similar. Changzhou was demonstrating its product at CES in Las Vegas, only to have the US Marshals raid its booth and seize all its products based on a 7 minute hearing in front a judge where Changzhou didn’t even get to present its side.”

Well, we too covered this at the time. The EPO-funded media (IAM) actually celebrated it, much as we have come to expect (we took note of this at the time). IAM will soon organise its EPO-funded pro-UPC event in the US. It’s an EPO project which broadens injunctions and makes these more severe. There are other associated issues, such as patent trolls, but this will be the subject of our next post.

Source: EPO’s Administrative Council Not Pursuing Battistelli’s Witch-hunt Against a Judge Anymore

Posted in Europe, Patents at 9:41 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Killing the messenger?

Killing the messenger
When the system which protects its own power deals with those who report abuses as the cause of all problems and the sole instance of abuse

Summary: The efforts to undermine communication of internal issues inside the EPO are no longer assisted by the Administrative Council, unlike several months ago

THE Administrative Council of the Organisation is finally growing a pair. It is willing to say “No” to Battistelli, so it’s not just the Enlarged Board of Appeal saying “No” to the Administrative Council after the Council had said “Yes” to Battistelli. It’s an important sign of progress which may also mean that the suspended judge has his job secured (at least until cutoff/nomination stage). After all, allegedly blowing the whistle on abuses by Team Battistelli shouldn’t be a crime, should it? Based on what we know about the story (which is quite a lot), the judge is likely a whistleblower. This is why Battistelli and his inner circle felt so afraid, even intimidated. Knowledge or information is a great danger to them.

As pointed out this morning, the latest rumour is that Battistelli might be on his way out and only the details are up for (private) negotiation at this stage or at some later stage (some say in a March meeting). We hear several different stories from different people, but rarely do these stories contradict one another, so while no single story is necessarily 100% accurate, the truth is probably somewhere in the middle. These rumours don’t come from a vacuum and it’s possible for Battistelli to try hard to change course of action to ‘prove’ (by intervention) the rumours ‘wrong’, though not totally unsubstantiated at the time they were spread.

“Presumably, since the President’s immunity as recited in A.13, Protocol on Privileges and Immunities, refers to privileges accorded to diplomatic agents, he is not subject to immunity in his home country and so the innocent judge could sue him there for defamation.”
According to this new comment: “At the protest held this Wednesday in Munich, it was announced that the Administrative Counsel [sic] had recently withdrawn its second request to the Enlarged Board of Appeal that a patent judge be dismissed. The AC seems to have finally understood that the accusations brought forward by the President and his minions were unsubstantiated, as had been ruled by the EBA in relation the first request, and that it had been manipulated by the President. Not good for him.”

Another person later chimed in with: “I’m sceptical about words like “announced” and “withdrawn” but, if there is substance to this, it could be the moment (had to discern) when the tide turns. But as we all know, if the tide has actually turned, what a momentous event that can be.”

Some believe that the judge might later wish to pursue defamation claims against Battistelli et al, in particular because of October's attacks through German and Dutch media, including Süddeutsche Zeitung with its baseless personal attack.

“This time around it might be Battistelli and Željko Topić — not Croatian journalists — who need to issue a public apology.”“Presumably,” said this person, “since the President’s immunity as recited in A.13, Protocol on Privileges and Immunities, refers to privileges accorded to diplomatic agents, he is not subject to immunity in his home country and so the innocent judge could sue him there for defamation.”

Another person clarifies that “the EBA’s [Enlarged Board of Appeal] response to the first request. They didn’t make a decision either way about the accusations. They just ruled that the request was inadmissible, because there was no proper statement of case setting out the grounds. This says nothing about the guilt or innocence of the accused board member, but it does say something about the competence of those making the request.”

One way or another, one day the public may find out the truth. This time around it might be Battistelli and Željko Topić — not Croatian journalists — who need to issue a public apology.

Links 19/2/2016: Samsung’s ARTIK, ZFS in Ubuntu 16.04

Posted in News Roundup at 8:36 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish



Free Software/Open Source

  • The Power Of Open Source To Solve The Data Fragmentation Challenge

    Apache Arrow is a new open-source project that helps data analysts wrestle diverse data sets into a single format. Apache Arrow is a collaborative effort that spans many of the largest providers and users of data infrastructure today including Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN), Cloudera (Private:CLOUD), Databricks, DataStax, Dremio, Hortonworks (NASDAQ:HDP) MapR, Salesforce.com (NYSE:CRM), Trifacta and Twitter (NYSE:TWTR). That so many different companies can collaborate on one initiative to improve data analysis industry-wide is a testament to the power of open source to inspire and engender great change.

  • Events

    • Akademy 2016 part of QtCon
    • Program Announced for Embedded Linux Conference and OpenIoT Summit

      The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today is announcing its full schedule of keynote speakers and conference sessions for Embedded Linux Conference and OpenIoT Summit, taking place April 4-6 in San Diego, Calif. These events are co-located, and one registration provides access to all sessions and activities for both events.

    • Embedded Linux and OpenIoT conference details emerge
    • Flock 2016 update: Submissions and lodging

      The call for submissions for talks and workshops is also open, and contributors may submit at the same registration site. The deadline for call for submissions is Friday, April 8, 2016. In a change from previous Flocks, talk and workshop selection will be driven by a Flock Scheduling panel. The panel members will work with the Flock staff and the Fedora Council to determine which talks and workshops are accepted.

    • DevConf 2016: community and containers

      This year it was even more difficult to decide how to spend my time at DevConf, the annual Fedora, Red Hat, JBoss developers’ conference in Brno. There were several good presentations in parallel, often I wished I could be in two separate rooms at the same time. There were also developers from all over the world, and I have missed quite a few talks due to some very good in-depth discussions about syslog-ng. As a community manager for syslog-ng, I have tried to focus on community-related presentations and on technologies related to syslog-ng: containers, security and packaging.

  • Web Browsers

    • The future of loading CSS

      Chrome is intending to change the behaviour of link rel=”stylesheet”, which will be noticeable when it appears within body. The impact and benefits of this aren’t clear from the blink-dev post, so I wanted to go into detail here.

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox for iOS is Faster with 3D Touch and More

        We recently released the first version of Firefox for iOS. It’s a great browser and we’re excited to bring you more new features today. The latest release of Firefox for iOS brings improvements to make browsing simpler and more fun by taking advantage of the latest iOS hardware and software features.

        Firefox for iOS on iPhone 6S and 6S Plus now offers 3D Touch to help you access commonly used features faster than ever before. Simply press the Firefox app icon to open the Quick Access menu which has shortcuts to Open Last Bookmark, open a New Private Tab or a New Tab.

  • SaaS/Big Data

    • Apache Arrow to Accelerate Open Source Big Data Analytics

      The Apache Software Foundation is rolling out a new top level project this week, and it’s one that didn’t first have to undergo the typical project incubation phase. Apache Arrow, an effort to build columnar in-memory analytics technology that could dramatically accelerate Big Data analytics, is launching with support from 13 major open source Big Data projects.

    • Spark 2.0 will offer Interactive Querying of Live Data

      The next version of Apache Spark will expand on the data processing platform’s real-time data analysis capabilities, offering users the ability to perform interactive queries against live data.

      The new feature, called structured streaming, will “push Spark beyond streaming to a new class of application that do other things in real time [rather than] just analyze a stream and output another stream,” explained Matei Zaharia, Spark founder and Databricks chief technology officer, at the Spark Summit East, taking place this week in New York. “It’s a combination of streaming and interactive that isn’t really handled by current streaming engines.”

  • CMS

  • Pseudo-/Semi-Open Source (Openwashing)

  • BSD

    • FreeBSD, Variants Not Affected by Recent GNU Bug

      Much has been made about a vulnerability in a function in the GNU C Library. And searching far and wide over the Internet, there was little — actually nothing — I could find regarding how this affected BSD variants.

      However, you can rest easy, BSDers: Not our circus, not our monkeys.

      Dag-Erling Smørgrav, a FreeBSD developer since 1998 and the current FreeBSD Security Officer, writes in his blog that “neither FreeBSD itself nor native FreeBSD applications are affected.”

  • Public Services/Government

    • Dutch Gov: ‘Our lack of knowledge hinders open source’

      A lack of understanding of free and open source software is hindering its uptake by Dutch public administrations, writes Minister for the Central Government Sector Stef Blok in a letter to the country’s House of Representatives. Not knowing how to deal with software errors, is a service risk that “multiple organisations have experienced”, the minister says.

    • Govt’s Move To ‘Open Source’: Firm support system a necessity for adoption

      Switching over to open source software across all Central departments, as per a policy decision taken by the NDA government last year, could entail substantial savings on the Centre’s software expenses as most open source alternatives are free. Experts, though, caution that the obvious financial advantages of adopting open source notwithstanding, concerns pertaining to security and operational efficiency may have to be addressed concomitantly.

    • France involves public to draft support contract

      France’s ministries are involving free software communities and the public in writing their next multi-year framework contract for services and support on free and open source software. It is the first time that an IT services support contract will be co-written by administration and citizens.

    • Tallinn Saves A Bundle Using GNU/Linux

      Schools in the city of Tallinn (Estonia) are gradually moving to PC workstations running on free and open source software. A pilot in March 2014 switched 3 schools and 2 kindergartens. Students, teachers, school administration and kindergartens’ staff members are using LibreOffice, Ubuntu-Linux and other open source tools.

  • Licensing

    • Canonical Says There Is No ZFS and Linux Licence Incompatibility

      Canonical announced that support for the ZFS (Z File System) will be available in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, but a lot of users have been asking about a possible license conflict. Canonical’s Dustin Kirkland explained why that’s not a problem.

      ZFS (Z File System) is described as a combination of a volume manager (like LVM) and a filesystem (like ext4, xfs, or btrfs), and it’s licensed under CDDL (Common Development and Distribution License). Don’t worry if you didn’t hear about it. It’s not something that’s commonly used.

    • ZFS Licensing and Linux

      We at Canonical have conducted a legal review, including discussion with the industry’s leading software freedom legal counsel, of the licenses that apply to the Linux kernel and to ZFS.

      And in doing so, we have concluded that we are acting within the rights granted and in compliance with their terms of both of those licenses.

  • Openness/Sharing

  • Programming

    • Google green-lights Go 1.6

      In a blog post, Google’s Andrew Gerrand called the HTTP/2 support “the most significant change” in the release, with the revision bringing the new protocol’s benefits to projects like the Go-based Caddy Web server. He otherwise described the upgrade, the seventh major stable release of the language, as more incremental than Go 1.5, which was released last August.

      The team has tinkered with garbage collection, featuring lower pauses than version 1.5, particularly for large programs, but programs may not necessarily run faster. “As always, the changes are so general and varied that precise statements about performance are difficult to make. Some programs may run faster, some slower,” according to release notes.

    • Version control isn’t just for programmers

      So that’s why I’ve personally chosen Mercurial. That said, there’s an analogous process in most of these other systems for what I’m going to describe here. So if you’d prefer to use Git or Fossil, I say that’s great. At least you’re using something. That puts you a step ahead of most other creatives.

    • Supporting Beep Beep Yarr!

      Some of you may be familiar with LinuxVoice magazine. They put an enormous amount of effort in creating a high quality, feature-packed magazine with a small team. They are led by Graham Morrison who I have known for many years and who is one of the most thoughtful, passionate, and decent human beings I have ever met.

      Well, the same team are starting an important new project called Beep Beep Yarr!. It is essentially a Kickstarter crowd-funded children’s book that is designed to teach core principles of programming to kids. The project not just involves the creation of the book, but also a parent’s guide and an interactive app to help kids engage with the principles in the book.


  • Health/Nutrition

    • EU Parliament Members Seek To Curb Antibiotics In Animals, Boost New Research

      In the fight against antimicrobial resistance, members of the European Parliament’s Environment and Public Health Committee have advocated banning collective and preventive antibiotic treatment of animals, and supported measures to stimulate research into new antibiotics, including longer data protection.

      Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) have been working on the update of a European Union law on veterinary medicine. According to a European Parliament press release, MEPs took a vote yesterday on draft plans for legislation on antimicrobial resistance.

    • Voices From the Front Lines of the Flint Water Crisis

      Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder’s successive emergency managers are now gone from Flint, but the wreckage of their rule there still pollutes many homes. The crisis in Flint is, on the surface, about water. In April 2014, the city switched from the Detroit water system, which it had used for more than 50 years, to the Flint River, ostensibly to save money. The Flint River water made people sick, and is likely to have caused disease that killed some residents. The corrosive water, left untreated, coursed through the city’s water system, leaching heavy metals out of old pipes. The most toxic poison was lead, which can cause permanent brain damage. The damage to the people of Flint, the damage to the children who drank and bathed in the poisoned water, is incalculable. The water is still considered toxic to this day.

  • Security

  • Defence/Police/Secrecy/Aggression

    • Nitro Zeus: USA’s Secret Cyber War Plan To Destroy Iran’s Complete Infrastructure

      Alex Gibney is known for his investigative documentaries that garner a unanimous applause from the critics. During the reporting for his latest cyber warfare-focused film Zero Days, the US government’s secret plan called Nitro Zeus was uncovered. This plan deals with a massive cyberattack on Iran’s infrastructure if the nuclear negotiations with Iran would have fail.

    • FBI Won’t Explain Its Bizarre New Way of Measuring Its Success Fighting Terror

      The Federal Bureau of Investigation has quietly developed a new way to measure its success in the war on terror: Counting the number of terror threats it has “disrupted” in a year.

      But good luck trying to figure out what that number means, how it was derived, or why it doesn’t jibe with any other law-enforcement statistic, most notably the number of terror suspects actually charged or arrested.

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • Climate Change Panel Seeks To Improve Communication, Open Doors To Private Sector

      The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change seeks to improve its communication to promote its reports, its chair said at a briefing yesterday. Working on its next assessment report expected to be released in five or six years, the IPCC seeks to increase participation of the private sector as a major stakeholders upon which depends the investment to find solutions to climate change he said.

    • Indonesia to continue easing restrictions on foreign investors: President Widodo

      Indonesia will continue opening up its market, making it easier for foreign investors to enter the country.

      Speaking to about 300 business leaders and other stakeholders at an ASEAN Economic Community conference in San Francisco on Wednesday (Feb 17), President Joko Widodo said even though Indonesia is doing more to attract investments, and announced a number of deregulation packages, he is still not satisfied.

      “I’m not satisfied; please understand we are still only at the beginning,” he said. “We will continue to simplify, continue to open up, continue to modernise our rules and regulations. There are still many excessive permits, licenses, and protections.”

      Mr Widodo gave a key note address at the conference after attending the US-ASEAN Leaders Summit in Sunnylands which ended on Tuesday. He said Indonesia’s investment climate is still not conducive enough and the country needs to deregulate more.

    • Shockingly, authorities arrest activists instead of people responsible for the Aliso Canyon methane gas leak

      The California State Patrol has arrested two people in connection with the massive methane leak in Southern California’s Aliso Canyon, but many residents who had to leave their homes near the leaking underground gas storage site think the wrong people are in custody. Instead of busting company executives and engineers who are responsible for the massive methane gas leak, the CSP arrested two protesters who draped banners on the headquarters of the California Public Utilities Commission. The protesters draped banners to highlight the lax regulatory environment that enabled the spill — similar to the political culture that enabled the water poisoning in Flint. But unbelievably, the activists are now the ones going to jail.

  • Finance

    • Minimum wage, minimum chance of a future: This is how horrible living on the minimum wage has become

      When presidential candidate Bernie Sanders talks about income inequality, and when other candidates speak about the minimum wage and food stamps, what are they really talking about?

    • Listen to interviews with the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples discussing the Trans Pacific Partnership

      The Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, if approved, would be the largest trade agreement in history involving 11 countries including the United States, Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru Singapore, and Vietnam.

      Cultural Survival staff caught up with the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, to discuss the trade deal’s implications for Indigenous Peoples in these countries, based on her recent research and report on this topic.

    • TTIP: Alternative ISDS No Real Alternative, NGOs Warn

      Malmstroem’s ICS proposal did not address most of the problems of the extra-judicial redress mechanisms for foreign investors, the study explains in a detailed comparison of ISDS and ICS. Instead, “it arguably grants investors even more rights than many existing investment treaties, which have already led to hundreds of investor-state lawsuits around the world,” the study states.

      A specific provision (section 2, article 3.4) of the proposed new system would allow for complaints when investors feel their “legitimate expectations” have been violated by regulatory acts of states. But “explicit protections of investors’ legitimate expectations are generally not part of existing treaties,” CEO and its partners warn.


      Nevertheless, ISDS is expected to be back on the agenda of negotiators next week after the EU Commission’s DG Trade after Malmstroem had taken it off the agenda while the public consultation in the EU was ongoing.

    • MPs can view TTIP files – but take only pencil and paper with them

      MPs have won access to documents covering controversial and secretive trade talks between Brussels and Washington, but can only take a pencil and paper into the room where the files can be viewed.

      Confidentiality rules mean no electronic devices – including phones, tablet and laptop computers, or cameras – are allowed in the room at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) in Westminster. This is fuelling concerns about a “cloak of secrecy” surrounding the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations between the EU and the US government.

      UK business minister Anna Soubry agreed to provide the room in BIS’s offices on the condition that MPs keep the TTIP documents private. Soubry said pressure on Brussels officials from EU governments had won the concession, but the department was obliged to maintain secrecy.

    • Expanded Version: The Us Economy Has Not Recovered and Will Not Recover

      Jobs offshoring benefitted Wall Street, corporate executives, and shareholders, because lower labor and compliance costs resulted in higher profits. These profits flowed through to shareholders in the form of capital gains and to executives in the form of “performance bonuses.” Wall Street benefitted from the bull market generated by higher profits.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • Sanders tops Clinton in a national poll for the first time

      Bernie Sanders has passed Hillary Clinton at the top of a national poll for the first time in the 2016 race.

      A Fox News poll of the Democratic presidential race released Thursday shows Sanders with 47 percent support to Clinton’s 44 percent.

      That’s a gain of 10 percentage points for Sanders a January version of the poll. Clinton’s support declined 5 points.

      Clinton posted leads as high as 30 points over the summer, but Sanders has been steadily closing the gap. While no other poll of the race going back to 2014 has ever showed Clinton trailing a rival, she led Sanders by just 2 points in the last two Quinnipiac University tracking polls.

  • Censorship

  • Privacy

  • Civil Rights

  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • FCC votes to “unlock the cable box” over Republican opposition

      The Federal Communications Commission today approved a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that seeks to give consumers more choices in the set-top boxes they use to watch cable TV.

      The vote was 3-2, with Chairman Tom Wheeler and fellow Democrats Mignon Clyburn and Jessica Rosenworcel voting in favor of the proposal, while Republicans Ajit Pai and Michael O’Rielly voted against. An NPRM is not a final vote. Instead, this will kick off a months-long public comment period leading up to a final vote that is likely to happen before the end of this year.

      The FCC is essentially trying to create a software-based replacement for CableCard. Pay-TV operators from the cable, satellite, and telco industries would have to provide content and programming information to makers of third-party hardware or applications. Theoretically, customers could then watch their TV channels on various devices without needing to rent a set-top box from their cable company and without buying equipment that is compatible with a physical CableCard.

    • FCC Votes to Dismantle Cable’s Monopoly Over The Set Top Box

      The FCC voted 3-2 today to begin dismantling the cable industry’s long-standing monopoly over ye olde set top cable box. As noted previously, the FCC is pushing a proposal that would require cable operators make their programming accessible to third-party set top manufacturers, without requiring the use of a CableCARD. The goal is to create competition in the set top box market, giving consumers a choice of better and cheaper gear, in the same way consumers can buy their own cable modems. 99% of consumers currently pay about $231 annually in rental fees for hardware that’s generally worth about half that much.

    • AT&T Makes It Clear: It Bought DirecTV So It Doesn’t Have To Upgrade Its Lagging Networks

      When AT&T originally announced the company wanted to spend $69 billion on a satellite TV company on the eve of the cord cutting revolution, even M&A bullish Wall Street thought AT&T was a little nuts. After all, AT&T’s refusal to seriously upgrade its aging DSL networks to full fiber have left it at a serious disadvantage to faster cable broadband. Given Verizon’s FiOS fiber build clocked in somewhere around $24 billion, the $69 billion AT&T spent on DirecTV could have gone a long way toward bringing those customers into the modern fiber to the home era.

    • AT&T, Time Warner Cable Hope Incessant Whining Will Keep Google Fiber From Louisville

      For fifteen years now, companies like AT&T and Time Warner Cable (and their various PR and policy tendrils) have whined incessantly about the “burdensome regulations” that saddle the U.S. broadband industry. Less regulation, they argue, will pave the path to broadband nirvana, opening the door to immense innovation and more competition in the sector. So Louisville recently set about reworking its city broadband ordinances to streamline both the pole attachment and franchise agreement processes dramatically, something you’d assume would thrill both companies.

    • Zero Rating: What It Is and Why You Should Care

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      What is zero-rating and why should you worry about it? In a nutshell, zero-rating plans exempt particular data from counting against a user’s data cap, or from accruing any excess usage charges. The most dangerous of these plans, such as the AT&T and Verizon offerings, only offer their users zero-rated data from content providers who pay the carriers money to do so. Such “pay for play” arrangements favor big content providers who can afford to pay for access to users’ eyeballs, and marginalize those who can’t, such as nonprofits, startups, and fellow users.

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      Imagine traveling back to 1996 in a typical American living room. What’s changed? The TV is three feet thick and weighs 150 pounds. There’s a VHS videocassette recorder underneath, but no Internet-connected devices to be seen.

      Now, what hasn’t changed?

      The cable or satellite tuner box. It’s a black or grey plastic slab. You have to lease it from your pay-TV provider for a monthly fee. It doesn’t add much functionality to your living room setup, except that your TV subscription doesn’t work without it.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

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      Carlos Correa, special advisor on trade and intellectual property at the South Centre, said the obligation to disclose the source of genetic resources is necessary if the World Trade Organization Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) and the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization to the Convention on Biological Diversity are to be implemented.

    • Trademarks

      • The Indonesian IKEA case: what happened and why it might actually be good for foreign companies

        Based on a literal interpretation of the Trademark Law’s non-use provisions, the decision appears to have a sound basis in law: while IKEA’s two original applications were registered in October 2006 and 2010, the first IKEA store selling Class 20 and 21 goods did not open in Indonesia until October 2014, with no ‘acceptable reason’ to excuse the non-use. Interestingly, the Supreme Court’s ruling was a 2-1 decision, with Judge I Gusti Agung Sumanatha filing a rare dissent, arguing that because IKEA had proven that it was the owner of a legitimately registered well-known trademark, the non-use provisions should not apply. While not explicitly supported by the Trademark Law’s text, Judge Sumanatha’s dissent speaks more to the spirit and purpose of the Law and is a welcome development. Troubling, however, is that both courts ruled PT. Ratania’s applications for the mark “IKEA INTAN KHATULISTIWA ESA ABADI” were “legitimate” (“sah”). Such a ruling is as unclear as it is unnecessary and ignored clear evidence presented during the trial that PT. Ratania knew about IKEA prior to filing their own applications, strongly implying that the applications were impermissibly filed in bad faith. While the courts’ unclear language and meaning likely lead to the confusion in reporting on this case, neither the Commercial Court nor the Supreme Court said that PT. Ratania is now the true and legitimate owner of the IKEA mark in Indonesia.

    • Copyrights

Rumours Suggest That Battistelli, Already Enjoying Life With a Huge (But Still Secret) Salary, Wants More Than a Decade’s Worth of Salary to Leave

Posted in Europe, Patents, Rumour at 4:51 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Name: Mr. B, Salary: Unknown, Accomplishment: Turning a once-great patent office into a laughing stock; Name: Mr. M, Status: Above the law, Accomplishment: Crushing staff unions for a few decades

Summary: Some of the latest rumours about the fate of Mr. Battistelli and a blast from the past involving Mr. Minnoye, who has helped defend Battistelli even in the face of court rulings against him (in The Hague)

Rumours are swirling regarding the EPO‘s President, Mr. Battistelli, as we last noted last night. Some rumours suggest that it all boils down to money, at least for Battistelli. “Further rumours,” said this one comment from last night is that “[i]n order to go, BB wants 18 millions €. Furthermore, Mrs Bergot should be allowed to remain in a high position. If true, it would be a shame. Someone who has destroyed the proper functioning of a model organisation and made a mess of the social climate should go with a kick in the lower back, not with money taken from the fees paid by the users. No negotiations, please! He and the crooks who supported him all along should simply go.”

“Someone who has destroyed the proper functioning of a model organisation and made a mess of the social climate should go with a kick in the lower back, not with money taken from the fees paid by the users.”
Around 700 people from the EPO went to protest, told us another person about Wednesday’s protest in Munich (against their employer, notably Battistelli). Information which Techrights received, moreover, serves to confirm there’s a major confrontation between Battistelli and the Administrative Council. The exact nature of it is still unknown.

The “news from the EPO,” as one person put it in a message to us, involves Guillaume Minnoye as well. “This is what I heard about the demo in Munich,” said the source. “With close to 700 persons, the demo went well (although there were less people than at the previous demos). SUEPO invited the Board 28 to talk to the protesters, but they didn’t.

“Guillaume Minnoye (EPO VP1) said during a meeting today that there is a proposal to be voted on in the Administrative Council’s (AC) March meeting. The proposal is apparently not from the EPO president. He expects a confrontation between the president and the AC.”

In the mean time, given a little more time to breathe, we decided to retrieve this ILO judgment (we’ve made a local copy of the official English translation, as PDF, just in case) which shows Minnoye, the head of Internal Services at the time (according to a source of ours), attacking SUEPO even two decades ago. In the following text we highlight the role played by Minnoye at the time:

Registry’s translation, the French
text alone being authoritative.




Judgment 1547


Considering the complaint filed by Mr. Bernard Jean Raymond Baillet against the European Patent Organisation (EPO) on 6 January 1995, the EPO’s reply of 27 March, the complainant’s rejoinder of 2 May and the Organisation’s surrejoinder of 6 June 1995;

Considering the complaint filed by Mr. Jean-Pierre Cervantes against the EPO on 6 January 1995, the Organisation’s reply of 27 March, the complainant’s rejoinder of 29 June and the EPO’s surrejoinder of 3 August 1995;

Considering the third complaint against the Organisation filed by Mr. Steven Derek Cook on 6 January 1995, the EPO’s reply of 27 March, the complainant’s rejoinder of 28 June and the Organisation’s surrejoinder of 2 August 1995;

Considering Articles II, paragraph 5, and VII of the Statute of the Tribunal;

Having examined the written submissions and disallowed the application by Mr. Cervantes for hearings;

Considering that the facts of the case and the pleadings may be summed up as follows:

A.The EPO employs the complainants as patent examiners at grade A3 in its Directorate-General 1 (DG1) at The Hague. Mr. Cervantes is chairman of the local section of the Staff Union (SUEPO) of the European Patent Office, which is the EPO’s secretariat. On 15 October 1992 the union used the Office’s internal messenger service to send each of its members at The Hague an invitation to attend a general meeting on EPO premises on 20 October at 11 a.m. Not all the invitations were delivered: Mr. Baillet and Mr. Cook did not get them.

In a note dated 19 October 1992 the head of Internal Services told Mr. Cervantes that the Office would not be helping to distribute the invitations because union meetings were not allowed in the “core” period of the working day, between 10 and 11.30 a.m.

By a letter of 14 January 1993 Mr. Cervantes asked the President of the Office to declare the note “invalid” and to make sure that mail was properly delivered in future. By letters of 15 January Mr. Baillet, Mr. Cook and other members of the union asked the President to declare “unjustified” what they described as the “censoring” of their private mail, to promise that the Administration would not intercept it again and, if he refused, to treat their letters as internal appeals.

The President upheld the decision and the case went to the Appeals Committee. In a report dated 4 July 1994 the Committee recommended rejection. By letters of 11 October 1994 the Director of Staff Policy informed the complainants that the President had endorsed the Committee’s recommendation. Those are the decisions they are impugning.

B.The complainants plead breach of Article 30 of the Service Regulations, which reads:

“Permanent employees shall enjoy freedom of association; they may in particular be members of trade unions or staff associations of European civil servants.”

Mr. Baillet says that by intercepting private mail from the staff union the Administration was guilty of censorship and acted ultra vires. Mr. Cervantes argues from precedent that to allow only “approved” communication betweenunion members is to deny freedom of association. What the EPO did hampered freedom of speech and betrayed the Administration’s resolve to cripple the union.

The complainants see the EPO’s behaviour as a departure from usage. Mr. Cook observes that the Office had always allowed staff associations and social clubs unrestricted use of the messenger service. The complainants plead discrimination on the grounds that others had their invitations delivered.

Questioning the impartiality of one member of the Appeals Committee, they charge the Organisation with breach of Article 111 of the Service Regulations.

They want the Tribunal to set aside the President’s decisions of 11 October 1994.

Mr. Baillet invites it to condemn “censorship” at the EPO and award him 5,000 German marks in moral damages and another 5,000 marks in damages for the “mishandling” of his case by the Appeals Committee.

Mr. Cervantes asks that it order the President to “stop censoring union mail” and award him 10,000 marks on that account, one mark for the flaw in the Committee’s proceedings and 10,000 marks in costs. As president of SUEPO he seeks a further 85,600 marks in damages for moral injury to the union.

Mr. Cook seeks an award of at least 20,000 guilders in moral damages, including 10,000 for breach of Article 111. He claims at least 3,000 guilders in costs.

C.In its replies the EPO argues that the complaints are irreceivable because the complainants suffered no injury: its action made no “real” impact on union business or on freedom of association.

In subsidiary argument on the merits the Organisation says it is under no duty to distribute private mail, let alone unsealed messages that are against the rules. In any event it did not bar timely announcement of the meeting on the union’s notice board or holding the meeting as scheduled.

The EPO denies breach of Article 111: had the impartiality of any member of the Committee been in doubt the staff representatives might have objected. In fact the Committee’s recommendation was unanimous.

Mr. Cervantes’ tirade against the Administration’s treatment of the union is “mistaken” and “uncalled-for”. Besides, he has no locus standi to claim damages on the union’s behalf.

D.In their rejoinders the complainants challenge allegations of fact in the replies and press their claims. Again they express doubts about the impartiality of one member of the Appeals Committee.

Citing Judgment 1269 (in re Errani), Mr. Cervantes submits that as the union’s “representative” he may seek damages on its behalf.

Mr. Cook gives examples of staff meetings held in the core period with support from the EPO.

E.In its surrejoinders the EPO enlarges on its pleas and comments on issues raised in the rejoinders. It maintains that the letters were unlawful insofar as they contained invitations to a union meeting to be held in working hours. It is the Appeals Committee, not the Administration, that decides under Article 111 whether to exclude a member whose impartiality is in doubt.

In the surrejoinder on Mr. Cook’s case the EPO maintains that it may allow a meeting even in working hours if the organisers have applied for and got permission: SUEPO did not.


The facts

1.The three complaints are about the right of members of the Staff Union of the European Patent Office (SUEPO) to have union notices delivered.

2.On 15 October 1992 Mr. Cervantes, as chairman of SUEPO, sent out invitations to all members to attend a general meeting on 20 October 1992 at 11 a.m. in a room on EPO premises at The Hague. The messenger service

delivered the invitations in the main building but not elsewhere. Mr. Baillet and Mr. Cook did not get them. By a letter of 19 October 1992 the head of Internal Services, who was in charge of the distribution of mail, told Mr. Cervantes that the Office would not be delivering the invitations. On 14 and 15 January 1993 the complainants sent letters of protest to the President of the Office. Letters of 19 January 1993 told them that the President was upholding the decision, and letters of 4 and 5 March that he was putting the cases to the Appeals Committee.

On 4 July 1994 the Committee recommended rejection. The President rejected the appeals by decisions of 11 October 1994, the ones now under challenge.


3.The Organisation applies for joinder. Since the complaints raise the same issues of fact and of law the application is allowed.


4.The EPO objects that the complaints disclose no cause of action and are therefore irreceivable.

5.It observes that Mr. Cervantes, who purports to be acting for the union, may not claim damages on its behalf; he may act only in his own name; and his interest in obtaining a promise of delivery of union mail is academic.

6.The purpose of Mr. Cervantes in bringing his complaint is to obtain the quashing of the President’s decision of 11 October 1994 to reject his appeal of 14 January 1993. One plea in support of his internal appeal was that by refusing to deliver the “individual and private invitations” he had sent out the EPO was in breach of his rights as its employee. And the claims he puts to the Tribunal are plain enough: he wants it to declare the Organisation out of order and reaffirm his freedom of speech, particularly on matters of union business. He also believes that intercepting messages from the union was a breach of the freedom of association that Article 30 of the Service Regulations guarantees for everyone in the EPO’s employ. The conclusion is that it is wrong to say he is acting for the union: he has brought his complaint in his own name; and he has a direct and rightful interest in the observance of freedom of association that Article 30 requires.

7.The EPO’s general objection to receivability is that the complainants show no cause of action. It is saying that it has committed no breach in fact or in law of their freedom of association or right to carry on union business. In its submission the union has no right to its help in delivering union messages; the complainants, as members of the union, have no greater rights than the union itself and no right to the delivery of private mail by the Organisation; and they have suffered no discernible injury since what the EPO did had no real effect on union business or on freedom of association.

8.Precedent has it that an organisation has some latitude in affording facilities to a staff union and its decisions are not subject to judicial review. That is not so, however, where it is charged with breach of freedom of association. The Tribunal will indeed interfere if the effect of the impugned decision is to hamper the freedom of speech that any union must enjoy. Refusal to deliver invitations to a union meeting is unquestionably a breach of the privacy of mail and of the freedom of speech that is part and parcel of freedom of association. The EPO’s pleas that the union had no right to delivery and that no injury was caused go rather to merits than to receivability. The conclusion is that because the complainants seek a ruling on the lawfulness of refusal to deliver union mail and because such refusal is actionable the objection to receivability must fail.

The membership of the Appeals Committee

9.A preliminary issue is the complainants’ objections to one member of the Appeals Committee. They cite Article 111 of the Service Regulations: the impartiality of any member may be challenged whenever he is “required to take part in a case in which he might have a personal interest or in respect of which he participated in preparing the decision under appeal …”. They contend that Mr. G. Schwabe should not have sat on the Committee because he was in charge of the distribution unit; the President’s decision was one of direct concern to that unit and while the case was pending Mr. Schwabe was asked to draft rules on the use of the messenger service.

10.The plea fails. It is plain from the text that the guidelines that Mr. Schwabe drew up on the handling of mail are general in purport: they are not about the particular case of union mail, and they say that at each duty station mail may be processed to suit local circumstances. Besides, the Committee reported on 4 July 1994, whereas the guidelines did not go out until 29 August 1994, and it is by no means sure that they were written by the earlier date.

The Committee’s members – including the staff representatives – were of one mind in rejecting the charges of partiality against Mr. Schwabe.

The merits

11.The gist of the complainants’ case in support of their claims to the quashing of the impugned decisions is breach of Article 30 of the Service Regulations, which is quoted in B above. They see the interception of the invitations as bare censorship and part of a policy of the EPO’s to curb the union. The Organisation’s answer is that the mail was neither “personal” nor even “individual and private invitations” but “unsealed announcements of a meeting”, the same for everyone and no mystery. Besides, having concluded no agreement with the Organisation for the purpose the union has no right to have it deliver a summons to such a meeting.

12.The notices were not private mail but invitations sent to each of the complainants by name to attend a general meeting. To be sure, the EPO had no formal agreement with the union about facilities such as the distribution of a summons to a meeting. But it admitted to the Appeals Committee that its consistent practice since 1992 had been to distribute any unsealed unofficial internal mail, whether private or not, save any text containing a personal attack on someone. Was such usage binding in law? As Judgment 421 (in re Haghgou) said, for example, a usage will be binding if staff have come to rely on it.

13.The plain expectation of the staff was that the EPO would deliver notices from their union without let or hindrance. The Organisation does not deny the practice, but just pleads limits to it: the union’s invitations offended against the rule that a general meeting must be held outside core working hours.

14.Yet the EPO did not treat the offence – the holding of the meeting as scheduled – as serious enough to constitute an abuse: in the event it authorised the meeting at the time announced and imposed on those who attended neither any penalty nor even the obligation to make up the time spent off work. Besides, by thwarting the delivery of union notices to staff outside the main building the EPO denied some, and not others, the freedom of association they were guaranteed by Article 30. It thereby discriminated against them. The conclusion is that the complaints must succeed.

15.The claim by Mr. Cervantes to an award of damages to the union is irreceivable because his complaint is in his own name. And though the individual claims by the three complainants are formally sound, the amounts they claim cannot be awarded: the meeting did take place and there is no evidence of any particular injury. Each is awarded 500 German marks in damages for moral injury.

16.Having won their case, they are entitled to costs, and the Tribunal awards them 500 marks each. Their other claims are dismissed.


For the above reasons,

1.The President’s decision of 11 October 1994 is set aside.

2.The EPO shall pay each complainant 500 German marks in moral damages.

3.It shall pay each complainant a further 500 marks in costs.

4.Their other claims are dismissed.

In witness of this judgment Sir William Douglas, President of the Tribunal, Mr. Edilbert Razafindralambo, Judge, and Mr. Jean-François Egli, Judge, sign below, as do I, Allan Gardner, Registrar. Delivered in public in Geneva on 11 July 1996.


William Douglas
E. Razafindralambo
A.B. Gardner

Updated by PFR. Approved by CC. Last update: 7 July 2000.

Long story short, in his capacity as head of Internal Services (alongside other people), Minnoye was found guilty and the EPO was forced to pay each victim “500 German marks in damages for moral injury.” Notice that it took several years for justice to be served, as is usual when dealing with I.L.O., which is now overwhelmed by EPO-related complaints. Problems at the EPO clearly go beyond just Battistelli.

Microsoft Socio Certificado: Immersion Enjuicia a Apple Usando Patentes de Software Mientras que Microsoft Acumula Patentes Símilares

Posted in Apple, Microsoft, Patents at 4:36 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz


Publicado en Apple, Microsoft, Patents at 7:30 am por el Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Aggresión de Patentes vistas en las noticias en lo que va de la semana

ImmersionSumario: La carrera de ratas y patentes de software que estan siendo astutamente disfrazadas como si pertenecieran al hardware en orden de engañar a los examinadores y habilitar de facto el trolling de patentes

DÍAS atrás mencionamos las patentes de Immersion (la traducción al Español fue publicada esta mañana) por que la OEP ha estado otorgando patentes a ellos (como iniciar vibraciones y cuando).

Coincidentalmente, el siguiente reportaje (de la Prensa Tecnológica Británica) ha sido traída a nuestra atención. Dice:

Traje Haptic Immersion, de quien se rumoreó haber estado en charlas con Apple, ha soltado una avalancha de juicios contra Cupertino, AT&T, y AT&T Mobility sobre presuntas infracciónes de patentes.

Las bolas de jucios de Immersion han aterrizado en la Comisión de Comercio Internacional (ITC) de los Estados Unidos y en la Corte del Distrito de Delaware.

Las charlas en el 2008 entre Apple e Immersion nunca consiguieron nada, pero más tarde ese año, la última compañía estableció un arreglo en su jucio de seis años contra Microsoft acerca de su tecnología ¨rumble¨ y se convirtió en un Socio Certificado de Microsoft.

¿Quién es el siguiente? ¿Distribuidores de Android? Ya vimos a Microsoft y Noka haciendo eso antes.

“A Microsoft también le gusta patentar software en la OEP (Microsoft es un VIP en la OEP).”Immersion es una compañía ´licenciadora´ a quien la OEP alimenta mucho con patentes de software. No sabíamos que era un Socio Certificado de Microsoft. A Microsoft también le gusta patentar software en la OEP (Microsoft es un VIP en la OEP). Nos preguntamos ¿qué hace la OEP aquí? No importa la ITC.

En otras noticias acerca de patentes, Microsoft esta ahora patentando mejoras de sistemas. Como la British Tecnology Press lo puso: ¨El resultado de todo esto es, básicamente, un estilo de Lego armelo usted ordenador, tomando los existentes conceptos de ordenadores que pueden ser mejorados por el usuario pero acabando con la necesidad de abrir algo.

¨Tal jugada no es nueva, por decir menos. Intel ha trabajado en algo similar en linea con su Siguiente Unidad de Computación (NUC) mini PC rango por varios años. La NUC no es apilable con simples unidades cerradas como el concepto de Microsoft, pero se caracteriza por sus pequeños componentes estilo laptop que simplemente se unen al tablero principal con minimo uso de destornilladores or habilidades transferidas.¨

“Si yo hubiera desarrollado un software como Vista 10 (como un desarrollador independiente), los medios de comunicación lo llamarían malware y correría el riesgo de ser arrestado. No Microsoft…”¿A quién está concesionando estas patentes de todos modos? Háptica en mente, también vean este reportaje titulado “¿Por qué Microsoft compró SwiftKey? Pista: No se trata de los teclados“(SE TRATA DE PATENTES Y ESPIONAJE). Microsoft quiere espiar cada vez más en el uso de teclados ‘en tiempo real, no sólo en Vista 10, que es efectivamente un keylogger hábilmente enmascarado como un sistema operativo que las personas no pueden evitar (en silencio se va a instalar, al igual que el malware). Si hubiera desarrollado un software como Vista 10 (como un desarrollador independiente), los medios de comunicación lo llamarían malware correría el riesgo de ser arrestado. No Microsoft …

Bueno, Microsoft es ‘especial’…muy conectada con el gobierno y la NSA.

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