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08.08.17

Links 8/8/2017: Linux 4.13 RC4, Unreal Engine 4.17, Mozilla Firefox 55

Posted in News Roundup at 10:00 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • Man in car seat costume tests response to driverless vehicles

    The Virginia Tech Transportation Institute has launched a new effort to gauge real world reactions to driverless vehicles by disguising a human driver to look like a car seat.

  • “Driverless van” is just a VT researcher in a really good driver’s seat costume

    The video opens with a guy rapping on the window of a van.

    “Brother, who are you?” the person holding the camera says. “What are you doing? I’m with the news, dude.”

    You can see hands holding the steering wheel from the bottom, but the man inside the Ford van, dressed in a full driver’s seat costume—including a face mask—doesn’t react.

  • Science

    • Fast Times at Ridgemont High is turning 35. Learn it. Know it. Live it.
    • India will achieve 100% literacy in next 5 years: Javadekar

      “Students from class 6 to 12 are being trained to be able to pass on their knowledge to their parents, grandparents and others in the family who have been deprived of it. The child becomes a guru to them,” Javadekar said, adding “that is how we can completely eradicate illiteracy from the country”.

    • 1,000-year-old German dinner reveals long-distance Viking trade routes

      Today, the coastal city of Haithabu is an archaeological site in Germany on the Baltic Sea. But the people who munched on that dried cod roughly 1,000 years ago were living under Danish rule in a cosmopolitan port city. Haithabu was a key stop on a lively sea trade route that brought tasty treats and trinkets like walrus tusks from distant lands. Though there is ample evidence of this kind of trade 800 years ago, University of Oslo environmental biologist Bastiaan Star and his colleagues have pushed that date back at least 200 years, and possibly 400, just by sequencing cod DNA. This dramatically changes our understanding of long-distance trade in Northern Europe during the Viking Age.

    • Surviving as an Old in the Tech World
    • Brexit relocation of EU medicines regulator ‘will hit UK researchers hard’

      Two of the UK’s foremost research organisations will lose much of their business to Amsterdam if the city is successful in securing the relocation of the EU’s medicines regulator, the Netherlands’ formal bid for the prized agency claims.

      Amsterdam, which has been tipped as an early favourite to secure the European Medicines Agency (EMA), says in its application submitted to the European commission that losing the agency will prove a double blow to London when Brexit forces its move.

      “The relocation of the agency will have considerable impact, not only because it has to move its headquarters and personnel, but also because the relationship with the UK Medicines Health and Regulatory Agency [MHRA] will change and potential risks need to be minimised in the event of a hard Brexit”, the document says.

  • Hardware

    • Talos II POWER9 Workstation With OpenBMC, PCI-E 4.0 Up For Pre-Ordering

      Last month we reported that Raptor was planning to launch a new POWER workstation and now they have revealed their system specifications and pre-order details.

      The Talos II workstation is built using POWER9 processors, is one of the first systems supporting PCI Express 4.0, supports DDR4 memory, is designed to be very secure and open, and uses the OpenBMC firmware.

    • AMD Confirms Linux Performance Marginality Problem Affecting Some, Doesn’t Affect Epyc / TR

      This morning I was on a call with AMD and they are now able to confirm they have reproduced the Ryzen “segmentation fault issue” and are working with affected customers.

      AMD engineers found the problem to be very complex and characterize it as a performance marginality problem exclusive to certain workloads on Linux. The problem may also affect other Unix-like operating systems such as FreeBSD, but testing is ongoing for this complex problem and is not related to the recently talked about FreeBSD guard page issue attributed to Ryzen. AMD’s testing of this issue under Windows hasn’t uncovered problematic behavior.

    • AMD Confirms Rare Ryzen Linux Anomaly And Fix, EPYC And Threadripper Chips Unaffected

      Over the weekend, we talked about an issue surrounding AMD’s Ryzen-based processors on Unix-based OSes. Today, we learn a lot more about what’s going on, as well as which products are actually affected. But first, let’s get the upside out of the way: this bug is rare, and requires very specific conditions. The vast majority of users are not going to experience an issue, but it’s at least an issue to be aware of.

    • AMD confirms Linux “performance marginality problem” on Ryzen
    • AMD Confirms Linux Marginality Problem, Doesn’t Affect Epyc or Threadripper
    • Chip IP designer ARM becomes “Arm” — or is it arm?

      Chip IP designer ARM Holdings has released a video that rebrands itself as “Arm” and promises to bring “happiness for everyone.”

      Eleven months after UK based semiconductor IP designer ARM Holdings was acquired by Japanese technology giant Softbank Group for about $31 billion, Arm has quietly rebranded itself with a hipper, lower-case “arm” logo. The strapless new look first debuted in a platitude rich Aug. 1 YouTube video (see below) spotted on Underconsideration.com’s BrandNew page. The name change seemed to have been challenged by a bit of indecision, judging by the recent edit history on Arm’s Wikipedia page (see Aug. 7, 2017 screenshot farther below), and the Arm website shows some examples of ARM, Arm, and arm. In an email to LinuxGizmos, Phil Hughes, Arm’s Director of Public Relations, wrote: “basically arm is all lowercase for the logo and when used in text is Arm.”

  • Security

    • Security updates for Monday
    • Oracle Joins SafeLogic to Develop FIPS Module for OpenSSL Security

      Oracle announced on Aug. 3 that it is joining SafeLogic in an effort to develop a much needed FIPS 140-2 module for the open-source OpenSSL cryptographic library.

      OpenSSL is widely used to help secure internet communication and infrastructure, though it currently is lacking a critical module for government standards, known as FIPS 140-2. The Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) Publication 140-2 is a U.S. government cyber-security standard used to certify cryptographic modules.

    • OpenSSL drops TLS 1.0/1.1 support for Debian Unstable and what does it mean for Debian sid users?
    • What Women in Cybersecurity Really Think About Their Careers

      For once, some good news about women in the cybersecurity field: A new survey shows that despite the low number of women in the industry, many feel empowered in their jobs and consider themselves valuable members of the team.

      The newly published “Women in Cybersecurity: A Progressive Movement” report — a survey of women by a woman — is the brainchild of security industry veteran Caroline Wong, vice president of security strategy at Cobalt, who formerly worked at Cigital, Symantec, eBay, and Zynga.

      Wong says she decided to conduct the survey after getting discouraged with all of the bad news about women being underrepresented, underpaid, and even harassed in the technology and cybersecurity fields. The number of women in the industry has basically plateaued at 11% over the past few years.

    • Radio navigation set to make global return as GPS backup, because cyber

      The risk to GPS has caused a number of countries to take a second look at terrestrial radio navigation. Today there’s broad support worldwide for a new radio navigation network based on more modern technology—and the system taking the early lead for that role is eLoran. As Reuters reports, South Korea is preparing to bring back radio navigation with eLoran as a backup system for GPS, and the United States is planning to do the same.

    • Open source vulnerabilities pose a serious risk for software startups [Ed: The Microsoft-connected FUD firm is at it again]
    • MalwareTech released on bail; supporters to meet Wednesday

      MalwareTech, the cyber security researcher who halted the WannaCry ransomware virus earlier this year and was arrested in Las Vegas last week, will be released on bail today and will travel directly to Milwaukee for a court appearance tomorrow in the Eastern District of Wisconsin – Update: the arraignment is rescheduled for 10am on Monday, 14 August. After 24 hours of no information about his arrest, and a flurry of international news coverage, it was reported that MalwareTech, who lives in the UK and who was in the US for Defcon, was not a flight risk and will be allowed out on $30,000 bail.

    • Marcus Hutchins freed on bail, to face court on 14 Aug
    • Regarding Marcus Hutchins aka MalwareTech
    • F2FS Hit By Three Security Vulnerabilities: Memory Corruption, Possible Code Execution

      Btrfs isn’t the only Linux file-system taking some heat but the Flash-Friendly File-System (F2FS) is now having a tough week with three CVEs going public.

    • How leaked exploits empower cyber criminals [Ed: The problem is the stockpiling and the back doors (e.g. by design, see Microsoft-NSA collaborations), not just the leaks.]

      A central themes in the 2016 report was issues that arose from the Mirai botnet and the takeover of numerous insecure IoT devices. Although those record-setting DDoS attacks were vastly different from 2017’s outbreak of WannaCry ransomware and the destructive NotPetya malware, the events share a similar root cause: leaked exploits and source code. IoT botnets and data-encrypting malware were of course common before those incidents however the September 2016 release of the Mirai source code and the April 2017 release of NSA exploits exacerbated the crime.

  • Transparency/Investigative Reporting

    • Engineer behind Google anti-diversity memo reportedly fired
    • Free Speech Advocate Jordan Peterson (Temporarily) Shut Down by Google

      The Toronto Sun reports that professor Jordan B. Peterson suspects political reasons may have been behind Google’s recent decision to shut down his gmail account, which kept him from uploading new videos to his popular youtube channel. Peterson became famous months ago when he posted a video critical of Canada’s proposed bill C-16 that he argued would compel Canadians to use gender-neutral pronouns at risk of fines and imprisonment.

    • Google has fired the employee who penned a controversial memo on women and tech

      In a memo to employees, Google CEO Sundar Pichai said the employee who penned a controversial memo that claimed that women had biological issues that prevented them from being as successful as men in tech had violated its Code of Conduct, and that the post had crossed “the line by advancing harmful gender stereotypes in our workplace.”

      He added: “To suggest a group of our colleagues have traits that make them less biologically suited to that work is offensive and not OK.”

      Pichai’s wording appears to indicate that the employee is likely be fired, which some inside and outside the company have been calling for. A Google spokesperson said the company would not confirm any firing of an individual employee, but others have been let go for violating its Code of Conduct in the past.

    • Google fires engineer who “crossed the line” with diversity memo

      Google has fired James Damore, an engineer who wrote a controversial essay arguing that the company has gone overboard in its attempts to promote diversity. Damore confirmed the firing in an e-mail to Bloomberg.

      “At Google, we’re regularly told that implicit (unconscious) and explicit biases are holding women back in tech and leadership,” Damore wrote in an internal posting that went viral within the company over the weekend. The posting was subsequently leaked to Gizmodo. However, he argued, that’s “far from the whole story.”

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife/Nature

    • USDA has begun censoring use of the term ‘climate change’, emails reveal

      Staff at the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) have been told to avoid using the term climate change in their work, with the officials instructed to reference “weather extremes” instead.

      A series of emails obtained by the Guardian between staff at the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), a USDA unit that oversees farmers’ land conservation, show that the incoming Trump administration has had a stark impact on the language used by some federal employees around climate change.

    • All the climate-change related words employees at the US agriculture department can’t use anymore

      On February 16, federal employees at an arm of the US Department of Agriculture received an email from one of their bosses on how to talk about climate change under the new administration. The gist was clear: Don’t talk about it.
      According to emails obtained by the Guardian, Bianca Moebius-Clune, the director of soil health, sent employees at the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) a list of terms to avoid in the future. The NRCS is the federal office that oversees farmers’ land conservation.

    • Emails Show USDA Staff Told to ‘Avoid’ Term ‘Climate Change’ Under Trump

      Staffers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) service responsible for helping American farmers with conservation efforts were instructed by top officials to avoid the term “climate change” shortly after President Donald Trump took office, according to emails (pdf) obtained by the Guardian.

    • The Trump administration’s solution to climate change: ban the term

      In a bold new strategy unveiled on Monday in the Guardian, the US Department of Agriculture – guardians of the planet’s richest farmlands – has decided to combat the threat of global warming by forbidding the use of the words.

      Under guidance from the agency’s director of soil health, Bianca Moebius-Clune, a list of phrases to be avoided includes “climate change” and “climate change adaptation”, to be replaced by “weather extremes” and “resilience to weather extremes”.

  • Finance

    • European Union preparing to disable ATM withdrawals when banks are insolvent

      [...] today’s banking is essentially a big Ponzi scheme, under the more formal names of “fractional reserve” and “quantitative easing”.

    • European Union Proposes Account Freezes to Protect Failing Banks

      The proposed account freezes extend the ability for states to suspend account withdrawals – which currently exempt insured deposit accounts that hold less than 100,000 euros. The plan would allow the suspension of payouts for five working days, with a possible extension of 20 days allocated for “exceptional circumstances”. Existing EU legislation allows for states to initiate a two-day suspension of certain payouts in the event of potential bank failure – with deposits explicitly excluded.

    • CBA blames faulty code for alleged law violations

      The Commonwealth Bank has blamed coding errors in a software update for its Intelligent Deposit Machines for its allegedly falling foul of Australian money-laundering and terror-financing laws.

    • Tories are flushing Britain down the Brexit toilet as government’s divisions makes deal negotiation impossible

      Warring Tories flushing Britain down the Brexit toilet couldn’t navigate their way out of a bathroom with an open door.

      The mockery echoing across the Channel and Irish Sea is the sound of our impending national doom.

      Gobsmacked diplomats representing the EU’s 27 other countries are warning that Britain has zero chance of successfully negotiating a deal until it knows what it wants.

      And with the Tory government’s irreparably, fatally split such a united response is impossible.

  • AstroTurf/Lobbying/Politics

  • Censorship/Free Speech

  • Privacy/Surveillance

    • Hotspot Shield VPN throws your privacy in the fire, injects ads, JS into browsers – claim

      The Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT), a digital rights advocacy group, on Monday urged US federal trade authorities to investigate VPN provider AnchorFree for deceptive and unfair trade practices.

      AnchorFree claims its Hotspot Shield VPN app protects netizens from online tracking, but, according to a complaint filed with the FTC, the company’s software gathers data and its privacy policy allows it to share the information.

      Worryingly, it is claimed the service forces ads and JavaScript code into people’s browsers when connected through Hotspot Shield: “The VPN has been found to be actively injecting JavaScript codes using iframes for advertising and tracking purposes.”

    • Separating NSA and CYBERCOM? Be Careful When Reading the GAO Report

      The Government Accountability Office last week published a report that, among other things, weighs in on the pros and cons the NSA/CYBERCOM “dual-hat” system (pursuant to which the Director of NSA/CSS and Commander of CYBERCOM are the same person). The report deserves attention, but also some criticism and context. Here’s a bit of all three.

    • NSA whistleblower discusses ‘How the NSA tracks you’

      At the outdoor hacker camp and conference SHA2017, which is taking place in the Netherlands, NSA whistleblower William Binney gave the talk, “How the NSA tracks you.”

      As a former insider, Binney knew about this long before Snowden dropped the documents to prove it is happening. Although he didn’t say anything new, Binney is certainly no fan of the NSA’s spying — he calls the NSA the “New Stasi Agency.” If you are no fan of surveillance, then his perspective from the inside about the “total invasion of the privacy rights of everybody on the planet” will fuel your fury at the NSA all over again.

      In today’s cable program, according to Binney, the NSA uses corporations that run fiber lines to get taps on the lines. If that fails, they use foreign governments to get taps on the lines. And if that doesn’t work, “they’ll tap the line anywhere that they can get to it” — meaning corporations or governments won’t even know about the taps.

    • FTC must scrutinize Hotspot Shield over alleged traffic interception, group says

      In its 14-page filing, which was submitted Monday morning, the Center for Democracy and Technology claims that the company displays persistent cookies and works with various other entities for advertising purposes, among other alleged unsavory practices.

    • Data Protection Bill: How will the new laws affect you?

      The new Data Protection Bill is designed to sign European privacy rules into British law, as well as update the existing Data Protection Act which has not changed since 1998.

    • Ireland planning to introduce national identity cards by stealth, with no debate and unclear privacy safeguards

      National identity cards are an emotive topic. In the UK, the ID card debate raged for years before and after the authorities there passed a law in 2006 to introduce them. Five years later, a change of government saw the law being repealed as a result of widespread public concerns. The Irish government seems to be adopting a different approach. It is introducing ID cards for its population while denying that it is doing so, perhaps in an attempt to dodge the heated arguments that raged in the UK.

    • Facebook addiction is a learned mess of guilt, reward and Pavlovian response

      The research showed that even glimpsing the Facebook logo or the pleasing blue-on-white colour scheme was enough to get the dopamine pumping in frequent users and might actually kick them off on a social update binge.

    • GDPR explained: How to prepare for the approaching General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

      The British government will adopt the regulation while the country remains in the EU and mirror it once it leaves, and has announced a new Data Protection Bill that will bring the regulations into UK law. The bill will likely be introduced in Parliament between the return from summer recess on 5 September and the end of 2017.

  • Civil Rights/Policing

    • Saudi Arabia is to execute 14 young men for protesting – where is Theresa May’s condemnation?

      In most countries organising an illegal demonstration on Facebook might get you a fine or, if you’re unlucky, a short jail sentence.

      But there is one place where it can actually help get you the death penalty.

      In Saudi Arabia today there are 14 pro-democracy demonstrators who face execution after being caught up in protests against the royal family which turned violent.

    • Asylum seeker on Manus Island found dead

      Iranian refugee and journalist Behrouz Boochani, who is also on Manus Island, said the asylum seeker concerned had a long history of mental illness and distress.

      He was reportedly jailed following a mental breakdown at the regional processing centre, but was released, only to be found wandering the streets of Lorengau without clothes.

      “He was homeless in the street and in a very bad situation,” Mr Boochani told Fairfax Media on Monday.

  • Internet Policy/Net Neutrality

    • These are the 11 Representatives and 21 Senators that have stood up to the FCC regarding net neutrality

      11 House Representatives chastise the FCC for attempting to destroy internet freedom
      The 11 Representatives are:

      Kathy Castor (D-FL)
      Anna G. Eshoo (D-CA)
      Diana DeGette (D-CO)
      Mike Doyle (D-PA)
      Joseph P. Kennedy III (D-MA)
      Doris Matsui (D-CA)
      Jerry McNerney (D-CA)
      Frank Pallone Jr. (D-NJ)
      John Sarbanes (D-MD)
      Jan Schakowsky (D-IL)
      Peter Welch (D-VT)

    • 10 Members of Congress rake FCC over the coals in official net neutrality comment

      “As participants either in the passage of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 or in decisions on whether to update the Act, we write to provide our unique insight into the meaning and intent of the law.”

      [...]

      “Since we voted for the Telecommunications Act in 1996, Americans rejected the curated internet services in favor of an open platform. Now, anyone with a subscription to an ISP can get access to any legal website or application of their choice. Americans’ ISPs no longer pick and choose what online services their customers can access.”

    • Dems press FCC to extend net neutrality comment period

      Fifteen Democrats led by Sen. Ed Markey (Mass.) in a letter Thursday to Republican FCC Chairman Ajit Pai asked that he provide more time for comments, citing the unprecedented number of comments on the rules.

    • At least 196 Internet providers in the US have data caps

      A company that tracks ISPs and data caps in the US has identified 196 home Internet providers that impose monthly caps on Internet users. Not all of them are enforced, but customers of many ISPs must pay overage fees when they use too much data.

      BroadbandNow, a broadband provider search site that gets referral fees from some ISPs, has more than 2,500 home Internet providers in its database. This list includes telecommunications providers that are registered to provide service under the government’s Lifeline program, which subsidizes access for poor people. BroadbandNow’s team looked through the ISPs’ websites to generate a list of those with data caps.

      The data cap information was “pulled directly from ISP websites,” BroadbandNow Director of Content Jameson Zimmer told Ars. “For those that have multiple caps, we include the lowest one and an asterisk to show that they have regional variation.”

      BroadbandNow, which is operated by a company called Microbrand Media, plans to keep tracking the data caps over time in order to examine trends, he said.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Trademarks

    • Copyrights

      • How many noted the implications of the European Court of Justice ruling on Internet copyright three years ago?

        The European Court of Justice (the ECJ, “the European Supreme Court”) ruled three years ago that anything published openly on the web may be freely reused by anyone in any way on their own website. This ruling didn’t get anywhere near the attention it deserved, as it completely reverses a common misconception – the idea that you can’t republish or reuse something you happen to come across. The ECJ says that an open publication on the web exhausts the exclusivity of a work as far as the web is concerned, and that further authorization or permission from the rightsholder is not required for any reuse on the web after that, commercial or not.

      • RIAA’s Piracy Claims are Misleading and Inaccurate, ISP Says

        Internet provider Grande Communications and the RIAA continue their fight in court. Much of the battle thus far has centered around evidence of copyright infringement. In a new filing at a Texas District Court, the ISP stresses that the RIAA’s evidence is misleading, as it doesn’t prove any actual distributions of the contested works.

      • ‘US Should Include Fair Use and Safe Harbors in NAFTA Negotiations’

        The Re:Create Coalition is offering a strong counter view to recent demands from copyright groups, urging the US to add strong copyright protections to the NAFTA negotiations. The coalition argues that if strong copyright enforcement is a central issue, fair use and safe harbor protections should be included as well, to maintain a proper balance.

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