12.06.22

Subsidising the Likes of Rupert Murdoch is Not Supporting Journalism

Posted in America, Deception, Finance, Law at 4:10 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link | md5sum dd4b69b8bb8a4043172f25bd7f500164
Taxing the Wrong Way Around
Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 4.0

Summary: There are yet more attempts to tax citations; not only does that make no practical or moral sense, it’s being lumped in or joined together with a must-pass “defence” (military) bill in order to suppress opposition

THE European Union has put forth some misguided proposals on “news sharing” for years. Canada is also pushing a ‘link tax’. Now, the United States — likely swayed by the very same lobbyists (and interests which infest “the media”) — might have the same inside a must-pass anti-democratic bill. It’s just unreal, is it not?

What are they trying to do? They want to tax people for linking to sites rather than accept that it would harm the Internet; if anyone should cushion a burden to pay, it’s the site/s enjoying additional audience, owing to the linking. They got it all backwards!

“This deserves to be broadly discussed as the general public would be disgusted.”Thankfully, unlike lobbyists’ mouthpieces (misframing this as “Big Tech” — a Microsoft lobbying straw man), there is some better coverage regarding “Journalism Competition and Preservation Act (JCPA)” (misnomer in every letter). It seems like US ‘democracy’ has been reduced to a bunch corporate dictators dropping stuff they want enshrined as law onto NDAA, bypassing an actual, real vote on pertinent proposals. “Piggybacking “riders” into must-pass legislation,” an associate said, “is toxic and anti-American. Notice that it’s not just that most of the coverage is afflicted by severe conflicts of interest, but that almost the only sites covering it at all are overseas: India, UK, Australia, etc. The US-based businesses don’t want the matter examined in any way, shape, or form.”

This deserves to be broadly discussed as the general public would be disgusted. Lots of scandals here all wrapped into one.

Microsoft Layoffs Again

Posted in Microsoft at 3:34 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link | md5sum 8efb1c7c8af855093a0a385343d80a89
Microsoft Layoff Waves
Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 4.0

Summary: The company behind Windows is in a bad state, but it is being propped up by the taxpayers; if rumours are true, Microsoft might get a lot smaller next year

THE rumour about impending (next month) Microsoft layoffs is noteworthy.

“Many of the “big tech” firms have been going through multiple rounds of layoffs all year,” an associate has noted. We, as usual, tend to focus on Microsoft because no company attacks GNU/Linux like Microsoft does. Microsoft loves Windows.

Microsoft is Killing Hospital Patients With Its Insecure-by-design Windows Operating System

Posted in Microsoft, Security, Windows at 3:16 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link | md5sum 9c2cd866f7a90f07c79e51b7e0523c86
Eradicate Windows From Hospitals
Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 4.0

Summary: Many people continue to needlessly die because many hospitals still foolishly deploy Windows on mission-critical life-saving machines

THIS 2020 series about Windows inside hospitals was based on whistleblowers. It attracted a lot of attention at the time.

The problem has not been resolved since then; the media reports similar incidents that are high-profile because it’s in France or Paris (so rich people suffer). Media coverage was amassed today, with more links gathered in prior days (with Daily Links containing these). Here are some examples:

  • French hospital cancels operations after cyberattack

    The Hospital Centre of Versailles — which consists of Andre-Mignot Hospital, Richaud Hospital and the Despagne Retirement Home — was affected by the hacking attempt, said the complex’s management. The regional health agency (ARS) said the Andre-Mignot Hospital had cancelled operations, but was doing everything possible to keep walk-in services and consultations running.

  • French Hospital Halts Operations After Cyber-Attack

    Although not mentioned explicitly in reports so far, the attack on the 700-bed hospital looks to be the work of ransomware actors.

    If so, it follows a major ransomware attack on another facility near Paris in September this year. The Centre Hospitalier Sud Francilien (CHSF) in Corbeil-Essonnes was forced back to pen and paper after being hit with a $10m ransom demand by the LockBit 3.0 group.

    A few months earlier, the GHT Cœur Grand Est hospital group said it had been forced to cut internet connectivity to its Vitry-le-François and Saint-Dizier hospitals after receiving a $1.3m ransom demand.

  • French Hospital Cancels Operations After Cyberattack

    The Paris prosecutors’ office has opened a preliminary investigation into attempted extortion, as well as the access and maintenance of the state’s digital system. The hospital had also filed a formal complaint Sunday.

    For several months now, hospitals and health systems in France have been targeted with such cyberattacks.

  • [Old] Paralysed French hospital fights cyber attack as hackers lower ransom

    A hospital southeast of Paris has been crippled by an ongoing cyberattack, drastically reducing the number of patients who can be admitted and forcing a return to pre-digital workflows. Security experts are trying to retake control of the computer system as ransom negotiations continue.

  • Brooklyn Hospitals Decried for Silence on Cyber Incident

    Some systems at One Brooklyn Health System’s three hospitals – Interfaith Medical Center, Brookdale Hospital Medical Center and Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center – were taken offline Nov. 19 following an incident about which little is publicly known.

    Sources tell Information Security Media Group that the organization has been tight-lipped with other area hospitals about the cause of the outage, which is suspected to involve ransomware.

  • Cyber Attackers Cripple IT Systems of Prominent Indian Hospital

    It’s unclear what data the attackers may have accessed, or what their motives were. The hospital itself hasn’t said what data — or whose — may have been compromised. On Monday, police in the Indian capital, where the hospital is located, said it was unaware of ransom demands in response to local media reports that 2 billion rupees ($24.5 million) had been demanded.

  • [Crackers] Cripple Prestigious Indian Hospital’s IT Systems

    The All India Institute of Medical Sciences — a hospital that’s traditionally treated the country’s top politicians — has succumbed to a ransomware attack that’s shut down centralized records, people familiar with the matter said.

  • Why Ransomware Victims Avoid Calling It ‘Ransomware’

    Mathew Schwartz: What is a ransomware attack called if it’s ransomware, but an organization that’s fallen victim doesn’t want to call it ransomware? Some companies have become expert at spinning as in using corporate speak or weasel words to avoid having to ever say the word ransomware. To a raft of press statements or data breach reports from companies that talk about suffering unexpected downtime, or perhaps a cybersecurity incident, the word cyberattack is another favorite. What’s going on here? Companies aren’t comfortable saying they’ve been hit by ransomware. That’s despite the volume of ransomware attacks appearing to have recently declined, at least against the healthcare sector.

Notice the conspicuous omission of the operating system. They make it sound like a general and system-agnostic problem. Just what Microsoft would like!

Sirius ‘Open Source’ Failing at the Most Basic Employment Regulations

Posted in Deception, Free/Libre Software, Law at 2:49 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link | md5sum 69c685809248895ed0059c14b5229a4f
No Pension, No Payslips
Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 4.0

Summary: The company we left behind last week was a repeat violator of employment laws; to make matters worse, it led to its long-term or long(time)-serving staff becoming very baffled, having to contact the pension provider for clarifications

THE latest part in the Sirius ‘Open Source’ series (expected to last this whole month based on a tentative estimate) deals with several pension blunders, further exacerbated by a lack of payslips and a lack of response from management (enquiries originally ignored).

“Running afoul of employment regulations, repeatedly even, is a wake-up call; it’s time to move on.”Should it take more than a week with repeated nags/reminders to simply receive an explanation for gaps in pension contributions? What if this happens for several consecutive months and repeats itself several years apart? Is this an accident or a company falling apart, or at best failing to juggle basic responsibilities?

The company I left last Friday probably won’t last much longer so it is important to talk about some of the warning signs. Running afoul of employment regulations, repeatedly even, is a wake-up call; it’s time to move on.

Your employer must provide you with a payslip. They do not have to do this if you’re: not an employee or ‘worker’, for example a contractor or freelancer; in the police service; a merchant seaman; a master or crew member working in share fishing (paid by a share in the profits or gross earnings of a fishing vessel); Your payslips can be used as proof of your earnings, tax paid and any pension contributions. Employers can choose whether they provide printed or electronic (online) payslips. Payslips must be provided on or before payday.

Sirius repeatedly broke these rules and was casually confronted about it. For the last 6 months or so that I was at the company it was a perpetual breach.

Sirius ‘Open Source’: When the Company Stops Paying Your Pension and You Don’t Know Until the Pension Provider Keeps Sending Physical Post to Alert You

Posted in Deception, Free/Libre Software at 12:34 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Too busy to do pensions and send payslips

Summary: Today we turn our attention to pension blunders at Sirius ‘Open Source’; in recent years even something basic like pension contributions wasn’t smooth sailing

WE’VE just posted a meme that demonstrates the immunity (de facto impunity) for bosses who make serious mistakes that upset not only staff but also clients. There are many examples of this, but today we share one. We’ll also show some evidence tomorrow as it serves to show the depth of these scandals.

This text, which can be found below, is part of a report left when we resigned; we may come back to that later as it shows a pattern of cover-up and lame excuses after utter failure to do the job properly at the very top of the company.

Regarding greenwashing the cessation of physical payslips, and not to forget repeated failure to send electronic payslips, this subject may also be revisited later. We’ve been noticing similar experiences in other companies, not just banks and utility billing; the bogus excuse that sending E-mail (or using a Web site, “apps” etc.) is “green” overlooks the massive carbon footprint associated with manufacturing (power and waste) and operating (electricity) computers, even some of the more modern “phones” that need to be charged every day.

Here is the relevant part of the report:


Pension Not Now!

There’s no more in-house accounting, the person who set up the pension scheme also left, and all workers’ pensions got outsourced to some other company (so the pension scheme is now fragmented for long-serving staff).

Years ago several colleagues, including Roy and Rianne, were cautioned by the pension provider that the pension was not being paid; it wasn’t an isolated incident as this happened for several consecutive months and on numerous occasions over the years. The simplest and plausible explanation is that the company (Sirius) had financial difficulties, but the “official” explanation was that the portal had technical issues in it. There are several inconsistencies in the latter explanation, for reasons beyond the scope of this document. Later difficulties cemented the belief that under the surface there was a crisis of another nature. It may be possible that there were technical issues coming back every now and then (for almost a year). If so, staff should have been notified and fully informed, sparing the need to go through the hassle communicating with barely-accessible pension companies, sometimes behind the managers’ backs (this is bashful both for workers and for the pension providers). This seems like a managerial failure. Speaking of failure to pay, it’s crystal clear that the company (Sirius) failed to pay providers of services or clients’ providers of services. It’s like not paying the webhost for a very long time. These chronic issues of either neglect or miscommunication should be brought up; but in Sirius it’s seriously unwelcomed.

It may seem appropriate to note that one administrator has been on maternity leave and as a result staff has received no payslips for months already (it’s a strict legal requirement by the way). As a matter of fact, prior to that everyone received physical copies by post. Then members of staff were assured electronic versions would replace them. Then… they stopped coming. And then, only upon polite prodding they started coming again, sometimes in bursts several months apart (not every month). Nowadays staff may receive nothing at all as evidence of pay. There are many gaps in the sending of such payslips, even electronically. Who has been given the responsibility and where is the accountability? Staff should not have to repeatedly ask for payslips; it ought to happen automatically without the feeling that it requires perceived ‘nagging’. Roy and Rianne were chasing this many times as payslips had stopped coming. This even needed to be escalated upwards (to the CEO) before things got belatedly done, at least temporarily.

Inconsistent operations or ‘compliance in intervals’ had already become routine. Communication had been diluted into subtle hints and sporadic innuendo. Engagement with clients had descended to storytelling, with very rare admissions of guilt or apologies. Some clients demanded a refund (all their money back) for Sirius failing to fulfil its side (contractual obligations) of the deliverables or service levels.

[Meme] Sirius Open Source, Closed-Minded Bossing

Posted in Deception, Free/Libre Software at 11:43 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Sirius Open Source: Don't you criticise me! I'm the boss!

Summary: At Sirius ‘Open Source’, decisions are made in the dark without consultation with staff and many things go wrong as a result; of course the culprits never hold themselves accountable

Links 06/12/2022: LibreOffice 7.5 Alpha and digiKam 7.9.0

Posted in News Roundup at 11:23 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • GNU/Linux

    • Applications

      • OpenSource.comHow the Linux Worker file manager can work for you

        Computers are like filing cabinets, full of virtual folders and files waiting to be referenced, cross-referenced, edited, updated, saved, copied, moved, renamed, and organized. In this article, I’m taking a look at the Worker file manager for your Linux system.

        The Worker file manager dates back to 1999. That’s the previous century, and a good seven years before I’d boot into Linux for the first time. Even so, it’s still being updated today, but judiciously. Worker isn’t an application where arbitrary changes get made, and using Worker today is a lot like using Worker 20 years ago, only better.

      • TecMintThe Best Tools for Creating Fillable PDF Forms on Linux

        In this article, you will find the best applications that can be used to create PDF files with fillable fields, also known as interactive forms, on Linux.

        If you need a powerful tool to create and edit PDF files on Linux, you have plenty of applications to choose from. They all make it possible to perform basic editing operations, like merging pages and adding annotations and even offer sometimes advanced functionality.

        However, not all PDF editors can create PDF forms – editable PDF files with interactive fields that can be filled out by other users. Such documents come in handy if you need to create a questionnaire, an admission form, or a sales contract, for example.

        The list below includes solutions that run on various Linux distributions and allow you to generate PDF forms for free in Linux.

    • Instructionals/Technical

      • Manuel MatuzovicDay 51: aspect-ratio and replaced elements

        Most elements have no preferred aspect ratio. On day 42 I’ve explained how you can use the aspect-ratio property to define a ratio for these elements. Replaced elements like <iframe>, <video>, <embed>, or <image>, on the other hand, have an intrinsic aspect ratio. This means that you don’t have to define one using the aspect-ratio property and they will scale naturally.

      • Terence EdenSome more silly Punycode domain names

        You know how it is, you buy one silly domain name and then you get an idea for loads more! A few weeks ago, I got https://⏻.ga/ – I think I’m the first person to get a domain name which uses a glyph from the Miscellaneous Symbols Unicode block. How exciting!

        And that got me wondering… what other abuses of the Punycode algorithm can I whack into DNS? Well, here’s some I whipped up using FreeNom – they offer free domain names on the .ga TLD (and a few others) and are very liberal in accepting Punycode domains.

      • University of TorontoUsing Dovecot 2.3′s ‘events’ system to create Prometheus metrics

        Last time around I covered using Dovecot 2.3′s events to generate log messages. This is actually the less interesting thing (to us) that you can do with them; the more interesting thing is that you can have Dovecot directly expose an OpenMetrics exporter for statistics, which Prometheus can scrape directly (the OpenMetrics metrics format is more or less the Prometheus one, and Prometheus can deal with it these days). However, actually generating useful metrics and understanding what you get is a little bit complicated.

      • Eli BenderskySSH port forwarding with Go

        While you could set up localhost forwarding for testing, to discuss a more realistic scenario I would recommend spinning up a basic VPS. For the purpose of writing this post, I run a bare-bones Ubuntu VPS on Digital Ocean with the public IP address 159.89.238.232 (at the time of writing) and a root user. You can easily do the same using any cloud provider (obviously, accessing my VPS won’t work for you since it requires SSH authentication with a known set of keys).

      • Linux CapableHow to Install Avidemux on Ubuntu 22.10/22.04/20.04

        Avidemux is a free, open-source software program designed specifically for non-linear video editing and transcoding. It supports many file types, including AVI, DVD-compatible MPEG files, MP4, and ASF, using various codecs. Avidemux has a broad array of features that allows it to compete against any commercial product at its price point. You can cut and join videos without re-encoding; manage multiple projects simultaneously; save memory during playback; and even automate tasks while recording. If you are looking for an easy-to-use video editor with all the features you need, then AVDemux is worth checking out.

        The following tutorial will teach you how to install Avidemux on Ubuntu 22.10/22.04/20.04 Linux using the command line terminal the LaunchPAD PPA by the XtraDEB team.

      • TecAdminHow to limit directory depth with find command

        The ‘find’ command with -maxdepth is a powerful tool in the Linux operating system. It is used to recursively search for files and directories in a given directory and its subdirectories. The -maxdepth flag is used to specify the maximum depth of the search. For example, if the -maxdepth is set to 2, the search will only look at the given directory and its immediate subdirectories. This means that it will not look in any of the subdirectories.

    • Games

    • Desktop Environments/WMs

      • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

        • digiKam – digiKam 7.9.0 is released

          Dear digiKam fans and users,

          After four months of active maintenance and another bug triage, the digiKam team is proud to present version 7.9.0 of its open source digital photo manager. See below the list of most important features coming with this release.

          [...]

          The application internationalization has also been updated. digiKam and Showfoto are proposed with 57 different languages for the graphical interface. Go to Settings/Configure Languages dialog and change the localization as you want. Applications need to be restarted to apply changes. If you want to contribute to the internationalization of digiKam, please contact the translator teams, following the translation how-to. The statistics about translation states are available here.

  • Distributions and Operating Systems

    • Fedora Family / IBM

      • University of TorontoI’ve now disabled systemd-oomd on my Fedora desktops

        Systemd-oomd is a somewhat controversial systemd component that, to quote its manpage, “uses cgroups-v2 and pressure stall information (PSI) to monitor and take corrective action before an OOM occurs in the kernel space”. A while back, Fedora enabled systemd-oomd by default and set it to be applied to user@.service, the template for user slices. When I upgraded to the relevant Fedora version, I sort of shrugged and went along with this to see what happened. Nothing did for a long time, until I had a little incident: [...]

    • Debian Family

      • Björn WärmedalHey Debian, How Can I Help?

        At this point I have two options as far as I can tell. I either wait for a new version of fturbo to be packaged, or I figure out where I can get the source for it to build fturbo myself. I’ll probably have to package it too, I dunno. It’s likely to cause problems with future updates though.

    • Open Hardware/Modding

      • Dev DiscourseIndia’s first open-source satellite ‘InQube’ to be launched this month

        Onkar Batra, a 12th-standard student at BSF Senior Secondary School Jammu who has added another feather as India’s first open-source satellite ‘InQube’ developed by him is going to be launched this month with the help of Indian Space Agency- ISRO. InQube was prepared under the banner of Paradox Sonic Space Research Agency.

      • Andrew HutchingsDesign of the GoFloppy Drive

        On the outside, it is two PCBs sandwiched together to look like a 3.5″ floppy disk, it is also exactly the same size (apart from thickness) as a floppy disk. I spent many hours measuring every part of a disk and applying it to a PCB layout, even the tactile parts of the disk such as the direction arrow are replicated.

        Internally the GoFloppy drive is a floppy drive emulator similar to the “Gotek” commonly used in retro hardware. It even uses exactly the same FlashFloppy firmware that is typically found in Gotek drives. But when reverse-engineering the Gotek I made quite a few changes to improve things and went through a few prototypes until I was happy.

      • Andrew HutchingsAcorn RiscPC: Upgrades Part 1

        My RiscPC came with a 1MB VRAM card, this accelerates the video but of course 1MB doesn’t give you a huge range of resolutions and colour depth. The maximum you can upgrade to is 2MB but the 2MB cards sell for at least £90 at the moment.

        The alternative is to upgrade your own card. The 1MB VRAM boards have positions on the back of them for the additional four chips and decoupling capacitors required to make it a 2MB board. Likely for cost reduction the PCB is the same for 1MB and 2MB boards. So I acquired the VRAM chips relatively cheaply from a Chinese supplier and soldered them on, along with the 0805 decoupling capacitors which I always have plenty of.

      • Russell GravesImproving Thinkpad T430s Bluetooth by Replacing the Wireless Card

        It’s been a few years since I wrote about improving some of the rough edges on the ThinkPad T430s – but the time has come again to write about improving yet another aspect of this laptop – the Bluetooth support. Today, I’m replacing the (crap) stock Bluetooth dongle with an Intel 7620 combo WiFi/Bluetooth card to rather radically improve the Bluetooth range!

      • Computers Are Badover the horizon radar pt II

        Previously on Deep Space Nine, we discussed the MUSIC and MADRE over-the-horizon radar (OTH) programs. MUSIC and especially MADRE validated the concept of an HF radar using ionospheric (often called “skywave” in the radio art) propagation, with a novel hybrid digital-analog computerized signal processing system. MADRE was a tremendous success, ultimately able to detect ICBM launches, aircraft, and ship traffic in the North Atlantic region. What was needed next seemed simple: a very similar radar, perhaps more powerful, aimed at the Soviet Union.

      • Raspberry PiOpen-Source Gamma Spectrometer

        It uses a mixture of Arduino code and Pico hardware, with processing done entirely on Pico itself. It makes use of a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and scintillator crystal which interact with the detector board to manage this, whereas other solutions need USB sound cards and up to a kilovolt of power. This only needs 30 V.

      • Andrew HutchingsAcorn RiscPC: Upgrades Part 2

        A couple more upgrades have turned up, so I gave them a quick try. Not everything went to plan as you will see.

    • Mobile Systems/Mobile Applications

  • Free, Libre, and Open Source Software

    • OpenSource.comA 10-minute guide to the Linux ABI

      Many Linux enthusiasts are familiar with Linus Torvalds’ famous admonition, “we don’t break user space,” but perhaps not everyone who recognizes the phrase is certain about what it means.

      The “#1 rule” reminds developers about the stability of the applications’ binary interface via which applications communicate with and configure the kernel. What follows is intended to familiarize readers with the concept of an ABI, describe why ABI stability matters, and discuss precisely what is included in Linux’s stable ABI. The ongoing growth and evolution of Linux necessitate changes to the ABI, some of which have been controversial.

    • LWNA 10-minute guide to the Linux ABI (opensource.com) [LWN.net]

      Alison Chaiken provides an overview of Linux ABI concerns on opensource.com.

    • EarthlyMake It Observable: Running Grafana in Docker

      To build observability into the infrastructure, you can use Grafana, an open-source visualization and analytics platform that aids in exploring observability data, such as metrics and logs. You can run Grafana in Docker containers. This is particularly beneficial in creating an observable, portable testing environment and can be implemented in the Kubernetes infrastructure with various customizations available to the Grafana Docker container.

    • MJ FransenOpen files with Deft in read only mode

      Deft for Emacs is an Emacs mode for quickly browsing, filtering, and editing directories of plain text notes.

      It was designed for increased productivity when writing and taking notes by making it fast and simple to find the right file at the right time and by automating many of the usual tasks such as creating new files and saving files.

    • OpenSource.comA data scientist’s guide to open source community analysis

      In the golden age of data analysis, open source communities are not exempt from the frenzy around getting some big, fancy numbers onto presentation slides. Such information can bring even more value if you master the art of generating a well-analyzed question with proper execution.

      You might expect me, a data scientist, to tell you that data analysis and automation will inform your community decisions. It’s actually the opposite. Use data analysis to build on your existing open source community knowledge, incorporate others, and uncover potential biases and perspectives not considered. You might be an expert at implementing community events, while your colleague is a wiz at all things code. As each of you develops visualizations within the context of your own knowledge, you both can benefit from that information.

      Let’s have a moment of realness. Everyone has a thousand and one things to keep up with, and it feels like there is never enough time in a day to do so. If getting an answer about your community takes hours, you won’t do it regularly (or ever). Spending the time to create a fully developed visualization makes it feasible to keep up with different aspects of the communities you care about.

      With the ever-increasing pressure of being “data-driven,” the treasure trove of information around open source communities can be a blessing and a curse. Using the methodology below, I will show you how to pick the needle out of the data haystack.

    • Web Browsers/Web Servers

      • Sean ConnerLate to the party

        I’ve been blogging for 23 years as of today. This is also the first day this blog is being served up via https:. All I had to do was just install the latest version of Apache on my server.

        It took several days, but I got the latest version of Apache compiled and installed on my server. Yes, I did it the hard way. What better way of knowing how things work than doing it the hard way. I then spent Saturday updating the configuration. There were a few changes, like NameVirtualHost being deprecated, and having to add “Protocols h2 h2c http/1.1” and “Require all granted”.

      • Mozilla

        • University of TorontoHow to lose some of your tabs in Firefox 107+ (and possibly earlier)

          This comes up for me because I default to opening URLs in new windows instead of in tabs, but periodically I open a burst of new windows that actually should be grouped together so I dock all all but one of those windows as tabs in the first window. People who default to tabs probably won’t see this, since it’s likely to be rare that you use a new window, never mind dock a window back into a tab.

    • Productivity Software/LibreOffice/Calligra

    • Content Management Systems (CMS)

      • Linux Links6 Top Free and Open Source C Web Frameworks – LinuxLinks

        One of the types of software that’s important for a web developer is the web framework. A framework “is a code library that makes a developer’s life easier when building reliable, scalable, and maintainable web applications” by providing reusable code or extensions for common operations. By saving development time, developers can concentrate on application logic rather than mundane elements.

        A web framework offers the developer a choice about how to solve a specific problem. By using a framework, a developer lets the framework control portions of their application. While it’s perfectly possible to code a web application without using a framework, it’s more practical to use one.

        C is a general-purpose, procedural, portable, high-level programming language that is one of the most popular and influential languages. It was designed to be compiled using a straightforward compiler, to provide low-level access to memory, to provide language constructs that map efficiently to machine instructions, and to require minimal run-time support. Many programming languages owe a considerable debt to C. It has become something of the lingua franca in the programming world.

    • Licensing / Legal

      • Gabriel SiebenMy unlawyered opinion on why AI will legally survive in the US

        Putting the current US concept of fair use aside, I think that at this point, AI companies have a vested interest in doing everything they can to get these algorithms entrenched as an industry, because that may actually ensure their legal survival.

    • Programming/Development

      • Ruby 3.2.0 RC 1 Released

        We are pleased to announce the release of Ruby 3.2.0-rc1. Ruby 3.2 adds many features and performance improvements.

      • Amos WengerDay 5 (Advent of Code 2022)

        Which is a visual representation of stacks, and so, for once, we have some serious parsing to do, and that means I finally have a good reason to bust out the nom crate.

      • Lionel DricotDrowning in AI Generated Garbage : the silent war we are fighting

        All over the web, we are witnessing very spectacular results from statistic algorithms that have been in the work for the last forty years. We gave those algorithms an incredibly catchy name: “Artificial Intelligence”. We now have very popular and direct applications for them: give the algorithm a simple text prompt (don’t get me started on the importance of text) and it generates a beautiful original picture or a very serious-sounding text. It could also generate sounds or videos (we call them “deep fakes”). After all, it generates only a stream of bits, a bunch of 1 and 0 open to interpretation.

      • Terence EdenOpenAI and the limits of mechanical poetry

        The Zietgiest’s newest toy is OpenAI’s Chat Platform. So I asked it “Could you write a limerick about a man from Woking?”

      • RachelA reader asks how to avoid working for evil

        When the legalities of the merger were finished in 2008, I too worked for that evil company by extension. By absorbing it instead of killing it, we became them (see also: Collabra). The name was different, but the internal damage was done. This lead to all kinds of other crazy shit that came down the line, all in the name of fellating the advertisers, like Emerald Sea, aka Google Plus. That whole thing.

      • Matt RickardThe Frontend Ouroboros

        Very roughly, there’s “frontend” engineering (building the parts of a website or application that users interact with directly) and “backend” engineering (building the parts that store data and power the frontend). In practice, there’s a large gray area in between.

        Any handoff creates friction. Frontend engineers might be waiting for an API route to be developed, a database schema to be migrated, or even just for their code to be deployed. Developer tools that empower engineers to do more by themselves are always in high demand.

        What if the frontend is eating the backend?

      • Amos WengerDay 4 (Advent of Code 2022)

        Each line has two ranges: the first line has ranges containing 2, 3, 4, and 6, 7, 8. We must count how many pairs have ranges where one fully contains the other.

      • Garrit Franke6 ways you can contribute to open knowledge right now

        I wrote the initial draft for this post a few months ago, traveling through Norway in a rented campervan. While roaming the beautiful landscapes, I spent a lot of time thinking. Reading books while traveling really is the best way to find new inspiration.

        On our trip, we wanted to try out an alternative to Google Maps. Most of the OpenStreetMap-based apps lack important features, but we recently stumbled upon MagicEarth, which perfectly fills the void. OpenStreetMap has been 95% accurate for us. Those last 5% are mostly less famous hiking trails and attractions that could easily be filled in by people like you and me. This inspired me to write this blog post, where I share six ways that you can contribute to open source knowledge right now.

      • HackadayEpic Guide To Bare-Metal STM32 Programming

        [Sergey Lyubka] put together this epic guide for bare-metal microcontroller programming.  While the general concepts should be applicable to most any microcontroller, Sergey’s examples specifically relate to the Nucleo-F429ZI development board featuring the ARM-based STM32F429 microcontroller.

      • Perl / Raku

        • PerlPerl Weekly: Issue #593 – 2022-12-05 – Perl on DEV.to

          I registered to DEV.to ( https://dev.to/ ) in 2017, more than 5 years ago. Posted a few articles with rather limited success: less than 10 people looked at the articles. Then in 2020 I posted a few more articles. On one of them Tests are awesome! ( https://dev.to/szabgab/tests-are-awesome-3i63 ) I got as many as 300 readers, but the others have not received much love so I did not continue publishing. In 2021 I had another experiment when I published Perl modules with their own web site (https://dev.to/szabgab/perl-modules-with-their-own-web-site-2gmo ) on which there were some 600 visitors. Primarily the readers of the Perl Weekly newsletter. I published a few more articles with readers in the low 10s. A few weeks ago I started to publish again. This time several of my articles got above 100 viewers and one, Open Source Development Courses (https://dev.to/szabgab/open-source-development-courses-5d4b ) is already above 1100 viewers. I started to get around 600 readers a day. That’s already really valuable!

          So what happened? There were a couple of changes: 1. There are more people on DEV. 2. I publish a lot more articles that appeal to a wider range of people. 3. There is a sort-of network effect. The more people up-vote and bookmark (the two kinds of reactions on DEV) my articles the more people will see it.

        • DEV CommunityThe odd binary string

          With that out of the way, we know that all binary numbers can be converted from the integers between 0 and 2n-1 (inclusive).

  • Leftovers

    • Kev QuirkWhat Happens When We’re Gone?

      My wife and I use Bitwarden as our password manager (BTW, it’s way better than LastPass). It works amazingly well, and both of us have emergency access to one another’s account.

      That’s all fine and dandy, but my wife has absolutely no idea how to manage this stuff without a lot of assistance from me. She’s not a techie and has absolutely no interest in becoming one.

    • Eric BaileySwearing and automatic captions

      Captions are a form of speech-to-text software, which takes words spoken by a person and converts them into text on a device. They are not text-to-speech, which is taking written content and making a device announce it via a digital voice.

    • CBCFamily says Amazon shipped fake product, refuses refund until ‘correct’ item returned

      But when Matthew opened the graphics card — a $690 part — he discovered the plastic casing had been hollowed out and filled with a putty-like substance to give it weight.

      “It was actually a bit of a shock,” he said. “Everything looked pretty official up to the point where I pulled it out and took a second look.”

      The real shock came, though, when Matthew’s father tried to get a refund.

    • Jim NielsenA Change of Employment

      Some news: Remix was acquired by Shopify and I did not end up going over in the acquisition.

      Rather than jump right back in the saddle, I took this turn of events as an opportunity to try not working for a bit.

      What have I been doing with my time the last few months?

    • The NationThe Queen of Candor: Aline Kominsky-Crumb 1948–2022

      Kominsky-Crumb, who died last Wednesday at age 74 of pancreatic cancer, was one of the most important and influential American cartoonists of the past century. Tributes to Kominsky-Crumb and samples of her work can be found here, here, here, and here. A key member in the generation of underground cartoonists who in the late 1960s and early ’70s brought subversive and transgressive countercultural values to the hitherto restricted world of comics, Kominsky-Crumb managed to be even more shocking than almost any other member of her cohort. The big names of underground cartoonists, including Robert Crumb or S. Clay Wilson, outraged readers with lurid phantasmic and psychedelic images of sex and violence, using a stylized visual vocabulary of traditional comics. Kominsky-Crumb respected these artists (and in 1978 would in fact marry Crumb). But she did work that challenged readers without the fireworks of fantasy.

    • Counter PunchStealth Reveal Party: the Unveiling of the B-21

      There was much slush and fudge about the project, with its release being treated as something akin to the Second Coming.  Those in public relations were kept particularly busy.  Social media was shamelessly used to advertise the event, which was livestreamed.  “Join now for our live reveal of the B-21 Raider,” tweeted Northrop Grumman.  “This changes everything.”

      The occasion was the first of its type since November 1988, when the Northrop B-2 Spirit made its debut. The aircraft in question, with serial number 00001 was rolled forward, still covered in tarpaulin, from a hangar before defence and policy wonks, the press and 2,000 workers.  The removal of the covering revealed a machine reminiscent of the original B-2 with an extra-terrestrial echo, described as “space-age coatings”.

    • HackadayPerhaps It’s Time To Talk About All Those Fakes And Clones

      A while back, I bought a cheap spectrum analyser via AliExpress. I come from the age when a spectrum analyser was an extremely expensive item with a built-in CRT display, so there’s still a minor thrill to buying one for a few tens of dollars even if it’s obvious to all and sundry that the march of technology has brought within reach the previously unattainable. My AliExpress spectrum analyser is a clone of a design that first appeared in a German amateur radio magazine, and in my review at the time I found it to be worth the small outlay but a bit deaf and wide compared to its more expensive brethren.

    • Education

      • TruthOutStudents Sue Yale for Pressuring Those With Mental Health Needs to Withdraw
      • The NationTime to Turn Up the Pressure on the University of California Decision-Makers

        Berkeley, Calif.—As a member of Local 5810 of the United Auto Workers, I can’t think of a more momentous month in our union. In the same week, starting November 14, I cast my ballot for the Members United reform slate in the national union’s first democratic direct-member vote for the top leadership, and I walked off the job with 48,000 other colleagues at the University of California in the largest strike of the year! Prior to becoming an academic researcher at the university, I was a member of UAW local 1981, the National Writers Union. I’ve also spent 38 years as a union organizer and contract negotiator, and I have the pleasure now of writing books and curricula for training programs to teach thousands of rank-and-file workers annually what it takes to win the hardest fights.

      • Counter PunchChallengers Win Big in UAW Elections; Presidency Headed to Run-Off
      • Telex (Hungary)The 8 most important things you should know about the Hungarian teachers’ protests
      • Indian Country TodayLittle Cherokee Seeds aims to create Cherokee speakers

        The program was founded in 2018 when Cherokee Nation citizen Melissa Lewis was unable to find resources to help her newborn child learn Cherokee. She reached out to fluent speakers and teachers Cora Flute, Kathy Sierra, Phyllis Sixkiller and Carolyn Swepston to create a reading hour to teach infants the Cherokee language.

        In 2019 and 2020 they offered 24 free language classes at three different sites in the Cherokee Nation. When the pandemic happened, they moved their classes to an online platform and the group reflected on the impact of losing fluent speakers during that time.

    • Hardware

      • HackadayDekatron Clock Tells The Time, Sans Semiconductors

        Over the years, there have been several memory and display technologies that served a particular niche for a while, only to be replaced and forgotten when a more suitable technology came along. One of those was the dekatron: a combination memory and display tube that saw some use in the 1950s and ’60s but became obsolete soon after. Their retro design and combined memory/display functionality make them excellent components for today’s clock hackers however, as [grobinson6000] demonstrates in his Dekaclock project.

      • HackadayRotary Dial Number Pad Is The Perfect Prank For Retro-Phone Enthusiast

        We’re not sure about the rest of you, but to us, a keyboard without a number pad all the way over to the right just seems kind of — naked? We might not be accountants, but there’s something comforting about having the keypad right there, ready for those few occasions when you need to enter numbers more rapidly than would be possible with the row of number keys along the top of the keyboard.

      • HackadayTrash Bag And Foam Board Hovercraft Doesn’t Fail To Succeed. Or Fail.

        When you think of a vehicle that can do it all- water, land, ice, snow and more- the hovercraft often comes to mind. And while they might not be ubiquitous, hovercraft catch the imagination of many a hacker just as it has for [JamesWhomsley] of [ProjectAir]. [James] has built a small, but just big enough hovercraft as you can see in the video below the break.

      • HackadayRadial Vector Reducer Rotates At Really Relaxed Velocity

        When [Michael Rechtin] learned about Radial Vector Reducers, the underlying research math made his head spin, albeit very slowly. Realizing that it’s essentially a cycloidal drive meshed with a planetary gear set, he got to work in CAD and, in seemingly no time, had a design to test. You can see the full results of his experiment in the video below the break.

    • Health/Nutrition/Agriculture

      • Hearst Magazine Media, IncThe ‘Blackout Challenge’ Has Resurfaced On TikTok, And It’s Still Just As Dangerous As It Was 16 Years Ago

        The “blackout challenge” has been around since at least 2008, according to People, but it started making the rounds on TikTok again back in 2021. Experts have warned young users not to try the trend, which was linked to more than 80 deaths back when it first emerged, per the CDC. In late November of 2022, a Bloomberg Businessweek report linked at least 15 deaths in children 12 and under to the challenge in the last 18 months, and another five deaths in children aged 13 and 14.

      • [Old] NYPostThe 24 craziest TikTok challenges so far – and the ordeals they’ve caused

        Pull up the video-sharing app and you’ll inevitably see opportunistic bozos risking their reputations and even bodies on camera for social media clout — like if Snapchat was created by the “Jackass” guys.

      • [Old] BloombergChinese Government Asked TikTok for Stealth Propaganda Account

        A Chinese government entity responsible for public relations attempted to open a stealth account on TikTok targeting Western audiences with propaganda, according to internal messages seen by Bloomberg.

      • [Old] Sportskeeda10 most deadly TikTok challenges of all time

        The social media platform and its users’ penchant for virality have them pulling stunts in the name of “challenges” that can prove fatal. Users, primarily children and teenagers, have suffered consequences ranging from hospitalization to death.

      • Kim KommandoTikTok challenge prompts an insanely stupid FDA warning

        TikTok is among the biggest offenders regarding data, but the damage goes beyond that. Viral trends on the platform can range from annoying to downright dangerous.

        A recent TikTok challenge is so dangerous to your health that the FDA had to step in. How bad could it be? It’s worse than you think.

      • Pro PublicaColorado Halfway House Residents Reluctant to File Grievances

        Soon after Shannon Lucas began serving a sentence at a Colorado halfway house, her medication began to disappear.

        Lucas had been sentenced to eight years in community corrections in lieu of prison for her role in a 2018 burglary involving her ex-boyfriend. At 41, she had never been in trouble with the law before.

      • Pro PublicaColorado Halfway Houses Lack Accountability, Oversight

        The last time Iris Román Prieto saw her son, he was leaving their family Christmas Eve party to report back at the Colorado Springs halfway house where he was completing a two-year sentence for burglary.

        After arriving at the facility, Robert Román Prieto called to let his mom know that he was safe.

      • What does antivax really mean since COVID-19?

        I’ve been writing about the antivaccine movement, antivax disinformation, and antivaxxers for close to a quarter of a century. Here’s a brief history. I first encountered antivaxxers on Usenet—does anyone remember Usenet?—in the late 1990s and then began writing about them here beginning in late 2004. Since then I have written more articles on vaccines, antivax misinformation, and the antivaccine movement than I can easily catalogue, both here and at my not-so-secret other blog. Recently, it occurred to me that it’s been over 12 years since I wrote a post specifically about what I mean when I refer to someone or someone’s claims as “antivaccine”. I had been thinking about updating that post for a while, going back at least to times when I noted how “new school” antivaxxers who started out being against just COVID-19 vaccines were so rapidly becoming indistinguishable from the “old school” antivaxxers from before the pandemic, in particular how “new school” antivaxxers were adopting the same deceptive tropes to argue against vaccinating children against COVID-19 that “old school” antivaxxers had deployed against, for example, vaccinating against measles with the MMR.

      • Counter PunchA Heart Surgeon in Palestine

        Give up?

        The name is Dr. Shehadeh “Shawki” Khalil Harb, better known as just Dr. Shawki Harb, from Ramallah. He was born on December 13, 1938, during the Great Revolt between 1936-1939 and, as Dr. Harb recounts, he came on his own, since the midwife could not reach the house in time due to intense shooting in the neighborhood. Born a Christian and breastfed by a Muslim, Dr. Harb embodies the best of both traditions.

      • Common DreamsUN, EU Officials Demand Probe Over Extrajudicial Killings of Palestinians

        United Nations and European Union officials in recent days condemned and called for an investigation into the extrajudicial killing of Palestinians by Israeli forces in the illegally occupied West Bank, including the shooting death of a 22-year-old last week.

        “Such incidents must be fully and promptly investigated, and those responsible held accountable.”

      • TruthOutEven Abortion Ban States Push for Further Restrictions on Reproductive Health
      • Common DreamsPatient Groups Push Congress to Combat Big Pharma Greed in Spending Bill

        A coalition of patient advocacy groups on Monday urged members of Congress to include bipartisan legislation in the year-end budget package that proponents say will lower prescription drug prices—in part by reforming a citizens’ petition process often abused by pharmaceutical companies to delay approval of cheaper generic medications.

        “Passing the bipartisan citizen petition bill would be a win-win for Congress.”

    • Proprietary

      • India TimesFrench hospital cancels operations after cyberattack [iophk: Windows kills]

        The Hospital Centre of Versailles — which consists of Andre-Mignot Hospital, Richaud Hospital and the Despagne Retirement Home — was affected by the hacking attempt, said the complex’s management. The regional health agency (ARS) said the Andre-Mignot Hospital had cancelled operations, but was doing everything possible to keep walk-in services and consultations running.

      • InfoSecurity MagazineFrench Hospital Halts Operations After Cyber-Attack [iophk: Windows kills]

        Although not mentioned explicitly in reports so far, the attack on the 700-bed hospital looks to be the work of ransomware actors.

        If so, it follows a major ransomware attack on another facility near Paris in September this year. The Centre Hospitalier Sud Francilien (CHSF) in Corbeil-Essonnes was forced back to pen and paper after being hit with a $10m ransom demand by the LockBit 3.0 group.

        A few months earlier, the GHT Cœur Grand Est hospital group said it had been forced to cut internet connectivity to its Vitry-le-François and Saint-Dizier hospitals after receiving a $1.3m ransom demand.

      • Security WeekFrench Hospital Cancels Operations After Cyberattack [iophk: Windows kills]

        The Paris prosecutors’ office has opened a preliminary investigation into attempted extortion, as well as the access and maintenance of the state’s digital system. The hospital had also filed a formal complaint Sunday.

        For several months now, hospitals and health systems in France have been targeted with such cyberattacks.

      • [Old] RFIParalysed French hospital fights cyber attack as hackers lower ransom [iophk: Windows kills]

        A hospital southeast of Paris has been crippled by an ongoing cyberattack, drastically reducing the number of patients who can be admitted and forcing a return to pre-digital workflows. Security experts are trying to retake control of the computer system as ransom negotiations continue.

      • Information Security Media Group, CorporationBrooklyn Hospitals Decried for Silence on Cyber Incident [iophk: Windows kills]

        Some systems at One Brooklyn Health System’s three hospitals – Interfaith Medical Center, Brookdale Hospital Medical Center and Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center – were taken offline Nov. 19 following an incident about which little is publicly known.

        Sources tell Information Security Media Group that the organization has been tight-lipped with other area hospitals about the cause of the outage, which is suspected to involve ransomware.

      • Insurance JournalCyber Attackers Cripple IT Systems of Prominent Indian Hospital [iophk: Windows kills]

        It’s unclear what data the attackers may have accessed, or what their motives were. The hospital itself hasn’t said what data — or whose — may have been compromised. On Monday, police in the Indian capital, where the hospital is located, said it was unaware of ransom demands in response to local media reports that 2 billion rupees ($24.5 million) had been demanded.

      • Yahoo News[Crackers] Cripple Prestigious Indian Hospital’s IT Systems [iophk: Windows kills]

        The All India Institute of Medical Sciences — a hospital that’s traditionally treated the country’s top politicians — has succumbed to a ransomware attack that’s shut down centralized records, people familiar with the matter said.

      • Gov Info Sec NewsWhy Ransomware Victims Avoid Calling It ‘Ransomware’

        Mathew Schwartz: What is a ransomware attack called if it’s ransomware, but an organization that’s fallen victim doesn’t want to call it ransomware? Some companies have become expert at spinning as in using corporate speak or weasel words to avoid having to ever say the word ransomware. To a raft of press statements or data breach reports from companies that talk about suffering unexpected downtime, or perhaps a cybersecurity incident, the word cyberattack is another favorite. What’s going on here? Companies aren’t comfortable saying they’ve been hit by ransomware. That’s despite the volume of ransomware attacks appearing to have recently declined, at least against the healthcare sector.

    • Security

      • Krebs On SecurityJudge Orders U.S. Lawyer in Russian Botnet Case to Pay Google

        In December 2021, Google filed a civil lawsuit against two Russian men thought to be responsible for operating Glupteba, one of the Internet’s largest and oldest botnets. The defendants, who initially pursued a strategy of counter suing Google for tortious interference in their sprawling cybercrime business, later brazenly offered to dismantle the botnet in exchange for payment from Google. The judge in the case was not amused, found for the plaintiff, and ordered the defendants and their U.S. attorney to pay Google’s legal fees.

      • Integrity/Availability/Authenticity

        • NBC[Crackers] linked to Chinese government stole millions in Covid benefits, Secret Service says

          The theft of taxpayer funds by the Chengdu-based hacking group known as APT41 is the first instance of pandemic fraud tied to foreign, state-sponsored cybercriminals that the U.S. government has acknowledged publicly, but may just be the tip of the iceberg, according to U.S. law enforcement officials and cybersecurity experts.

          The officials and experts, most speaking on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the subject matter, say other federal investigations of pandemic fraud also seem to point back to foreign state-affiliated hackers.

      • Privacy/Surveillance

        • New York TimesMy Building Has Replaced Our Keys With an App. Is That Legal?

          Q: I moved out of New York City to an apartment in New Rochelle. Instead of keys, tenants use a smartphone app to open doors to the building lobby and individual apartments. The app often fails when I use it, but I don’t have a key as a backup. This policy wasn’t disclosed when I signed the lease, which does not mention the lack of keys. Can a building refuse to give residents keys? What about older people without smartphones? Or people with vision issues?

        • CNETReal ID Deadline Pushed Back Again

          The Real ID act was passed by Congress in 2005 in the wake of 9/11 as a way to more accurately verify an individual’s identity. It created minimum security standards for state-issued IDs, including anti-counterfeiting technology, as well as a more stringent application process.

        • India TimesIndia records over 23 billion digital payments worth Rs 38.3 lakh crore in Q3

          India logged 23.06 billion digital transactions worth Rs 38.3 lakh crore in the third quarter of FY23, stated a report on Monday.

          These digital transactions include payment done by Unified Payments Interface (UPI), debit and credit cards, prepaid payment instruments like mobile wallets, and prepaid cards.

        • NPRREAL ID enforcement is delayed again to 2025

          More than 14 years after the original deadline, the enforcement of REAL ID-compliant driver’s licenses or IDs has been pushed back once again.

          The Transportation Security Administration and other federal agencies were expected to only accept the nationally approved IDs starting May 3, 2023. But on Monday, the Department of Homeland Security announced that the deadline would be extended until May 7, 2025.

          [...]

          REAL ID-compliant licenses or IDs will be required for people 18 years old and older to fly anywhere within the U.S., enter nuclear power plants and access some federal facilities like military bases.

        • Site36German football fans speak out against repression

          Often, fans are „treated worse than other citizens“ and are approached particularly harshly by the police. At matches abroad, there are also reprisals against the travelling fans, including the refusal to allow them to go to the toilet. „Water cannons, full-body checks and even drone surveillance are now part of the standard police repertoire – even at 3rd division football matches. This reveals a completely exaggerated general suspicion of all fans,“ says Linda Röttig, a member of the board of the umbrella organisation. This hostile image of „football fans“ must be systematically dismantled.

        • TechdirtLaw Enforcement Is Extracting Tons Of Data From Vehicle Infotainment Systems

          For years, cars have collected massive amounts of data. And for years, this data has been extraordinarily leaky. Manufacturers don’t like to discuss how much data gets phoned home from vehicle systems. They also don’t like to discuss the attack vectors these systems create, either for malicious hackers or slightly less malicious law enforcement investigators.

        • TechdirtJ6 Suspect Challenges FBI’s Geofence Warrant, Exposing The Massive Scale Of The Fed’s Data Haul

          Geofence warrants are popular. They’re also controversial. Cops have discovered Google houses plenty of location data. Going to cell phone providers is a bit tricky, thanks to the Supreme Court’s Carpenter decision, which erected a warrant requirement for acquiring weeks or months of location data.

    • Defence/Aggression

      • RFI‘Colonial’ China accused of depriving Tibetans of their own language, education

        He compares it to the way the CCP and its army, the People’s Liberation Army, occupied Tibet in 1949, after which the administration of the country was handed over to Beijing’s representatives.

        Gyal Lo adds that the idea that China should be considered a colonial power “has not yet been fully recognised by the international community”.

      • France24West African leaders agree to create regional peacekeeping force

        West African leaders agreed on Sunday to create a regional force to intervene against jihadism and in the event of coups, a senior official said.

      • JNSGenocidal antisemitism is conquering American campuses

        Students and faculty have wrapped themselves in the colors of the far-left and Islamist fascism, both defined by their hatred of Israel and Jews.

      • NPRSurvivors of the Brussels suicide attacks seek closure as the trial starts Monday

        The 10 defendants face charges including murder, attempted murder and membership, or participation in the acts of a terrorist group, over the morning rush hour attacks at Belgium’s main airport and on the central commuter line on March, 22, 2016.

      • RTLDefendant slams security at Brussels attacks trial

        Ten men are on trial accused of directing or aiding suicide attacks on Brussels airport and a metro station near EU headquarters that killed 32 people, and which were claimed by the Islamic State (IS) extremist group.

      • Jihad WatchUS ambassador to Lebanon wears hijab during meetings with pro-Hizballah officials

        In the Islamic Republic of Iran, women are being killed in protests against the forced hijab. Is Dorothy Shea tone deaf? Oh yes, and much worse as well: administration officials such as Robert Malley have made it quite clear that they don’t want to see the regime in Tehran fall, by persistently claiming that the Iranian people just want reform, not the end of the Islamic Republic.

      • Vice Media Group‘We Need to Wake Up’: How ISIS Made Africa Its Second Home

        ISIS’s presence in southern Africa is most obvious in Mozambique where brutal campaigns by its affiliate Ahlu Sunnah wa Jama’a (ASWJ) have killed more than 3,000, displaced nearly a million and threatened billion-dollar gas investments. But a budding network of ISIS supporters in neighbouring South Africa, where about 2 per cent of the population is Muslim, has gone largely unnoticed.

      • ME ForumTurkish Delight: Depravity in Northern Cyprus

        It is certainly not a random choice by Erdoğan, who selected Metin Feyzioğlu, an anti-West, neo-nationalist lawyer who has no experience in diplomacy, as the new envoy to the Turkish-controlled north of the divided island. There is a well-thought-out, sinister plot behind this considering Feyzioğlu has long been associated with the dark forces of the neo-nationalist (Ulusalcı) networks that like to operate beyond the realm of the law and were in the past incriminated in murders, plots and schemes that at times targeted non-Muslims in Turkey.

      • MeduzaAnother barrage Russia pummels Ukraine’s critical infrastructure with another massive missile attack, knocking out power and water in Odesa — Meduza

        The Russian military launched new missile strikes on Ukraine’s critical infrastructure on December 5. On Monday afternoon, air-strike alerts were active across almost all of Ukraine, including Kyiv and the surrounding region. Meduza summarizes events from throughout the day.

      • Telex (Hungary)The ethnic Hungarian violinist who took up arms for Ukraine
      • The NationThe Question of the Offensive Monument

        On a recent visit to Arlington National Cemetery, I was the only loner amid squadrons of middle schoolers on field trips, their matching T-shirts printed with the names of the hometowns from which they had come to Washington, D.C., for a dose of national mythology. I was there to see the Arlington Confederate Memorial. Unveiled in 1914, the memorial’s bronze frieze shows dozens of life-size Southerners rushing to the aid of a comely personification of the South, her drapery fallen open to reveal her breasts.

      • The NationRooting for Russia
      • The NationAfter an Attempt on Imran Khan’s Life, Pakistan Is in Crisis

        It has been a miserable year in Pakistani politics. In April, an unpopular and increasingly authoritarian government led by Prime Minister Imran Khan was toppled in a vote of no confidence brokered by the same army that had brought it into power. A 13-party coalition, headed by the Pakistan Muslim League (N), which had spent three years campaigning against the army’s interference in politics, performed a stunning volte-face and became the institution’s biggest defender. Imran Khan, meanwhile, in a seemingly never-ending agitation campaign against the country’s leading generals, succeeded former prime minister Nawaz Sharif as the symbol of civilian supremacy. On November 3, Khan was shot in an apparent assassination attempt by a gunman who dubiously claimed to be motivated by religion.

      • MeduzaFuel truck explosion at airfield outside Ryazan kills 3 — Meduza

        A fuel truck exploded at an airfield outside Ryazan. RIA Novosti reported the incident, citing the local emergency services.

      • MeduzaRussian authorities report oil tank fire after drone attack in Kursk region — Meduza

        A drone attack near an airfield in Russia’s Kursk region caused an oil storage tank to catch on fire early Tuesday morning, Regional Governor Roman Starovoit reported.

      • MeduzaDrone crashes at military airfield in Saratov Region — Meduza

        Baza reports that an unknown aircraft crashed on the runway of an airfield in Saratov region on the morning of December 5. They have so far not identified the source of the information.

      • Meduza1ADAT: Chechen blogger and Kadyrov critic Tumso Abdurakhmanovkilled in Sweden — Meduza

        According to Telegram channel 1ADAT, Chechen blogger Tumso Abdurakhmanov was killed in Sweden. 1ADAT cited, “informants from Europe and Chechnya,” in their report.

      • MeduzaRussian senator proposes restrictions for those who left country after start of mobilization — Meduza

        Andrey Klishas, the head of the Federation Council Committee on State Building and Constitutional Legislation, proposed limiting distance work in “sensitive areas of the economy” for Russians who left the country after the beginning of mobilization.

      • EFF44 Local Organizations Stand Against SFPD’s Killer Robots

        We thank all of the groups who signed onto this letter, and the many groups and residents who attended today’s Stop Killer Robots rally outside of city hall. We again commend Supervisors Walton, Ronen, and Preston for their continued leadership in support of civil rights and civil liberties issues.

      • Counter PunchThe Wages of Corruption From Iraq to Britain

        But the Iraqis are not correct in claiming “the theft of the century” for themselves because Britain may be out-competing them. For evidence of this, look no further than the headline from a report from the House of Commons Public Accounts Committee which reads “£4 billion of unusable PPE bought in first year of pandemic will be burnt “to generate power”, published on 10 June 2022.

      • Common DreamsSupply Chains Woes Didn’t Slow Down Global Arms Sales, Analysis Shows

        Sales by the world’s 100 leading weapons and military services firms continued to increase last year despite significant supply chain challenges—with the United States accounting for more than half of all sales—an annual analysis published Monday revealed.

        Global arms sales rose for the seventh straight year, increasing by 1.9% to $592 billion in 2021, according to new data published by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI). The rate of growth was higher than the previous year, but still well below the 3.7% average of the four years preceding the Covid-19 pandemic.

      • ScheerpostMacron Says Security Guarantees for Russia Needed for Future Peace Deal

        The French president’s comments drew criticism from Ukraine.

      • ScheerpostScott Ritter: Merkel Reveals West’s Duplicity

        War, it seems, was the only option Russia’s opponents had ever considered.

      • Common DreamsOpinion | A Mediator’s Guide to Peace in Ukraine

        There is a new glimmer of hope for a quick negotiated end to the war in Ukraine. 

      • Meduza‘We’ve been left to die’: In their own words, Mariupol residents describe life in the occupied city as winter sets in — Meduza
      • Counter Punch“They’re Militarizing the Cops Again, Hurroo, Hurroo”

        It just never ends, does it?

        While making my way through the newspaper (SFC) one day (Nov. 27, 2022), I came across a familiar story. Two cops in the Denver area had just been indicted for having killed a man who was sitting in his car. On June 10, the car had somehow started to slip down an embankment. The man had obviously gotten scared (it was the middle of the night), and called for help. When two cops showed up, they told him to get out of the car. He refused. He said something about being afraid. The media reports that they talked to him for about an hour. But he kept the window closed. Finally, they ordered him out of the car. Again, he refused. So they smash in the window of the car. He throws things at them. And they shoot him to death.

      • Common Dreams10,000+ Sign Open Letter Demanding Biden Order Paid Sick Leave for Railway Workers

        U.S. President Joe Biden faces mounting pressure to take executive action to ensure that freight rail workers have paid sick leave, including from an open letter spearheaded by The Lever that’s already been signed by over 10,000 people, according to the online news outlet.

        Calls for Biden to issue such an order have been stacking up since the U.S. Senate passed a resolution forcing rail workers on the verge of striking to accept a White House-brokered agreement without paid sick days. On Friday, the president signed the measure for which he’d advocated, provoking widespread working-class outrage.

    • Environment

      • Dawn MediaRussia to provide petrol, diesel to Pakistan at discounted rates: minister

        The decision comes a month after Finance Minister Ishaq Dar said that the country is considering buying discounted Russian oil, pointing out that neighbour India has been purchasing oil from Moscow and Islamabad also has a right to explore the possibility.

      • Counter PunchWhat Climate Debt Does the North Owe the South?

        Equally troubling has been the distribution of those carbon emissions. “With just below 20 percent of the world population, the Global North has overconsumed 70 percent of the historic carbon budget,” notes Meena Raman, president of Friends of the Earth Malaysia and head of programs at Third World Network, at a Global Just Transition webinar. “Those who became rich in a world unfettered in terms of emitting greenhouse gasses are responsible for much of the destruction we’re facing today.”

        Because of this large disparity in emissions and in wealth earned alongside those emissions, the rich countries of the north owe the poorer countries a kind of “climate debt.” Now, when carbon emissions have to be controlled severely, the north has a historic responsibility to help the south make its own transition to a post-fossil-fuel future.

      • The NationIt’s Time for Rich Countries to Pay Up—Before the Next Climate Disaster

        On October 29, 75-year-old Saifullah Paracha, Guantánamo Bay’s oldest detainee, was finally released by US authorities and flown home to his family in Karachi, Pakistan. He had been incarcerated for nearly two decades without either charges or a trial. His plane touched down in a land still reeling from this year’s cataclysmic monsoon floods that, in July, had covered an unparalleled one-third of that country. Even his own family’s neighborhood, the well-heeled Defense Housing Authority complex, had been thoroughly inundated with, as a reporter wrote at the time, “water gushing into houses.”

      • TruthOut750+ Groups Reject Inclusion of Manchin’s Dirty Deal in Pentagon Spending Bill
      • Common DreamsGroups Warn Pelosi, Schumer Against Allowing Manchin ‘Dirty Deal’ in Pentagon Spending Bill

        A broad coalition of environmentalists, public health campaigners, and progressive advocacy organizations on Monday issued a stern warning to Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi not to include the so-called “dirty deal” on energy project permitting reforms in the mammoth military spending bill set to roll through Congress this month.

        “Every lawmaker who is accountable to their constituents, especially those facing the most severe environmental injustices, must do all in their power to block this bill and all future attempts to risk our lives for a profit.”

      • Counter PunchIrrigation Withdrawals as Ecological Vandalism

        At one time the Deschutes River had the most even flow of any river in the country. Due to numerous springs that provide most of its waters, the river varied little more than 6-8 inches between summer and winter with flows of 700-800 cubic feet per second. Today the river may be as low as 100 CFS in winter to over 2500 CFS in summer when irrigators use the upper segment of the river as an irrigation channel. This variation is devastating to the river’s aquatic ecosystem and dependent species.

        The annual fish kill is vandalism, pure and simple. If I were fishing and kept even one trout over the limit, I could be arrested and fined. If I were to dump a truckload of sediment in the river, I would be jailed. But every year, the irrigators, by reducing natural river flows kill tens of thousands or more of fish, and other wildlife, like Oregon spotted frogs. They also degrade the water quality of the Deschutes River with excess sediment with no consequence.

      • Common DreamsOpinion | COP27′s Greenwashing Scam

        As the annual UN climate conference, COP27, came to a close in late November, the talks produced a lot of lofty rhetoric but little concrete progress on the gravest threat facing humanity today.

      • Common DreamsReport Reveals Corporate Capture of Global Biodiversity Efforts Ahead of Summit

        With the next United Nations Biodiversity Conference set to kick off in Canada this week, a report out Monday details how corporate interests have attempted to influence efforts to protect the variety of life on Earth amid rampant species loss.

        “Addressing corporate capture of the CBD is a precondition for saving biodiversity.”

      • Energy

        • Hindustan TimesClimate activists deflate tyres of over 900 SUVs in ‘largest action’. Here’s why

          Climate activists’ group Tyre Extinguishers took their “largest ever night of action against SUVs”, with tyres of over 900 Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs) deflated worldwide. The highest number of SUV tyres were deflated in the United Kingdom (340 SUVs), followed by Switzerland (172), Germany (124), France (112), Sweden (72), United States (52) and Austria (11).

          The group took action in Amsterdam and Enschede in the Netherlands, Paris and Lyon in France, Berlin, Bonn, Essen, Hanover and Saarbrucken in Germany, Bristol, Leeds, London and Dundee in the UK, Malmo in Sweden, Innsbruck in Austria, Zurich and Winterthur in Switzerland, and New York in the US.

        • The Independent UKTyres of 900 SUVs deflated in ‘biggest ever action’ by Tyre Extinguishers

          Environmental activist group Tyre Extinguishers claim to have deflated wheels on 900 SUVs in what they called their “largest-ever night of action”.

          The guerrilla group said they had targeted vehicles in seven countries across Europe and in New York on Monday night.

        • DNA IndiaDNA Special: Who are Tyre Extinguishers and how they are trying to fight pollution?

          The group claimed to have deflated the tyres of a record 900 vehicles at once for the first time. Earlier in September, this group had simultaneously deflated the tyres of 600 vehicles in 9 countries.

          The Tyre Extinguishers is an organised group fighting against pollution across the world. This group believes that SUVs cause a lot of pollution and that they are a symbol of luxury and status.

          The group has its website called www.tyreextinguishers.com, which mentions all the necessary information – why and how this group deflates tyres, how to join the group and what to do after that.

        • [Old] ForbesJust How Polluting Is Your SUV? This New Campaign Might Shock You

          To put it another way, it means SUVs are producing more emissions than the entire aviation industry. The IEA forecasts that if conventional SUV purchases continue at the same pace, by 2040 they will have offset the emissions savings of close to 150 million electric cars.

          New Weather Institute also points out that SUVs are more dangerous for pedestrians. In June, Forbes.com highlighted a study of vehicle crashes in three cities in Michigan which showed that 100% of pedestrians struck by SUVs travelling at over 40 mph or more were killed; only 54% of those struck by regular cars doing the same speed died. So great is the concern regarding the lethality of SUVs that British safety experts have called on Prime Minister Boris Johnson to exclude American-made cars from post-Brexit trade deals.

        • [Old] WiredSUVs Are Worse for the Climate Than You Ever Imagined

          According to a summary analysis of a report by the International Energy Agency that was released on November 13, SUVs are the second-biggest cause of the rise in global carbon dioxide emissions during the past decade. Only the power sector is a bigger contributor.

          The analysis, which surprised even its own authors, found a dramatic shift toward SUVs. In 2010, one in five vehicles sold was an SUV; today it’s two in five. “As a result, there are now over 200 million SUVs around the world, up from about 35 million in 2010,” the agency reports.

        • [Old] IEAGrowing preference for SUVs challenges emissions reductions in passenger car market

          This trend is universal. Today, almost half of all cars sold in the United States and one-third of the cars sold in Europe are SUVs. In China, SUVs are considered symbols of wealth and status. In India, sales are currently lower, but consumer preferences are changing as more and more people can afford SUVs. Similarly, in Africa, the rapid pace of urbanisation and economic development means that demand for premium and luxury vehicles is relatively strong.

          The impact of its rise on global emissions is nothing short of surprising. The global fleet of SUVs has seen its emissions growing by nearly 0.55 Gt CO2 during the last decade to roughly 0.7 Gt CO2. As a consequence, SUVs were the second-largest contributor to the increase in global CO2 emissions since 2010 after the power sector, but ahead of heavy industry (including iron & steel, cement, aluminium), as well as trucks and aviation.

        • [Old] The ConversationFour reasons SUVs are less safe and worse for the environment than a regular car

          We urgently need to reduce the greenhouse emissions from road transport. The good news is that key markets like Europe are actually doing well in setting targets to reduce tailpipe emissions, and in many cases, hitting them early. However, SUVs could start to reverse this trend.

        • Eesti RahvusringhäälingRail Baltic route construction to begin in Kohila Municipality next year

          Rail Baltic Estonia (RBE) on Monday announced the first procurement for the construction of the main route of Rail Baltic, a planned high-speed railway connecting Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania to the rest of Europe.

      • Wildlife/Nature

      • Overpopulation

        • [Old] Sci-fi InterfacesReport Card: Soylent Green (1973)

          Now that 2022 is almost behind us, we can breathe a small sigh of relief that Soylent Green is not true here in the year it was meant to take place. But let’s not pat ourself on the environmental back yet, we are still heading for a 2.4°C scenario and despite the small-seeming number, that’s disastrous. So no resting on laurels. There is still work to be done at a planetary level to avoid a collapse scenario where we are forced to choose between cannibalism and suicide by cinema.

    • Finance

      • Telex (Hungary)Hungary in near-critical situation – says Governor of Central Bank
      • TruthOutNew York Mayor’s Plan to Round Up Homeless People Is a Trauma-Inducing Horror
      • ScheerpostWill LA’s New Mayor Karen Bass Reset the City’s Labor and Housing Markets?

        Or will her administration stand by as a series of high-profile sporting events turn the city into Doha on the Pacific?

      • Counter PunchRail Workers Shafted Again

        If you happen to be sick, you still better report in or lose wages. If you are injured on the job, you may be inclined to cover it up because your employer will do everything in their power to put the blame on you. If there are unsafe working conditions, you better keep your mouth shut, because if you speak up your employer is going to look for a pretext to fire you.

        Those are the conditions under which railroad workers live, and the backdrop of the current labor dispute in which workers once again were shafted. This time it was by the Biden Administration and Congress, which just voted to forbid railroad unions to strike, and imposed a settlement that unions had voted against. An overwhelming majority on both sides of the aisle voted days before a cooling off period ended, which could have resulted in a strike during the holiday shipping period. The politicians said they feared damage to the economy. They had another option to extend negotiations another 60 days, but voted it down.

      • TruthOutLet’s Take Up the Railroad Workers’ Fight for Paid Sick Leave. We All Need It.
      • Common DreamsAfter US Prevents Railway Strike, South Korea Moves to Crush Truckers

        An order by South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol for thousands of truckers to end their strike last week drew comparisons to a “dictatorship,” but Yoon on Monday was preparing to expand the order to truck drivers in the petroleum and steel industries, ignoring their calls for fair pay. 

        Truck drivers in South Korea have been on strike for nearly two weeks, demanding a permanent adoption of the country’s Safe Trucking Freight Rates System (STFRS)—a minimum rate introduced in 2020 that truckers say has allowed them to make a living without increasing their workloads and driving unsafely in order to make a certain number of deliveries.

      • Counter PunchTax the Rich? We Did That Once
    • AstroTurf/Lobbying/Politics

      • MeduzaAlexey Kudrin joins Yandex as part of reorganization plan — Meduza

        Alexey Kudrin, the former head of Russia’s Audit Chamber, has announced that he has accepted an offer to join Yandex as a corporate development advisor:

      • The NationGeorgia Democrats Are Going Into Overdrive to Reelect Raphael Warnock

        At first it seemed that exactly what Senator Raphael Warnock needed to prevail in the December 6 runoff against Republican Herschel Walker was happening: People all over the metro Atlanta area were waiting hours in line to vote early last weekend, almost all of them for Warnock.

      • Counter PunchThe Volatility of US Hegemony in Latin America: Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua, Haiti, and China

        In this larger context, the socialist triad of Cuba, Venezuela, and Nicaragua are addressed below along with the importance of Haiti.

        Henry Kissinger once quipped: “To be an enemy of the US is dangerous, but to be a friend is fatal.” He presciently encapsulated the perilously precarious situations in the “enemy” states targeted for regime change by the imperial power – Cuba, Venezuela, and Nicaragua – as well as the critical consequences for Haiti of being “friended.”

      • Counter PunchDon’t Mess With the Constitution

        “A Massive Fraud of this type and magnitude allows for the termination of all rules, regulations, and articles, even those found in the Constitution,” Trump posted on his Truth Social media website.

        He meant, of course, the 2020 election that he has been saying was “rigged” since before it even started.

      • TruthOutTrump Calls for “Termination” of Constitution to Put Him Back in Power
      • TechdirtTechdirt Podcast Episode 338: Scrutinizing “The Twitter Files”

        Last Friday evening, Elon Musk and Matt Taibbi dropped a non-bombshell on everyone, with the revelation of internal Twitter documents about the content moderation around Hunter Biden’s laptop that showed… nothing particularly unusual or notable happened, and there’s no evidence of government interference. Over the weekend, Mike was interviewed by Justin Hendrix for the Tech Policy Press podcast for a closer look at just what was contained in “the Twitter Files”, and we’ve got the whole conversation for you here on this week’s episode.

      • MeduzaProsecution requests life sentences for former Russian senator Rauf Arashukov and his father — Meduza

        The state prosecutor requested a life sentence for Rauf Arashukov, a former senator from the Karachay-Cherkess Republic.

      • MeduzaLatvian authorities revoke broadcasting license of exiled Russian TV station Dozhd — Meduza

        Latvia’s National Electronic Mass Media Council (NEPLP) is revoking the broadcasting license of the independent Russian news outlet Dozhd (TV Rain), the council’s chairman, Ivars Āboliņš, said on Tuesday.

      • Common DreamsOpinion | The Midterms Mean Cities and States Are Where Workers Must Fight to Improve Their Jobs

        While voters on a national level handed control of the House to Republicans in the midterms, they simultaneously decisively backed stronger state and local protections for workers—from a $15 minimum wage in Nebraska, to banning so-called right-to-work laws in Illinois, to finally prohibiting involuntary servitude in four states. With Washington returning to divided government, states and cities will be the frontlines of progress as workers organize to demand new solutions to improve their jobs and lives. The past few months provide a road map for what that is likely to look like, as workers across the country—especially Black and brown workers facing some of the worst job conditions—have been fighting for and winning important new policies at the state and local levels to promote better jobs, a greater voice at work, and protection from the worsening climate crisis.

    • Censorship/Free Speech

      • The Tribune INMonk sentenced to 18-month imprisonment in Tibet

        In 2011, Lobsang Choephel was arrested for resisting and protesting against the “patriotic education campaign” or “legal education” that the Chinese authority had forced on monks along with an indefinite ban on normal religious activities at the monastery said the Central Tibetan Administration.

      • Vice Media GroupRamzan

        Two European security services told VICE World News on the condition of background that the reports of Abdurakhmanov’s death were credible enough for them to take action in their own countries to increase protections for other Chechen dissidents, although Sweden has yet to officially confirm any details.

      • RFERLProminent Chechen Blogger, Kadyrov Critic Killed In Sweden

        Colleagues of Chechen blogger Tumso Abdurakhmanov told RFE/RL’s Russian Service that he had been shot dead on the night of December 1-2, confirming earlier reports of his killing.

        Swedish authorities have not issued a statement on the matter.

      • New York TimesChina Stems Wave of Protest, but Ripples of Resistance Remain

        None of those local acts amount to a major challenge to Mr. Xi and the Communist Party. But they suggest that residents are less afraid of challenging officialdom, albeit in more measured, tactical ways. They often invoke China’s own laws and policy pledges, an approach that is less likely to draw the wrath of Communist Party leaders.

      • MeduzaRussian ebook site Litres asks authors to rewrite books in response to new anti-LGBT law — Meduza

        The Russian ebook service Litres will remove all books that are at risk of falling under Moscow’s new ban on “propaganda of non-traditional sexual relationships” and is recommending that authors rewrite the books to make them eligible for the company’s store again.

      • The Globe And Mail CADespite peace deal, Tigray still cut off from world as internet shutdown persists – The Globe and Mail

        More than a month after a much-publicized Ethiopian peace agreement, six million people in war-ravaged Tigray are still largely cut off from the world. Their voices have been silenced by one of the world’s most prolonged internet shutdowns, and there is still no end in sight.

        The shutdown, including phones as well as internet access, has left many Tigrayans struggling to learn the fate of their families in the devastated region in northern Ethiopia, where a brutal war erupted in November, 2020 as the national army tried to crush a rebellion by the regional government.

        “My entire family, my father, aunts and uncles, are all trapped in Tigray,” said Maebel Gebremedhin, a Tigrayan activist in the United States. “I’ve been unable to speak to them. I don’t know who’s alive and who’s not.”

    • Freedom of Information / Freedom of the Press

      • Hollywood ReporterLayoffs Begin at CNN Amid Warner Bros. Discovery Cost-Cutting Plan

        In a memo Wednesday morning, CNN CEO Chris Licht wrote that the channel will inform paid contributors Wednesday as part of a new reporting strategy, with full-time employees being informed of their status on Thursday.

      • Scheerpost“Publishing Is Not a Crime”: The New York Times Joins the Fight to Free Assange

        In 2010, Chelsea Manning, then a U.S. Army intelligence analyst, provided WikiLeaks with “Cable gate” and other documents containing evidence of U.S. war crimes. They included the Iraq War Logs: 400,000 field reports describing 15,000 unreported deaths of Iraqi civilians, as well as systematic rape, torture and murder after U.S. forces “handed over detainees to a notorious Iraqi torture squad.” They also contained the Afghan War Diary, which included 90,000 reports of more civilian casualties by coalition forces than the U.S. military had reported, and the Guantánamo Files — 779 secret reports with evidence that 150 innocent people had been held at Guantánamo Bay for years, and 800 men and boys had been tortured and abused, in violation of the Geneva Conventions and the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.

      • TechdirtMedia Organizations Ask US To Drop Charges Against Assange

        While it seems difficult for some to balance these things, it remains entirely possible to think that Julian Assange is, generally speaking, a horrible human being, who was likely easily played like a fiddle by foreign nation states looking to play influence games in other nations… and that the US’s charges against him remain absolute bullshit and a threat to freedom of the press. That’s basically the position we’ve held since day one.

      • TechdirtIs It Possible To Get Fair Coverage Of The Link Tax Bill When The News Orgs Covering It Are The Main Beneficiaries?

        We’ve been covering the Journalism Competition and Preservation Act (JCPA), which is a blatant handout by Congress in the form of a link tax that would require internet companies pay news orgs (mainly the vulture capitalist orgs that have been buying up local newspapers around the country, firing most of the journalists and living off of the legacy revenue streams) for… daring to send them traffic. We’ve gone over all the ways the bill is bad. We’ve gone over the fact that people in both the House and the Senate are (at this very moment) looking for ways to sneak it into law when no one’s looking. Indeed, there are reports that there will be an announcement tonight that it’s included as a part of the National Defense Appropriations Act (NDAA).

      • The DissenterItalian Journalist’s Book Chronicles Her Time As A WikiLeaks Media Partner
    • Civil Rights/Policing

      • The PrintProtests in China give chance to focus on Tibet and all minority groups: Tibetan scholar

        Following his talk in cooperation with the Amis du Tibet association in Luxembourg, the Chinese Embassy in the European nation said that the claims have no truth. The news report citing Tibet Action Institute report said that more than 80,000 children have been forced to attend boarding schools and have been banned from Tibetan language education.

        According to the Phayul report, Dr Gyan Lo was one of the primary sources to the Tibet Action Institute report. An eyewitness who saw the impacts of the ‘repressive school system’ fled China and took refuge in Canada.

      • The NationAfter 3 Decades, Yale Graduate Workers Are Finally Unionizing

        Though grad workers form the backbone of the university, Local 33 argues that they are not receiving proper compensation, which is well below the necessary wage needed to live in New Haven. Additionally, the current graduate worker health care plan lacks access to dental and mental health care. Local 33 organizers stress that a union can attack many of these problems while helping the university become a place that better respects worker input in their decision-making. For Fentress, a union will be a meaningful space for grad workers to better advocate for themselves while also making campus more democratic.

      • India Today‘Giving election tickets to Muslim women against Islam’: Ahmedabad cleric sparks row

        He said he strongly opposes the idea of giving tickets to women as they will have to conduct door-to-door campaigns if they contest elections and speak to everyone regardless of their religion.

      • NBCIran protesters brush off morality police uncertainty and seek to build pressure with strikes

        The demonstrations against her death have morphed into a wider movement, parts of which are demanding outright revolution, the strongest challenge to the theocratic regime since it came to power in 1979.

      • CS MonitorAre Iran’s protestors gaining ground? It’s hard to tell.

        Saturday’s announcement could signal an attempt to appease the public and find a way to end the protests in which, according to rights groups, at least 470 people have been killed. More than 18,000 people have been arrested in the protests and the violent security force crackdown that followed, according to Human Rights Activists in Iran, a group monitoring the demonstrations.

      • Hollywood ReporterVideo Game Workers Launch Union Drive at Microsoft-Owned ZeniMax Studios

        About 300 quality assurance (QA) workers at The Elder Scrolls Online: High Isle developer are attempting to join the Communications Workers of America (CWA), the union announced on Monday. The workers are based at company sites in Hunt Valley and Rockville, Maryland and Austin and Dallas, Texas. Per the CWA, Microsoft has agreed to voluntarily recognize the union if a majority of the ZeniMax Studios workers vote to join in a card count.

      • Hollywood ReporterNickelodeon Studios Production Workers Go Public With Wage Concerns During Union Drive

        TAG, an IATSE Local, said Monday that it is attempting to unionize 177 production managers, production coordinators, post production assistants, art production coordinators and asset coordinators, among others, at the studio. Though TAG has been busy organizing production workers at studios including Bento Box Entertainment and ShadowMachine since the start of the year, “To date, this is the largest bargaining unit of production workers to organize under The Animation Guild,” TAG said in a statement. According to TAG, a “supermajority” of this group voted to join the Guild in a card count.

      • MedforthGermany: Iraqi man suffocated his sister four days after marrying her new husband to restore family honour

        Sozan A. had separated from her husband and married someone else. Judge Herbert Pröls (60): “In the eyes of the family this was a disgrace. The brothers were supposed to restore the so-called family honour with the murder.”

      • MeduzaInterpol declines to extradite Alexander Nevzorov and several other writers and journalists facing criminal charges in Russia — Meduza

        The Interpol has declined Russia’s request for the extradition of several writers and journalists facing criminal charges in Russia: Alexander Nevzorov, Alexander Soldatov, the former policeman Oleg Kashintsev, and the blogger Veronika Belotserkovskaya. All of them have been charged with spreading “fakes” about the Russian army, punishable by up to 15 years in prison under Article 207 of the Russian Criminal Code.

      • Meduza‘Stop this madness immediately’ Facing a nine-year prison sentence, Russian opposition politician Ilya Yashin uses his courtroom statement to urge Putin to end the Ukraine war — Meduza

        Ilya Yashin is poised to become the first opposition politician in Russia to be imprisoned for speaking the truth about atrocities committed against civilians in Bucha. State prosecutors have asked Moscow Judge Oksana Goryunova to lock away Yashin for nine years and then ban him from using the Internet for another four as punishment for comments he made during a livestream where he discussed how occupying Russian troops murdered and abused the residents of the Kyiv suburb earlier this year. In his closing statement on Monday (later published on his Telegram channel), Yashin appealed to President Putin, urging him to end the war with Ukraine immediately. Meduza translated Yashin’s courtroom speech, omitting the very introduction. His verdict is expected on Wednesday, December 7, 2022.

      • MeduzaProsecution requests 9-year sentence for opposition politician Ilya Yashin, charged with Bucha ‘fake’ — Meduza

        The state prosecutor has petitioned the court to sentence the opposition politician Ilya Yashin to nine years in prison, on charges of spreading “fakes” about the Russian army. The Criminal Code article on spreading army “fakes” provides up to 10 years as punishment for disinformation.

      • The NationStaughton Lynd Never Lost the Courage of His Convictions

        Few American radicals rivaled Staughton Lynd, who died on November 17, in the longevity of their activism or the range of issues they pursued. For six decades, Lynd, an historian and lawyer, put himself on the front lines of struggles for racial equality, against the Vietnam War, for worker rights, against deindustrialization, for Palestinian rights, in the defense of prisoners, and against the death penalty. Once a nationally known figure, feted on the left and fretted over by President Lyndon Johnson, over time Lynd increasingly turned to local struggles and a low-profile style of politics, so that by the time he died his name had largely slipped out of public view.

      • Democracy NowAbandoned? Meet a Student Suing Yale for Pressuring Those with Mental Health Needs to Withdraw

        A group of current and former Yale students is suing the Ivy League university over what they say is “systemic discrimination” against students struggling with mental health issues. In a lawsuit filed last week, they say school administrators routinely pressure students to withdraw from Yale rather than accommodating their mental health needs, a practice that disproportionately hurts students of color, those from poor or rural backgrounds and international students. For more, we speak with Alicia Abramson, a current Yale student and one of the named plaintiffs in the lawsuit, who says she was pushed to withdraw while dealing with an eating disorder, depression and insomnia, which led her to lose her health insurance and most of her tuition. “It certainly felt like Yale was abandoning me when I was in need of the most help,” says Abramson. We also speak with attorney Monica Porter, with the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, and Miriam Heyman, a researcher at the Lurie Institute for Disability Policy at Brandeis University.

      • Democracy NowThe Jailscraper vs. Chinatown: NYC Residents Fight Construction of World’s Tallest Jail

        Residents of New York’s Chinatown are speaking out against the construction of a new megajail in the neighborhood that would be a third as high as the Empire State Building, which would likely make it the tallest jail in the world, if finished. The so-called jailscraper is part of an $8 billion plan to build new jails across the city in order to retire the infamous Rikers Island facility, but opponents say that money would be better spent on social services, harm reduction and other initiatives that would better serve the community. Jan Lee, co-founder of the community group Neighbors United Below Canal, says Chinatown residents are interested in “creating a more humane environment for those who are incarcerated.” We also speak with Christopher Marte, who represents the area on New York City Council, and Jon Alpert, co-founder of the community media center DCTV, based in Chinatown for half a century, who has been documenting the struggle.

      • TruthOutPrison COVID Policies Fell Short. Incarcerated Activists Fight for Their Lives.
      • Papers PleaseDHS resets the clock on its threat to stop flyers without ID

         

        Soccer fans have been noticing unusually large amounts of stoppage time added on to extend the final whistle in many of this year’s World Cup matches. But FIFA and World Cup referees have nothing on the US Department of Homeland Security when it comes to extending the end of the game of REAL-ID chicken that the DHS has been playing with air travelers.

      • Counter PunchLetter from London: This Fenced-Off Narrow Space Assigned to Me

        I don’t much like confrontation. I resent polarisation. Just two reasons I have hated politics so much of late. Jeffrey St Clair touched upon this kind of disinclination in his essay ‘The Retail Carrion Feeders of Rural America’ from his book ‘An Orgy of Thieves: Neoliberalism and Its Discontents’ with the late Alexander Cockburn. In it he meets up with old friends in southern Indiana at a place he knows well but at the time of writing is in sudden and serious decline, telling the reader he rarely talked about politics, usually finding it the most boring topic on earth. Even at my first ever protest I had to bring work into it rather than leave it just to politics. We have so many institutionalised people. Politics, especially, thrives on them. My first protest took place on a simple and open patch of windswept dunes close to Dunbar in Scotland more than 40 years ago. It was at the site of a planned nuclear power station at a spot known as Torness Point. I recited to roughly 3,000 people a 3,000-word poem I’d written, coming in at a tidy one word per person, I may have joked at the time. Among the sand dunes and reeds was a young and gifted Irishman called Robin singing Irish ballads through a prematurely grey beard, including one about only a river running free. None of us made a difference. The power station was built. In phantasmagorical fashion, the only thing to nearly shut it down several years later was a large intake of jellyfish. People say true change has to come from within. I guess I just didn’t have the right nuclear power station inside of me.

        At least there is such a thing as advancement in a protest-free zone. More recently, I was about to visit my outstanding friend Godfrey Devereux at a yoga retreat he was running close to Angoulême in France when I was badly bitten by two wasps above the left eye. I tried not to protest. The only sunglasses I could find for the train journey in order to save the world from my rather horrific swelling was a giant Haight-Ashbury-style pair with a generous flower-patterned frame. I looked like a latter-day Merry Prankster. It was my second trip down there making a film on a budget and largely out of love about the epic journeying of someone — Godfrey — within. This was a tall order but I learned much from the experience. During a third trip to a similar event run again in part by Godfrey and the prodigious Olivia Crooks in Spain outside Barcelona, one of Godfrey’s students from Germany who worked in theatre spoke of the importance on a stage of an actor finding the light. Thinking about this last week, while thinking also about protest, I took down my copy of Jack Kerouac’s ‘The Dharma Bums,’ a book Godfrey recommended to me in my teens. (Everything connects.) Godfrey has a print edition of his book ‘Radical Ecology’ out soon in which he explains among other things the possibility of feeling secure in a big bad world. In Kerouac’s book, I was interested in the character Japhy Ryder — based on mountaineer poet Gary Snyder — enjoying the same kind of security pinpointed so brilliantly by Godfrey. Though different in their stories and their telling, I feel sure he and Snyder would agree on one thing — the longer the friendship lasts, the more it inspires — just as too much fury and anger in physical protest easily spoils the party. Maybe it is all about finding the light.

      • Counter PunchThe Volatility of US Hegemony in Latin America: the Pink Tide Surges, 2018-2022

        This electoral wave, according to Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro, speaking at the Climate Summit in November, “open[s] a new geopolitical age to Latin America.” This “Pink Tide” challenges US hemispheric hegemony, whose pedigree dates back to the 1823 Monroe Doctrine.

        The tidal surge

      • Counter PunchFreedom isn’t Just Another Word For a Job Left to Lose

        Their shock evidently isn’t at socialists being anti-business.  The editorial posits that employers being “allowed to hire and fire whom they choose” makes “the free market better respected,” unrestricted not only by legislation — such as a proposal from the New York City Council’s Tiffany Cabán to require “just cause or a legitimate economic reason” for terminations — but organized labor negotiation.  “Unions aren’t always appropriate,” since they can keep “rubber-room teachers or excessive-force cops” on the payroll.

        What should be startling is that the assumptions that workers have it better than they would in a freer market, and that their bargaining power is bad for business, have lasted so long.

      • TechdirtHundreds Of Hong Kong Cops Illegally Accessed Woman’s Case File After Her Arrest For Public Indecency

        Cops gonna cop, as Rachel Cheung reports for Vice.

      • Common DreamsRight-Wing SCOTUS Majority Signals Support for Anti-LGBTQ+ Reactionaries

        With rights advocates rallying outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday, the right-wing majority of the court appeared poised to rule in favor of a web designer who aims to discriminate against LGBTQ+ couples when she creates wedding websites, as the justices heard arguments in the case 303 Creative LLC v. Elenis.

        The court’s six right-wing justices asked a number of pointed questions of Colorado Solicitor General Eric Olson and the state’s principal deputy solicitor general, Brian Fletcher, as they defended Colorado’s public accommodation law.

      • Common DreamsOpinion | The Ruling Class Broke the Railway Strike—Because That’s What It Means to Be the Ruling Class

        The Congressional decision to prohibit railroad workers from going on strike and force them to accept a contract that meets few of their demands is part of the class war that has defined American politics for decades. The two ruling political parties differ only in rhetoric. They are bonded in their determination to reduce wages; dismantle social programs, which the Bill Clinton administration did with welfare; and thwart unions and prohibit strikes, the only tool workers have to pressure employers. This latest move against the railroad unions, where working conditions have descended into a special kind of hell with massive layoffs, the denial of even a single day of paid sick leave, and punishing work schedules that include being forced to “always be on call,” is one more blow to the working class and our anemic democracy.

      • Common DreamsFears of Escalation as Ukraine Answers Russian Missile Onslaught With Strike Deep Inside Invader’s Territory

        Ukraine’s forces launched unmanned aerial drone attacks on two military bases deep inside Russia on Monday amid the latest wave of Russian missile strikes on Ukrainian cities, raising fears of an escalation in the nine-month war. 

        In what The New York Times described as “its most brazen attack into Russian territory,” Ukraine’s military fitted antique Soviet-era Tupolev T-141 photo-reconnaissance drones with explosive warheads and launched them at two bases hundreds of miles from the Ukrainian border. One of the strikes reportedly killed three Russian troops and wounded four others, while damaging two warplanes.

      • Common DreamsOpinion | The International Persecution of Refugees Must End

        Almost anyone would agree that war is horrifying and peaceful countries should do their best to help its victims. The widespread eagerness to welcome fleeing Ukrainians after Russian President Vladimir Putin invaded their country last February is a heartening example of such aid. But behind that altruism lies an ugly truth: most of the countries embracing Ukrainians are simultaneously persecuting equally desperate refugees from elsewhere.

      • AccessNowThe EU AI Act must protect people on the move

        The European Union Artificial Intelligence Act (AI Act) will regulate the development and use of ‘high-risk’ AI, and aims to promote the uptake of ‘trustworthy AI’ whilst protecting the rights of people affected by AI systems.

        However, in its original proposal, the EU AI Act does not adequately address and prevent the harms stemming from the use of AI in the migration context. Whilst states and institutions often promote AI in terms of benefits for wider society, for marginalised communities, and people on the move (namely migrants, asylum seekers and refugees), AI technologies fit into wider systems of over-surveillance, criminalisation, structural discrimination and violence.

        It is critical that the EU AI Act protects all people from harmful uses of AI systems, regardless of their migration status. We, the undersigned organisations and individuals, call on the European Parliament, the European Commission, the Council of the European Union, and EU Member States to ensure the EU Artificial Intelligence Act protects the rights of all people, including people on the move.

      • AccessNowEU AI Act must protect all people, regardless of migration status – Access Now

        All people must be protected from the dangers of discriminatory artificial intelligence (AI), including those migrating, seeking asylum, and living with an irregular migration status. Through a joint statement, Access Now, European Digital Rights (EDRi), Platform for International Cooperation on Undocumented Migrants (PICUM), Refugee Law Lab, and 163 civil society organisations and 29 individuals are calling on the European Union (EU) to ensure the Artificial Intelligence Act (AI Act) centres the rights of marginalised people and communities on the move in its goals to successfully regulate the development and use of “high-risk” AI, and prevent irreversible harm by prohibiting certain AI systems.

        As it reads, the EU AI Act does not adequately address and prevent the harms stemming from the use of AI in the migration context, and the IMCO and LIBE Committees of the European Parliament must immediately amend the current proposal.

        “Artificial intelligence tech is being deployed to intimidate, discriminate, and categorise certain groups of people,” said Caterina Rodelli, EU Policy Analyst at Access Now. “The EU has a responsibility to ensure the fundamental rights of all are upheld inside, outside, and at every border across the Union, and that these new tools are not used to reinforce prejudice and perpetuate oppression of certain groups. The AI Act must be amended now.”

    • Internet Policy/Net Neutrality

      • TechdirtWireless Carriers Find That Nobody Cares About 5G Despite Years Of Hype

        We’ve noted for a long time how the “race to 5G” was largely just hype by telecoms and hardware vendors eager to sell more gear and justify high U.S. mobile data prices. While 5G does provide faster, more resilient, and lower latency networks, it’s more of an evolution than a revolution.

    • Monopolies

      • New YorkerCory Doctorow Wants You to Know What Computers Can and Can’t Do

        The second time we spoke, Doctorow told me that he had eight books in production. “I’m the kind of person who deals with anxiety by working instead of by being unable to work,” he explained, when I asked how he was handling the ongoing pandemic. Among those eight books were “Chokepoint Capitalism,” co-written with the law professor Rebecca Giblin and published this past September, and “Red Team Blues,” a novel set in the world of cryptocurrency, which will come out in April. In the course of two interviews, Doctorow discussed the right and wrong lessons that one can learn from science fiction, the real dangers of artificial intelligence, and the comeuppance of Big Tech, among other topics. Those conversations have been edited for length and clarity.

      • Software Patents

        • Middle East North Africa Financial Network, Inc.Why We Need Open-Source Science Innovation — Not Patents And Paywalls

          The basic idea is a professor would patent an invention that could be mass manufactured and then reap licence revenue for 20 years.

          This does happen. However, a tidal wave of academic study after study, have shown that patents actively hamper innovation .

          This is because most innovation builds on other ideas and there is no“fair use” for patents.

          It is illegal to even experiment on a patented idea without a licence. If you need to wait 20 years to build on a good idea, it obviously takes a lot of time to innovate. Historically innovation moved rather slowly, now the rate of innovation is fast. Consider now how ancient a 20-year-old phone would be in your pocket.

          Some academics like science and engineering professors do make money on patents for their universities . But the patent revenue they keep tends to be meager, because the costs to get the patent must first be recovered before the inventors get anything.

      • Copyrights

        • The VergeAI-generated answers temporarily banned on coding Q&A site Stack Overflow

          The site’s mods said that the ban was temporary and that a final ruling would be made some time in the future after consultation with its community. But, as the mods explained, ChatGPT simply makes it too easy for users to generate responses and flood the site with answers that seem correct at first glance but are often wrong on close examination.

        • Creative Commons20CC: Open Works from CC’s 20th Anniversary

          In November 2022, CC brought the 20th anniversary celebration to an official close with both online and in-person activities. Highlights from these events were a collection of new open works showcasing the creativity and power of the open community. Take a tour down the page to explore video, digital experiences, music, and visual arts, all made to mark 20 years of Creative Commons and now part of the open commons for everyone to share and remix.

        • Torrent FreakFilmmakers Want to Link ISP Subscriber Data to ‘Pirating’ YTS and Reddit Users

          As part of an ongoing piracy liability lawsuit, Internet provider WOW! was ordered to hand over the personal details of hundreds of subscribers to a group of filmmakers. Among other things, rightsholders want to cross-reference the details with YTS and Reddit accounts. With backing from WOW!, several subscribers are refusing to have their identities exposed.

  • Gemini* and Gopher

    • Personal

      • Are We Adults Yet?

        My single friends (and I, I guess) aren’t looking for “men” or “women”. They’re looking for “guys” or “girls”. Just, y’know, guys and girls aged roughly 30-40.

        Is it just in my circles or is this a linguistic generational shift? It’s not like I react in any way if someone uses the words “woman” or “man”, but I think we more often use the more youthful equivalents.

        This makes sense in a way, because our generation doesn’t marry or stay married to the same extent as our parents. A partner you have who is neither your wife, husband, or fiancée is called girlfriend or boyfriend. We just don’t really more “adult” words for them, so to speak. You never hear someone talk about their manfriend or womanfriend, in fact my spellchecker doesn’t even recognise those words. Likewise a male friend or a female friend are distinctly set apart from boyfriend or girlfriend. They’re expressions signalling that one has a friend of the opposite gender with whom one is explicitly not romantically involved.

      • Why monsters have HP

        We often hear advice that DMs should just ignore HP or change it on the fly since it’s a narrative game anyway. Now, if that’s how a table likes playing, and the players are on board with this, then yeah, that’s fine.

        I’m never gonna do this, though. Why? Because before I started running D&D, I came from rules-less, dice-less, stat-less, splat-less, feat-less, class-less, story games. Pure narrative games.

        I still play those kinds of games sometimes. If you want a reco, Untold: Adventures Await is great.

      • 🔤SpellBinding: LMYPRTO Wordo: TRUL
    • Technical

      • Programming

        • CSS Themes Exist Now!?

          Yeah news to me too! Seems like according to the MDN it’s been supported since 2019 for most browsers and supported by all by now.

          This is so wild!


* Gemini (Primer) links can be opened using Gemini software. It’s like the World Wide Web but a lot lighter.

Rumour: Very Large Microsoft Layoffs (Another Round) Next Month, Lists Already Being Prepared

Posted in Microsoft, Rumour at 7:36 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

5 hours ago:

Microsoft layoffs in 2023

Summary: In spite of attempts to just simply shoot the messenger, it seems plausible large-scale layoffs are again imminent (after several rounds of layoffs in 2022)

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