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04.15.14

Lawsuit by Microsoft Shareholder Targets Fine for Crimes Rather Than the Crimes Themselves

Posted in Antitrust, Bill Gates, Courtroom, Microsoft at 10:13 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: A new lawsuit by a Microsoft shareholder shows everything that’s wrong with today’s model of accountability, where those who are responsible for crimes are accused of not avoiding fines rather than committing the crimes

THE MENTALITY OF greedy investors, and more so investors who put their money in a criminal enterprise, is worth noting. Microsoft has a long history of crime and the investors occasionally sue not because the act of committing crime is bad but because Microsoft fails to dodge the fines (i.e. there is conviction for the crimes).

Here we have a new example of an investor in a criminal company complaining about the wrong thing. To quote the Indian press: “The lawsuit, brought by shareholder Kim Barovic in federal court in Seattle on Friday, charges that directors and executives, including founder Bill Gates and former chief executive officer Steve Ballmer, failed to manage the company properly and that the board’s investigation was insufficient into how the miscue occurred.”

The problem is not that they “failed to manage the company properly”; as we saw in court documents, the crimes go all the way to the top and include instructions from Bill Gates, who chose to break competition laws. This “Supreme Villain” is now spending his wealth on PR (distracting from his crimes), in order to gain yet more wealth while paying virtually nothing in tax.

Here is a new article about protests against Bill Gates profiteering from private prisons.

Criminals rarely change their spots, they just change how the public perceives them. Gates was personally responsible for many of Microsoft’s crimes (and we have the documents to prove it), but nowadays he is busy bribing much of the press and even blogs in order to paint a different picture while he keeps hoarding a lot more money (at everyone else’s expense). Historically there were people like Gates who used the same tactics to alter public opinion. What’s truly shameful is that the biggest (more expensive) crimes still lead to no jail sentence, especially when the government is funded and run by corporations.

04.11.14

Replicating the Destruction of Dual Boot (GNU/Linux) by Microsoft-Friendly UEFI Implementations

Posted in Antitrust, Hardware, Microsoft, Windows at 7:51 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Hammer

Summary: Reports of “loss of Linux dual-booting” due to Windows Update are investigated further; FSF award to Garrett faces opposition

IT WAS recently reported in Reddit that UEFI was used by Microsoft Windows to wipe out GNU/Linux. Windows Update rendered GNU/Linux unbootable and allegedly turned ‘secure’ boot on to achieve this.

According to this new analysis from Jamie the UEFI explorer, it’s not an isolated incident. He starts by stating: “I can finally report that yes, there is a problem — but it’s generally not as serious as has been reported.” He also writes: “While I found that I was able to ‘fix’ the loss of Linux dual-booting on both of my systems, I am NOT trying to say that everyone who has posted claims about dual-boot being ‘destroyed’ by Windows Update is wrong. I certainly have enough experience with UEFI boot configuration to know that all sorts of strange things are possible, and it may well be that some systems, with some configurations, really do get more seriously damaged by Windows Update than mine have. One very obvious example might be that the Linux items could get deleted from the boot object list. If that happened you would have to use efibootmgr to put them back again.”

But who would know how to do this and how many people would just turn away from GNU/Linux at this stage? This is why UEFI should face a boycott and antitrust complaints against Microsoft get bolstered. I wholeheartedly disgree with FSF for giving Garrett an award. This can be a PR disaster waiting to happen, a bit like Miguel de Icaza and Theo de Raadt and getting such an award before their FSF bashing. Apparently I am not alone in disagreeing with the FSF; Sam Varghese expressed similar concerns, having opposed ‘secure’ boot for quite some time along with many others. He writes: “The Free Software Foundation has given an annual award this year for work that enslaves people to the demands of Microsoft – something that flies in the face of all that the organisation has stood for since its founding.”

This has indeed been a bizarre move and it can help weaken existing complaints (in Europe) over Microsoft’s UEFI tricks.

03.27.14

Chih-Wei Huang is Trying to Start Misguided Antitrust Case Against Android/Linux (Through Google)

Posted in Antitrust, GNU/Linux, Google, Hardware, Microsoft at 7:29 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Chih-Wei Huang, widely known for his role in the Chinese Linux Documentation Project and Chinese Linux Extensions, wants the Justice Department to investigate Google because Asus, his employer, does not ship Android on Intel hardware

ECT, going by the name Linux Insider, has just published this article about Android-x86 — a project that mostly helps a convicted monopoly abuser (Intel) interject itself into Linux/Android.

The article is very negative about Google and it speaks of complaints for abuse in a Free software project. We have seen such stuff before and it usually turns out to be provocation. It has been very typical for Microsoft people to do so, or even Microsoft proxies such as Nokia. It’s often provocation against Google using forks that don’t obey simple rules, or simply lead to FUD, patent taxation, and even severe privacy issues like NSA/Microsoft Skype.

“Sadly enough, ECT only quotes people who are against Google. No balance is offered, not even an attempt at balance.”Dealing with the core of the article from ECT, it says that the “maintainer of the Android-x86 Project has suggested that the Justice Department should investigate whether Google has been interfering with adoption of the open source code his community is developing.”

This is attributed to Chih-Wei Huang, which is a common name in places like Taiwan. There is Dr. Chih-Wei Huang, who worked 5+ years in Washington/Redmond (with Microsoft payroll), but he is not to be confused with this guy (same full name and even the same username in the same country) that has a good track record when it comes to Free software in China and Taiwan. We already know of former Microsoft staff like Xuxian Jiang, who pretend to be researching Android but are actually FUD mills against Android. But this one guy has nothing to do with Microsoft, unlike Dr. Chih-Wei Huang (see his revealing CV).

According to ECT, Huang said (to ECT): “Asus announced the dual OS laptop TD300LA in the CES and got very positive feedback. However, Google asked to stop the product so Asus are unable to ship it, sadly.”

This doesn’t sound right. Days ago we covered this and it was actually Microsoft that put the kibosh on the project (see the links here), not just Google as previously (and perhaps even falsely) reported. Neither party wanted to support this product. Several publications reported on that. So why is Huang picking only on Google?

Sadly enough, ECT only quotes people who are against Google. No balance is offered, not even an attempt at balance. There is no approach for comment from Google. It only says: “Asus executives did not respond to repeated requests for comment on Huang’s assessment of the alleged thwarted hardware release. Google officials several times declined requests for interviews to discuss the Android-x86 Project.”

What about Asus then? Maybe he should ask Asus (according to Wikipedia his current employer) for more information before accusing Google. What does Google have to lose here? Motivation is too weak for this theory to make sense. If anyone has reasons to interfere here, it would be ARM (UK-based) or Nvidia (also external to Asus).

Asus already ships a lot of Android (e.g. the Nexus 7), so only hardware limitation is the mystery here. Intel’s x86 is notoriously unsuitable for mobile devices, especially due to heat, size, and energy consumption. Intel’s “Atom” was a massive failure; heads were rolling. In fact, Google would generally be wise to avoid or to dodge those chipsets that put Windows to shame (heavy, clumsy, not running for long). But it doesn’t mean that Google intervened; in fact, maybe Asus reached those same conclusions on its own.

Five years ago when Asus announced a Linux-booting device (Android Eee PC, running Linux/Android) is was most seemingly killed because pressure from Microsoft, not Google (just read what the head of Asus said at the time).

It seems likely that Huang is barking up the wrong tree. We are eager to give Google the benefit of the doubt here because looking at the track record of Android, there tend to be provocations every now and then, trying to portray Android as “not open” (common line from Apple and Microsoft), abusive, monopolistic, etc. Almost every time this type of claims floods the media it eventually turns out to be bogus and often it ends up revealing an embarrassing link to Microsoft (which shamelessly runs anti-Google smear campaigns).

02.14.14

Installing GNU/Linux is Still Hard Due to UEFI

Posted in Antitrust, GNU/Linux, Microsoft, Vista 8, Windows at 10:05 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

So boycott UEFI

UEFI logo with monopoly

Summary: The latest experiences with UEFI (reported by one who is experienced with UEFI) suggest that a boycott of UEFI is still justified

AS we pointed out before, UEFI ‘secure’ boot is actually a mechanism for reducing security, enabling remote entities to take control of one’s hardware or destroy it ‘IBM style’ (IBM works with the NSA on self-destroying hardware). Even the NSA recognises this ability. In addition, UEFI makes it harder for people to explore operating systems other than those which have NSA back doors.

Several days ago Jamie Watson reported [1] that he had purchased a computer saddled with the notoriously unwanted Vista 8. He said he was getting it “ready for Linux” and days later he reported on his findings, having had many issues with UEFI before (the UEFI Forum contacted him as part of well-coordinated attempts to change perceptions). His opinion on UEFI is hardly changed. He calls UEFI “a royal pain” after trying almost a dozen distributions with it (over the course of nearly 2 years). He said: “For those who might not be personally familiar with UEFI boot yet, and especially for those who might be familiar with only one UEFI boot implementation, I’m going to include some more details here to explain and illustrate why it is, for me, such a pain.”

Intel and Microsoft are making it very hard to dodge back doors, surveillance, etc. in pursuit and in favour of freedom. It’s time to dodge Microsoft and Intel and it’s time to seriously just boycott any hardware that comes with UEFI.

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. Buying a new Windows 8.1 laptop – and getting it ready for Linux

    One of the large retail chains here in Switzerland has a low-priced product range that it calls “M-Budget”, which includes everything from groceries to housewares to computers, and pretty much anything else you can think of.

    As I was walking past one of its shops on Saturday, I saw that it was offering an HP Compaq laptop for 333 Swiss Francs (about £225/€272/$370), and that is so low for the Swiss market that I couldn’t resist.

  2. Experiments with my new laptop, Linux and UEFI

    But as for UEFI: what a royal pain. For those who might not be personally familiar with UEFI boot yet, and especially for those who might be familiar with only one UEFI boot implementation, I’m going to include some more details here to explain and illustrate why it is, for me, such a pain.

    The UEFI BIOS boot configuration is made up of two basic parts — a list of boot objects, and a sequence in which they should be attempted. When you get a new Windows 8 system, there is usually only one “real” item in the list, that being the Windows 8 Bootloader.

    There will probably also be some other “pseudo” items or “generic” items in the list which allow for CD/DVD and USB boot, for example. The boot sequence on the a new Windows 8 system will contain the Windows Boot item first, and then perhaps some or all of the pseudo/generic boot items.

    This is the first place I saw something unexpected in this UEFI BIOS, because there were items included in the default sequence which don’t even exist in the list of boot objects. Weird.

    When you install another bootable operating system, such as Linux, it will add an item to the boot object list for itself, and that item will be placed at the front of the boot sequence list.

    [...]

01.30.14

Journalists Report Issues With UEFI, Cannot Install GNU/Linux

Posted in Antitrust, Hardware, Microsoft at 3:06 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Lock

Summary: Calls for boycott against UEFI receive supportive proof from journalists who are unable to install GNU/Linux because of Microsoft/Intel locks

WE HAVE already published many articles about UEFI because it is clearly a Linux-hostile plot to remove users’ control over their PCs. It’s about limiting the ability to boot operating systems, usually by giving authorisation powers to some third party like Microsoft. Novell (ex-)employees in particular — suffice to say because of their Microsoft ties — have been friendly towards this agenda and they laid inside Linux some of the endorsing code which weakens antitrust action.

Based on this new report from one who knows his way around GNU/Linux, UEFI is a pain in the neck. To quote his article’s summary: “Opinions vary on whether the UEFI standards are helping or hurting the migration to Linux. Enterprise users can select a Linux distro certified to work with UEFI standards, but not all Linux distros have keys that allow it to install. Despite the intent of the UEFI standards, the process so far is not universally successful. It should “just work,” said the Linux Foundation’s Greg Kroah-Hartman.”

Well, not quite. Novell’s Kroah-Hartman played a key role in pushing Microsoft-serving code into Linux and this includes UEFI restricted boot. UEFI should never have been embraced by Linux; it should be shunned because it’s a patent trap that serves a rapidly-shrinking criminal entity known as Intel as well as its partner Microsoft (they are jointly known as “Wintel”). Intel cannot keep up with mobile revolution according to the latest news [1], so it must be fighting to keep the old abusive duopoly/oligopoly going. To quote more from the above article: “I have extensive practice with installing various Linux distros on older and new computers. I am handy at setting up disk partitions and dual booting to maintain a working Microsoft Windows OS alongside numerous Linux distros. I also have routinely installed Linux on older and new computers by removing the Windows OS and replacing the entire drive with one or more Linux distros.

“However, it was not until I attempted to do a Linux installation on a new Gateway Series DX desktop with Windows 8 installed that I stared that UEFI monster down. At first I nearly ran back to the big box store to return the shiny new Windows box. I was not able to get the BIOS settings for the UEFI and Secure Boot permissions to even see USB and DVD live sessions for Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Korora 19 or Puppy Linux. That made routine installation of Linux impossible.

“The current use of UEFI and Secure Boot technologies might all too conveniently lock down the hard drive to lock out the installation of other operating systems — like Linux. Successfully installing Linux on UEFI/Secure Boot hardware controls depends on which computer brand or model you buy. Some of the newest BIOS versions effectively lock down any other OS access.”

Advice to the author: join the effort to enforce antitrust action. The European authorities have already received a formal complaint from lawyers. In the mean time, boycott hardware that comes with UEFI. Voting with one’s wallet is casting a strong vote.

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. Intel could abandon smartphone market: Report

    Intel’s deal with Chinese manufacturer Lenovo to supply chips for its smartphones has now ended. The processor giant, however, is reportedly working on other partnerships to replace the deal. Asus also released the Intel-powered Asus Zenfone series at CES. The new line of smartphones—featuring 4-inch, 5-inch and 6-inch models—will be released in March, mainly aimed at the China and Southeast Asia markets.

01.20.14

Fraudulent Microsoft Reportedly Pays OEMs Not to Entertain Linux

Posted in Antitrust, GNU/Linux, Microsoft at 2:51 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Microsoft is reportedly paying billions of dollars (negative pricing) for unfair competition against Free (as in freedom) software that it is extorting using patents to induce fees

II sure seems like Microsoft has done enough, especially with moles in the national healthcare programme, to undermine FOSS and GNU/Linux in key areas of government operations. When people leave Microsoft they often turn into moles. Stephen Elop is one among many examples; in recent years he became the most famous such mole, and people generally know about him because the corporate media covers it. There are many more examples like him. It is now being reported that another entity, a fraud partner of Enron (to which Microsoft is similar because of confirmed financial misconduct), will get involved in the same programme. What an effective way to discredit national healthcare. Fraudsters are being put in charge. It’s corruption, just like repeated financial fraud at Microsoft (maybe it’s collaborations/collusion with the NSA that gave Microsoft immunity from criminal prosecution/legal actions, not to mention funneling of public money from black budget).

Microsoft’s illegal actions are not a thing of the past though.

Now that there is “damage control”, following reports that Microsoft is bribing companies like B&N, not just dumping ‘free’ (gratis) traps, we should keep an eye open for potentially new moles like Blair Westlake. The reports are denied by Shaw, who is a proven liar (it’s formally his job and we proved him to be a liar quite a few times before), but there is most likely substance to this (Microsoft paying billions to OEMs to prevent them from choosing Linux, only the numbers are being challenged). As the author puts it, “Mobile-Review.com’s Eldar Murtazin, who has provided some accurate Windows Phone scoops before, reports Microsoft (MSFT) will be making $2.6B in “support” payments (likely including marketing spend) to OEM partners in 2014 to compel them to make one Windows Phone apiece.

“Samsung (SSNLF, SSNLF) is said to be receiving $1.2B, Sony (SNE) $500M, Huawei $600M, and other firms $300M.”

Windows Mobile was such a failure that Microsoft is now struggling to keep any presence at all in mobile. As iophk puts it, “what are the real numbers then?”

Sosumi said, “windows mobile is so bad that MS has to bribe OEMs” and iophk said, “like with regular windows, too.” (e.g, in netbooks)

MinceR said, “hopefully that android won’t have to be virtualized on top of winblows (building a castle on a swamp…)”

Where are antitrust regulators? Bribes as a business model are not an acceptable strategy. It’s a serious abuse and there are laws against it. Sure, Microsoft’s close partners at the NSA are confirmed to be spying (espionage) on EU regulators under pretexts like “terrorism” (reported months ago), but these people should still be able to do their job.

01.17.14

Apple Exploits Children

Posted in Antitrust, Apple at 8:26 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Apple’s attitude towards children continues to be one that resembles drug dealers’

NOT ONLY under-aged children in China are being exploited for Apple profit.

According to a new post [1] and photograph from Will Hill, children are forced to sign an “agreement to use [Apple] laptop for school.” This comes at an interesting time because the FTC has just ruled that Apple will “pay at least $32.5 million in refunds to parents who didn’t authorize hefty purchases racked up by their children on their iPhones and iPads.”

What about laptops? How can Apple and its facilitators at schools get away with forcing children to become Apple customers? Apple is a company without ethics (in many areas), so this is morally wrong. Apple hopes to raise a generation of Apple ‘addicts’ using the help of state schools. Apple is not an alternative to Microsoft (Apple is trying to dodge antitrust actions in nefarious ways right now), it’s just another Microsoft. The alternative to both (the oligarchy) is freedom-respecting software, or BYOD (Bring Your Own Device).

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. Troubling User Agreement for Grade School

    Today, my daughter had to sign an agreement to use a laptop for school. They are going to replace most of the paper flow and text books with Apple laptops, so she was unable to refuse.

  2. FTC says Apple will pay at least $32.5 million over in-app purchases

    The federal government on Wednesday said Apple has agreed to pay at least $32.5 million in refunds to parents who didn’t authorize hefty purchases racked up by their children on their iPhones and iPads.

    The Federal Trade Commission’s settlement with Apple is the first punishment handed to a major tech company over the handling of children’s apps. It comes amid growing concern that as children clamor to use mobile devices, companies are doing little to protect their privacy or provide parents with the tools to supervise online behavior.

  3. Apple Settles FTC In-App Purchasing Complaint

01.07.14

Microsoft is Still Dreaming of Crushing Android by Doing What It Accuses Google of Doing

Posted in Antitrust, GNU/Linux, Microsoft, Windows at 10:45 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Joaquin Almunia, who is closely observed by the NSA (under the pretext of “terrorism”), won’t buy Microsoft’s complaints

Joaquin Almunia
Photo by Agência Brasil

Summary: Android, which incorporates Linux, is truly unstoppable, so Microsoft resorts to desperate measures that it previously used to suppress GNU/Linux adoption

TO MICROSOFT, Android is no joking matter and not a platform to be ridiculed (Microsoft is well past the stage of ridicule). Microsoft now uses proxies such as Nokia (via additional proxies) for patent assaults and even antitrust assaults against Android (it’s not going to work in Europe because of obviousness and hypocrisy).

Why should Microsoft be so terrified and nervous about Android?

Well, Android is now moving up to the desktop, Microsoft’s main area of illegally-obtained domination. “HP takes Android PCs commercial,” said one ZDNet journalist [1] (journalists are rare at ZDNet, as most are trolls, moles, and even existing Microsoft staff), adding to what his colleague said about Lenovo [2]. Another article asked: “Could an Android desktop replace your Windows PC?” [3]

In addition, Android is getting huge traction inside cars [4-7] (Western companies), not to mention tablets [8], cameras [9], and smartwatches [10] (mostly east Asian companies). All that Microsoft can do is try to tax those companies (as it does especially in east Asia) and try dropping the price of Windows to zero [11], essentially rendering its bogus antitrust complaints against Android hypocritical.

It has been quite gratifying to see Microsoft resorting to desperate measures like these. When German cars run Linux (Android) [12-13], Acer turns to Android desktops [14], longtime Linux foes like NVIDIA shift attention to Linux (Android) [15] and “fragmentation” FUD becomes too weak to be used [16] (CyanogenMod is an alternative option for Android devices, not a fork [17]) it is clear that Android is only growing. There’s no turning back now. It even starts occupying desktops, cars, kitchens, living rooms, etc. It is already dominant in phones (new example in [18-20]) and in tablets (examples in [21-24]). Muktware covers a good range of new products [25-28] and on the applications side too there is a lot to be found [29]. The wide range of cutting-edge applications which are designed for Android would be probably the reasons that some companies now seriously consider Android a desktop-ready platform. There’s not much Microsoft can do now; it lost its inertia.

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. HP takes Android PCs commercial

    The move, outlined at the Consumer Electronics Show 2014, comes just a few hours after Lenovo launched an Android all-in-one designed for the living room. HP’s Slate Pro AiO will run Android 4.3 with an Nvidia Tegra 4 quad-core processor. For good measure, HP is including Kingsoft Office Suite, Box storage and Citrix Receiver for Windows application support.

  2. Android desktops arrive as Lenovo eyes your living room

    Lenovo on Sunday rolled out an Android all-in-one home computer designed to be a living room multimedia PC. Should Android-powered PCs do well it would further disrupt the PC market and splinter the operating system selection a bit more.

  3. Could an Android desktop replace your Windows PC?

    Android as a PC operating system isn’t a new idea. Samsung announced a dual-boot Windows 8.x/Android convertible tablet, the Ativ Q, in June 2013. There are also rumors that Intel and its partners will be announcing “PC Plus” devices that will run Android apps on top of Windows 8.1, ala Bluestacks, at CES. HP and Lenovo have a more radical idea: Replace Windows entirely with Android on the desktop.

  4. Google launches Android automotive consortium
  5. Google creates Open Automobile Alliance to put Linux (Android) in cars
  6. Google wants an Android in every Audi and Honda

    The search giant has created a new organisation, with the backing of several of the world’s largest car makers, to promote the Android operating system as a common standard for in-car computers

  7. Google launches the Android-based Open Automotive Alliance with Audi, Honda, GM, and more

    Google and a number of automakers are planning to bring Android to cars with the launch of a new group called the Open Automotive Alliance. The alliance consists of Google, GM, Honda, Audi, Hyundai, and chipmaker Nvidia, and will focus on bringing the successful mobile operating system to in-car entertainment systems “in a way that is purpose built for cars.” The first cars with Android integration are planned for launch by the end of 2014.

  8. Samsung said to unveil Galaxy Pro tablets in early 2014

    Based on a tidbit from an unnamed insider, SamMobile said on Friday that Samsung is prepping three Pro tablets as well as a lite version of the Galaxy Tab 3. The pro lineup would include the Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4, the Galaxy Tab Pro 10.1, and the Galaxy Note Pro 12.2.

  9. Samsung’s Galaxy Camera 2 starts to refine the Android point-and-shoot

    Samsung is unveiling the Galaxy Camera 2 today, its second take on the idea of a truly smart point-and-shoot. Like its predecessor, the Galaxy Camera 2 runs Android, has wireless connectivity, and is operated primarily through controls on a large, 4.8-inch touchscreen. It’s still designed around making photos easy to share and edit using Android apps, but this time around, Samsung is promising a camera that can take even better photos in the first place — potentially making up for one of its predecessor’s weakest points.

  10. ZTE to showcase its smartwatch among other devices in CES
  11. Will Microsoft make Windows free to defeat Android?

    This can only be viewed as a seriously desperate attempt by Microsoft to grasp at any straw left within reach. Google and Apple have both hit Microsoft hard by providing free operating systems, and Microsoft is flailing around trying to figure out how to become relevant again.

  12. Google and Audi plot new front in Android vs. iOS war
  13. Android will power Audi cars

    Android is everywhere, it is currently powering lot of other electronic devices. The OS that started with mobile devices, is now slowly making it’s way into automobiles. Google has joined hands with german automaker, Audi to develop in car entertainment and information system based on Android for their cars.

  14. Why Acer’s new Android desktops are a game-changer

    This year at CES, Acer is introducing two new desktops – yes, you read that correctly, desktops – running the wildly successful variant of Linux known as Android. They’re cleverly positioning these exactly as I’ve been predicting for a long time: as monitors. They’re monitors with video inputs that the luddites can connect to a computer running Windows 8, complete with touchscreen input. But they also have a full Android stack available, which will operate independently with no external computer attached.

  15. Nvidia’s Tegra K1 tablet shows a beautiful future for Android gaming

    Nvidia’s big announcement for CES 2014 was, as expected, the fifth generation of its Tegra mobile processor. It’s such a momentous step forward for the company, however, that it’s getting a whole new designation in being called the Tegra K1. That’s because it implements the Kepler architecture, which underpins Nvidia’s desktop graphics card lineup, meaning you’re literally getting desktop-class graphics technology in your mobile processor.

  16. Balky carriers and slow OEMs step aside: Google is defragging Android

    Android 4.3 was released to Nexus devices a little over a month ago, but, as is usual with Android updates, it’s taking much longer to roll out the general public. Right now, a little over six percent of Android users have the latest version. And if you pay attention to the various Android forums out there, you may have noticed something: no one cares.

  17. CyanogenMod Source Code for Samsung Galaxy Note 3 now available

    CyanogenMod is going strong, the team has brought support to all major flagship devices of 2013 from different manufacturers. Samsung Galaxy S4, HTC One, LG G2, Moto X and Nexus 5 makes the list of supported devices. You might have noticed Samsung Galaxy Note 3 missing from the list; well, not anymore, a recent post on the official Google+ page of CyanogenMod says that CyanogenMod source code for Note 3 is now available for download, nightlies are coming soon.

  18. Rugged Android phone surprisingly thin, light

    The Handheld Group launched the Nautiz X1, a rugged, 4-inch smartphone with Android 4.0, a 15mm profile, 180-gram weight, and IP67 water- and dustproofing.

  19. Gift Guide: Our Favorite Android Phone
  20. Top 10 Android phones (January 2014 edition)
  21. DreamWorks will release its own ‘Dreamtab’ Android tablet this spring

    DreamWorks has partnered with Fuhu, the company responsible for the Nabi line of tablets, to produce an Android tablet for kids. The 8-inch Dreamtab will cost “under $300,” according to the New York Times, and will feature regularly updated original content based on DreamWorks characters. The content will be tailored for tablets, and will automatically arrive on Dreamtabs ready for consumption. Unlike many mobile games based on movies and TV, the content isn’t being created by a third party, but instead is being produced in-house.

  22. 27-inch Android all-in-one sports 2560 x 1440 pixels

    The Android computer within the TA272 HUL runs on an Nvidia Tegra 4 quad-core processor, which is still one of the fastest ARM SoCs around. The Tegra 4 features four Cortex-A15 cores and a 72-core GeForce GPU (graphics processing unit). Other TA272 HUL features include 16GB of internal storage, dual-mode WiFi, HDMI and DisplayPorts, and a USB 3.0 port for game controllers and other peripherals.

  23. Intel’s 2014 Android ambitions embrace 64-bit, more tablets

    Intel has big Android ambitions for 2014. The chipmaker’s points of focus for the year ahead include 64-bit processing power and more tablets.

  24. The bumpy road ahead for Android tablets in 2014

    When you look at existing Android tablets, they are all basically the same with the exception of Lenovo’s Yoga 8 and 10. They are thin, light slates with roughly equivalent processors and memory. They have memory slots to augment system storage, and the typical audio/video ports.

  25. You can boost the speed of your Nexus devices, thanks to Moto X
  26. Motorola now selling Moto X for $399
  27. $100 Moto G launched on Verizon Wiresless
  28. Samsung’s Galaxy Camera 2
  29. 50 best Android apps of 2013

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