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12.29.11

Cablegate: State Governments in India Prefer Open Source Code

Posted in Asia, Cablegate, Free/Libre Software, GNU/Linux, IBM at 5:48 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Cablegate

Summary: A diplomatic cable about IBM, Linux and Free/open source software

The following Cablegate cable talks about IBM and Linux. It also states that “[t]he use of an open source code Linux is another area of focus for IBM India. The company formed an IBM Linux Competency Center and Linux Solution Center in Bangalore to establish product standards, further Linux R&D as well as to localize products for an increasingly global customer base with local content requirements. State governments in India are big customers as they prefer open source code that enables development of local language fonts.”

Here is the Cablegate cable in full:


VZCZCXRO6031
RR RUEHBI RUEHCI
DE RUEHCG #2571/01 3260727
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 220727Z NOV 06
FM AMCONSUL CHENNAI
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 0443
INFO RUEHNE/AMEMBASSY NEW DELHI 2087
RUEHBI/AMCONSUL MUMBAI 4907
RUEHCI/AMCONSUL CALCUTTA 0647
Hide header
UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 03 CHENNAI 002571 
 
SIPDIS 
 
SIPDIS 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: ECON [Economic Conditions], EINV [Foreign Investments], 
EINT [Economic and Commercial Internet], IN [India; Andaman Islands; 
Lakshadweep Islands; Nicobar Islands] 
SUBJECT: IBM INVESTS BIG IN INDIA: HUMAN RESOURCES 
ARE KEY 
 
REF: CHENNAI 1187 
 
¶1. (U) Summary:  Riding the crest of a $6 billion 
investment, IBM India plans to expand its Bangalore 
research and development (R&D) operations and in 
doing so will unleash a new human capital thrust in 
already talent-hungry south India.  The company 
anticipates its Indian workforce will triple in the 
next five years.  An expanding market in India for 
U.S. manufactured mainframes and network software 
services presents an opportunity the company does not 
plan to miss. Increasing demand for remote management 
of global client networks is another revenue stream 
for IBM India. Simultaneous investments in open 
source software protocol and capacity building 
spearhead the companyQs effort to market e-governance 
solutions in the Indian market.  To meet its expanded 
human resource requirements, IBM plans to initiate 
in-house staff training programs, marking a notable 
shift from its past strategy of hiring employees away 
from competitors.  Indian software companies, already 
experiencing a human capital crunch, are now 
struggling to quickly respond and prevent attrition, 
fearful of losing skilled employees to their 
competitors.  End summary. 
 
----------------- 
All bets on India 
----------------- 
 
¶2. (U) On June 6 Sam Palmisano, IBMQs Chairman, 
announced investment plans in India of $6 billion 
over a five year period (reftel).  The company 
remains reluctant to disclose the details of its 
investment strategy, but during a recent meeting in 
Bangalore with visiting New Delhi DCM Pyatt, Inder 
Thukral, Director Strategy and Business Development 
at IBM India told post that emphasis will be on 
research and development of telecommunication and 
netware solutions for IBM operations worldwide.  The 
desire to leverage even further IndiaQs large highly- 
skilled labor force led to this investment move, 
Shankar Annasamy, Managing Director IBM India told 
us.  The company expects to triple its workforce from 
the current 47,000 employees at 25 locations in the 
next five years. 
 
----------------------------------------- 
India: IBMQs research and development hub 
----------------------------------------- 
 
¶3. (U) IBM India, with $2 billion in current 
investments, is the proverbial Q800-pound gorillaQ of 
IT research and development in the country.  The 
companyQs India-based teams account for over 30% of 
IBMQs global R&D on network and communications 
solutions.  With its latest investment, the company 
has rapidly diversified to meet its R&D needs:  The 
IBM Innovation Center in Bangalore provides an 
institutional platform for software service suppliers 
and is a critical testing ground for new products in 
both the Indian and global market. IBMQs India 
Software Lab, with facilities in Bangalore and Pune, 
also develops and supports IBM software products for 
worldwide operations.  In addition, the high- 
performance On Demand Lab develops specialized 
software to automate and virtualize the complex 
information technology infrastructure of clients 
located in the south Asian region.  To further 
hardware development, the Engineering and Technology 
Services Center designs advanced chips, cards and 
systems to meet customer requirements across Asia. 
 
------------------------------------------ 
India: A big market for US made mainframes 
------------------------------------------ 
 
¶4. (U) IBMQs U.S. manufactured main frames have 
captured the booming Indian main frame market.  The 
company holds an 80 percent share of IndiaQs 
estimated $250 million market for main frames.  The 
market is currently growing at 55 percent, with much 
of the growth coming from mid-sized Indian 
businesses.  Main frames offered to the Indian market 
are pre-positioned at the companyQs Bangalore-based 
Innovation Center to enable potential customers to 
experience the computing power and capabilities of 
the machines.  IBMQs service oriented architecture 
that facilitates communication between different 
business segments located in various locations has 
 
CHENNAI 00002571  002 OF 003 
 
 
found favor in India and helped IBM secure a $100 
million deal with Bharti-Airtel, one of IndiaQs 
largest mobile phone service providers. 
 
------------------------------------------- 
Open source products spearhead E-governance 
------------------------------------------- 
 
¶5. (U) The use of an open source code Linux is 
another area of focus for IBM India.  The company 
formed an IBM Linux Competency Center and Linux 
Solution Center in Bangalore to establish product 
standards, further Linux R&D as well as to localize 
products for an increasingly global customer base 
with local content requirements.  State governments 
in India are big customers as they prefer open source 
code that enables development of local language 
fonts. 
 
-------------------------------- 
IBMQs BPOs transform outsourcing 
-------------------------------- 
 
¶6. (U) Leveraging IndiaQs large talent pool of 
network managers, IBM India services clients around 
the world via satellite and fiber optic networks from 
its global operations hub in Bangalore.  IBM Daksh, a 
back office unit which the company acquired in 2004, 
accounts for nearly 50% of the companyQs staff in 
India and is expected to contribute over half of the 
company revenues in the next five years.  Similar to 
other BPO operations such as local giants Infosys and 
Wipro, Daksh provides services for clients involved 
in retail, technology, banking, mortgage, energy and 
life insurance.  The range of services includes 
application processing, account maintenance, data 
conversion services, logistics management, claims 
processing, email support and financial services. 
According to IBM executives, this line of business 
registered some of the fastest growth rates for IBM 
in recent history. 
 
---------------------------------------- 
In-house training to meet in-house needs 
---------------------------------------- 
 
¶7. (U) IBMQs recent investment spike comes at a time 
when a fiercely competitive hiring climate is forcing 
top leadership to rethink its human resource 
strategy. In the past the company notoriously 
QpoachedQ experienced individuals from local firms. 
Looking for new HR capacity building vehicles, 
company executives are emphasizing university 
recruitment to attract and train new waves of fresh 
engineering graduates, or Qfreshers.Q  Yet this may 
be a tall order in a time when A-list tech firms are 
vying for talent, and freshers with experience under 
their belt are job-hopping for bigger and better 
packages.  Nonetheless, IBM executives are betting on 
a combination of higher salaries and their global 
brand equity to ensure a steady talent pool. 
 
¶8. (U) Strategic partnerships with elite Indian 
technology institutions are also enabling IBM India 
to further leverage local human capital expertise. 
IBMQs Center for Advanced Studies, for example, 
maintains a close relationship with prestigious 
institutions such as the Indian Institute of 
Technology (IIT) Chennai that leads directly into 
software R&D.  The company has a similar program with 
the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore and 
plans to expand its partnerships with other high- 
caliber institutions across India. 
 
--------------------------------------------- -------- 
Expansion plans leave Indian software companies 
scared 
--------------------------------------------- -------- 
___ 
 
¶9. (U) Comment:  IBMQs investment announcement sent a 
minor wave of anxiety through the Indian software 
industry, which is already struggling to control 
costs.  InfosysQ Human Resource Director told us his 
company is trying to preempt potential attrition by 
offering a 30% salary hike.  Mindtree Consulting, a 
medium sized software development company, plans to 
tap bright talent as early as the secondary school 
level.  The company hopes to partner with U.S.-based 
universities to offer recruits a degree in 
 
CHENNAI 00002571  003 OF 003 
 
 
engineering at the end of a five year stint. 
Whatever strategy adopted, representatives of both 
Infosys and Mindtree told us that IBMQs investment 
plans will dramatically alter IndiaQs software 
business landscape and long-term human capital 
strategy. End comment. 
 
¶10. (U) This message was coordinated with Embassy New 
Delhi. 
 
HOPPER

In later cable we are going to see some more evidence of warming up to FOSS.

12.28.11

Cablegate: Brazil Advocates, Praises “the Usefulness of Free, Open Source Software”

Posted in America, Cablegate at 7:45 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Cablegate

Summary: Some interesting words from Brazil (source: CSTD Paris panel meeting on WSIS)

According to the following Cablegate cable, Brazil’s representative “emphasized that free and open source software helps to reduce costs, particularly in e-government.”

Also, “Brazil noted that the elements for a roadmap for digital inclusion included [...] the usefulness of free, open source software.”


null
Lucia A Keegan  11/17/2006 11:17:27 AM  From  DB/Inbox:  Lucia A Keegan

Cable 
Text:                                                                      
                                                                           
      
UNCLAS    SENSITIVE     PARIS 07358

SIPDIS
cxparis:
    ACTION: SCI
    INFO:   DCM POL LABO ENGO ECSO AGR UNESCO AMBO SCIO AMB
            ECON ESCI

DISSEMINATION: SCIX
CHARGE: PROG

APPROVED: ESTH RDRY/ECON SDWYE
DRAFTED: ECON: HSULLIVAN; EST
CLEARED: CLEAR: USOECD: JMALLORY

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DE RUEHFR #7358/01 3171627
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 131627Z NOV 06
FM AMEMBASSY PARIS
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 3066
RUCNDT/USUN NEW YORK
RUEHGV/USMISSION GENEVA 2524
RUEHZN/EST COLLECTIVE 

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 05 PARIS 007358 
 
SIPDIS 
 
STATE FOR IO/EDA, OES, EB/CIP, EUR/WE 
 
SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 
 
E.O. 12958:  N/A 
TAGS: ECPS [Communications and Postal Systems], TINT [Internet Technology], KWWW [World Wide Web Site], PREL [External Political Relations], FR [France; Corsica] 
SUBJECT: CSTD PARIS PANEL MEETING ON WSIS OUTCOME PRODUCES GUIDANCE 
DOCUMENT 
 
NOT FOR INTERNET DISTRIBUTION. 
 
¶1.  (U) Summary: The November 6-8, 2006 Paris Panel Meeting of the 
UN Commission on Science and Technology for Development (CSTD) Panel 
Meeting on WSIS outcome "Promoting the building of people-centered, 
development-oriented, and inclusive information society, with a view 
to enhancing digital opportunities for all people" did not raise 
significant 'red flags' for the U.S., with the exception of Brazil's 
occasional assertions that the Committee should address "internet 
governance."  On the margins of the meeting, U.S. officers who 
attended as observers reminded Commission leadership and staff that 
internet governance issues were not appropriate subjects for the 
Panel Meeting, and Commission leadership agreed.  Some participants 
(e.g., Brazil, Germany) were clearly taking directions from their 
capitals while others (e.g., Ethiopia) appeared little aware at the 
beginning of the meeting why the Commission was focusing on the 
Information Society.  In general, however, delegates came 
well-informed and engaged in the discussions.  Commission leadership 
appreciated the presence of U.S. officers as observers.  The Panel 
produced a document -- still subject to minor language editing 
changes -- in response to ECOSOC's resolution 2006/46, which had 
requested the Commission's review of this WSIS outcome.  The 
document is produced in full at para. 15, below.  End Summary. 
 
----------------------------------------- 
Information Society - People-centered and Inclusive 
----------------------------------------- 
 
¶2. (U)  The UNCTAD-provided Secretariat began the three-day meeting 
by explaining the purposes for the Commission's Panel Meeting and 
defining the concept of a people-centered, development-oriented and 
inclusive information society as a framework for development.  The 
Secretariat provided a chart showing the differences of internet 
 
SIPDIS 
penetration in various continents and also on the varying rates of 
growth.  The Secretariat noted that in Africa, although internet 
penetration in 2005 was only 3.6 percent, over the decade 1995-2005, 
internet use grew by 600%.  The Secretariat noted that governments 
should focus on a people-centered, development-oriented, inclusive 
Information Society, consistent with WSIS decisions.  Inclusive 
means that all stakeholders should participate, with benefits and 
opportunities available to all.  The purpose of the Information 
Society is to improve the quality of life for consumers, the 
Secretariat continued.  Various stakeholders have different roles. 
 
SIPDIS 
The government should develop national e-strategies, create an 
investment-friendly environment, deregulate, privatize, and 
liberalize the telecommunications sector.  The private sector will 
develop and finance the internet and its infrastructure.  Civil 
society will focus on local issues, while international 
organizations will help implement the WSIS. 
 
¶3. (U)  According to the Secretariat, the main obstacles to 
narrowing the digital divide are: 
 
- The high cost of telecommunications for the poor in developing 
countries; 
 
- Lack of human resources to develop the information infrastructure 
exacerbated by a brain drain of qualified personnel; 
 
- Lack of local content, which limits its usefulness to poor, rural 
populations. 
 
¶4. (SBU) In the ensuing discussion session, Charles Geiger, WSIS 
Executive Director from 2003 to 2005, commented substantively that 
governments should not try to control the direction of technology or 
internet growth since the technology was moving faster than 
governments could grasp developments.  For example, he suggested, 
the growth in mobile telephony occurred organically, not as a result 
of WSIS outcomes.  However, governments should use information 
communication technology (ICT) in the health sector, to promote 
transparent government (e-government), and improve distance 
learning.  These measures would promote social development, 
according to Geiger. 
 
¶5. (U) The Greek delegate said that he was surprised that in some of 
the examples of countries discussed that mobile telephony 
penetration surpassed that of fixed line.  Geiger replied that, in 
many areas of the developing world, mobile penetration is greater 
because of the lack of protection, as in the wireline world.  He 
noted that in India, one might have to wait seven years for a 
wireline telephone, but consumers could get mobile phones in 24 
hours.  Additionally, the decrease in mobile phone rates have made 
them more affordable than fixed line telephones in many areas. 
 
--------------------------------------------- ---- 
Brazil Opposes a Focus on Investment; CSTD Demurs 
--------------------------------------------- ---- 
 
¶6. (SBU) The Brazil representative thought that CSTD should focus on 
decentralization.  If governments tried to plan too much, they would 
not succeed because technology evolves faster than governments can 
plan.  Second, the Commission should downplay the role of foreign 
investment since the primary development should be at the community 
level.  Brazil, he commented, had 90 percent television penetration, 
while the internet had only reached 13 percent.  To wait for this 
percentage to slowly increase would be slower than the switch to 
digital TV, which would allow for interaction between the two 
systems.  He also emphasized that free and open source software 
helps to reduce costs, particularly in e-government.  No one else 
took up these points, except that Sudan expressed interest in the 
technology permitting greater interactivity with television systems. 
 Geiger emphasized that UNCTAD was not the WTO (implying that Brazil 
should not bring its GATS telecom mode 3 agenda into this forum.) 
 
------------------------------ 
CSTD Reviews WSIS Action Items 
------------------------------ 
 
¶7. (U) In a subsequent intervention, Geiger ran through the eleven 
action items from the Geneva WSIS Summit, reviewing which 
organizations were responsible for follow-up on each action item. 
He noted that the UN Group on Information Society (UNGIS) was 
created on July 14, 2006 to coordinate implementation of WSIS.  Its 
effectiveness would be proportionate to the extent that responsible 
UN agencies (primarily the ITU, UNDP, and UNESCO) provided it input, 
he suggested.  On April 17, 2006, the Global Alliance for 
Information and Communication Technology formed to provide private 
sector and civil society input into the CSTD's work.  Likewise, 
according to Geiger, the UNDP and the World Bank ought to be engaged 
with the CSTD's work so that its recommendations could be filtered 
into organizations that had financing capabilities. 
 
¶8. (SBU) Brazil responded by noting that the CSTD's role is to 
review and assess implementation of WSIS, not implementation itself. 
 However, to do so effectively, the CSTD needed to have better 
feedback on what the various UN agencies were doing to implement the 
WSIS outcomes.  Furthermore, the eleven action items from the Geneva 
conference should not be the sole scope of coverage since limiting 
its work to those would ignore the outcomes from the second WSIS 
Summit in Tunis.  Geiger agreed.  He noted that Brazil's position on 
internet governance "has always been very strong," but questioned 
the extent that the CSTD could effectively work on all WSIS issues. 
 
 
¶9. (SBU) The Romanian delegate suggested that CSTD create five 
parallel groups that would focus on implementation of the various 
recommendations.  Turkey noted that the recommendations were not 
mutually exclusive. 
 
------------------------------------- 
Summary of Individual Country Reports 
------------------------------------- 
 
¶10. (SBU) Commission members gave a number of reports regarding the 
state of the information society in their respective countries.  The 
German representative presented on a study that the GOG performed 
for the German Parliament on internet usage in Sub-Saharan African 
educational institutions.  It concluded, inter alia, that the 
internet could not solve many of the problems that African 
educational institutions faced such as large class sizes, poor 
salaries for teachers, and lack of funding.  However, it could, for 
example, spur joint programs between various institutions to share 
ideas about curriculum development. 
 
¶11. (U) The Lesotho representative gave a brief presentation about 
efforts it is undertaking to provide an environment conducive to 
building an information society involving, for example, new 
telecommunications laws.  Lesotho said that it would need 
multilateral assistance to achieve its goals.  Sudan presented its 
experiences, noting that internet only exists in big cities and 
towns, while 75 percent of the population lives in rural areas. 
Sudan uses solar energy to power its ICT in rural areas.  It has 
placed emphasis on connecting its universities and polytechnic 
institutions.  Sudan plans to establish a science park managed by 
specialized professionals to stimulate and manage the flow of 
knowledge and technology among universities, R&D institutions, 
companies and markets.  It also aims to facilitate the creation and 
growth of innovation-based companies through incubation, spin-off 
processes, and provision of other value-added services.  Sudan did a 
feasibility study on whether its science park could attract foreign 
and private sector investment.  The science park will cost USD 500 
million.  Phase One would cost USD 150 million, which a large Arab 
Gulf country has already provided.  This sum will finance, inter 
alia, communications and fiber optics requirements. 
 
¶12. (SBU) The Brazilian representative said that 97.2 percent of 
households have electricity, but, in the Amazon region, the 
percentage of households with electricity is much lower.  The 
percentage of the population with access to the internet is also not 
evenly distributed, but in no area is it over 30 percent except for 
Brazilia.  Brazil therefore has planned to introduce digital TV with 
the possibility of interactivity.  Through a remote control system, 
Brazilians can access TV on demand.  This is an opportunity for 
digital inclusion since internet reaches so few people and will take 
a long time to grow organically.  Brazil noted that the elements for 
a roadmap for digital inclusion included: noting countries' 
experience; promoting democratic governance based on transparency, 
accountability, and participation; infrastructure according to 
community interest; commitment to local development; the promotion 
of e-government; and the usefulness of free, open source software. 
The role for ECOSOC and CSTD should be to coordinate public policy 
issues at the international level and internet governance, according 
to the Brazilian representative. 
 
¶13. (U) The Moroccan representative discussed various initiatives 
the government was taking to promote connectivity in its educational 
system. She also mentioned the Casablanca Technopark, which boasts 
140 ICT companies with 750 permanent job positions. 
 
¶14. (U) Geiger, Hamdi, the delegates from Brazil, Chile, the GAID, 
and another NGO met following closure of the second day to propose 
how the instant CSTD Panel Meeting should make recommendations for 
the benefit of the tenth session of the CSTD, to be held in May 
2007.  That group prepared a document which was accepted - subject 
to minor revisions (yet to be included in the draft) on the 
following day.  The document, read by the Chilean delegate is as 
follows: 
 
---------------------------- 
CSTD Recommendation Document 
---------------------------- 
 
¶15. (U) The text of the 'Recommendation' document produced by the 
special CSTD Panel Meeting held in Paris, November 6-8, 2006 to 
provide guidance to the CSTD's Tenth Session to be held in May 2007 
follows.  Begin text: 
 
"The World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) adopted a vision 
of a people-centered, development-oriented, and inclusive 
information society, with the view to creating digital opportunities 
for all people.  The Tunis Agenda for the Information Society, 
adopted in 2005 by the WSIS and endorsed by General Assembly 
Resolution 60/252, requests the Council to oversee the system-wide 
follow-up of the Geneva and Tunis outcomes of the Summit, and to 
that end, requests the Council, at its substantive session of 2006, 
to review the mandate, agenda and composition of the Commission on 
Science and Technology for Development, including considering 
strengthening the Commission, taking into account the 
multi-stakeholder approach, 
 
In this regard, the ECOSOC Resolution 2006/46 requests the 
Commission to review and assess the progress made in implementing 
the outcomes of the Summit and advise the Council thereon, including 
through the elaboration of recommendations to the Council aimed at 
furthering the implementation of the Summit outcomes, and that to 
that end, the Commission shall: 
 
-- review and assess progress at the international and regional 
levels in the implementation of Action Lines, recommendations and 
commitments contained in the outcome documents of WSIS; 
 
-- share best and effective practices and lessons learned, and 
identify obstacles and constraints encountered, actions and 
initiatives to overcome them and important measures for further 
implementation of WSIS outcomes; 
 
-- promote dialogue and foster partnerships in coordination with 
other appropriate UN funds, programs and specialized agencies to 
contribute to the attainment of the WSIS objectives and 
implementation of its outcomes, to use ICT for development and the 
achievement of internationally agreed development goals, with the 
participation of governments, the private sector, civil society, and 
the UN and other international organizations according to their 
different roles and responsibilities; 
 
Bearing in mind that the comprehensive review by the GA of WSIS will 
take place in 2015, and the ECOSOC requested that in its next 
session the Commission shall develop a multiyear work program, the 
Panel takes note of the issues paper presented by the Secretariat, 
and after considering this matter requests the Secretariat to make 
consultations with relevant stakeholders and to present to the 
Commission a draft program of work that should be flexible and 
inclusive. 
 
In order for the ECOSOC, through CSTD, to carry out its mandate of 
overseeing system-wide follow up of the WSIS effectively, it will 
require that the Commission has an effective interface with all 
agencies and mechanisms that are tasked with implementation of WSIS 
outcomes and other post-WSIS activities. 
 
In this regard, the Panel proposes the following: 
 
Multi-year work program and methods of work: 
 
The Panel requests the UNCTAD Secretariat to prepare a Note for 
consideration at the Tenth Session, which contains proposals for a 
multi-year work program of the Commission and new methods of work. 
This Note should take into account the timeframe for the 
comprehensive review, as well as the clustering and sequencing of 
thematic issues from WSIS outcome documents.  The work program 
should adequately address the thematic concerns of WSIS, but also be 
flexible enough to accommodate any future need for adjustment, in 
view of the fast pace of technological development.  To gather 
inputs on the work program, the Secretariat will carry out informal, 
open-ended consultations before February 2007, with a wide range of 
stakeholders.  These consultations could be scheduled back-to-back 
with meetings of action line facilitators and moderators. 
 
The Note should also elaborate on new methods of work of the 
Commission, including through interactive dialogues during its 
annual session, with the active participation of action line 
facilitators, and other agencies and mechanisms involved with the 
implementation of WSIS outcomes.  Additionally, the Note should 
propose concrete ways to explore development-friendly and innovative 
use of electronic media, drawing upon existing online databases on 
best practices, partnership projects and initiatives, as well as 
other collaborative electronic platforms, which would allow all 
stakeholders to contribute to follow up efforts, share information, 
learning from the experience of others and explore opportunities for 
partnerships. 
 
Since WSIS implementation constitutes ongoing activities over a wide 
area, which will be fast evolving, the Commission may have a wide 
range of topics to examine every year.  The Panel suggests that the 
Commission could invite the facilitators of action lines, and other 
agencies and mechanisms involved in implementation of WSIS, as well 
as members of other stakeholder groups, to participate in its annual 
session. 
 
The Panel also proposes that the Commission at its Tenth Session in 
May 2007 requests the United Nations system entities, including the 
regional commissions, engaged in the implementation of the Geneva 
and Tunis outcomes of the World Summit for the Information Society 
to collaborate closely with the Commission on Science and Technology 
for Development by providing it with periodic reports on the 
progress made in the implementation of the main themes and Action 
Lines of the World Summit for the Information Society, with a view 
to enabling the Commission to monitor, review and appraise progress 
achieved and problems encountered in the implementation, and to 
advise the Council thereon."  End text of document. 
 
------------------------------ 
CSTD leadership and commentary 
------------------------------ 
 
¶16. (SBU) Below are the CSTD leaders, who guided the discussion 
during the meeting: 
 
Chairman - Stefan Moravek, former Slovak Ambassador to South Korea 
and Kenya.  Aware of U.S. positions and 'red lines.'  Would welcome 
a U.S. return to the Commission. 
 
Vice President - Dr. Arnoldo K. Ventura, Special Adviser to the 
Prime Minister on Science and Technology, Jamaica. 
 
Executive Director - Charles Geiger.  Knows the WSIS 'inside out' 
having participated in both the Geneva and Tunis WSIS Summits.  Also 
aware of USG sensitivities regarding internet governance, and worked 
to assure this item remained "off the agenda."  He would like to see 
the U.S. become more involved in the work of the Commission. 
 
Secretariat -- Mongi Hamdi, Secretary to the UN Commission on 
 
SIPDIS 
Science and Technology for Development, Office of the Secretary 
General for UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)  - Spent 
nearly 20 years in the U.S., first studying at Harvard and 
University of Southern California, followed by a long spell at UN 
Headquarters in New York (14 years).  His interventions emphasized 
the importance of investment in building infrastructure; the 
importance of deregulation; and focusing the role of government and 
international organizations on issues such as the digital divide. 
On the margins of the meeting, he asked U.S. observers to relay a 
request to Washington to rejoin the Commission, noting that USG 
interests could best be served by working as an insider rather than 
an outsider. 
 
President of Prepcom WSIS Tunis Phase - Ambassador Janis Karkins. In 
a WSIS follow-up presentation, he urged members and UN bodies 
working on WSIS issues to adhere to its mandate, to avoid reopening 
discussion of issues already addressed, and to operate within the 
allocated resources. 
 
¶17.  (SBU) Comment: The CSTD principals welcomed U.S. officers who 
observed (from USOECD, Science Officer Mallory on 11/6; Embassy 
Paris, ECON/Telcoms Officer Sullivan on 11/7; and Embassy Paris ESTH 
Couns Dry on 11/8).  They expressed interest in the USG becoming 
more engaged in the Committee, and believed with the expansion from 
30 to 40 members, there would be more participants that are 
"like-minded" with the U.S. on Information Society issues.  Many 
participants were clearly taking directions from their capitals, and 
delegates came well-informed and engaged in the discussions.  That 
said, the "reform" of this Commission is "a work in progress," 
although its work clearly is important to the task of development. 
Its present focus on WSIS implementation also makes its work 
relevant to the U.S.  End Comment. 
 
STAPLETON

More Cablegate cables will be covered here tomorrow.

Cablegate: Indian Ambassador Criticises UNESCO for Signing a Software Agreement With Microsoft (Updated)

Posted in Cablegate, Microsoft at 7:14 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Cablegate

Summary: A cable from 5 years ago shows that UNESCO deals we often criticise meet opposition behinds the scenes too

WHENEVER UNESCO promises to promote Free software we quickly see Microsoft showing up and turning UNESCO into what seems like corrupt imposition of Microsoft software on children. According to the following Cablegate cable, we are not alone with these concerns and to quote ¶6, ” The Indian Ambassador criticized UNESCO for signing a software agreement with Microsoft, stating that such an agreement had resulted in UNESCO abandoning efforts to develop open-source software. (COMMENT: It is not clear whether the Indian Ambassador is motivated by anti- globalization ideals, as she might like to suggest, or national interest, though we suspect the latter. The UNESCO open-source software project “Enrich” is being developed, in large part, by Indian software engineers. END COMMENT.) ADG Khan defended this partnership by stating that developing software is vital for capacity building, and added that UNESCO continues to work on open-source software. The Tunis Agenda, he reminded the audience, calls for private sector partnerships in this area, and UNESCO plans to increase them. The DG stated that UNESCO must maintain momentum in building partnerships with the private sector in areas covered by WSIS. The agreement with Microsoft does not mean that UNESCO will stop pursuing the idea of free and open software.”

Here is the full cable:

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 PARIS 001007 
 
SIPDIS 
 
FROM USMISSION UNESCO PARIS 
 
SENSITIVE 
 
E.O. 12958:    N/A 
TAGS: KPAO [Public Affairs Office], ECPS [Communications and Postal Systems], ETRD [Foreign Trade], 
ECON [Economic Conditions], EINT [Economic and Commercial Internet], ETTC [Trade and Technology Controls], 
UNESCO [UN Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization] 
SUBJECT:  FOLLOW-UP ON THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE TUNIS AGENDA 
FOR UNESCO 
 
REF:  PARIS 431 
 
¶1.   (SBU) SUMMARY:  On February 2, 2006 the UNESCO Director 
General (DG), Koichiro Matsuura, and Assistant Director 
General (ADG) for Communication and Information, Khan, held 
an information session for UNESCO's permanent delegations to 
outline the implications for UNESCO of the World Information 
Summit on the Information Society's (WSIS) Tunis Agenda. 
UNESCO's strategy at WSIS featured four key principles: 1) 
Freedom of expression, 2) Universal access to information 
and knowledge, 3) Respect for cultural and linguistic 
diversity, 4) Quality education for all.  According to the 
DG, UNESCO's delegation to Tunis clarified which action 
lines it would work on, distanced itself from the Internet 
governance debate, did not rule out the creation of new 
normative instruments, and reiterated its commitment to 
private sector partnerships.  END SUMMARY. 
 
-------------------------------------------- 
IMPLICATIONS OF THE TUNIS AGENDA FOR UNESCO 
-------------------------------------------- 
 
¶2.  (SBU) The Tunis Agenda designates UNESCO as a 
moderator/facilitator for 7 Action Lines: 1) Access to 
information and knowledge, 2)E-learning, 3)E-science, 4) 
Cultural diversity and identity, linguistic diversity and 
local content, 5) Media, 6) Ethical dimensions of 
Information Society, 7) International and regional 
cooperation. The DG stressed that UNESCO expects to actively 
participate along with ITU and UNDP in the overall 
coordination of multi-stakeholder implementation of the WSIS 
outcomes. 
 
--------------------- 
INTERNET GOVERNANCE 
--------------------- 
 
¶3.  (SBU) UNESCO will participate in the Internet Governance 
Forum (IGF) as established by the Tunis Agenda.  Any 
preference that UNESCO had for the location of the IGF 
Secretariat was not discussed. The Brazilian Ambassador 
 
SIPDIS 
asked how "enhanced cooperation," as mentioned in the Tunis 
Agenda, would be addressed, noting that the language was 
deliberately imprecise.  The DG stated that UNESCO would 
play a role in identifying what was meant by enhanced 
cooperation, so that all parties are involved.  (COMMENT: 
He did not offer specifics.  END COMMENT.)  He also affirmed 
that UNESCO would be engaged in three aspects of Internet 
governance: 1) Openness, 2) Linguistic diversity, 3) Access 
(meaning interoperability). 
 
--------------------- 
CALL FOR INSTRUMENTS 
--------------------- 
 
¶4.  (SBU) The Japanese DCM asked if the DG saw scope for 
normative instruments in the area of Internet governance. 
The DG responded that at the moment he does not envisage any 
normative instruments in the Communication and Information 
sector, but UNESCO's important mission is to formulate 
normative instruments in key areas.  If there is further 
need for instruments in Communication and Information, he 
added, UNESCO should not shy away.  ADG Khan noted that the 
IGF could advance areas of concern with member state 
support.  The Communication and Information sector did not, 
he said, need normative instruments today, but since 
technology was changing so fast, he could not say that 
UNESCO would not consider them in the future.  (COMMENT: 
World Press Freedom Committee Representative Rony Koven's 
reaction to this comment was, "We'll worry about the future 
when we get there.  The main thing is that he sees no need 
for instruments now."  Koven is a thirty-year advocate of 
media freedom at UNESCO, an active WSIS stakeholder, and 
seasoned observer of the UNESCO scene, who will participate 
as a stakeholder in the Internet Governance Forum.  END 
COMMENT.) 
 
--------------------------- 
UNESCO'S ROLE INADEQUATE? 
--------------------------- 
 
¶5.  (SBU) Delegates from Brazil, India, and Japan questioned 
whether UNESCO had been given its "due" role in the process. 
The Indian Ambassador stated that, according to the Indian 
delegate at WSIS, UNESCO was not allowed to play the role it 
wanted to have because of "certain key delegations." 
(COMMENT:  Is this the same Indian Delegate to WSIS that the 
USG worked well with?  We wonder if the Indian Ambassador is 
articulating her own version of WSIS events here.  END 
COMMENT.)  This echoed concerns that UNESCO ambassadors, 
including the Indian Ambassador, raised with Ambassador 
Gross on January 18, 2006 (reftel).  The DG responded that 
while he shared this concern, it was useless to complain. 
UNESCO, he stated, had wanted to represent member states in 
the WSIS process and its only ambition was to fulfill its 
mandate. 
 
------------------------------------------ 
CRITICISM OF PUBLIC SECTOR PARTNERSHIPS 
------------------------------------------ 
 
¶6.  (SBU) The Indian Ambassador criticized UNESCO for 
signing a software agreement with Microsoft, stating that 
such an agreement had resulted in UNESCO abandoning efforts 
to develop open-source software.  (COMMENT:  It is not clear 
whether the Indian Ambassador is motivated by anti- 
globalization ideals, as she might like to suggest, or 
national interest, though we suspect the latter.  The UNESCO 
open-source software project "Enrich" is being developed, in 
large part, by Indian software engineers.  END COMMENT.) 
ADG Khan defended this partnership by stating that 
developing software is vital for capacity building, and 
added that UNESCO continues to work on open-source software. 
The Tunis Agenda, he reminded the audience, calls for 
private sector partnerships in this area, and UNESCO plans 
to increase them.  The DG stated that UNESCO must maintain 
momentum in building partnerships with the private sector in 
areas covered by WSIS.  The agreement with Microsoft does 
not mean that UNESCO will stop pursuing the idea of free and 
open software. 
 
¶7.  (SBU) COMMENT:  While it is disturbing that the DG 
stated that the Communication and Information sector "should 
not shy away" from new instruments, we note that some 
Communication and Information junkies at UNESCO find little 
evidence that this will happen in the next biennium.  The 
Mission will remain vigilant in its efforts to promote media 
freedom and Internet status quo at UNESCO.  END COMMENT. 
Oliver

It is reassuring to see that some politicians too let their opposition be known. The Microsoft/UNESCO PR needs to be countered.

Update: There is also a cable that says: “UNESCO staff noted the “Preservation of Digital Heritage” program, UNESCO-sponsored open source software for digital libraries, and a 2003 declaration on Multilingualism and Cyberspace.”

The cable in full:


UNCLAS PARIS 001733 
 
SIPDIS 
 
FROM USMISSION UNESCO PARIS 
FOR IO/UNESCO 
E.O. 12958:    N/A 
 
TAGS: KPAO [Public Affairs Office], ECPS [Communications and Postal Systems], ETRD [Foreign Trade], 
ECON [Economic Conditions], EINT [Economic and Commercial Internet], ETTC [Trade and Technology Controls], 
EAID [Foreign Economic Assistance], UNESCO [UN Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization] 
SUBJECT:  UNESCO AND THE WORLD DIGITAL LIBRARY 
¶1.   (SBU) SUMMARY AND GUIDANCE REQUEST:  Deanna 
Marcum, Associate Librarian for Library Services and 
Chair of the Memory of the World Programme 
International Advisory Committee met with the UNESCO 
Communication and Information Sector and the Director 
 
General (DG) on March 8, 2006 to discuss the Library of 
Congress' (LOC) initiative to develop a plan for the 
World Digital Library (WDL).  She also discussed the 
UNESCO Memory of the World Program with the Director 
General. The DG and other senior level staff were 
enthusiastic about the WDL project, but working level 
staff, who discussed the LOC's initial planning stage 
with Marcum, were suspicious of Google motives to fund 
the WDL plan.   Marcum stated that Google had stepped 
out of the picture after making its donation. The 
UNESCO Secretariat is confused as to whether Marcum is 
the point of contact on the WDL, or another LOC 
staffer.  Marcum has told post that, in her view, her 
meetings at UNESCO Headquarters were "unofficial," and 
mentioned that another LOC staffer would be designated 
as the project manager and would come to UNESCO to 
discuss the WDL further.  Mission requests guidance on 
who is going to be the LOC's WDL point of contact and 
what its vision of the WDL is, and asks IO/UNESCO to 
remind U.S. officials request country clearance from 
the Mission rather than setting up their own meetings 
at UNESCO.  Mission notes that the UNESCO Secretariat 
does not consider meetings between U.S. officials and 
the DG to be "unofficial."  END SUMMARY AND GUIDANCE 
REQUEST. 
--------------- 
MEETING THE DG: 
--------------- 
¶2.  (SBU) Marcum met with the UNESCO Director General 
Koichiro Matsuura on March 8.  He stated his strong 
support for the WDL and noted UNESCO's desire to 
contribute to the project.  Marcum stated that the 
question was how to formulate a partnership with UNESCO 
on the WDL, noted that Google had provided 3 million 
USD in finances, and stated that Project Manager John 
van Oudenarem would be in contact with UNESCO to follow 
up.  The Communication and Information Sector's 
Director for the Information Society, Elizabeth 
Longworth, cited UNESCO's experience and familiarity 
with digitization, ability to provide a neutral 
platform, interest in building standards around 
metadata, expertise on governance and interoperability 
issues and commitment to spreading digitization. 
Matsuura instructed Longworth to continue to work with 
the LOC on an agreed-upon approach to the WDL, and 
stated that UNESCO could hold an international meeting 
to promote the WDL. 
¶3.  (SBU) Marcum brought up her recent election as 
Chair of the Memory of the World Programme 
International Advisory Committee and indicated her 
interest in encouraging U.S. institutions to put forth 
nominations for the programme.  The Director General 
responded with enthusiasm.  Ambassador Oliver noted 
that this was a good idea that ought to be discussed 
with the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO and urged 
Marcum to coordinate with them. 
---------------------------------- 
Working Level - Developing a Plan: 
---------------------------------- 
¶4.  (SBU) The UNESCO Communication and Information 
Sector convened a meeting for Marcum to meet with 
working-level representatives of the Division on the 
Information Society and UNESCO librarians and 
archivists from the Administrative Section in order to 
have a more detailed discussion on the WDL.  Marcum 
emphasized that she had come to UNESCO to listen and to 
describe the idea for a WDL and clarified that she did 
not have a proposal in hand to present to UNESCO staff. 
(COMMENT: The lack of a proposal appeared to take them 
by surprise, but they welcomed the opportunity to 
contribute to plans.  END COMMENT.)   The main issues, 
she stated, were governance, selection and 
architecture.  The LOC had identified a project manager 
for the WDL, and the goal would be to draft a report by 
October 2006, she said.  Marcum stated that the LOC 
could bring the principle of the library to the digital 
world, as an aggregation of lots of different 
information, not as a repository.  She stated that it 
was important for the WDL not to be politicized. 
¶5.  (SBU) She provided a history of the concept of a 
WDL dating beyond the American Memory and Global 
Gateway websites.  Global gateway projects, she noted, 
were bilaterally arranged with Russia, Brazil, France, 
Spain, The Netherlands and Egypt.  Each one addressed 
an area where U.S. culture intersected with these 
countries, and from this project, the LOC started to 
think about bilingual digital images of collections. 
The Librarian of Congress, James Billington, she 
emphasized, wanted to find ways to help people 
understand one another and use information exchange as 
a basis for global understanding. 
¶6.  (SBU) She stated that Billington spoke to the U.S. 
NATCOM last June to ask them to think about what steps 
to take to create a WDL.  The LOC had also reached out 
to the Digital Library Federation (mostly U.S. 
libraries, plus the British and Australian libraries) 
to look at standards, best practices, architecture, and 
metadata.  Marcum noted that many libraries around the 
world have started digital libraries already for items 
not covered by copyright.  Examples include the 
European library, the British Library/Microsoft 
partnership or the test project of the "Google 5" 
libraries.  (The University of Michigan, The New York 
City Public Library, Harvard University, Oxford, and 
Stanford University.)  A key difference here is that 
unlike the other projects, the European Library, 
spearheaded by France last year as a move "against 
googlization" and including the national libraries of 
Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, 
Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, 
Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Slovenia, 
Slovakia, Spain and Sweden, is government funded. 
¶7. (SBU) Marcum explained that Google was impressed 
with Billington's desire to promote mutual 
understanding through on-line access to other cultures, 
and therefore donated 3 million USD for the LOC to 
devise a plan for a WDL.  The brand name of Google, she 
acknowledged, raises questions for many.  She added 
that there is probably every reason to be concerned 
about Google's influence on open access when one looks 
at the details.  She noted that the LOC did not pursue 
mass digitalization with Google because of concerns 
about how this would mesh with the LOC housing the U.S. 
copyright office.  She explained that there was almost 
nothing in writing in terms of an agreement between the 
LOC and Google:  it had handed over the check, and that 
was the end of its involvement in the WDL plan. 
---------------- 
UNESCO CONCERNS: 
---------------- 
¶8.  (SBU) Above all, suspicion of Google and its role 
in the plan dominated UNESCO concerns at the working 
level.  Staff asked if there was an outline of how the 
LOC would use the Google funds (Comment:  UNESCO staff 
does not appear to know a lot about private 
philanthropy in the U.S and expected there would be an 
MOU-type document.  END COMMENT.)  One UNESCO staffer 
stated that he believed the Google 3 million USD 
donation was seed money for it to come in later on the 
WDL.  A French UNESCO staffer asked if Google 
involvement was even necessary. 
¶9.  (SBU) Another staffer stated that the U.S. 
initiative on the WDL was a lot like the U.S. position 
on Internet Governance while another stated that the 
U.S. should refer to the WSIS Geneva declarations 
(2003) which states that libraries should be accessed 
electronically.  UNESCO staff also noted that the LOC's 
"Global Gateway" project, cited by Marcum as an example 
of intergovernmental cooperation on digital items, had 
generated editorially driven electronic publications 
and that the WDL should not use this model. 
¶10.  (SBU) UNESCO staff strongly urged that the U.S. 
reaches out to a wide variety of international actors 
on this project.  The Communication and Information 
Sector's Director for the Information Society, 
Elizabeth Longworth noted the potential for 
politicization of the WDL, given the documented -- and 
French-led - negative European reaction.  Longworth 
suggested that the U.S. and UNESCO draw lessons from 
the Internet governance debate. (COMMENT:  Some at 
UNESCO feel the perception that other countries could 
not have a role in internet governance undermined the 
U.S. position in the lead up to WSIS II in Tunis last 
November.  END COMMENT.) She also asked who the LOC's 
stakeholders were in the project while other staff 
noted that Marcum did not mention libraries in Latin 
America, Arab States, Asia and Africa.  They mentioned 
a digital library project led by the Philippines and 
financed by Intel for 20 Asian countries link their 
public domain material. 
------------------- 
UNESCO Value Added: 
------------------- 
¶11.  (SBU) UNESCO staff made many suggestions on how 
UNESCO might contribute to the WDL, many of which were 
repeated by Longworth in Marcum's meeting with the DG. 
They noted above all that UNESCO has the power to 
convene people, help with capacity building and 
training and to provide a neutral platform.  UNESCO 
also had a library portal with some 14,000 links and 
was active in the development of small digital 
libraries, such as the El Dorado library for Latin 
America and the Caribbean (Note: Only a Bolivian 
contribution to this project exists thus far, although 
in terms of other regions, the Palestinians also asked 
UNESCO to help them build either a virtual or actual 
library.) 
¶12.  (SBU) UNESCO staff noted the "Preservation of 
Digital Heritage" program, UNESCO-sponsored open source 
software for digital libraries, and a 2003 declaration 
on Multilingualism and Cyberspace.  UNESCO's French- 
chaired Information for All Programme could be 
involved, they suggested.  They offered to hold a panel 
discussion on the WDL at the next UNESCO Open Forum, 
and suggested that the LOC work with IFLA and UNESCO on 
this.  UNESCO could also call a conference on the 
issue, they added.  One staffer suggested UNESCO could 
create standard setting instruments in the area of 
digital libraries. (COMMENT:  Mission strongly advises 
against this.  END COMMENT.) 
¶13.  (SBU) The UNESCO Archivist stated that one 
excellent source of primary documents for a WDL would 
be the United Nations.  He cited the United Nations 
Intellectual History Project (UNIHP) whose secretariat 
was established at the Ralph Bunche Institute for 
International Studies of The Graduate Center of The 
City University of New York in 1999.  There was a 
potential copyright issue with some UN publications, he 
warned.  But there was a goldmine of material in UN and 
UNESCO archives, he added.  Other staff cited UNESCO's 
e-science program and its scientific information 
commons may be able to contribute. 
-------- 
COMMENT: 
-------- 
¶14.  (SBU) COMMENT:  At a high level, UNESCO staff has 
received the WDL project with open arms.  However, at 
the working level, suspicion of Google's role in the 
project as well as a lack of understanding of how 
private philanthropy works in the United States must be 
addressed for the project to succeed.  In addition, the 
LOC will want to demonstrate to UNESCO that it has a 
wide -- and significantly international - stable of WDL 
stakeholders.  Procedurally, the Secretariat has 
advised the Mission that meetings with the Director 
General and other senior officials at UNESCO 
Headquarters are indeed official, and we ask IO/UNESCO 
to convey to all USG agencies and branches that engage 
with UNESCO that country clearance and a briefing with 
the Mission Country team is essential to their visit. 
Mission also requests clarification of who leads the 
WDL project at the LOC, and, if this person is not 
Marcum, whether his views on the entire project are the 
same as the ones she conveyed.  END COMMENT. 
 
Oliver


Cablegate: US Government Implies Proprietary Software Leaves Digital Footprint

Posted in Cablegate, Free/Libre Software at 6:48 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Cablegate

Summary: Cable from Burma shows American diplomats who “would also like to assist in distributing USB sticks Internews has developed, which allow the activists to utilize open source software”

According to the following Cablegate cable, activists and antagonists (even subversives) are seen as beneficial to US embassies if they support the tenets of democracy (usually something subservient to the West), so the government supports foreign activists in Burma and says: “We would also like to assist in distributing USB sticks Internews has developed, which allow the activists to utilize open source software to launch programs, and enables them to use web browsers without leaving a digital footprint.”

They also say: “We will need considerably more assistance from Washington to facilitate communications by the activists with the outside world.”

Previously in Techrights we covered back doors and spy ‘features’ that exist in proprietary software such as Microsoft’s. Here we may have more incidental concordance courtesy of Cablegate:


VZCZCXRO8235
OO RUEHCHI RUEHDT RUEHHM RUEHNH RUEHTRO
DE RUEHGO #0181/01 0670922
ZNY SSSSS ZZH
O 070922Z MAR 08
FM AMEMBASSY RANGOON
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 7276
INFO RHEHNSC/NSC WASHDC IMMEDIATE
RUCNASE/ASEAN MEMBER COLLECTIVE
RUEHGG/UN SECURITY COUNCIL COLLECTIVE
RUEHBY/AMEMBASSY CANBERRA 0976
RUEHNE/AMEMBASSY NEW DELHI 4529
RUEHUL/AMEMBASSY SEOUL 8067
RUEHKO/AMEMBASSY TOKYO 5628
RUEHCHI/AMCONSUL CHIANG MAI 1444
RHHMUNA/CDR USPACOM HONOLULU HI
RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 1392
RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC
RUEKJCS/JOINT STAFF WASHDC

S E C R E T SECTION 01 OF 02 RANGOON 000181 
 
SIPDIS 
 
SIPDIS 
 
DEPT FOR EAP/MLS, DRL, AND IO 
PACOM FOR FPA 
 
E.O. 12958: DECL: 03/06/2018 
TAGS: PGOV [Internal Governmental Affairs],QL, PHUM [Human Rights], BM [Burma] 
SUBJECT: BURMA: SUPPORTING STRATEGIES FOR THE REFERENDUM 
 
REF: A. RANGOON 153 
     B. RANGOON 145 
     C. RANGOON 134 
     D. CARL-YODER-COPE 10/15/2007 E-MAIL 
 
RANGOON 00000181  001.2 OF 002 
 
 
Classified By: P/E Chief Leslie Hayden for Reasons 1.4 (b) & (d) 
 
¶1.  (S/NF) Burma's pro-democracy opposition continues to 
struggle to organize a coordinated effort to respond to the 
upcoming constitutional referendum.  We expect the regime 
will continue its severe restrictions on free speech and 
association, making it impossible for the opposition to carry 
out a widespread, public campaign.  Activists inside Burma 
plan to carry out a "vote no" educational campaign via 
word-of-mouth, and using posters, stickers, and T-shirts. 
What would most help them succeed is funding for travel and 
equipment such as memory sticks, MP3 players, and cell 
phones.  We are confidant we could discreetly distribute 
these items.  $200,000 in additional funding to this Embassy 
would enable us to quickly assist the activists.  End summary. 
 
------------- 
Reality Check 
------------- 
 
¶1.  (C) Burma's fractured pro-democracy opposition continues 
to grapple with how to address the regime's upcoming 
constitutional referendum (Refs B and C).  The only group 
that has outlined a concrete plan to us (and this includes 
U.S.- funded exile groups on the Thai-Burma border) is 88 
Generation Students.  NLD spokesman Nyan Win told us today 
that the NLD still had not finalized a concrete plan for 
their "vote no" campaign.  He anticipated they would have it 
ready by next week.  Ethnic pro-democracy leaders inside 
Burma told us last week that they had no concrete plan to 
oppose the referendum either, even though most oppose the 
referendum. 
 
¶2.  (C) In the lead-up to the referendum, we do not 
anticipate the regime will loosen the tighter restrictions 
imposed since the September protests.  We expect a massive 
military and police presence as the date of the referendum 
approaches to prevent any protests or civil unrest. 
Activists are likely to be closely watched during this time. 
Likewise, anyone attempting to approach polling stations to 
conduct an exit poll not sanctioned by the regime is certain 
to be arrested. 
 
¶3.  (C) Regardless of these restrictions, 88 Generation 
activists who are not in prison, and remain in Burma, are 
determined to go forward with their "vote no" campaign.  The 
campaign will rely mostly on education via word-of-mouth. 
They plan on using sympathetic monks to educate their 
constituencies on why the constitution, in its present form, 
is not a step forward for democracy in Burma.  Additionally, 
they will dispatch members of their organization throughout 
Burma to distribute educational materials by hand. 
 
-------------- 
What They Need 
-------------- 
 
¶4.  (S/NF) 88 Generation has requested approximately $4,300 
for "vote no" posters, $2,600 for stickers, and $2,000 for 
its members to travel throughout Burma to coordinate with 
their members in other states and divisions.  We can use the 
Embassy print shop and copiers to assist them in making 
flyers and pamphlets for their campaigns. 
 
¶5.  (S/NF) In addition, the opposition needs memory sticks 
and MP3 players, which they intend to load with educational 
material and distribute throughout the country.  The players 
and memory sticks can be hidden and hand delivered from town 
to town by the activists during their travels. 
 
¶6.  (S/NF) Cell phones in Burma are prohibitively expensive, 
costing approximately $2,300 each.  Since many of their cell 
phones were confiscated after the September protests, 
 
RANGOON 00000181  002.2 OF 002 
 
 
activists urgently need cell phones to facilitate 
communication and coordination.  Their traditional suppliers 
from Thailand have not been able to get them the equipment. 
Since cameras are very dangerous to carry, the opposition 
would like to procure cell phones with cameras so they can 
discreetly take pictures of their campaigns and document 
abuses by the regime during the referendum process. 
 
¶7.  (S/NF) Since September, internet communication has been 
monitored much more closely by the regime, and Special Branch 
Police confiscated many of the activists' computers.  Post 
again recommends support for the wireless internet connection 
we proposed last October (Ref D), to assist the activists in 
communicating with pro-democracy groups inside and outside 
Burma to organize a coordinated response to the referendum. 
 
¶8.  (S/NF) We would also like to assist in distributing USB 
sticks Internews has developed, which allow the activists to 
utilize open source software to launch programs, and enables 
them to use web browsers without leaving a digital footprint. 
 These would be invaluable tools for aiding their 
communication with each other. 
 
¶9.  (S/NF) Comment:  The faster we can move this equipment 
and money to the activists the better.  The regime plans on 
holding its referendum in May, and their "vote yes" campaign 
is already in full force.  A large, sophisticated, public 
campaign will not happen in Burma: the regime shows every 
intent of halting any sign of public opposition.  The Embassy 
has gained experience in distributing small amounts of funds 
without attracting additional regime scrutiny of the Embassy 
or our recipients.  The activists need funds now to prepare 
for a vote that could take place as early as two months from 
now.  We estimate that $200,000 would enable us to assist the 
activists with their equipment needs.  We will need 
considerably more assistance from Washington to facilitate 
communications by the activists with the outside world.  End 
comment. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
VILLAROSA

Without ascending (or descending) to politics, the important point here is that Free software helps people’s freedom.

Cablegate Comes Back to Techrights

Posted in Cablegate at 4:07 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Comfort

Summary: Cablegate returns to Techrights in the interest of spreading the truth

OVER the next few days we are going to make an effort to catch up with cables that we know we missed — notably ones that relate to Free/open source software.

Going a few months back, Alan gave one example from Vietnam and another from Thailand:

I had a bit of a poke about in the newly released Wikileaks diplomatic cables archive looking for interesting stuff and came across a cable from the Chiang Mai Consulate that contains an allegation that the Microsoft Thailand Corporate Affairs Director was explicitly bad mouthing Open Source and being critical of Thailands Creative Economy policy of promoting the use of legal Open Source software instead of using unauthorised copies of proprietary software. The open source community generally doesn’t have this level of access into the heart of government, which is one thing that we have been working to fix in the UK with our friends at Open Forum Europe (who I work for part time). It really is important for the community to support organisations and individuals that can provide a credible voice at a high level and advocate for Open Standards, Free Software (yeah, approximately synonymous with Open Source) and a level playing field through the interoperability of systems and a lack of vendor lock in.

These cables are important because the media probably did not cover this at the time. We are trying to build a decent wiki page on the subject.

09.21.11

Cablegate: More Coming Soon, Impact Still Expanding

Posted in Cablegate, Site News at 11:36 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Old typewriter

Summary: Brief explanation of where we stand on Cablegate and more new examples of its impact around the software world

CABLEGATE is an area we wrote about a great deal at the beginning of the month. We are going to address the subject area again, probably tackling the next few issues on our list (we now have these categorised in the wiki). This does not have to be pushed as urgent because the stampede for ‘smoking guns’ is mostly over by now. The gold mine was exhausted after a week or two, but there is more to be learned and documented in an easily accessible way.

“Microsoft shady business as usual, same modus operandi that we have witnessed once and again everywhere around the world and at the ISO OOXML fracas…”
      –Anonymous reader
One reader explained to us this week that he may “have not had much time to contribute news or comments to Techrights, though but I’m still keeping an eye on the corporate war against (software) freedom and just found this that might be of interest for you and TR’ readers: [original | English]

“Microsoft shady business as usual,” he calls it, “same modus operandi that we have witnessed once and again everywhere around the world and at the ISO OOXML fracas…

“Keep up the good fight.”

09.19.11

Cablegate: Microsoft’s Craig Mundie Lobbies for Intellectual Monopolies in China

Posted in Asia, Cablegate, Intellectual Monopoly, Microsoft at 3:31 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Cablegate

Summary: A look at cables where Microsoft’s Craig Mundie (one of the very top chiefs) is mentioned as involved

According to the following Cablegate cable, “Microsoft Chief Research and Strategy Officer Craig Mundie to Peking University Guanghua School of Management Dean Zhang Weiying emphasized China’s need to create an environment that would allow innovators to be financially rewarded for the risks they took to innovate. They cited the need for real intellectual property rights…”

In other public talks, Mundie was bashing the GPL. It matters because Mundie is influential [1, 2] and he speaks to influential people (he is also among those attending Bilderberg meetings). The following two cables help us see where he’s making these engagements (see ¶7 in the first cable and 1045-1145 for the middle eastern programme in the second cable).


VZCZCXRO8717
RR RUEHCN RUEHGH
DE RUEHGH #7085/01 3310818
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
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UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 04 SHANGHAI 007085 
 
SIPDIS 
 
SENSITIVE 
SIPDIS 
 
USDOC FOR 4420/ITA/MAC/CEA/MCQUEEN 
USDOC ALSO PASS TO NIST AND BEA 
STATE PASS USTR 
USTR FOR STRATFORD/WINTER/MCCARTIN/ALTBACH/READE 
TREASURY FOR OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT 
TREASURY FOR OASIA/ISA -- DOHNER, HAARSAGER AND CUSHMAN 
GENEVA PASS USTR 
PARIS PASS TO USOECD 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: ECON [Economic Conditions], EFIN [Financial and Monetary Affairs], EINV [Foreign Investments], 
ETRD [Foreign Trade], PGOV [Internal Governmental Affairs], 
PREL [External Political Relations], CH [China (Mainland)],
WTO [World Tourism Organization] 
SUBJECT: INNOVATION REQUIRED FOR CHINA'S ECONOMIC GROWTH 
 
REF: BEIJING 23856 
 
¶1. (SBU) Summary: The National Bureau of Statistics and the 
U.S.-based Conference Board hosted a national forum on 
Innovation and China Economic Growth October 20- 22 in Suzhou, 
Jiangsu Province.  During the conference, PRC officials from the 
Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC), 
National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), People's Bank of China 
(PBOC) and the Shanghai Stock Exchange, as well as 
representatives of foreign multinational corporations, discussed 
"self-innovation" and identified systemic changes necessary to 
foster innovation in China.  The systemic changes included: 
increased IPR protection, financial sector liberalization, 
openness to the world, and creation of a society in which 
failure was acceptable.  End summary. 
 
--------------------------- 
 
CHINA:  Big, but not Strong 
 
--------------------------- 
 
¶2. (U) CPPCC Vice Chairwoman Zhang Meiying stressed in her 
keynote address the importance that China's leadership has 
placed on innovation.  Zhang said that while China's total GDP 
made it the fourth largest economy in the world, on a per capita 
basis, China ranked only 110th in the world.  This showed that 
China was a big country, but not a strong country.  According to 
Zhang, under President Hu Jintao's leadership, China has decided 
that the way to create strength from size is through self 
innovation. 
 
¶3. (U) Zhang said that rapid growth over the past twenty years 
had placed strains on national resources that would lead to 
decreased economic development.  China needed to rely on 
innovation to create a foundation for sustainable growth.  China 
had a low proportion of clean, high-technology industries. 
China's leadership realized that the environment was not a free 
commodity and that environmental damage would devour many of 
China's economic gains.  While China manufactured low-technology 
items, it was dependent on other countries for its 
high-technology needs.  Additionally, China's consumption of 
energy and raw materials per unit of production far exceeded 
that of developed world and was not sustainable, she said.  If 
China did not develop its own human resources, China would 
continue to be only the manufacturing base for the rest of the 
world. 
 
¶4. (U) According to Zhang, in major industries, such as the 
petroleum and electronics industries, China was dependent on 
imported technology for 75-80 percent of its needs.  She said 
that China needed to learn to innovate to create its own core 
technologies.  She said that China needed to "digest 
technologies from other countries" before it could "re-innovate 
these technologies for other purposes."  China needed to 
generously fund its own scientists to insure its "leap-frog in 
development."  She also criticized the "longstanding planned 
economy mindset" in China that meant that companies were too 
passive -- not taking on risks or investing in the future.  As a 
result, she said, these companies were not positioned for 
success, and China lagged behind.  Zhang's speech was widely 
quoted and referred to by other government speakers during the 
course of the weekend conference. 
 
SHANGHAI 00007085  002 OF 004 
 
 
 
------------------- 
 
What is Innovation? 
 
------------------- 
 
¶5. (SBU) When asked how the Chinese government defined 
"self-innovation," National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) China 
National Research Association Secretary General Zhang Zhongliang 
said: "China is a big country, but it has no power.  China needs 
to import 90 percent of its technology.  China needs to develop 
its own name-brands and self-proprietary technology so that it 
can build a strong economy.  To be a strong country, China needs 
to develop its own innovative abilities." 
 
¶6. (U) In his talk, Development Research Center of the State 
Council (DRC) Deputy Director Liu Shijin outlined what was meant 
by self-innovation.  He said that the three kinds of innovation 
are prime innovation, re-innovation, and the integration of 
innovation from abroad into China.  Liu said that foreign 
companies with investments or joint ventures in China had 
expressed their concern with China's emphasis on self-innovation 
and begun to limit their investment in innovative areas.  He 
tried to put them at ease by explaining that any innovation done 
in China by foreign companies located here was actually "Chinese 
self-innovation" because ultimately these companies would 
contribute to the building of China and its capabilities. 
Ministry of Commerce Vice Minister Shang Ming was more explicit 
when he said, "Self-innovation does not rule out the importation 
of innovative technologies from abroad." 
 
--------------------------------------------- ---------- 
 
Requirements for Innovation - IPR and Financial Reforms 
 
--------------------------------------------- ---------- 
 
¶7. (U) Multiple speakers from Microsoft Chief Research and 
Strategy Officer Craig Mundie to Peking University Guanghua 
School of Management Dean Zhang Weiying emphasized China's need 
to create an environment that would allow innovators to be 
financially rewarded for the risks they took to innovate.  They 
cited the need for real intellectual property rights to protect 
innovation and a competitive financial sector that fostered 
"innovations" such as venture capital and other mechanisms for 
the efficient distribution of financial resources. 
 
¶8. (U) People's Bank of China Vice Governor Su Ning said that 
due to increased global competition, China needed to tear down 
restrictions in the financial sector.  He said that Chinese 
banks needed to reform and innovate in order to increase their 
margins of profitability.  He also said that China needed to 
reform its regulatory framework to allow for financial products 
such as bonds, funds, options and other ways to diversify 
financial risk.  He stressed that China needed a unified credit 
database to enable efficient access to financing. 
 
¶9. (U) Shanghai Stock Exchange (SSE) President Zhu Congjiu noted 
that while there was 30 trillion RMB (about USD 3.8 trillion) 
worth of capital available in China, Chinese companies had a 
"weak capability to engage in venture capital."  He said this 
 
SHANGHAI 00007085  003 OF 004 
 
 
was why quality companies chose to go public abroad, rather than 
in China.  It also meant, he added, that 83 percent of all 
venture capital in China was from foreign sources.  According to 
Zhu, the SSE planned to make the reforms necessary to keep 
Chinese companies in China by creating an environment where they 
would have access to the capital they needed domestically.  In 
response to a question, Zhu admitted that for the financial 
sector, "innovation" actually meant reforming the Chinese system 
to be more like the international financial market standard. 
 
--------------------------------------------- --- 
 
Innovative Translation -- Some Words Left Unsaid 
 
--------------------------------------------- --- 
 
¶10. (SBU) The conference theme as translated in English was 
"Innovation and China Economic Growth."  In Chinese, however, 
the title was "Self-Innovation (Zizhu Chuangxin) and China 
Economic Growth."  Chinese government speakers all used the word 
"self-innovation," but the translators uniformly translated it 
as "innovation."  Conference speaker European Union Economics 
and Regional Officer Leila Fernandez-Stembridge noted to Econoff 
that this appeared to be an intentional "mistranslation."  Price 
Waterhouse Coopers Senior Advisor Kenneth DeWoskin, another 
conference speaker, speculated that a political decision had 
been made to de-emphasize the Chinese-centric focus on "self" in 
an attempt to soften the tone of the conference. 
 
--------------------------------------- 
 
When Innovation Means Using an Airbrush 
 
--------------------------------------- 
 
¶11. (SBU) DeWoskin noted to Econoff that the "palpable unspoken 
undercurrent" had been the sacking of NBS head Qiu Xiaohua eight 
days before the conference in connection with the Shanghai 
pension corruption scandal.  No mention of Qiu was made 
publicly, even when Xie was introduced as only having been on 
the job for a week.  An NBS employee who helped organize the 
conference materials told Econoff about the "huge amount of 
work" that he had to re-do in replacing Qiu Xiaohua's 
information and name with that of new leader Xie Fuzhen in all 
of the many professionally produced bound conference materials. 
An NBS press officer commented that his office had been given no 
notice of the sacking and been inundated with "questions we 
cannot answer." 
 
------------------------------------- 
 
Challenges Facing Innovation in China 
 
------------------------------------- 
 
¶12. (SBU) Sixteen non-governmental speakers at the conference, 
including Sun Microsystems Vice President Piper Cole, GE China 
Technology Center Managing Director Bijan Dorri, and The 
Conference Board Executive Vice President Gail Fosler, China 
were tasked with outlining how China could create and nurture an 
environment that led to innovative people and companies.  These 
speakers described several challenges that China faced to its 
 
SHANGHAI 00007085  004 OF 004 
 
 
drive for self-innovation, including: 
 
- China needed to stay open to the world.  Innovation would be 
greatly hampered in a closed system. 
 
- China needed to avoid "nationalizing" or "branding" its 
innovations in a way that would limit its global reach.  By 
creating a "China standard" different from global standards, 
China would shut itself out of competition. 
 
- China needed to protect intellectual property rights in order 
to protect those who had taken risk. 
 
- China needed to create the financial market conditions that 
would support venture capital in order to reward risk takers. 
 
- China needed to create a social milieu in which failure was 
acceptable.  If the price of failure was too high, no one would 
take any risks. 
 
- China needed to develop educational systems that continued to 
foster interest in math and science. 
 
¶13. (SBU) Chinese government speakers appeared receptive and 
largely agreed to the above list of prescriptions.  However, 
they tended to stress the importance of Chinese brands and 
standards being the mark of Chinese innovation.  As one speaker 
commented, "We hope that the day will come when the label does 
not read 'Made in China' but 'Created in China.'" 
 
¶14. (SBU) Comment:  Innovation -- or self-innovation -- has 
clearly been identified as the next necessary step in  China's 
economic development strategy.  While the mission is clear, 
China still faces enormous systemic economic, legal, educational 
and social barriers to create an innovation-friendly environment. 
JARRETT


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RUEAFCC/FCC WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY
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UNCLAS STATE 012095 
 
SIPDIS 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: ECIN [Economic Integration and Cooperation], 
ECPS [Communications and Postal Systems], EINT [Economic and Commercial Internet], MARR [Military and Defense Arrangements], 
MCAP [Military Capabilities], PREL [External Political Relations], 
XF [Middle East] 
SUBJECT: GULF REGION COMMUNICATIONS CONFERENCE 2010 UPDATE 
 
REF: 09 STATE 122229 
 
¶1. This is an action request. See paragraph 6. 
 
¶2. SUMMARY. Reftel announced a by-invitation-only Gulf Region 
Communications Conference (GRCC) in Amman, Jordan, 21-23 
February 2010, co-hosted by United States Central Command 
(USCENTCOM) and the Jordanian Armed Forces (JAF). Reftel 
requested posts deliver a hold-the-date request to regional 
civilian and/or government attendees pending release of 
formal invitations. A separate notification was distributed 
to military attendees through military channels. On 4 
February 2010, USCENTCOM forwarded to posts, in care of the 
security assistance offices, hard copy and electronic 
versions of the formal GRCC invitations, along with RSVP 
registration information and conference agenda, for delivery 
to attendees.   Invitations are co-signed by Commander, 
USCENTCOM and by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, JAF. 
This cable requests posts deliver invitations and an update 
notification to regional civilian and/or government attendees 
to further highlight the conference and encourage 
participation.  In order to ensure timely delivery of 
invitations, please deliver update notifications based on 
receipt of, and in conjunction with, the electronic 
invitations, and forward hard copy versions when they arrive. 
Draft update notification language is provided in paragraph 
¶6. END SUMMARY 
 
¶3. For reference, the following is the text for USCENTCOM's 
half of the formal joint invitation. 
 
Dear Mr. Communications Minister, 
 
On behalf of United States Central Command, I am pleased to 
invite you to attend the 2010 Gulf Region Communications 
Conference in Amman, Jordan during 21-23 February 2010. 
 
The conference follows last year's inaugural conference in 
Bahrain.  Again, our intent is to gather regional 
communications representatives to collaborate on topics of 
mutual interest in a Regional forum.  Ministers of 
communications, communications regulatory commissioners, and 
senior military communicators from each of eleven Gulf Region 
states are invited to participate.  Also, senior United 
States communications representatives from the federal, 
military, and private sectors are invited.  Regional private 
sector representatives will also be invited. 
 
Conference participants will be able to address regional 
communications capabilities and concerns and discuss 
opportunities to support regional stability and security 
efforts.  The enclosed conference agenda is provided for your 
information. 
 
We would be honored to have you join us.  Mr. John Simpson, 
the Central Command point of contact (813-827-3931, 
simpsoja@centcom.mil), will accept replies.  A detailed 
conference information packet will be sent separately. 
 
With warm regards, 
 
DAVID H. PETRAEUS 
General, U.S. Army 
Commander, 
United States Central Command 
 
¶4.  Also for reference, the following is the text for JAF's 
half of the formal joint invitation. 
 
Dear Honorable Minister, 
 
On behalf of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, I am pleased to 
invite you to attend the 2010 Gulf Region Communications 
Conference (GRCC) in Amman, Jordan during 21-23 February 2010. 
 
We believe last year's conference in Bahrain was a great 
success, and we are looking forward to hosting distinguished 
communicators within the Kingdom of Jordan. 
 
This next GRCC will enable us, as partners, to continue our 
examination and discussion of the Region's most significant 
communications concerns.  We are hopeful that this forum and 
its actions will lead to improved capabilities, stability, 
and security within the Gulf Nations and across the Region. 
 
Communications ministers and regulatory commissioners, and 
senior military communicators from each of eleven Gulf Region 
states are invited to participate. Also, senior United States 
communications representatives from the federal, military, 
and private sectors are invited.  Representatives of the Gulf 
Region's private sector will also be invited.  The enclosed 
conference agenda is provided for your information. 
 
We would be honored to have you join us in the Hashemite 
Kingdom of Jordan. 
 
With utmost respect, 
 
General 
Khaled J. Al-Sarayreh 
Chairman Of The Joint Chiefs Of Staff 
Jordan Armed Forces 
 
¶5.  The agenda's structure and content reflect extensive 
collaboration with JAF, including integration of 
JAF-recommended panel discussions. Each participating nation 
will be given one speaking part (seat) on each panel and one 
speaking part (five minute presentation) during closing 
remarks. All attendees will be invited to participate in 
roundtable discussions.  For reference, the GRCC Agenda 
follows: 
 
21-23 February 2010 
Grand Hyatt Hotel 
Amman, Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan 
 
Sunday, 21 February 
 
Arrival of conference participants and registration at Grand 
Hyatt Hotel, Amman, Jordan, Telephone: 962-6-456-1234 
 
1830-2000 
RECEPTION (Hotel Location TBD) - For ministers and 
distinguished visitors (DVs) 
HOST:  U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) 
ATTIRE/GENTLEMEN: Business/National Dress 
ATTIRE/LADIES: Business (dress, pants outfit)/National Dress 
 
Monday, 22 February 
 
ATTIRE/GENTLEMEN: Business/National Dress/Class A Uniform 
ATTIRE/LADIES: Business (dress, pants outfit)/National 
Dress/Class A Uniform 
 
0800-0850 
NO-HOST BREAKFAST 
 
0900-0905 
CONFERENCE WELCOME (Hotel Grand Ballroom) - Brigadier General 
Ghazi Salem Salman al-Jobor, Director of the Special 
Communications Commission, Jordan Ministry of Defense 
 
0905-0910 
TRANSLATION EQUIPMENT FAMILIARIZATION 
 
0910-0930 
CONFERENCE OPENING REMARKS - USCENTCOM and Kingdom of Jordan 
Representatives (TBD) 
 
0930-1000 
PRESENTATION 1 - His Excellency Marwan Juma, Jordan Minister 
of Information and Communications Technology 
TOPIC:  Sector Policy--Mobile Communications, Fixed Services, 
and Regional Connectivity 
 
1000-1030 
PRESENTATION 2 - Jordan Telecommunications Regulatory 
Commission 
TOPIC:  Regulation of Telecommunications 
 
1030-1045 
BREAK 
 
1045-1145 
PRESENTATION 3 - Mr. Craig Mundie, Chief Research and 
Strategy Officer, Microsoft Corporation, United States 
TOPIC:   Cloud Computing 
 
1145-1245 
PANEL DISCUSSION 1 - Industry/Government Representatives 
TOPIC:   Implementing Cloud Computing Solutions to 
Information Exchange Challenges 
 
1245-1345 
LUNCH (Hotel Restaurant TBD) - For ministers and DVs 
HOST:  Jordan Ministry of Information and Communications 
Technology 
 
1400-1415 
GROUP PHOTO SESSION (Hotel Location TBD) 
 
1415-1515 
ROUNDTABLE 1 - Roundtable Moderator, TBD 
TOPIC:  Policy and Regulation Perspective--Improving 
Telecommunications across the Region and across the 
Commercial, Government, and Military Sectors 
 
1515-1535 
PRESENTATION 4A - Brigadier General Ghazi Salem Salman 
al-Jobor, Jordan Ministry of Defense 
TOPIC:  Mobile Communications in Support of Relief Operations 
 
1535-1555 
PRESENTATION 4B - Brigadier General Mowafaq Assaf, Royal 
Jordanian Air Force 
TOPIC:  Fiber Infrastructure in Support of Government and 
Civilian Agencies 
 
1555-1655 
PANEL DISCUSSION 2 - Military Communicators 
TOPIC:  Mobile, Fixed, and Fiber Communications 
 
1655-1830 
FREE TIME 
 
1830-1900 
COCKTAILS (Hotel Location TBD) - For ministers and DVs 
HOST:  USCENTCOM 
ATTIRE/GENTLEMEN: Business/National Dress 
ATTIRE/LADIES: Business (dress, pants outfit)/National Dress 
 
1900-2100 
DINNER (Hotel Location TBD) - For ministers and DVs 
HOST:  Jordan Telecommunications Regulatory Commission 
ATTIRE/GENTLEMEN: Business/National Dress 
ATTIRE/LADIES: Business (dress, pants outfit)/National Dress 
 
Tuesday, 23 February 
 
ATTIRE/GENTLEMEN: Business/National Dress/Class A Uniform 
ATTIRE/LADIES: Business (dress, pants outfit)/National 
Dress/Class A Uniform 
 
0800-0850 
NO-HOST BREAKFAST 
 
0900-0915 
ADMINISTRATIVE REMARKS (Hotel Grand Ballroom) - Brigadier 
General Ghazi 
 
0915-0945 
PRESENTATION 5 - Lieutenant General Carroll F. Pollett, 
United States Army, Director, Defense Information Systems 
Agency 
TOPIC:  Synchronizing Commercial, Government, and Military 
Communications Priorities in the United States 
 
0945-1015 
PRESENTATION 6 - Mr Sami Smeirat, Chief Executive Officer, 
Orange Company, Jordan 
TOPIC:  Regional Reach 
 
1015-1030 
BREAK 
 
1030-1130 
ROUNDTABLE 2 - Roundtable Moderator 
TOPIC:  Synchronizing Wireless Challenges and Potential 
Solutions 
 
1130-1200 
PRESENTATION 7 - Mr. Nidal Qanadilo, Investment Manager, 
Jordan Ministry of Information and Communications Technology 
TOPIC:   Fiber Communications in Support of E-learning, 
E-government, and Rural Areas 
 
1200-1300 
LUNCH (Hotel Restaurant TBD) - For ministers and DVs 
HOST:  USCENTCOM 
 
1345-1415 
ROUNDTABLE 3 - Roundtable Moderator 
TOPIC:   Regional Fiber Backbone Solutions to Civilian, 
Government and Military Challenges 
 
1415-1445 
ROUNDTABLE 4 - Brigadier General Donahue, Roundtable Moderator 
TOPIC:  2010 Conference Action Items and 2011 Conference 
Theme and Topics 
 
1445-1500 
BREAK 
 
COUNTRY REMARKS 
1500-1510, Kingdom of Bahrain 
1510-1520, Arab Republic of Egypt 
1520-1530, Republic of Iraq 
1530-1540, State of Kuwait 
1540-1550, Republic of Lebanon 
1550-1600, Sultanate of Oman 
1600-1610, State of Qatar 
1610-1620, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 
1620-1630, United Arab Emirates 
1630-1640, Republic of Yemen 
 
1640-1700 
CLOSING REMARKS - USCENTCOM and Jordan Representatives TBD 
 
1700 
CONFERENCE CONCLUDES 
 
¶6. Action Request: Washington agencies request posts ensure 
delivery of invitations and deliver the following update 
notification regarding GRCC 2010 to the appropriate regional 
civilian and/or government attendees by 8 February 2010. 
Please notify the USCENTCOM and State POCs in paragraph 7 on 
completion of action by 10 February 2010.  Email replies are 
acceptable. 
 
Dear (Embassies, please address invitations to appropriate 
individuals listed), 
 
ABU DHABI: 
-- His Excellency Muhammad bin Ahmad Alqamzi, Chairman 
Telecommunications Regulatory Authority 
-- His Excellency Mohamed Nassar Al Ghanim, Director General 
and Board Member Telecommunications Regulatory Authority 
 
BAGHDAD: 
-- His Excellency Farooq Abdulqadir Abdulrahman, Minister of 
Communications 
-- Barhan Shawi Al-Tamimi, DG, Communications & Media 
Commission 
-- His Excellency Mazin Hashim Al-Haboubi, CEO Deputy for 
Administrative Affairs 
 
BEIRUT: 
-- His Excellency Mr. Charbel Nahas, Minister of 
Telecommunications 
-- Dr. Kamal S. Shehadi, Chairman & Chief Executive Officer 
of Telecommunications Regulatory Agency 
 
CAIRO: 
-- His Excellency Dr. Tarek Kamel, Minister of Communications 
and Information Technology 
-- Dr. Amr Badawy, Executive President of National 
Telecommunications Regulatory Authority 
 
DOHA: 
-- His Excellency Dr. Hessa Al-Jaber, Secretary General 
Supreme Council of Information & Communications Technology 
-- Mister William Fagan, Director, Supreme Council of 
Information & Communications Technology 
 
KUWAIT: 
-- Dr. Mohammed Mohsen Al-Busairi, Minister of Communications 
 
MANAMA: 
-- Dr. Mohammed Al Amer, Chairman and Acting General 
Director, Telecommunications Regulatory Authority 
 
MUSCAT: 
-- His Excellency Dr. Khamis bin Mubarak al Alawi, Minister 
of Transportation and Communications 
-- His Excellency Mohammed Nasser Al-Khusaibi, Chairman, 
Telecommunications Regulatory Authority 
 
RIYADH: 
-- Mister Mohammed Jameel bin Ahmed Mulla, Minister of 
Communications and Information Technology 
-- Dr. Abdulrahman Al-Jafari, Governor Communications and 
Information Technology Commission 
 
SANAA: 
-- His Excellency Kamal Al-Jabri, Minister of 
Telecommunications & Information Technology 
 
United States Central Command and the Jordanian Armed Forces 
will co-host the by-invitation-only Gulf Region 
Communications Conference (GRCC) 2010 in Amman, Jordan on 
21-23 February 2010. Formal invitations have been distributed 
to you separately along with details regarding RSVPs and 
registration and the conference agenda. GRCC 2010 will 
continue GRCC 2009 multilateral engagement on regional 
telecommunications and information sharing capabilities and 
will foster cooperation among our respective entities in 
order to overcome challenges, to include crisis response 
and/or disaster relief missions. 
 
GRCC 2010 presentations and discussions support a theme of 
Synchronizing Commercial, Government and Military 
Communications Priorities. GRCC 2010 adds panel discussions 
to the GRCC 2009 conference format of presentations and 
roundtables. Each nation attending the conference will be 
given one seat for a national representative on each panel. 
As with GRCC 2009, roundtable discussions will be open to 
participation by all attendees. Each nation attending the 
conference will also be given five minutes for one national 
representative to present closing remarks. Please identify to 
the conference co-hosts as soon as possible those individuals 
who will represent (post, please insert here your nation) on 
each panel and present closing remarks. 
 
I encourage you to attend the conference. 
 
Sincerely, 
(DoS originator name) 
(DoS originator title) 
U.S. Department of State 
 
¶7. CENTCOM point of contact for the conference: 
 
Jim Ramirez DAFC 
U.S. Central Command 
Deputy, Strategic C4 Architecture Programs and Policy 
Division 
* (813) 827-5816 DSN 651-5816 
* ramirejs@centcom.mil 
* ramirejs@centcom.smil.mil 
 
State Department points of contact for the conference: 
 
COL Dave Huggins 
Senior Military Advisor, Near Eastern Affairs Bureau 
* (202) 647-3945 
* HugginsWD@state.sgov.gov 
 
Steve Simpson 
Communications and Information Policy / Middle East 
Energy, Economic, and Business Affairs 
* (202) 647-5306 
* SimpsonSC@state.gov 
* SimpsonSC@state.sgov.gov 
CLINTON
 

Yes, that latter cable is signed by Clinton. Interestingly enough, Mundie is doing politics.

09.18.11

Cablegate: More Sensitive Diplomatic Cables About “Community Patent” or “EU Patent”

Posted in Cablegate, Europe, Patents at 2:27 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Cablegate

Summary: A couple more transmissions between embassies/consulates regarding “SENSITIVE” details from Brussels

According to the more recent Cablegate cables, harmonising patent laws — a process now known as “Community Patent” or “EU Patent” — is rather abrasive as a whole. Countries in Europe would benefit almost in no shape or form from it. Politicians worry that people will find out who benefits from this, mostly patent lawyers and multinationals to be specific.

To quote the cable from the Government of Italy (GOI), as it was posted yesterday morning, “THE GOI, MOREOVER, DOES NOT/NOT SUPPORT THE CREATION OF A SEPARATE GROUP TO PURSUE PATENT HARMONIZATION DISCUSSIONS. PRIGIONI NOTED THAT, IN THE GOI VIEW, THE CREATION OF A SEPARATE GROUP WOULD CREATE THE IMPRESSION OF A DEAL BEING STRUCK BEHIND CLOSED DOORS, POTENTIALLY UNDERMINING THE LEGITIMACY OF AN AGREEMENT. HE PROPOSED INSTEAD THAT BILATERAL EXCHANGES BE USED TO SUPPLEMENT STANDING COMMITTEE DISCUSSIONS.”

In the following latest two cables from Brussels (2009), cable 1 states in ¶3 that: “Speaking at the post-Social Summit press conference, Dutch PM/European Council chair Balkenende said participants all agreed that “if we want a social Europe we need a strong economy in Europe.” Commission President Prodi underlined the need to actually implement the Lisbon agenda. With a reference to the persisting deadlock on the draft legislation concerning the Community patent, Prodi stated: “If we continue to decide by unanimity, the Lisbon agenda has no chance of being implemented.” Prodi also called for Member State budgets to reflect the commitments taken under the Lisbon strategy. Balkenende and Prodi underlined the role of social dialogue as being “at the heart of the European Social model.”

“Politicians worry that people will find out who benefits from this, mostly patent lawyers and multinationals to be specific.”The “Lisbon strategy” need not depend on the so-called ‘Community’ patent (a euphemism), which would only increase the aftermath of lawsuits. Cable 2 says in ¶4: “The Communication cites a number of problems for the shortcomings. It notes barriers to ICT business growth, wherein sub-optimal conditions for SME access to markets, innovation and finance, plus excessive regulatory burdens, prevent SMEs from expanding and growing their market shares more rapidly. The Communication highlights how fragmentation of EU ICT markets is also a key limiting factor for SME growth and innovation. The EU’s failure to achieve a real internal market in telecoms, and to standardize ICT regulation and IPR regimes, limit the ability of firms to grow rapidly. The Communication calls for creation of a Community patent to help remedy this situation. The lack of collaboration between public procurement authorities and those overseeing R&D and innovation results in many missed opportunities for innovative products to flourish.”

The logic here is very flawed. What they are trying to insinuate is that in order for businesses to thrive in Europe they might need a broader market like that in the United States. But to suggest that SMEs suing or threatening more competitors in more parts of Europe would somehow spur innovation is to ignore all the good academic studies (including empirical evidence) from the US — ones that suggest patents have only harmed innovation and continue to do so. The sacred cow which is patents is simply the wrong thing to blame here and to portray it as a gateway to success is simply to spin or lie for an agenda. Here are the two cables in question:


UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 BRUSSELS 004741 
 
SIPDIS 
 
DEPT FOR DRL/IL 
DOL FOR ILAB 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: PREL [External Political Relations], ELAB [Labor Sector Affairs], 
ECON [Economic Conditions], EUN [European Union], USEU BRUSSELS 
SUBJECT:  EU SOCIAL SUMMIT RENEWS COMMITMENT TO 
LISBON STRATEGY; LABOR AND EMPLOYERS SPLIT ON 
PRIORITIES 
 
 
¶1.  SUMMARY.  EU-level organizations of labor and 
employers at a pre-European Council meeting with EU 
leaders on November 4 reaffirmed their commitment to 
the "Lisbon strategy" for turning the EU into the 
most competitive economy by the year 2010.  The 
employers and unions not surprisingly continue to 
have different priorities for reactivating the 
Lisbon agenda.  END SUMMARY. 
 
¶2.  The European Council meeting was preceded on 
November 4 by a "Tripartite Social Summit," in which 
the EU Troika (Dutch Presidency, Luxembourg, UK and 
European Commission) as well as representative 
organizations of the "social partners" (labor, 
employers, "cadres" and employees) reviewed the 
Lisbon strategy for turning the EU into the most 
competitive economy by the year 2010.  The Social 
Summit heard a presentation by former Dutch PM Wim 
Kok of the report drawn up by his high-level panel 
on the progress of the Lisbon Strategy.  The report 
takes a gloomy view on progress made over the past 
four years.  It explains the EU's disappointing 
delivery by the overloaded agenda, poor coordination 
and conflicting priorities, and blames the lack of 
political will by the Member States.  In order to 
ensure that Member States take up their 
responsibilities, the Kok report calls for a process- 
redesign along three lines: "more coherence and 
consistency between policies and participants, 
improving the process for delivery by involving 
national parliaments and social partners, and 
clearer communication on objectives and 
achievements."  The report rejects proposals for the 
2010 Lisbon target to be lifted.  It also states 
that the EU should not become a "copy-paste" of the 
US. 
 
¶3.  Speaking at the post-Social Summit press 
conference, Dutch PM/European Council chair 
Balkenende said participants all agreed that "if we 
want a social Europe we need a strong economy in 
Europe."  Commission President Prodi underlined the 
need to actually implement the Lisbon agenda.  With 
a reference to the persisting deadlock on the draft 
legislation concerning the Community patent, Prodi 
stated: "If we continue to decide by unanimity, the 
Lisbon agenda has no chance of being implemented." 
Prodi also called for Member State budgets to 
reflect the commitments taken under the Lisbon 
strategy.  Balkenende and Prodi underlined the role 
of social dialogue as being "at the heart of the 
European Social model." 
 
¶4.  The President of the European Employers' 
Federation (UNICE), Jurgen Strube, opined that the 
sense of urgency with the Lisbon agenda must be 
translated into implementation but called for the 
focus to be on competitiveness: "All (Lisbon) 
objectives are interrelated but it's important to 
focus on the key drivers: competitiveness and 
economic growth.  ETUC Secretary-General John Monks 
said his organization (the European Trade Union 
Confederation) supported the Kok report as a 
"realistic" and "balanced" document, adding:  "We 
know there are choices to be made, but the route is 
not the same as in the U.S.  What concerns us are 
the "delocalisations" (out-sourcing), working time 
related issues, etc.  There is an agenda there." 
 
¶5.  A statement released by the Dutch Presidency 
said the parties "reaffirmed their commitment to the 
Lisbon agenda" as "the most effective means by which 
to fulfill" the EU's economic and social objectives 
"and thereby underpin the role of social dialogue in 
European governance," adding: "All parties agreed on 
the need to add a new impetus to the implementation 
of the Lisbon strategy in order to bring about a 
balanced economic, social and environmental renewal 
in the EU."  The contribution of social partners was 
"essential in unleashing the potential for economic 
and employment growth by finding the balance between 
flexibility and security."  Balkenende and Prodi 
were said to have "expressed their readiness to 
continue the debate and stated that they were 
looking forward to a substantial joint contribution 
from the social partners with commitments relating 
to their area of competence in the context of the 
Mid-Term review of the Lisbon strategy next spring." 
 
¶6.  COMMENT.  Just like the members of the Kok panel 
were said to be divided on the remedies to the 
problems of the EU economy, the employers and unions 
not surprisingly continue to have conflicting 
demands on priorities to be addressed in the context 
of their "social dialogue" at the service of the 
Lisbon strategy:  the employers are calling for 
further liberalization, the removal of obstacles to 
cross-border provision of services, and for research 
policy to be tweaked toward boosting 
competitiveness.  In contrast, the ETUC calls for 
stronger social cohesion "as an essential part of 
Europe's competitive advantage" and insists that the 
Lisbon process should not amount to deregulation, 
weakening worker rights and protection, and cutbacks 
in living and social standards. 
 
SCHNABEL



VZCZCXRO5173
PP RUEHAG RUEHDF RUEHIK RUEHLZ RUEHROV RUEHSR
DE RUEHBS #0399/01 0790718
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 200718Z MAR 09
FM USEU BRUSSELS
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY
RUCPDOC/USDOC WASHDC PRIORITY
RUEAFCC/FCC WASHDC PRIORITY
INFO RUCNMEM/EU MEMBER STATES COLLECTIVE

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 03 BRUSSELS 000399 
 
SENSITIVE 
SIPDIS 
 
FCC FOR WEISLER 
DOC FOR ITA, NTIA - ALEXANDER, MAC - DEFALCO 
STATE FOR EUR/ERA, EB/CIP, EB/IPE 
PLEASE PASS TO USTR 
 
E.O. 12958:  N/A 
TAGS: ECPS [Communications and Postal Systems], 
ECIN [Economic Integration and Cooperation], 
EINV [Foreign Investments], EINT [Economic and Commercial Internet], 
ETRD [Foreign Trade], ECON [Economic Conditions], EUN [European Union] 
SUBJECT: EU SEEKS TO DOUBLE ICT RESEARCH AND INNOVATION FUNDING 
 
¶1. (SBU) SUMMARY.  The European Commission released a March 13 
Communication calling for doubling funding for information and 
communication technology (ICT) research and innovation and other 
steps to boost ICT in Europe.  "A Strategy for ICT R&D and 
Innovation in Europe: Raising the Game" emphasizes that ICT provides 
vital tools to promote economic recovery and address long-term 
aging, environmental and energy concerns and  lays out plans to make 
the EU the world leader in ICT development by 2020.  The Commission 
notes that the EU lags the U.S. and Japan in the proportion of R&D 
devoted to ICT and the economic value generated by ICT.  The report 
cites regulatory barriers to ICT business growth, fragmented 
markets, disjointed R&D efforts and inadequate funding for the 
shortcomings.  The Commission calls specifically for doubling ICT 
R&D investment by 2020, to be matched by member states.  The 
Communication also calls upon EU institutions and Member States to 
coordinate efforts to overcome fragmentation of ICT R&D efforts and 
markets, to raise the number of ICT "poles of excellence," and to 
set the right conditions to grow new innovative ICT businesses 
across Europe.  The new strategy forms part of preparations for an 
EU research and innovation plan as called for by the December 
European Council, and underpins EU efforts to promote greater 
emphasis on R&D and innovation as a critical factor to speed 
recovery from the global economic crisis.  END SUMMARY. 
 
COMMISSION PROPOSES ICT RESEARCH AND INNOVATION STRATEGY 
--------------------------------------------- -------- 
 
¶2. (U) The European Commission released a Communication on March 13 
calling for doubling funding for information and communication 
technologies (ICT) research and innovation and other steps to boost 
the ICT sector in Europe.  The report follows upon a public 
consultation, launched in September 2008, on an EU research and 
innovation strategy for ICT, and responds to the December 2008 
European Council call for an EU plan for innovation and research. 
The Communication, "A Strategy for ICT R&D and Innovation in Europe: 
Raising the Game," stresses the importance of deepening, rather than 
cutting R&D support during the current economic crisis, and lays out 
plans to make the EU the world leader in ICT development and use by 
2020.  The Communication underlines that Member States, EU 
institutions and industry must pool resources and better coordinate 
ICT research and innovation efforts to reach this goal. 
 
EU LAGS OTHERS IN ICT RESEARCH 
------------------------------ 
 
¶3. (U) The Communication notes that in the EU, ICT represents 34 
percent of the two trillion euro global ICT market, accounts for 12 
million jobs and generates six percent of EU GDP.  ICT R&D accounts 
for a quarter of all private R&D spending, a third of all R&D 
employment, and fifth of all patents in the EU.  Nevertheless, the 
EU ICT business sector spends less than half as much as its U.S. 
counterpart on R&D spending.  The EU also lags other OECD members in 
the proportion of R&D devoted to ICT, who on average devote more 
than 30 percent of total R&D to ICT.  The Communication notes a 
growing deficit of ICT skilled workers across the EU, resulting in 
"several hundreds of thousands" of unfilled jobs.  Value added by 
the EU ICT sector is only 23 pecent of total value added, which 
lags the U.S., Japan and advanced economies. 
 
¶4. (U) The Communication cites a number of problems for the 
shortcomings.  It notes barriers to ICT business growth, wherein 
sub-optimal conditions for SME access to markets, innovation and 
finance, plus excessive regulatory burdens, prevent SMEs from 
expanding and growing their market shares more rapidly.  The 
Communication highlights how fragmentation of EU ICT markets is also 
a key limiting factor for SME growth and innovation.  The EU's 
failure to achieve a real internal market in telecoms, and to 
standardize ICT regulation and IPR regimes, limit the ability of 
firms to grow rapidly.  The Communication calls for creation of a 
Community patent to help remedy this situation.  The lack of 
collaboration between public procurement authorities and those 
overseeing R&D and innovation results in many missed opportunities 
for innovative products to flourish. 
 
¶5. (U) In addition, the Communication outlines how Europe's ICT R&D 
landscape remains fragmented, despite new efforts under the seventh 
EU Framework Program for R&D (FP7).  Member State ministries 
continue to develop R&D, innovation and education policies in 
isolation, without adequate cross-ministerial consultation.  The 
plethora of varied EU, Member State and intergovernmental R&D 
funding mechanisms also lead to confusion for innovators. 
 
THE SOLUTIONS - GREATER AND MORE COORDINATED ICT R&D INVESTMENT 
--------------------------------------------- ------- 
 
 
BRUSSELS 00000399  002 OF 003 
 
 
¶6. (U) In response to these shortcomings, the Commission says Europe 
"needs to raise its game."  The Commission calls for a systematic 
ICT R&D strategy that mobilizes resources and stakeholders along 
three paths: raising public and private ICT research and innovation; 
prioritizing ICT research and innovation into key areas and reducing 
fragmentation; and facilitating the emergence of new public and 
private markets of ICT-based innovations. 
 
¶7. (U) In specific terms, the Commission calls for doubling ICT R&D 
investment by 2020, beginning with a boost in EU-level spending 
under FP7 from 1.1 billion Euros in 2010 to 1.7 billion in 2013, to 
be matched by Member States.  This could be accompanied by direction 
of additional regional/cohesion funding toward ICT innovation and 
research.  The Commission urges Member States to develop more 
public-private partnerships, to boost public procurement of 
innovative ICT products, and to explore pre-commercial procurement. 
 
OVERCOMING FRAGMENTATION 
------------------------ 
 
¶8. (U) The Communication calls for a series of actions to better 
coordinate its R&D and innovation policies and specialize its 
resources.  It urges Member States to work with EU institutions to 
develop shared strategies and policies, to enhance the dialogue 
within the National ICT Research Directors Forum and to work more 
closely with ICT advisory groups.  The Commission commits to 
strengthen stakeholder groups and use instruments such as the ICT 
Knowledge and Innovation Communities (KICs) to bring industries, 
entrepreneurs and academics together.  Member States and regions are 
urged to redouble efforts to develop knowledge-based innovation 
clusters, and increase sharing of R&D infrastructures for sectors 
that require large investments, such as nanotechnology and 
high-performance computing. 
 
FACILITATING MARKETS FOR INNOVATION 
----------------------------------- 
 
¶9. (U) The Communication discusses ways to facilitate the emergence 
of markets for innovation, so that the EU can "produce and 
commercialize the equivalent of its share in the global ICT market." 
 The Commission calls for both general policy measures and targeted 
procurement as means to create more favorable conditions for EU-wide 
innovation markets.  Member States and regions should promote closer 
collaboration between innovation users and producers across the 
public sector.  Governments should ensure interoperability and work 
harder to promote common standards, and the Commission will work to 
revise the ICT standardization process. 
 
¶10. (U) Also, the Commission plans to support a series of 
substantial pilot projects to deploy innovation ICT products and 
develop new pan-European ICT-based service infrastructures.  Among 
these may be projects to focus on innovative ICT solutions for 
sustainable healthcare or for energy efficiency, as well as an 
effort to develop an electronic identity management (eID) 
infrastructure, to increase the trustworthiness of e-government and 
e-commerce services. 
 
¶11. (U) Finally, the Communication calls for simplification and 
streamlining of R&D administrative procedures, to cut red tape and 
allow for greater flexibility in program procedures.  The Commission 
notes it will expand international cooperation on the largest-scale 
ICT challenges, such as the Future Internet and quantum computing. 
 
CONCLUSION AND COMMENT 
---------------------- 
 
¶12. (U) The Commission's new proposed ICT R&D and innovation 
strategy projects that if fully adopted, by 2020 the EU will have: 
doubled its private and public investment in ICT R&D, doubled 
venture capital investment in high growth ICT SMEs, developed an 
additional five ICT poles of world-class excellence, to make ICT 
research careers more attractive to bridge the current skills gap; 
grown new innovative ICT businesses so that one third of all ICT R&D 
business expense comes from new firms; and ensured that the EU ICT 
sector supplies at least the equivalent of its share in the global 
market. 
 
¶13. (SBU) The proposed strategy is part of a larger series of EU 
initiatives to boost the EU's innovative capacity across sectors. 
These were triggered by the seminal 2005 Aho report detailing the 
EU's R&D and innovation shortcomings.  The new ICT strategy is 
designed to build on the EU i2010 ICT policy framework, the 
broad-based EU innovation strategy and ICT-related initiatives under 
the European Research Area framework.  The effort will need approval 
by the European Council, which is likely.  It is unclear whether 
 
BRUSSELS 00000399  003 OF 003 
 
 
this and other EU innovation promotion initiatives will allow the EU 
to overcome the persistent innovation gap remaining versus the U.S., 
and in any case, will take time to show measurable results. 
 
MURRAY


If there are any Cablegate areas we should explore more urgently, please leave a comment.

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