10.02.21

What are Flatpaks and How Do They Help on a GNU/Linux Distribution Such as Debian? Why Are They Better Than Snaps?

Posted in GNU/Linux, Red Hat at 4:22 pm by Guest Editorial Team

Guest post by Ryan, reprinted with permission from the original

Flatpak picture

Every GNU/Linux distribution has a “native” package manager system.

In Debian-family distributions, this has normally been Debian Packages. (Although, arguably, Snap may eventually replace it in Ubuntu.)

These DEB files, managed by dpkg, are in turn managed overall by the Advanced Packaging Tool, or Apt, which tracks dependent libraries and programs of what the user is trying to install, and which offers to clean up orphaned packages when nothing is left that requires them.

“One thing that these different systems have in common is they’re basically incompatible with each other, even when it’s the same package management system on each distribution.”In Red Hat distributions, these are RPM files, managed by…well, RPM, which in turn is now managed overall with dependency tracking and orphan cleanup by DNF (still called YUM in Red Hat Enterprise Linux, but it’s DNF now in RHEL 8).

One thing that these different systems have in common is they’re basically incompatible with each other, even when it’s the same package management system on each distribution. If you install an Ubuntu package or software repo in Debian, you’ll probably break Debian, and vice versa, and the same holds true with Fedora, OpenSUSE, and Mageia, even though they all use RPM.

Sometimes you can get away with it, or the author has taken into account that he or she needs to set the stuff in a place where it won’t collide with anything from such a distribution, and you have “universal” RPMs or DEBs that you can install locally, but this is also a pain because it’s not guaranteed to work.

Enter Flatpak.

Flatpak, formerly called xdg-app, is a “universal” package system for GNU/Linux distributions, where developers can write a program, build it once, and deploy it to users of multiple, otherwise quite incompatible GNU/Linux distributions, and it works. Why? They’re fairly self-sufficient in “containers”, and while they have dependencies, they can satisfy them by bringing in those other Flatpaks which contain the foundations the program needs.

In fact, when most people (including me) first see the disk space calculation to install a Flatpak app, they freak out because it’s misleading. It looks like they’re gigantic, but they’re really not that bad. First of all, the more of them you install, the more dependencies you’re going to get, and eventually the next programs you get will need less and less that you don’t already have.

Then, there’s the fact that the containers are compressed.

They install very quickly, and I’ve been messing around and have converted several of the applications I use to Flatpak format and I’m finding the system quite fast. There actually is not much in the way of “install” because it just puts them where it puts them and that’s basically it.

Applications default to being installed for all users on the system, but can be installed for a particular user. Although for the sake of efficiency, you probably want system-wide installations.

Every once in a while, you should run flatpak uninstall –unused to remove orphans, but in my case there are none at the moment.

How does this help a desktop user?

Well, it helps in a few ways.

“…Flatpak lets you have your Debian cake and eat it too.”You get software a lot faster than a distribution is going to package it, at least if you use a Debian or Enterprise or Long Term Support distribution, where the packages available in the native format can go stale rather fast.

On a system like Fedora, where applications are packaged rapidly from upstream, or a rolling release like Manjaro or Arch, or even a 6 month release of Ubuntu, this may not be as important, but these systems exact a toll on the user by forcing them to stop and deal with problems along the way, including in the core OS, the desktop environment, etc. All of which is essentially super stable and maintained with security and bug patches in a longer-lived distribution.

In other words, Flatpak lets you have your Debian cake and eat it too.

When I was a Fedora user, I used to spit and curse all the time when they brought in some new kernel that did more harm than good. They always do more harm than good once your computer works well enough that you’d be better parking yourself on a LTS Linux kernel. (These special kernels are maintained for years by various stakeholders and get hundreds of stabilizing releases, and a little new hardware support if it won’t risk rocking the boat too much.) Other parts of the system could be brought in by Fedora that do something terrible.

Once, they brought in a new build of the 32-bit x86 libc that contained “optimizations” that turned out to brick some of my Steam games and I had to wait for them to revert it. When they’re just bringing in new junk all the time and pimping your ride, you just never know what will happen next. It’s barely tested. In fact, you are the tester.

Then, a while later, they brought in a Linux kernel where Intel tried closing a minor security problem in the graphics driver by disabling its power management, thereby causing my Skylake U-based Yoga 900-ISK2 (which was basically a SoC architecture design) to consume twice as much power. All of a sudden, my usual 6-8 hours away from the wall became 2 or 3, and I had to back out that kernel and go to an older kernel _and_ version-lock it.

By the time Intel “fixed” the power mess, by giving up on fixing the security issue (LOL), my computer had over 160 unpatched security vulnerabilities before I could upgrade the kernel again.

“It used to be that Fedora was more hit or miss, and now it’s just some janky semi-rolling crap that IBM hardly even cares about.”

Now I can just strap some Flatpaks onto Debian 11 and let Debian worry about keeping the underlying system nice and stable, and my computer working properly, and if there is a failure in one of my Flatpak apps, at least it doesn’t spill out and ruin the entire OS like a bad OS update could.

It used to be that Fedora was more hit or miss, and now it’s just some janky semi-rolling crap that IBM hardly even cares about.

Flatpak also gets around distribution packaging policies that you don’t agree with.

Debian has their “Free Software Guidelines” and for the most part, this helps us because they’re not spamming proprietary software, but sometimes you want a program like SNES9x, which Debian considers non-Free because it has source available, you can redistribute it with modifications, but you can’t use it for commercial purposes.

In other words, you don’t care. Why would you care if a company can make a product with SNES9x? You just want to load ROM files in it and play Super Nintendo games.

Flatpak has it. Honey Badger don’t care about no commercial use on an SNES emulator.

There’s also a potential security upside with Flatpak applications.

Thanks to sandboxing and a permissions system, they might be safer than non-Flatpak applications, especially if they have to handle untrusted data from the Internet, or run media codecs, which are notoriously insecure.

Web browsers and VLC are in Flatpak format.

Flatpak is the end of dependency hell, system file stomping from third party repos, and many other kinds of problems.

When you add third party repositories to your distribution’s package manager, and that person doesn’t take care to get along with the OS and not overwrite any of its files, or you install multiple such repositories, you can end up in big trouble really fast.

In fact, OpenSUSE used to encourage the user to set up multiple such repositories to get extra software, and then the system was immediately broken at setup with food fights over which version of what package to install, which broke this or that, and then broke the package manager and then the OS was ruined.

Although that was an extreme example. Most distributions are smart enough not to do this. Stupid krauts.

How is the system integration?

Usually pretty good. I noticed that Debian doesn’t install the Adwaita-Qt theme or set the environment variable to make sure Qt applications look close to native on your GNOME desktop, especially if you use dark themes. I love dark themes.

“…you may hit minor bumps here and there, but overall they integrate pretty well with the system.”You can either set up Adwaita-Qt, or you can let Flatpak handle your Qt or KDE apps, like VLC (Qt) and Krita (KDE). Normally, APT would just bring in a ton of stuff from Qt and KDE and then maybe it does a good job tracking and getting rid of it if nothing needs it, and maybe it doesn’t.

I tweak my GNOME settings to work better as a more traditional desktop, and to look more “correct” for an American PC user, and to blow away some of the settings that I’ve always hated, like middle click paste.

While I was messing around with Flatpak Firefox, I noticed it was middle click pasting. Well, this is a problem because I enable autoscroll in about:config, and so every time I’d hit scroll, it would paste random crap into a blog post or something, so I had to go back into about:config and find a setting to disable middle click paste. The Firefox ESR from Debian respects your system settings.

So you may hit minor bumps here and there, but overall they integrate pretty well with the system.

How do Flatpaks compare with Snap from Ubuntu?

I hate Snap, and that won’t change. I think they implemented it poorly.

It requires a system service that takes hundreds of MB of RAM to manage the software images. Flatpak doesn’t.

When I tried using Snap on Ubuntu, there were many Snaps that just didn’t work at all, and one of them was GZDoom, which I have installed on Debian 11 as a Flatpak, and which works fine.

Snaps require AppArmor, which Debian has since version 10 (but not all distributions do!), or else there’s no sandbox at all, Flatpaks have their own sandbox methods. Snaps are bigger and don’t integrate as well with system settings. Flatpak is Free Software on the client _and_ server side, but Snap is totally proprietary on the server side and only Canonical can run a Snap store.

Canonical claims that Snaps are universal “Linux” programs, but it doesn’t really work properly on other distributions, and most of them have rebuked Snap in forceful language and purged it from their distribution completely, including the Ubuntu-based Mint and Fedora.

Microsoft loves Snap. Of course, when they packaged a DEB, they clobbered Debian system files with it, so when they’re too $%#$ing stupid to package an application and they love Snap, you should know to run. Hell, they screw up their own OS all the time with bad updates.

So I hope this encourages some interest in Flatpak.

I think it’s a really neat and exciting software management system that compliments the usability of a very stable and long-lived distribution such as Debian.

Microsoft Secure Boot and Intel VMD Pointless on GNU/Linux and Lenovo’s Documentation Recommends That You Turn Them Off

Posted in Deception, GNU/Linux, Hardware, Microsoft, Security at 2:32 pm by Guest Editorial Team

Guest post by Ryan, reprinted with permission from the original

Secure Boot is Microsoft trash that was designed to paper over some of the reputation of Windows as a malware plaything.

The problem is that Secure Boot doesn’t actually work. uEFI firmware has been so horrendously bad from its inception that there’s always a Secure Boot escape.

Microsoft introduced the Windows RT (ARM, not the standard x86 instruction set CPU) devices, based on Windows 8, and there was a Secure Boot escape almost immediately. It was necessary to escape Secure Boot were there to be any other operating systems for these devices, because there was no option to turn it off. Something that may be coming with new “Windows 11” PCs, since Secure Boot is required or else Windows will refuse to load.

“Sometime they lose billions of dollars and quietly write it down.”Someone got Grub (the bootloader program commonly used with GNU/Linux) to work on the Surface RT, but GNU/Linux was never ported to these things due to lack of interest at the time. Nobody bought the product and it was just another Microsoft FAIL. They have many of them, like Windows Phone. Sometime they lose billions of dollars and quietly write it down.

GNU/Linux has never had a big malware problem. Microsoft pays the “tech media” to imply otherwise, but it always turns out to be a bald-faced lie. More propaganda. More Microsoft bullshit!

In these churnalism articles, EVERYTHING with an open source license inevitably becomes “Linux”, even if it has the same problem on Windows. Even if it’s a part of Windows (like OpenSSL is). In some cases, when they refer to “Linux malware”, they mean malware that runs on Windows if you use the fake Linux (virtual machine with bad performance) in Windows, called WSL/WSL2.

And frankly, I’m getting sick and damned tired of Microsoft paying for this crap to be typed up and then Googlebombing Linux as part of their most recent smear campaign.

In South Park, Mr. Garrison, as a stand in for Donald Trump, defined something called DARVO, wherein the bully denies their bad behavior, then goes on the attack by reversing the victim and offender.

““Get The Facts”, “GPL is Communism”, and “Linux is a cancer”, never stopped. They just changed the signaling.”It’s hard to come up with a better description of what Microsoft has been doing for the past two decades. “Get The Facts”, “GPL is Communism”, and “Linux is a cancer”, never stopped. They just changed the signaling.

And of course, it’s easier to try to imply that GNU/Linux has problems than it is to fix your own Windows mess.

In the past 20 years, GNU/Linux has had fewer viruses and worms than you can count on your fingers which were even worth mentioning. None of them “just happened”, either. You had to defy GNU/Linux best practices of getting signed packages from your distribution or other trusted source, and grab random unsigned software from some internet site and jam it in somehow.

Grabbing random things from the Internet and hoping for the best is how most software gets installed on Windows.

In fact, according to most antivirus companies, Windows gets that in under a typical hour.

They don’t even try to keep up with detection patterns for most specific threats because they can’t. So, antivirus on Windows becomes mostly a guessing game except for the very most prevalent threats.

And when this happens, many threats are missed.

“Grabbing random things from the Internet and hoping for the best is how most software gets installed on Windows.”That’s why you hear about Ransomware attacks that mean no gasoline on the eastern seaboard of America or how a poultry plant can’t process chickens. The media, bribed by Microsoft money, never mentions Windows.

Windows Security is so godawful that they add tons and tons of fake security bullet points that are trivially bypassed and probably don’t do much except break legitimate applications that are just too old to anticipate them, or need to write somewhere and aren’t automatically allowed to.

Did you enable Controlled Folder Access to “protect against Ransomware” and now LibreOffice can’t save your documents?

Congratulations. Even though there are 4 ways to use the Windows system to evade this protection, and malware authors will do it, your LibreOffice broke.

“Disable Secure Boot and turn off Intel VMD.”What’s more telling is that Lenovo’s documentation on how to install GNU/Linux recommends changing uEFI (BIOS) settings.

Specifically, they tell you to do what I did when I changed over to Debian 11 GNU/Linux on this PC.

Disable Secure Boot and turn off Intel VMD. (VMD was previously called RST. Which is pointless under Linux, hides the storage from Linux and makes it impossible for you to install and use GNU/Linux until you figure out that this is why.)

Here’s some images from their PDF for installing Ubuntu on several of their notebooks.

Ubuntu setup
Ubuntu setup manual

VMD
VMD

Secure boot
‘Secure’ boot

Secure Boot is a bandaid for Windows.

Lenovo knows it. They support GNU/Linux on some of their models and probably don’t want their customers calling in when something like this inevitably happens again.

The uEFI key revocation problem struck me a while back when I had been running Kubuntu on my Lenovo Yoga 900-ISK2 (older laptop) and then went to boot Fedora. Ubuntu had “updated the dbx” and ended up revoking Microsoft’s permission (yes, you heard this right) for Fedora to run on MY LAPTOP.

“Moreover, with the mess that uEFI and Secure Boot have been over the last decade plus, why would I enable this antifeature when all it will cause is more problems for me?”So, it was at that point I disabled Secure Boot, which the Fedora Wiki said to do for the time being, as well as resetting the Secure Boot system in the BIOS, although I never turned it on again for obvious reasons. Why exactly, the hell, should Microsoft have any say over what I do with my laptop, which doesn’t even run their OS, ever?

Moreover, with the mess that uEFI and Secure Boot have been over the last decade plus, why would I enable this antifeature when all it will cause is more problems for me?

This is another reason why dual booting with Windows is unwise and you should just let GNU/Linux completely take over the PC. Not only does Windows ultimately end up hosing Grub and causing both systems to fail, but these key revocations can be pushed by Windows Update with total disregard for whether GNU/Linux will boot up again.

It’s bad enough that this Microsoft/Intel trash, uEFI, completely screwed up the relative simplicity of installing and using operating systems that the “Legacy BIOS” provided for, but it didn’t even improve anything.

Right before uEFI became common, I bought the best computer I could afford at the time, a quad core Phenom II based system, with a Legacy BIOS, expecting early uEFI to be a disaster, and it was.

“And even years later, there are killer pokes when operating systems use uEFI interfaces, and it’s becoming apparent that this situation is uEFI Groundhog Day. It’s always going to be broken.”Right off the bat, many OEMs permanently walled off the native interface and had it expose itself to the OS in (Legacy) BIOS mode because they knew their own native uEFI interfaces were too bad to trust, and the BIOS CSM sort of acted like a condom to filter what the OS was doing with the firmware, to prevent a “killer poke” that left the computer unusable.

And even years later, there are killer pokes when operating systems use uEFI interfaces, and it’s becoming apparent that this situation is uEFI Groundhog Day. It’s always going to be broken.

Ubuntu introduced the intel-spi driver in one release (I think it was an LTS, but don’t quote me.), and inadvertently caused the Yoga 900-ISK2’s settings to become read-only as soon as the pointless (to most people) driver was loaded. At the time, I was spared because it was part of the -staging tree for known bad drivers and ones that are not high enough quality to merge yet, and Fedora wasn’t building it. Many people booted Ubuntu after the new kernel went out and had to figure out how to fix their firmware after just booting the OS up even once!

“This is touted by people like Linux saboteur Matthew Garrett, who implemented Security Theater Boot in Linux as if it were an improvement.”Plus, there were/are still numerous cases where operating systems use a native uEFI interface as documented and the computer never boots again.

This is touted by people like Linux saboteur Matthew Garrett, who implemented Security Theater Boot in Linux as if it were an improvement.

It’s an improvement if we rewrite the dictionary to say that a convicted software monopolist that hates Linux and wants you to have problems with it, who sponsored Garrett indirectly to put it in the kernel, and succeeded, has improved the situation. I think my computer potentially not booting because of this rat’s nest is not an improvement, but what do I know, right?

“They don’t get any pushback ever since they started using their money to corrupt many organizations including the Linux Foundation.”Regardless, I think Lenovo’s advice of just shutting it off…. Look, you’re probably only going to hear me say this once or twice in my life. Listen to Lenovo!

All I can say is that the Free Software Foundation must be truly hopeless if it mostly gives awards to treacherous scumbags these days, and this is at least the second major incident. The first was when they gave Miguel de Icaza one for implementing the patent mess called Microsoft .NET Runtime on Linux. His company was bought by Microsoft as a golden parachute after Novell (his former employer, a Microsoft collaborator) went under.

In closing…

I’d like to summarize that this is a small taste of the bad behavior that continues at Microsoft. They don’t get any pushback ever since they started using their money to corrupt many organizations including the Linux Foundation.

Linus Torvalds has been put on mute even though he used to say things about Microsoft and Intel in particular that were not family-friendly.

Is there really any hope for the future of the x86 PC or are people who want their computing to work going to have to abandon it entirely in the era of Windows Vista 11?

Comments welcome.

09.27.21

[Meme] Tech Companies: No Friends of Women

Posted in Deception, FSF, GNU/Linux at 12:15 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

James Franco Seriously/IBM: Wait, what? So RMS supports women's rights? We'll say he's misogynist and pro-abortion at the same time

Debian RMS message

Summary: Just another reminder that companies like IBM do not actually care about women; they are misusing genuine feminism for corporate objectives

09.26.21

Regrettable Acts of Self-Harm: OpenMandriva and Mozilla Being Outsourced to Microsoft Proprietary Software and Monopoly

Posted in Free/Libre Software, GNU/Linux, Microsoft at 8:16 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link | md5sum afbb4bfd50a72a8df166274fd7774de9

Summary: In another blow to software freedom, OpenMandriva and Mozilla decide to abandon their own systems and use proprietary software from Microsoft instead

MICROSOFT is paying projects to move to GitHub. This is monopoly abuse and today's biggest threat to software freedom. The GitHub acquisition was never supposed to be allowed, but when was the last time a major takeover was blocked by the US government? Incidentally, the other day Wired published “Microsoft is heading for a new antitrust showdown” (it’s well overdue but Microsoft used diversion tactics).

Anyway, it’s not a secret that Microsoft wants to control the competition through GitHub and it pays money to accomplish this (or gives ‘freebies’ like CPU cycles in “Actions”). We have long covered examples and names of projects/companies like these. The payments aren’t always direct, but the correlation is shallow enough to see.

Now, with Microsoft inside Mozilla's board, we should not be too shocked to see reports about Mozilla testing censorship engine Bing as the default ‘search’ engine in Firefox. Mozilla considers letting Microsoft spy on Firefox users whilst also diverting those users to Microsoft products.

“This is how projects die and Mozilla needs to urgently replace its management.”Yes, Microsoft — the very same company that fought Firefox for many years and corrupted officials to undermine Mandriva contracts until Mandriva dissolved. Stockholm Syndrome all over this…

The reason we bring up Mandriva is this morning’s appalling news. It seems like OpenMandriva has entered the lion’s den and put its head inside the jaws of the lion. Who on Earth came up with this decision and was there any prior consultation with the community? They move away from Bugzilla to Microsoft’s proprietary software — a similar trend to what we see in Mozilla itself. It’s outsourcing itself, piece-wise, to Microsoft, while Microsoft pays slush funds for it. And where does the money go? Millions of dollars for a failing CEO and based on these press reports a bunch of PR firms that convince Mozilla to act like a political party instead of tech company/community. This is how projects die and Mozilla needs to urgently replace its management. Otherwise it cannot survive and users will flee faster than ever before (no, they don’t want to use Bing).

09.25.21

Reminder: GNU Turns 38 This Monday Around Midday (When GNU’s Founder Gives Talk in Poland)

Posted in Free/Libre Software, GNU/Linux at 3:42 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Of relevance: Richard Stallman to Speak (in Person) in Poland, Dedicate the Talk to Medical Professionals

GNU/Linux turns 38

Summary: With media and Torvalds speaking again about anniversaries (this has gone on for the past week because Torvalds wrote about it yet again), it is important to recall the announcement that got the ball rolling and basically started it all (the GNU/Linux operating system) because it was in 1983, not 1991. We reproduce in full the announcement.



From CSvax:pur-ee:inuxc!ixn5c!ihnp4!houxm!mhuxi!eagle!mit-vax!mit-eddie!RMS@MIT-OZ
From: RMS%MIT-OZ@mit-eddie
Newsgroups: net.unix-wizards,net.usoft
Subject: new Unix implementation
Date: Tue, 27-Sep-83 12:35:59 EST
Organization: MIT AI Lab, Cambridge, MA

Free Unix!

Starting this Thanksgiving I am going to write a complete
Unix-compatible software system called GNU (for Gnu's Not Unix), and
give it away free(1) to everyone who can use it.
Contributions of time, money, programs and equipment are greatly
needed.

To begin with, GNU will be a kernel plus all the utilities needed to
write and run C programs: editor, shell, C compiler, linker,
assembler, and a few other things.  After this we will add a text
formatter, a YACC, an Empire game, a spreadsheet, and hundreds of
other things.  We hope to supply, eventually, everything useful that
normally comes with a Unix system, and anything else useful, including
on-line and hardcopy documentation.

GNU will be able to run Unix programs, but will not be identical
to Unix.  We will make all improvements that are convenient, based
on our experience with other operating systems.  In particular,
we plan to have longer filenames, file version numbers, a crashproof
file system, filename completion perhaps, terminal-independent
display support, and eventually a Lisp-based window system through
which several Lisp programs and ordinary Unix programs can share a screen.
Both C and Lisp will be available as system programming languages.
We will have network software based on MIT's chaosnet protocol,
far superior to UUCP.  We may also have something compatible
with UUCP.


Who Am I?

I am Richard Stallman, inventor of the original much-imitated EMACS
editor, now at the Artificial Intelligence Lab at MIT.  I have worked
extensively on compilers, editors, debuggers, command interpreters, the
Incompatible Timesharing System and the Lisp Machine operating system.
I pioneered terminal-independent display support in ITS.  In addition I
have implemented one crashproof file system and two window systems for
Lisp machines.


Why I Must Write GNU

I consider that the golden rule requires that if I like a program I
must share it with other people who like it.  I cannot in good
conscience sign a nondisclosure agreement or a software license
agreement.

So that I can continue to use computers without violating my principles,
I have decided to put together a sufficient body of free software so that
I will be able to get along without any software that is not free.


How You Can Contribute

I am asking computer manufacturers for donations of machines and money.
I'm asking individuals for donations of programs and work.

One computer manufacturer has already offered to provide a machine.  But
we could use more.  One consequence you can expect if you donate
machines is that GNU will run on them at an early date.  The machine had
better be able to operate in a residential area, and not require
sophisticated cooling or power.

Individual programmers can contribute by writing a compatible duplicate
of some Unix utility and giving it to me.  For most projects, such
part-time distributed work would be very hard to coordinate; the
independently-written parts would not work together.  But for the
particular task of replacing Unix, this problem is absent.  Most
interface specifications are fixed by Unix compatibility.  If each
contribution works with the rest of Unix, it will probably work
with the rest of GNU.

If I get donations of money, I may be able to hire a few people full or
part time.  The salary won't be high, but I'm looking for people for
whom knowing they are helping humanity is as important as money.  I view
this as a way of enabling dedicated people to devote their full energies to
working on GNU by sparing them the need to make a living in another way.


For more information, contact me.
Arpanet mail:
  RMS@MIT-MC.ARPA

Usenet:
  ...!mit-eddie!RMS@OZ
  ...!mit-vax!RMS@OZ

US Snail:
  Richard Stallman
  166 Prospect St
  Cambridge, MA 02139

The Corporate Coup Against the Soul of the Free Software Community Is Not Over

Posted in Deception, Free/Libre Software, GNU/Linux, Kernel at 9:54 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link | md5sum 7aae2b19743ecec30dc69a131f5871dd

Summary: The erosion of community role in the development of GNU/Linux is a growing problem; part of the problem is that large corporations target technical and philosophical (perceived) leaders in coordinated smear campaigns, led by media they own

THE operating system many people who read Techrights are using was developed in the mid 80s. It was developed initially by a man in his 30s, who recently embarked on a visit to eastern Europe to give talks in spite of all the mobbing from the media, mostly distracting from actual Epstein enablers and allies such as Bill Gates.

In the early 90s a young student from Finland developed an operating system kernel known as Linux. Together with the former, GNU, it adds up to a solid operating system with many pertinent programs, including GNU core utilities (new major release yesterday).

“Just like the Web, which was captured by large and monopolistic corporations that eventually put DRM in it, Linux is being captured by some of those same corporations and their agenda is similar.”These two gentlemen and their friends spent decades developing a system which some have dubbed “revolution OS” — an operating system (OS) which gradually replaces proprietary ones in every sector, whether it’s servers or small devices (like phones). With locked-down things like handheld consoles and Chromebooks — not that they advance freedom in any meaningful way — this “revolution OS” (GNU/Linux) is fast becoming the de facto standard everywhere.

It’s not too shocking that the big corporations are trying to control both GNU and Linux. But in order to accomplish this they’ve been trying to implement coups, a slow process by which they gradually weaken a community role or ownership (Linux Foundation is all about passing ownership to its sponsors).

“The trouble started when it [the Linux Foundation] cancelled the community representation…”
      –Techrights Associate
The video above is inspired by a chat we had this morning.

since doing this video the total number of known (to Lupa) Gemini capsules jumped a couple more to 1,668. We’ll exceed 2,000 some time soon, maybe in a couple of months. Just like the Web, which was captured by large and monopolistic corporations that eventually put DRM in it, Linux is being captured by some of those same corporations and their agenda is similar.

We need to resist the coup. This means we need to support the founders, even those we don't always agree with. Power vacuums are almost always being filled by corporations, which sometimes themselves engineer those vacuums based on false pretexts. This accurately describes what has been done to Linus Torvalds, the founder of Linux.

“That CoC crap did its job in distracting from the infiltration and destruction. Heck, they even signed Linus up for unnecessary treatment.”
      –Techrights Associate
“Linus needs to take his trademark, fork the code, and walk,” an associate of ours notes. “I hope he has at least given the idea consideration. I presume that regardless of his inclinations he is afraid of the huge amount of administrivia and financing required to start anew. The trouble started when it [the Linux Foundation] cancelled the community representation [...] the removal of community representation was a huge warning [as] the corruption arrived quickly. What could be done to ensure a slower takeover of a replacement institution? A lot of it comes down to the individuals participating and their integrity. However, they are supported in staying on track by sound guidelines and maybe the right charter. That CoC crap did its job in distracting from the infiltration and destruction. Heck, they even signed Linus up for unnecessary treatment.”

“In Business Insider,” I’ve noted, “they stated clearly that he had been signed for therapists as if he was mentally ill. Smacks of Communist Russia. I regard that a form of self-humiliation and degradation, akin to what was done to Assange to demoralise him [and] the stallman.org site has not been the same. RMS-lite, Linus-lite. That’s how the authorities like it. Self-censorship. Lithuania says that China now enforces this using ‘phones’.”

“With Assange lies and disinformation still circulate. And some of those who were actively spreading those lies are still around in FOSS circles…”
      –Techrights Associate
The associate says that “inappropriate, wrong, and unnecessary medical treatment was / is used as a form of torture.”

“With Assange lies and disinformation still circulate. And some of those who were actively spreading those lies are still around in FOSS circles…”

It may sound like it’s all just “old news”, but it is not. “The important thing is to show both that it has been a long-term problem and that it is highly relevant in the current environment,” the associate stresses.

09.24.21

ZDNet Has Failed

Posted in Deception, GNU/Linux, Microsoft at 8:03 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link | md5sum 14f143a95d57025c304dd3023a95cf32

Summary: ZDNet is on the decline and its demise appears to have greatly accelerated in recent months; we take a quick look at this month’s coverage and explain the conflict of interest (it’s PR, not news, and it’s far too shallow/blatant to simply overlook)

FOR those who are not familiar — or barely familiar — with the antics of ZDNet, see our wiki on this subject. It won’t take long to understand, even based on the headings alone. The good news is, the site is perishing and little of what’s left of it spilled over to a sister site called TechRepublic, a mixture of Microsoft operatives and paid-for puff pieces.

“The network behind ZDNet perished 2-3 years ago.”As it turns out, lying to people may be a profitable business model, but only in the short term. Sooner or later people walk away (earlier today we mentioned conflict of interest in Bill Gates coverage).

ZDNet screenshotA few days ago, by mere serendipity (and by accident rather) I clicked on a ZDNet link because it had Torvalds/Linux in the headline. See on the right what I was presented with. Does that make any sense to anyone? The connection between those two things is at best imaginary, fictional. But when Microsoft operatives run the ‘news’ site they tend to view everything from a Microsoft lens. As I noted in the video above, Microsoft is the very first category to be listed in the site’s menu and it’s almost the only brand name in that menu. Earlier this week they published not one but two puff pieces about the latest 'research' stunt from the Linux Foundation. Why? Follow the money…

The network behind ZDNet perished 2-3 years ago. Defunct as of December 4th, 2019 (21 months ago) although CBS Corporation was already facing issues prior to that. But now ZDNet itself is dying. Just 7-8 stories in the “Linux” section (mostly sponsored junk) were posted in the first 24 days of September. It used to be about 2 stories per day and most of those were anti-Linux or an attack on facts, even malicious slander. When ZDNet collapses completely we won’t miss it. We’ll just sigh in relief and say, “good riddance…”

Princess Bride: What better than Microsoft propaganda? Microsoft propaganda masked in 'Linux' clothing

09.17.21

[Meme] Microsoft Loves Linux Bug/Back Doors

Posted in GNU/Linux, Microsoft, Security, Windows at 9:38 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Yesterday: Microsoft Azure and Back/Bug Doors in GNU/Linux: Fool Me Once (Shame on You) / Fool Me Twice (Shame on Me) | Trusting Microsoft With Security is a Clown Show

Dirty Things: I put my GNU/Linux VM in Azure; Wait until she finds out his 'desktop' is WSL...

In the news (when they say “Linux” they actually mean Windows):

New malware uses Windows Subsystem for Linux for stealthy attacks

Theory confirmed: Lumen Black Lotus Labs discovers Linux executable files have been deployed as stealth Windows loaders

Theory confirmed: Lumen Black Lotus Labs discovers Linux executable files have been deployed as stealth Windows loaders

Summary: Microsoft is just cementing its status as little but an NSA stooge

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