03.06.21

How To Deal With Your Raspberry Spy — Part IV: Doing The Task

Posted in BSD, GNU/Linux, Hardware, Kernel at 7:59 pm by Guest Editorial Team

By Gavin L. Rebeiro

Contents

Cover

Copyright

1 Acknowledgements

2 Introduction

2.1 Prerequisite Knowledge
2.2 Apparatus

3 Fundamentals

3.1 Communication
3.2 Kernel Ring Buffer
3.3 Drivers
3.4 Operating Systems
3.5 Special Files

4 YOU ARE HERE ☞ Doing The Task

4.1 Preparing The Boot Media
4.2 Connecting Physical Components
4.3 Using Picocom
4.4 OS Installation

5 Thanks

6 OpenPGP Key

A Malicious Hardware

B Linux Kernel Source Tree Analysis

C Digital Multimeter Tests

Summary: We now spell out the steps taken to actually replace the Raspberry Pi OS with something more trustworthy (for background see Part I, Part II, and Part III)

We’ve now covered enough ground to make the installation of
NetBSD on our Raspberry Spy (over our UTUB) a relatively painless matter.

Let’s go through the process in little steps.

4.1 Preparing The Boot Media

I’m going to grab the appropriate NetBSD image by taking hints from the following:

NetBSD/evbarm on Raspberry Pi tells us everything we need to know to pick the right image. All the sections here related to booting are worth reading at least once. Also read sections about consoles and serial consoles at least once.

Raspberry Pi boot modes is useful if you want to dig deeper into the booting mechanisms of the Raspberry Spy. USB mass storage boot is particularly useful for booting off USB. Trust me, you don’t want to muck around with SD cards; they’re a nightmare.

NetBSD/evbarm can be referenced for general information about NetBSD on ARM boards.

The above links should give you a good idea of what’s going on and what needs to be done with regards to putting a NetBSD on a boot media that goes into a Raspberry Spy.

Let’s go through a concrete example.

My Raspberry Spy is of the model “3 B+” variety so I’m dealing with an ARM64 CPU architecture. We’ll follow along the instructions outlined in Installation procedure for NetBSD/evbarm; pay close attention to the section “NetBSD/evbarm subdirectory structure”; I follow these instructions as I explore Index of pub/NetBSD/NetBSD-9.1/evbarm-aarch64/.

I grab the appropriate image like so:

$ mkdir ~/Downloads/netbsd
$ cd ~/Downloads/minted
$ wget https://cdn.netbsd.org/pub/NetBSD/NetBSD-9.1/evb c
 → arm-aarch64/binary/gzimg/arm64.img.gz

Now that we’ve got the image, we can write it to our boot media. I’m going to assume you have an appropriate reader already plugged into your GNU/Linux box. I’ve got my USB thumb drive as “/dev/sdg” on my system. Use the right block device file on your system1. We base our procedure along the lines of “Installation for ARMv7 and AArch64 devices with U-Boot” section from Installation procedure for NetBSD/evbarm:

$ gzip --decompress --keep arm64.img.gz
# dd if=arm64.img of=/dev/sdg bs=1M conv=sync
 → status=progress
$ lsblk -f | grep sdg

We’re going to ignore the minutiae of writing to block devices, bootloaders, and other adjacent topics related to the utilities we just used; that’s left for another time. We care about learning how to use a serial console in this project so we must stay focused on our primary target.

We’re going to have a look at how to make a serial install possible via some editing of the “cmdline.txt” file that now resides in the boot media (on the boot partition which is of type “vfat”):

# mkdir /media/netbsd_image
# mount /dev/sdg1 /media/netbsd_image
# grep "console" < cmdline.txt
# root=ld0a console=fb
# grep "enable_uart" < config.txt
# enable_uart=1

The “console=fb” part is to get out OS image to use the HDMI output. We will get rid of that string from the file “cmdline.txt”. Who needs that anyway? One way to do it2:

# ed cmdline.txt
21
,p
root=ld0a console=fb
1
root=ld0a console=fb
s/console=fb//
,p
root=ld0a
wq
11
# echo ",p" | ed cmdline.txt
11
root=ld0a

Remember to check your edits!

We also ensure that “enable_uart=1” is set in the file “config.txt”:

# echo ",p" | ed config.txt
82
arm_64bit=1
kernel=netbsd.img
kernel_address=0x200000
enable_uart=1
force_turbo=0

Everything looks good! Additional useful information on the Raspberry Spy UART can be found in UART configuration. Pretty self-explanatory. That wasn’t so hard. Was it? Note that the following links document the files we’ve been messing around with:

The Kernel Command Line
config.txt

It’s a good idea to back up the state of your image, at this point3. We can now safely unmount our boot media and get on with the project:

# cd ~
# umount /media/netbsd_image

We change directory, before we unmount, so that we don’t get any “device busy” errors.

We’ve now got our boot media ready. Onwards!

4.2 Connecting Physical Components

Before you power up your UTUB, you should really check that the pins are working properly. The very basic test you should do is to check that the right voltage is being supplied. Check out Appendix C.

The pins on our UTUB and Raspberry Spy that we’re interested are the following:

• Raspberry Spy: Pin6 (Ground), Pin8 (GPIO14, TXD), Pin10 (GPIO15, RXD). You can find the layout in the official GPIO page.

• UTUB: I’ve got a CP2104 UTUB so I’ve got to only worry about the pins marked TX, RX, and GND. I have other pins on the module but they’re not relevant for this task.

We won’t be using any of the voltage pins on the boards because it’s more prone to errors. Just use the USB power supply that comes with your Raspberry Spy.

Don’t plug anything into power for the following sequence. Connect the jump-wires like so:

• Ground on UTUB to Ground (Pin6) on Raspberry Spy.

• TX on UTUB to RX (Pin10) on Raspbery Spy.

• RX on UTUB to TX on (Pin8) Raspberry Spy.

“We won’t be using any of the voltage pins on the boards because it’s more prone to errors.”Don’t make the rookie mistake of matching TX with TX and RX with RX; TX always goes to RX and RX always goes to TX. Keep this in mind, always, when working with UARTs. Colour-coding your jump-wires helps.

We’ll just go over the order of attaching the stuff to do with power on our devices:

• Attach the USB power adapter to the Raspberry Pi without plugging the adapter into the power outlet.

• Attach the UTUB to your GNU/Linux box.

• Attach your USB power adapter to your power outlet.

The logic for the above procedure is that you can ensure that your serial interface is up and running before you start getting input from your Raspberry Spy.

4.3 Using Picocom

Using picocom(1) is simple. All we need to do is select the correct baud rate and give the right device file as a parameter to picocom(1).

I’ll give you an extract from the manual page to enlighten you:

In effect, picocom is not an "emulator" per-se. It is a
simple program that opens, configures, manages a serial
port (tty device) and its settings, and connects to it
the terminal emulator you are, most likely, already
→ using
(the terminal window application, xterm, rxvt, system
console, etc).
When picocom starts it opens the tty (serial port)
given as its non-option argument. Unless the
--noinit option is given, it configures the port to
the settings specified by the option-arguments (or
to some default settings), and sets it to "raw"
mode. If --noinit is given, the initialization and
configuration is skipped; the port is just opened.
Following this, if standard input is a tty, picocom
sets the tty to raw mode. Then it goes in a loop
where it listens for input from stdin, or from the
serial port. Input from the serial port is copied
to the standard output while input from the standard
input is copied to the serial port. Picocom also
scans its input stream for a user-specified control
character, called the escape character (being by
default C-a). If the escape character is seen, then
instead of sending it to the serial-device, the
program enters "command mode" and waits for the next
character (which is called the "function
character"). Depending on the value of the function
character, picocom performs one of the operations
described in the COMMANDS section below.

We use “C-a C-x” (Ctrl+a followed by Ctrl+x)4 to tell picocom(1) to exit; for more, RTFM; in particular, pay close attention to the “COMMANDS” section.

Make sure you’ve set up all the physical connections, as advised. It’s time to attach our UTUB to our GNU/Linux box and then make sure we invoke picocom(1) correctly:

# picocom --baud 115200 /dev/ttyUSB0
picocom v3.1

port is         : /dev/ttyUSB0
flowcontrol     : none
baudrate is     : 115200
parity is       : none
databits are    : 8
stopbits are    : 1
escape is       : C-a
local echo is   : no
noinit is       : no
noreset is      : no
hangup is       : no
nolock is       : no
send_cmd is     : sz -vv
receive_cmd is  : rz -vv -E
imap is         : 
omap is         :
emap is         : crcrlf,delbs
logfile is      : none
initstring      : none
exit_after is   : not set
exit is         : no

Type [C-a] [C-h] to see available commands
Terminal ready

It really is that simple. You’ve now got a serial terminal ready and listening.

4.4 OS Installation

Now that you’ve got a serial terminal operational, all we have to do to install NetBSD on the Raspberry Spy is to plug the USB power adapter into the power outlet. Keep a close eye on what goes on in the output of your serial terminal:

...
[   7.4246937] root device:
[  11.6252523] use one of: mue0 sd0[a-p] ddb halt reboot
[  11.6252523] root device: sd0
[  13.9755661] dump device (default sd0b):
[  15.7257992] file system (default generic):
...

You should be promoted to pick a root device. I pick “sd0” as it’s the first ’disk’ offered by NetBSD (which can only be my boot media)5. I go for the suggested defaults, for everything else. No need to overcomplicate things, at this point.

You will probably see your Raspberry Spy reboot once or twice during the OS install process. Just pass the same parameters for the boot device, and you should be good to go.

Eventually, you should be met with the following:

...
NetBSD/evbarm (arm64) (constty)
...

login:

If you login as “root”, you should have a nice login shell presented to you.

And we are done! You’ve successfully done some tinkering over a serial terminal. That wasn’t so hard. Was it? You can shutdown your device (halt the OS) like so:

# shutdown -p now
...
[   910.5814809] The operating system has halted.
[   910.5814809] Please press any key to reboot.

You can now disconnect the power supply from your Raspberry Spy. Then just send “C-a C-x” to picocom(1); after which, you should see:

...
Terminating...
Thanks for using picocom
#

Welcome to the world of serial terminals; hack your heart out!
____
1 The command lsblk -f should help you out here. Don’t wipe the wrong device by accident.
2 If you use another text editor, that’s fine. You really should learn ed(1) at some point though, especially if you want to get into embedded systems.
3 At least keep track of the files that you tweaked. If you use some sort of version-control-system, you get bonus points.
4 I don’t know why the manual doesn’t bother to explicitly mention that these are GNU-Emacs-style key sequences.
5 See the NetBSD sd(4) manpage for details.

02.09.21

The Foundation of Shame

Posted in GNU/Linux, Kernel, Marketing, Microsoft at 7:48 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Jim Zemlin in tuxedo
Photo credit: The Linux Foundation

Summary: The term “foundation” is being corrupted to the point where ‘non-profit’ (but actually for-profit) entities promote bad practices, monopolies, and openwashing of truly awful and oppressive things

THE sister site of ZDNet, TechRepublic, not only spreads Microsoft propaganda about the Raspberry Pi Foundation this week (yesterday). It employs longtime Microsoft moles and constantly spreads Microsoft propaganda and Linux Foundation propaganda, which is in turn linked to Microsoft’s. There’s just a marketing company behind it; it’s not a news site! But this rant isn’t about TechRepublic itself.

Last night I saw a worrying TechRepublic puff piece by someone whose name I never saw before, openwashing autocratic tools (‘vaccine passports’) devised by patent profiteers to blackmail people into buying their experimental prototypes (products), threatening punishment or retaliation in spite of variants/strains that make such “passports” nowhere as meaningful as actual tests (as is already done at airports). The title was “Open source ‘vaccine passports:’ Linux Foundation Public Health talks development, security, and digitally restoring trust”. My wife and I are pro-vaccination, but this infuriated both of us (myself last night and her this morning) for two reason: 1) the Linux Foundation is clearly misusing the name “Linux”. 2) those “passports” aren’t the solution and they mostly help Microsoft’s co-founder. In my wife’s view, this is another way Microsoft advances its agenda through the Linux Foundation (it has long been stated in the news that Microsoft wants to manage those “passports”) and the “contact-tracing” tools the Linux Foundation put its name behind had been outsourced to Microsoft’s proprietary software trap (GitHub). Not to even mention Gates’ stake in patents on vaccines [1, 2, 3].

“In my wife’s view, this is another way Microsoft advances its agenda through the Linux Foundation (it has long been stated in the news that Microsoft wants to manage those “passports”) and the “contact-tracing” tools the Linux Foundation put its name behind had been outsourced to Microsoft’s proprietary software trap (GitHub).”Whether you support those “passports” or not (what next? A “passport” to enter a building? A store? “Passports” for leaving one’s own apartment?), Linux as a brand has no place in “passports”. It’s bad enough that in the name of “Linux” they’re monopolising Web site trust and outsourcing both their own Web site and the project code to proprietary software of Microsoft [1, 2].

This institution has become "Stalin's dream" and people like my wife, who were only introduced to “Linux” one decade ago, already resent the brand, or at least the foundation (Torvalds’ employer).

Microsoft recently did similar things at the Raspberry Pi Foundation and since we’ve mentioned attempts to interject Rust (GitHub-controlled, not only for code) into Linux how about news from yesterday about a new thing called the Rust Foundation [1-4]? It was announced by Daniel Nazer from the EFF (where he used to combat “bad” patents such as software patents). He left the EFF to join Mozilla some 1-2 years ago and he does not mention that Microsoft is in the Board of the Rust Foundation [1]. The official announcement [4] calls Microsoft a “Founding member company,” reaffirming our suspicion about the direction of Rust.

“There are meanwhile more dodgy foundations being formed, where Microsoft sits on the board and all the code — not to mention newsletters and meeting minutes — are being outsourced entirely to Microsoft’s proprietary software monopoly.”So, in short, the “Linux” brand is now being used for privacy-violating (and pointless) contact-tracing, which we now know was grossly misused, mishandled and put in the hands of bad actors in direct violation of promises made to those choosing to participate (there were many press reports about it). That same “Linux” brand is also used for openwashing of so-called ‘vaccine passports’, painting with the “Linux” (or “ethical”) brush a threat to a decent society, never mind if such ‘vaccine passports’ are pretty useless anyway (there’s still hardly any data about efficacy of such vaccines).

There are meanwhile more dodgy foundations being formed, where Microsoft sits on the board and all the code — not to mention newsletters and meeting minutes — are being outsourced entirely to Microsoft’s proprietary software monopoly. You need to sign up with Microsoft to participate. Be sure to check who leads OpenJS, which is also linked to OSI and the Linux Foundation. This is how full-time Microsoft employees become the bosses of Torvalds.

Maybe all those foundation will end up just as corrupt as the Gates Foundation.

References (Rust Foundation):

  1. Mozilla Welcomes the Rust Foundation

    Today Mozilla is thrilled to join the Rust community in announcing the formation of the Rust Foundation. The Rust Foundation will be the home of the popular Rust programming language that began within Mozilla. Rust has long been bigger than just a Mozilla project and today’s announcement is the culmination of many years of community building and collaboration. Mozilla is pleased to be a founding Platinum Sponsor of the Rust Foundation and looks forward to working with it to help Rust continue to grow and prosper.

    Rust is an open-source programming language focused on safety, speed and concurrency. It started life as a side project in Mozilla Research. Back in 2010, Graydon Hoare presented work on something he hoped would become a “slightly less annoying” programming language that could deliver better memory safety and more concurrency. Within a few years, Rust had grown into a project with an independent governance structure and contributions from inside and outside Mozilla. In 2015, the Rust project announced the first stable release, Rust 1.0.

  2. The Rust language gets a foundation

    The newly formed Rust Foundation has announced its existence.

  3. Rust Foundation Established To Steward The Rust Programming Language

    Mozilla has been sponsoring the Rust programming language for more than a decade while in 2020 as part of Mozilla’s big round of layoffs most of the Rust team was let go along with dropping the Servo web engine team. Following that plans were drafted to create the Rust Foundation as an independent entity.

  4. Hello World!

    Today, on behalf of the Rust Core team, I’m excited to announce the Rust Foundation, a new independent non-profit organization to steward the Rust programming language and ecosystem, with a unique focus on supporting the set of maintainers that govern and develop the project. The Rust Foundation will hold its first board meeting tomorrow, February 9th, at 4pm CT. The board of directors is composed of 5 directors from our Founding member companies, AWS, Huawei, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla, as well as 5 directors from project leadership, 2 representing the Core Team, as well as 3 project areas: Reliability, Quality, and Collaboration.

01.31.21

Time to Rebrand the Linux Foundation, Which is Clearly a Misnomer Apathetic Towards Linux and Sometimes Hostile Towards What Linux Actually Stands For

Posted in Deception, Free/Libre Software, GNU/Linux, Kernel at 10:59 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link

Summary: More people ought to call out and berate the sham that the Linux Foundation became in recent years; it turned from pro-Linux into apathetic and even hostile — to the point of promoting proprietary software, fake security, mass surveillance and shameless posturing that exploits racial grievances for corporate propaganda [1, 2]

IF people in charge of the Linux Foundation (people who receive their salary from Microsoft!) push to outsource Linux itself to Microsoft proprietary software (GitHub) and when offshoots of the Foundation are being put at the hands of Microsoft staff (no kidding, here’s the example from the media, as mentioned in the above video) you just know that the Foundation is truly and completely defunct. It’s just a money-making operation (or greed machine) that has little or nothing to do with Linux itself. We’ve been watching the Linux Foundation closely for 14 years and we’ve never seen it as defunct as this. They lost track of Linux and got blinded with money, which they raise by openwashing surveillance, proprietary software, and ritualistic Orwell resurrections.

“Please do not ever assume that the Foundation cares about people or human rights or personal freedoms (such as software freedom). They only care about one thing: money.”The above video arose from a culmination of recent press reports and press releases from the Foundation, highlighting the immense and troublesome degree of Microsoft infiltration and proprietary software advocacy/promotion (GitHub is just one among many examples). They’re sometimes hosting with Windows, they outsource to Zoom, and they use “Mac” PCs to create reports about Linux itself (the kernel).

#CancelFreedomAs I point out in the video, if Linus Torvalds was to quit the Foundation and start his own thing (to escape the corruption of the Foundation and their “Speech Policing”), the Foundation would carry on, likely under some other and more suitable name. Maybe the Openwashing Foundation. Because that’s what it really is and what it formally became several years ago. As noted on the right, the Microsoft-funded SFC (connected to Linux Foundation) and the Microsoft-funded Linux Foundation both tried hard to cancel the founder of Free software and delete his legacy, basically exploiting his accomplishments to their own advantage (financial gain) while brushing him under some carpet.

Please do not ever assume that the Foundation cares about people or human rights or personal freedoms (such as software freedom). They only care about one thing: money. They’re bossed and governed by greedy corporations and nobody nothing else (corporations are not people). Look no further than the composition of their current board.

01.11.21

The Media is Slurring and Misleading Linux Users Instead of Just Telling the Mundane and Objective News

Posted in Deception, GNU/Linux, Kernel at 12:22 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link

Summary: The “big sites” or the so-called ‘news’ sites seem incapable of just objectively covering the news (in line with journalism/journalistic standards)

THE 3rd release candidate (rc, or RC) of the next Linux version has been released. That was less than a day ago (the announcement is, as usual, entitled “Linux 5.11-rc3″).

“Why can’t we have actual news that’s not provoking and baiting readers?”The original, as usual, isn’t particularly exciting. LWN decided to stick to the news, not drama and gossip-type clickbait. Phoronix also chose a reasonably OK headline. What about the corporate news sites? Well, they barely even mention the actual news (certainly not in the headline) and the envisioned spin/dramatisation is all over the place (e.g. “Linus Torvalds rates his own words ‘incoherent ramblings of a crazy old man’” and “Linus Torvalds slams….himself over latest Linux build”).

The press or the “big media” says nothing about “Linux 5.11-rc3″, which is actually the news. Instead, it is just divisive distractions and nonsense. We saw that last week with a very similar example last year. Why can’t we have actual news that’s not provoking and baiting readers? The video above tackles this visually.

01.06.21

Gossip Mill as ‘News’: The Mainstream Media Covers Linus Instead of Linux

Posted in GNU/Linux, Kernel at 5:05 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link

Summary: Personification of the news by corporate or mainstream media may be useful for the advertising industry; but it doesn’t contribute to public understanding of what’s really important and what constitutes news

THE point made here last summer [1] is being proven correct again, for earlier this week we saw at least half a dozen examples [2-7] of media obsessing over something said by Linus Torvalds while not even mentioning the actual, real news (the release of Linux 5.11-rc2).

“Society won’t be able to separate the wheat from the chaff.”If this sort of click-bait drama is what nowadays qualifies as “journalism” (never mind endless puff pieces or ads disguised as ‘reports’), then we’re in deep, deep trouble. Society won’t be able to separate the wheat from the chaff.

Links from the video above:

  1. ‘Journalism’ in 2020: Far More Articles About What Computer Linus Torvalds Bought Than About Linux Releases
  2. Linus Torvalds tears into Intel, favors AMD
  3. Linux creator isn’t happy with Intel, here’s why
  4. Linus Torvalds, creator of Linux, calls out Intel on the importance of ECC RAM in the consumer market space
  5. Linux founder Linus Torvalds roasts Intel over lack of ECC memory support
  6. Linus Torvalds Rails At Intel For ‘Killing’ the ECC Industry
  7. New year, new rant: Linus Torvalds rails at Intel for ‘killing’ the ECC industry

01.01.21

Here Comes Again the False Parity (Comparing GNU/Linux Security to That of Platforms With NSA Back Doors)

Posted in FUD, GNU/Linux, Kernel, Security at 10:13 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link

Summary: Contrary to what lousy and sleazy sites claim about “Linux” (in order to sell highly misleading agenda/impression and false claims, or push ads based on provocative click-baiting), bad practices and/or clueless admins/users are to blame for what constitutes security breaches in the Free software world, unlike back doors in proprietary software (sometimes mandated by authorities)

IT is hardly a secret that despite the fact nation states bemoan security problems they themselves are the bigger/biggest contributors to security problems. They want back doors in virtually everything, ranging from operating systems to encryption algorithms. Microsoft is one of their biggest facilitators if not by far the biggest.

“They want back doors in virtually everything, ranging from operating systems to encryption algorithms.”According to some so-called ‘news’ [1, 2, 3], security is impossible and “Linux” is just as bad as Windows. This is the sort of message they recycle as Microsoft reveals (when everyone is on holidays) how badly screwed they are, how Azure got cracked (Azure also has layoffs, but they don’t want anybody to mention that), and how we’re supposed to think that it’s not Microsoft’s fault. I recorded this video without any preparation, so it’s a bit of a rant.

This relates to this recent article and video.

12.23.20

Pushing Mesa and Linux Graphics Towards Proprietary Microsoft GitHub, WSL (Vista 10), and DirectX

Posted in Deception, GNU/Linux, Kernel, Microsoft, Standard, Vista 10, Windows at 1:24 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: In yet another arrogant display of Hubris and self-admiration, Microsoft enters a project merely to divert resources away from its principal goals, instead rendering it a ‘slave’ of Microsoft’s proprietary universe (DirectX, WSL, GitHub)

THE ‘good folks’ from Microsoft have decided to ‘help’ Linux… by helping themselves to it. In whose favour? To whose ends?

Bill Gates once said: “The fact that there’s some e-mail here at MS that says ‘let’s go up and beat this guy’: there’s nothing wrong with that – that is capitalism at work for consumers.”

Yeah, so sabotaging Linux is also “capitalism at work for consumers.”

“They don’t love Linux, they just try to change Linux, including outsourcing of Linux to GitHub, which is proprietary software.”He even used the word “consumers” because that’s how Microsoft views computer users — merely those ‘peasants’ out there, ripe to ‘consume’ whatever Microsoft imposes on them.

This video started as a response to this hours-old article entitled Microsoft Adds SPIR-V To DXIL Library In Mesa – With A Focus On WebGPU Support (as usual, the responses are better).

Linux and GitHubMicrosoft “should stop fooling around, drop DX/DXIL and switch to Vulkan/SPIR-V to begin with,” as somebody put it in the latest comment. The article itself says Microsoft is “using Mesa to translate the APIs for consumption by Direct3D 12 drivers…”

So they come to Mesa to promote Microsoft, i.e. the usual. We’ve seen this many times before and we wrote about it dozens of times this year alone.

They don’t love Linux, they just try to change Linux, including outsourcing of Linux to GitHub, which is proprietary software. It's all about control (by Microsoft). As these videos aren’t scripted I ended up also discussing the sort of vision Microsoft has for Linux, namely a kernel that’s closely controlled by Microsoft, with all developers closely monitored and censored by Microsoft. Is this what we want for Linux?

Microsoft loves to use or mischaracterise its control over some GNU/Linux instances (in Azure) as “proof” that it “loves Linux”, but Azure has basically been an utter failure (financial calamity) and days ago we had it confirmed that Azure employees were fired this year. The video above also mentions that WSL has been an utter failure. They’re not exactly succeeding at “Embrace, Extend, Extinguish,” but they carry on trying. If we aren’t sufficiently vigilant, we might even fall into their trap.

12.15.20

Video: What Has the Linux Foundation Done to Linux.com?

Posted in Deception, GNU/Linux, Kernel at 2:44 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Linux.com used to be a fine Web site, but now it is ‘sold’ (or sold out). Destroyed almost. Today they have “LF Platinum Member Content” (see screenshots below; as HTML and RSS); so what they basically say is, pay us (the Linux Foundation) and in exchange we’ll link to your “content”. Buying links is what that is (IBM in this particular case). This video, unscripted and done in a single take as usual, mentions Swapnil Bhartiya, who stepped in two months after all staff got fired; for over a year he was posting pure nonsense and Microsoft spam in that site, sometimes worse than mindless press releases (like “Cut your Cloud Computing Costs by Half with Unikraft,” the fluff posted today and shown above), driving away what was left of regular readers/subscribers.

Linux Foundation sells links to sponsors
Linux Foundation sells links to sponsors

Linux Foundation sells links to
This is what happens when Linux.com becomes a site not about Linux but a for-profit venture of the Linux Foundation

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