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04.22.12

Links 22/4/2012: Linux 3.4 RC4 is Out, Linus Torvalds Respects Ubuntu

Posted in News Roundup at 10:58 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • RIM may make BlackBerry OS open source

    Research In Motion, which makes BlackBerry phones, may be looking at making the operating system open, which will allow other manufacturers to make smartphones using the platform.

  • BlackBerry to go open source?
  • Scientists: All Research Should Be Open Source

    Phys.org is reporting on a recently published paper that suggests all scientific journals should require the full disclosure of source code as a condition of publication. The paper states that only 3 science journals currently require source code.

  • Why Google secretly switched to an open-source networking technology in 2010
  • CSCO, JNPR: ‘OpenFlow’ Takes Stage, Says ISI (Correction)
  • Google revamps network via OpenFlow
  • Ex-Magento CTO And Co-Founder: eBay Doesn’t Understand The Meaning Of Open
  • Open source WEM from Rivet Logic

    Consulting and systems integration firm Rivet Logic has released Crafter Rivet V. 2.0, an open source Web experience management (WEM) offering built on Alfresco 4. The WEM solution is the latest addition to Rivet Logic’s suite of solutions for content management, collaboration and community leveraging open source software.

  • Research lab extends host-based cyber sensor project to open source

    A Department of Energy (DOE) lab is taking research done to develop a host-based security sensor and open-sourcing the software to encourage community feedback and participation.

  • Open Source Integrity Report : Key Findings
  • Open Source Integrated Photonics Software Launched

    Ghent University and nanoelectronics research center imec of Leuven have launched IPKISS, an open source software platform for designing photonic components and complex photonic integrated circuits, they announced.

  • Photonics integration goes open-source with IPKISS
  • Radical Idea: Open source social networking
  • First Open Source Online Gambling Platform Launched by Cubeia Ltd.

    In a recent press release from Stockholm Sweden the software developer Cubeia Ltd, has announced its launch of the first open source multi-player server focused on the online gambling industry.

  • Events

  • Web Browsers

  • SaaS

    • High stakes for open source in the commercial cloud

      Cloud computing has been described by some of the more radical thinkers as a profound challenge to the heart of software freedom. There’s some justification to this accusation.

      First, you need more than your software’s source code to take your cloud activity into your own hands. Although open source gives you the freedom to use, study, modify, and distribute the software, it doesn’t necessarily allow the use of the place it runs or the APIs needed to access that place. As such, considering your software-freedom-derived business flexibility in the area of cloud computing is more complex than for in-house desktop or server solutions.

    • Puppet equipped to be OpenStack interface
    • OpenStack Is Not A Proprietary Cloud, Kemp Argues

      Former NASA CTO and Nebula founder Chris Kemp says private clouds will need to be based on a flexible, general purpose set of open source code that can work with public clouds.

    • Open vs. proprietary debate heats up the cloud

      The familiar debate of open source vs. proprietary IT offerings now seems in full swing in the cloud, and the rhetoric shooting back and forth between some of the major vendors is intensifying. The most recent round really picked up a few weeks ago when Citrix announced it would bring its CloudStack cloud building platform to the Apache Software Foundation, creating a competing model to OpenStack. Before that, OpenStack had been gaining momentum in the open source cloud worlds. While Citrix’s move was initially seen as a competition to OpenStack, both companies have more recently taken aim at a common foe: VMware.

  • Databases

  • CMS

  • Funding

  • BSD

  • Public Services/Government

    • Get rid of ‘digital handcuffs’, says European commission vice-president

      The openness of the web needs to be protected and “digital handcuffs” need to be removed, Neelie Kroes, the vice-president of the European commission with responsibility for Europe’s digital agenda, has said.

      Speaking at the World Wide Web (WWW2012) conference in Lyon on Thursday, Kroes examined the idea of an open web and spoke of its benefits. “With a truly open, universal platform, we can deliver choice and competition; innovation and opportunity; freedom and democratic accountability,” she said.

      Holding up a pair of handcuffs sent to her the previous day by the Free Software Foundation along with a letter asking if she was “with them on openness”, she said: “Let me show you, these handcuffs are not closed, not locked. I can open them if and when I want. That’s what I mean by being open online, what it means to me to get rid of ‘digital handcuffs’.”

    • ‘Make M’sia open-source software hub’

      Malaysia should take the lead and implement policies to transform the country into an international open-source software (OSS) hub, Consumer Association of Penang (CAP) said here today.

      CAP president SM Mohamed Idris suggested that the government form a specific agency to formulate policies to make Malaysia the leader in the promotion and development of OSS.

      He urged the government to take the initiative to make the country an OSS hub that would save millions of ringgit for Malaysian consumers and companies.

      He said it would create jobs and develop skills for local manpower, providing the competitive cutting-edge expertise and support services for the huge OSS market worldwide.

    • Dev: keep government tech open source

      Linux admin Richard Harvey has made an impassioned plea for support in influencing UK government policy on open source.

      The government is currently consulting on the use of open standards and open source as an alternative to proprietary software. Corporations that stand to lose out are lobbying the government in an attempt to discredit open source and open standards, he claimed on his Support Open Standards website.

      “As the open source community, we have generally not responded to the consultation because we may have read it and thought ‘that’s really good’,” said Harvey on the site. “We need to feed this back, otherwise this will become a one-sided debate. Don’t let large corporates buy UK policy.”

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Real-life, working Tricorder developed by Trekkie-scientist and made open source available

      Sometime at the beginning of the year I mentioned in post that once stepping into the age of Terahertz electromagnetic waves (T-rays), which can penetrate any molecule and and then interpret it for identification, we will come to know a slew of new, grand applications, from surveillance , to medical, but possibly the most interesting prospect would be the passing of Star Trek’s iconic handheld device, the tricorder, to the realm of reality. It might take a while for a full fledged tricoder to be created, not until T-ray scanner/emitters become reasonable enough, however Dr. Peter Jansen, a PhD graduate of the Cognitive Science Laboratory at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, has come up with the best working tricorder-spin off so far. His handheld device is capable of sensing temperature, pressure, humidity, distances, location, motion and even electromagnetic measurements to test magnetic fields, and is open source available – anyone has access to the device’s plans and can build one at home.

    • Updated: Virtual MS research community emerges

      Stakeholders in the development of multiple sclerosis drugs have taken their fight against the neurodegenerative disease online with the launch of a virtual community intended to connect researchers of MS and related disorders. The effort has emerged after earlier crowd-sourcing and open source efforts to discover new treatments.

    • Open Data

      • City to Allocate $50,000 for Open-Source Data

        Raleigh is talking the talk and walking the open-source walk. In a 6-to-2 vote, city councilors agreed Tuesday to provide $50,000 annually for an open-source data catalog.

        The funding will be included in next year’s budget, which will be presented by City Manager Russell Allen next month. Councilor and Technology and Communication Committee Chair Bonner Gaylord, who originally proposed the idea, said the catalog is a necessary step for a more open and transparent government.

      • The Open Source Public Tree Inventory Platform – OpenTreeMap
      • Opening Up the Inner Workings of New York City

        One of the most fascinating impacts of the open data and open source (software code that’s available to the public to improve and reuse) movements has been the influx of new web tools, developed by private companies and nonprofits, that help people better engage with, and navigate, their city.

        In March, Mayor Michael Bloomberg signed a law mandating that all city agencies put their data online over the course of the next six years.

        The Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT), which oversees how new technologies are being used by other city agencies, began putting city data online in a Socrata site — technology created in Seattle — in 2011, and will enforce the city’s new requirements.

        The benefits of open data can be seen in the work of the nonprofit company OpenPlans, which has been at the forefront of the open source movement in New York City. The products and services it creates using data and code from the MTA and other city agencies illuminate how New Yorkers might live in the near future, as the physical and digital versions of the city merge together.

    • Open Access/Content

      • A cornerstone for success

        An open source textbook library that would be available to students free of charge is a promising step toward the future.

    • Open Hardware

      • Open-source Hardware Movement Seeks Legitimacy

        Inspired by the success of the open-source software movement, a group of technology enthusiasts is looking to unite the fragmented open-source hardware community in an effort to promote hardware innovation.

  • Standards/Consortia

Leftovers

  • Study Calls on EU Regulators to Free Up the Airwaves

    The European Commission released a ground-breaking study on shared access to radio spectrum. The study, conducted by SCF Associates Ltd, calls for a sweeping reform of wireless communications policies, so as to free up more airwaves and pave the way for “super-WiFi” networks. The EU is severely lagging behind the US when it comes to adapting spectrum policy to new needs and possibilities, and this study should sound as a wake-up call for policy-makers.

  • Security

  • Finance

    • SEC, CFTC Retreat On Swap Dealer Regulation

      Corporate America, with help from the Obama administration, has struck yet another blow against the scary financial regulations it claims will hurt the economy.

      On Wednesday they undercut new regulations on derivatives, which the detail-obsessed among us might point out didn’t just hurt the economy but nearly destroyed it. Just a few years ago.

      It’s just the latest in a growing string of defeats and surrenders by regulators to the same financial industry that helped nearly destroy the economy, and needed massive bailouts as a result. Just a few years ago.

      Under heavy pressure from the energy industry and other corporate interests, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission and the Securities and Exchange Commission are retreating from a plan to regulate many reaches of the U.S. trade in financial derivatives known as swaps, including the credit derivatives that nearly brought down the financial system.

04.21.12

Links 21/4/2012: Linux on the Watch, More Migrations to Linux in India

Posted in News Roundup at 11:22 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • Finance

    • Sequoia Fund Manager Campaigns Against Goldman Board Member, Former Fannie CEO Jim Johnson

      A telling taboo in elite circles is the issue of corruption. At INET last year, after a panel discussion on the financial crisis, Jamie Galbraith said he was astonished that there was not a single mention of fraud. His observation was met with a resounding silence.

    • The Risk of ‘Hot’ Inflation

      The answer is a ‘cold’ inflation, marked by a steady loss of purchasing power that has progressed through Western economies, not merely over the past few years but over the past decade. Moreover, perhaps it’s also the case that complacency in the face of empirical data (heavily-manipulated, many would argue), support has grown up around ongoing “benign” inflation.

      If so, Western economies face an unpriced risk now, not from spiraling deflation, nor hyperinflation, but rather from the breakout of a (merely) strong inflation.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Possible hepatitus C cure stymied by deadlocked patent owners

      The two companies “owning” the drugs, however, are refusing to enter serious negotiations. Instead, they seem to be guarding their current patent monopolies and the profits generated thereby, while offering the public pablum justifications for not getting on with a deal that seems obvious and hugely in the public interest.

    • Copyrights

      • ACTA

        • Is the G8 already working on a new ACTA?

          A leaked G8 (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the UK and USA) document gives the strongest indication yet that the leading countries behind ACTA are working on the basis that the Agreement is now in serious trouble and needs to be fundamentally re-thought and re-worked – and in its current form even abandoned.

          The leaked document, apparently prepared in the context of law enforcement working groups, appears to consciously address some of the criticisms that have been made of ACTA. In particular, the document avoids repeating the most obvious failure in ACTA – seeking to propose a “one size fits all” solution for every IPR issue from counterfeiting to unauthorised copying of digital goods. Instead, it narrows its focus wholly to counterfeit goods and medicines.

04.20.12

Linux Device for Retro Games, Raspberry Pi Pre-orders @ 350,000

Posted in News Roundup at 2:41 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Links 20/4/2012:

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • Security

  • Finance

    • The European Stabilization Mechanism, Or How the Goldman Vampire Squid Just Captured Europe

      By December 2011, European Central Bank president Mario Draghi, former vice president of Goldman Sachs Europe, was able to approve a 500 billion Euro bailout for European banks without asking anyone’s permission. And in January 2012, a permanent rescue funding program called the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) was passed in the dead of night with barely even a mention in the press. The ESM imposes an open-ended debt on EU member governments, putting taxpayers on the hook for whatever the ESM’s Eurocrat overseers demand.

      The bankers’ coup has triumphed in Europe seemingly without a fight. The ESM is cheered by Eurozone governments, their creditors, and “the market” alike, because it means investors will keep buying sovereign debt. All is sacrificed to the demands of the creditors, because where else can the money be had to float the crippling debts of the Eurozone governments?

  • Privacy

    • Privacy Advocates vs. The Government: Why CISPA Will Become Law

      Have you heard about CISPA? It’s the acronym for the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act.

      CISPA is being likened to the now-moribund SOPA and PIPA bills smothered by Congress after widespread public opposition.

      However, only opponents see similarities. Advocates see it as completely different.

04.19.12

Links 19/4/2012: Linux 3.4 RC3, GNOME Shell 3.4.1, Fedora 17 Almost Done

Posted in News Roundup at 2:38 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • Why Apple Will Get Rich While Losing Market Share
  • Security

    • The TSA’s mission creep is making the US a police state

      Ever since 2010, when the Transportation Security Administration started requiring that travelers in American airports submit to sexually intrusive gropings based on the apparent anti-terrorism principle that “If we can’t feel your nipples, they must be a bomb”, the agency’s craven apologists have shouted down all constitutional or human rights objections with the mantra “If you don’t like it, don’t fly!”

      [...]

      Anyone who rode the bus in Houston, Texas during the 2-10pm shift last Friday faced random bag checks and sweeps by both drug-sniffing dogs and bomb-sniffing dogs (the latter being only canines necessary if “preventing terrorism” were the actual intent of these raids), all courtesy of a joint effort between TSA VIPR nests and three different local and county-level police departments. The new Napolitano doctrine, then: “Show us your papers, show us everything you’ve got, justify yourself or you’re not allowed to go about your everyday business.”

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • North America Takes Further Steps to Export its Natural Gas

      North America has a number of LNG export projects underway, mostly in Kitimat, British Columbia. But yesterday the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) approved the first application for such a facility in the lower 48. Until these projects are operational, North American natural gas will continue to be trapped by geography. And, given that prices here are near $2.00 per million btu, I thought it would be enlightening to pull the most recent data chart from FERC, showing what customers pay for the same amount of NG, in liquified form, around the world. | see: World LNG Estimated April 2012 Landed Prices.

  • Finance

  • Privacy

  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • Danish Presidency on the scrounge – Future Internet Assembly

      Die Danish EU Presidency is on the scrouge. For the EU Future Internet Assembly they raise fees from lobbyists. Makes me wonder if they fear EU presidency conferences become the new food stamps. I find it unpleasant that even a low walled garden would exclude parts of the Dutch population e.g. students from participation.

  • DRM

    • International Day Against DRM — May 4, 2012

      While DRM has largely been defeated in downloaded music, it is a growing problem in the area of ebooks, where people have had their books restricted so they can’t freely loan, re-sell or donate them, read them without being tracked, or move them to a new device without re-purchasing all of them. They’ve even had their ebooks deleted by companies without their permission. It continues to be a major issue in the area of movies and video too.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • ACTA

        • Encouraging Draft ACTA Report, Still Under Copyright Lobbies Influence

          David Martin, the rapporteur of ACTA at the EU Parliament, has issued his draft report recommending the Parliament to reject ACTA. This is an important step toward effectively killing this dangerous agreement. But while denouncing ACTA, the rapporteur nevertheless supports the 15 year-long war on culture sharing. He also carefully avoid to stress the need for a positive reform of copyright, so as to protect fundamental freedoms online and fostering access to culture and knowledge.

        • ACTA Mobilization, And Beyond

          In the next few weeks, the EU Parliament will continue to work on ACTA, the anti-counterfeiting trade agreement, ahead of its final vote around the summer. This is a crucial moment for the citizen mobilization against ACTA, which will have to resist the growing pressure that the copyright lobbies put on the Parliament. Beyond the rejection of ACTA, the whole EU copyright enforcement policy needs to be revised. Only a reform of copyright can protect once and for all fundamental rights online of EU citizens and push the online creative economy in a new direction, away from blind repression. Here is a state of play on the next steps of the mobilization in the European Parliament.

04.17.12

Links 17/4/2012: Wine 1.5.2 Released, Raspberry Pi Starts Shipping

Posted in News Roundup at 5:42 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Linux Features Prominently at This Year’s CES
  • How Linux defines success and innovation

    Based on that incredibly important criteria, I hereby declare that Linux has reached the pinnacle of true success. Send the marketing folks home, ladies and gentlemen, we’re done here, because everyone and their brother is now officially trying to the “the Linux of” whatever the sector within which they are seeking to succeed.

    The latest company to hang this label on their product line is VMware, which has declared via CTO Steve Herrod that their new Cloud Foundry platform-as-a-service (PaaS) will be the “Linux of the cloud.”

  • More FUD About Security of GNU/Linux

    The truth is you are thousands of times more secure with GNU/Linux than that other OS. The count of malwares proves that. The incidence of malware infections proves that. The prevalence of GNU/Linux servers on the web proves that. The fact that M$’s servers are becoming more like GNU/Linux machines with time is another. Heck, M$’s 2008 server can even run GUIless and uses scripting. Where have we heard of that? Oh, GNU/Linux back about 1995.

    It is a standard military manoeuvre to seek out an enemy’s weakness and exploit it. If you are trying to run IT are you charging the enemy’s centre with it’s heavy artillery, enfilade fire and mines or are you going to flank him and cut his supply lines? We must do the same in IT. M$ has proven thousands of times that its software is insecure. We should run GNU/Linux. It’s the smart thing to do.

  • Softpedia Linux Weekly, Issue 195
  • Don’t forget the newbies!
  • Linux and Open-source news overview for week 15-2012
  • Server

    • Ubuntu-Friendly HP Cloud Enters Public Beta

      According to survey results released earlier this year, Ubuntu still has a lot of room to grow in the cloud space. But it seems to be doing just that, the latest indicator being HP’s release of cloud products based partially on Ubuntu. Here’s the scoop, and why it matters for the Ubuntu world in particular.

      Last week, HP announced the public availability beginning May 10 of its HP Cloud platform, which began life as a private beta about six months ago. Most of the HP Cloud features are not very unique — it’s the same basic deal as other popular hosted cloud infrastructures, like Amazon EC2 — but one of the characteristics HP seems to be pushing is the open-source technologies on which its solutions are built, freeing users from vendor lock-in.

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • Calligra Project open source office suite released

        /li>

      • Managing Users with KDE

        KDE Plasma Workspaces provide a graphical interface and lots of eye candy for the desktop Linux experience. Many would argue that it is equal to or even better at this than Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X. KDE, however, is not only a graphical frontend for Linux. It comes with a set of applications and also with a set of system administration tools that can help power users take control of their desktops or laptops without dropping to the command line.

  • Distributions

    • Slackware Needs Your Help

      For Slackware, it’s been no exception. Some of you faithful Slackers may have noticed lately that the Slackware home page has been offline. I posted about this at Jeremy’s Linux Questions forums. Alien Bob (Eric Hameleers) replied stating that it was an old hardware/lack of funds issue. This is sad. :(

    • New Releases

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat’s reaction to Microsoft’s open-source spinoff: Welcome! (mostly)

        There were a number of points in Cormier’s blog post, however, that could be interpreted as being less complimentary toward the Redmond giant. A reference to Red Hat having attained its current status “not without opposition” may well be a veiled dig at Microsoft, as could a line asserting that “some of the new entrants [to the open source world] are surprising.”

      • Red Hat Enterprise Linux celebrates 10 years of Enterprise Linux

        While Red Hat might be one of the largest open source providers in the world, Jim Totton, vice president for the company’s platform business unit, is surprisingly coy about mistakes the company has made and learnt from in the decade since it launched.

        Coming up to its 10-year anniversary in May, Totton is in Australia from the US to celebrate. However, discussing mistakes Red Hat has made over the years doesn’t appear to be on the agenda.

    • Debian Family

      • Debian Project News – April 16th, 2012

        * Debian project leader elected
        * Registration open for DebConf12
        * Personal BSP initiatives
        * The state of Debian s390x
        * Interviews
        * Other news
        * Upcoming events
        * New Debian Contributors
        * Release-Critical bugs statistics for the upcoming release
        * Important Debian Security Advisories
        * New and noteworthy packages
        * Work-needing packages
        * Want to continue reading DPN?

      • Siduction 11.1

        Siduction 11.1 is a fork of the Aptosid distro. Siduction comes in KDE, Xfce or LXDe spins. You can get 32-bit or 64-bit versions of each spin. Siduction is based on Debian Sid and includes Linux Kernel 3.1-6 and X.Org server 1.11.2.902.

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Speed up your computer with Ubuntu

            Windows is great, but after a while, it can get cluttered up with too many programs and become intolerably sluggish. Backing up your files and reinstalling it can help, but an alternative is to try the free Ubuntu operating system. Ubuntu isn’t too demanding and can make even a lowly netbook seem sprightly compared with running Windows on it.

          • Job Posting Reveals Canonical’s Plans for Ubuntu Phone OS
          • Ubuntu wants to be your cloud and data-center Linux
          • Ubuntu/Canonical Goes Global

            Ubuntu GNU/Linux has been global on the web but Canonical/Mark Shuttleworth has a larger project in mind. So far they have created business relationships with most of the large OEMs and provided cloud services and content-distribution portals.

          • Ubuntu Phone OS Takes A Step Closer?
          • Canonical is not interested in the Linux kernel

            Two weeks ago a Linux Foundation report showed that since version 2.6.32, Microsoft had committed more code to the Linux kernel than Canonical. Since then, Canonical has faced claims from rivals that it does not contribute to Linux as much as it should given its popularity.

          • Adopt An ISO

            We need to ensure we get total coverage of our different ISO images; the different images that you can download and install from. Each of these images has a small set of mandatory tests that we need to run through to ensure everything is working. We want to ensure all of these mandatory tests are run so that we can find any problems before the release and get them fixed.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Installing Linux Mint 12

              Y’all should know by now that I’m a Linux user. I write in Linux, I game in Linux, heck, my house has been Microsoft-free for about three years and I’ve never looked back. (The only exception being my day-job laptop. I’m stuck with Windows there.) The only thing that really bugs me about Linux is the uncertainty of upgrades.

              I’ve been using Linux Mint for a while now. Since version 8, I believe, when I changed over from Ubuntu. I find Linux Mint more user friendly than just straight Ubuntu and this is important. I’m a very plug-and-play kind of person. I don’t want to sit around installing drivers and slogging away at software installs. I want to plug it in, turn it on, and have it work. When I installed Linux Mint 8 for the first time, it did just that.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Raspberry Pi $35 mini system starts shipping

      Raspberry Pi, the $35 Linux system about the size of a credit card, is fully baked and ready to eat… er, ship.

      The system was designed by a British nonprofit with the idea of encouraging people everywhere, particularly young people in developing countries, to become more interested in programming.

    • First Wave of Raspberry Pi Units Arriving in Users’ Hands
    • Delivery begins for first units of Raspberry Pi’s $35 Linux computer
    • Raspberry Pi fetches over the odds on Ebay
    • Conquered: Raspberry Pi Starts Shipping

      Free Software is resilient, Raspberry Pi has proven it again. After a month full of challenges and hurdles whether it be wrongly soldered LAN port or requirement of getting a CE mark the tiny devices are now shipping. For those who missed to order, the Raspberry Pi boards from RS and Allied are priced at £21.60 plus a shipping charge of £4.95 to any destination worldwide, plus VAT and import duty as applicable.

    • Raspberry Pi Gets New Arch Linux ARM Build
    • Phones

      • Android

        • HTC Golf Images Leaked To Press
        • Rooted Kindle Fire screenshot tour

          This screenshot tour was created to accompany DeviceGuru’s forthcoming post describing how we rooted and tweaked an Amazon Kindle Fire. The tour comprises more than 100 screenshots, which showcase the Kindle Fire’s standard homescreens and settings, the utilities and process we used for rooting and tweaking it, and the overall end result.

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Cisco Cius Android Tablets & AppHQ: At Cisco Partner Summit?

        When Cisco Systems CEO John Chambers and other executives take the stage at this week’s Cisco Partner Summit, The VAR Guy wonders: Will Cisco (NASDAQ: CSCO) executives be armed with Cius tablets? The answer to that question could reveal how Cisco is feeling about its purpose-built tablets, which run Google Android and leverage the Cisco AppHQ app store.

        Cisco Cius tablets don’t seek to compete in the consumer tablet market. Rather, the devices are designed for corporate executives who leverage unified communications and video applications. Cisco Partner Summit 2012 (April 16-19, San Diego), could provide a prime stage to update partners on the Cius.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Open Networking Foundation Set to Advance OpenFlow

    One of the most exciting up and coming trends in the world of networking in the last few years has been emergence of Software Defined Networking (SDN). At the core of the SDN revolution is the open source OpenFlow protocol which has helped to define the entire SDN space.

  • Netflix to Open Source Army of Cloud Monkeys
  • Netflix Pledges to Open Source Its “Monkey” Cloud Utilities
  • Netflix open sources cloud tools in hopes to attract people
  • How will open source react to Microsoft?

    The hits just keep on coming for the Android mobile operating system–albeit this time from European telecom vendors that are insisting the Linux-based operating system would help prop up the flagging Lumia smartphone sales… if only the Lumias ran Android instead of Windows Phone 7.

  • Web Browsers

  • Databases

    • MySQL founder’s latest MariaDB release takes “enterprise” features open-source

      MontyProgram AB, the company formed by MySQL creator Michael “Monty” Widenius in the wake of his break with Sun Microsystems, has released the latest version of MariaDB, a “drop-in replacement” for MySQL built on the MySQL 5.5 codebase. MariaDB 5.5.23, which according to developer Colin Charles has “1.5 million additional lines of code compared to MySQL,” pushes forward the development of an open-source database with features that aim to match those of Oracle’s commercial-only MySQL releases.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice/OpenOffice//Calligra

  • BSD

    • A look at FreeNAS 8.0.4

      A few weeks ago I asked if readers would be interested in seeing reviews of network-attached storage (NAS) projects. The feedback was really positive and so I present the first of what I hope to be a series of reviews covering NAS solutions. This week we will be looking at FreeNAS, a FreeBSD-based project sponsored by iXsystems.

      Before we get started I think it’s only fair that we address the question of why we might want to run a dedicated NAS operating system rather than a generic server system. For instance, this week we’re looking at FreeNAS, what motivation do we have for using it instead of FreeBSD or a popular Linux server distribution? The answer is largely one of specialization. People looking at network-attached storage are looking for a place to store files (usually a lot of files) and aren’t interested in other features a server operating system might provide. A NAS box will be focused on storing and transferring files, it’s probably not going to serve up e-mails or websites or provide DNS services. With that in mind, a NAS should come with all the tools we might need to easily add new disks, take snapshots, perform backups and, being focused on these tasks exclusively, it can cut out any extras, providing a lightweight solution.

  • Standards/Consortia

Leftovers

  • Security

    • Hacking IT systems to become a criminal offence

      Cyber attacks on IT systems would become a criminal offence punishable by at least two years in prison throughout the EU under a draft law backed by the Civil Liberties Committee on Tuesday. Possessing or distributing hacking software and tools would also be an offence, and companies would be liable for cyber attacks committed for their benefit.

  • Civil Rights

    • Expert: New CISPA Bill Isn’t SOPA, But Still Attacks Constitutional Rights

      Congress’ latest attempt at a bill that affects the way people use the Internet has many scared, with some calling the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) is “worse than SOPA,” the bill that caused widespread Internet outrage and blackouts before ultimately being shelved. Experts say the danger level associated with CISPA depends on the answer to one question: Which Constitution amendment do you care about more, the First or the Fourth?

  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • Web freedom faces greatest threat ever, warns Google’s Sergey Brin

      The principles of openness and universal access that underpinned the creation of the internet three decades ago are under greater threat than ever, according to Google co-founder Sergey Brin.

      In an interview with the Guardian, Brin warned there were “very powerful forces that have lined up against the open internet on all sides and around the world”. “I am more worried than I have been in the past,” he said. “It’s scary.”

04.14.12

Links 14/4/2012: Mandriva Speaks Out, Firefox Demotes Flash

Posted in News Roundup at 11:02 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • Machine Learning with WEKA: An Interview with Mark Hall
  • Syllable chalks up new release

    Syllable, an attempt to write a desktop-focused operating system from scratch using best practices, has notched up a new milestone, with its developers releasing 0.6.7 today.

  • Friday Favorite: Audacity 2.0

    Audacity, the venerable and much loved open source audio editor, has a 2.0 release today in versions for OS X, Windows and GNU/Linux.

  • Eaton touts open-source SDK as a boon to power management

    UPS supplier Eaton has released a new open-source software development kit aimed at providing better accessibility and flexibility to users of its power management products.

    RELATED: Cisco, EMC, VMware unite behind big data, cloud training initiative

    Hervé Tardy, the company’s vice president and general manager of distributed power quality, says the ability to substantially modify the management software based on the specific needs of each client is a powerful upside to the firm’s technology.

  • Eaton Offers Customized Open-Source Software to Address IT Manager Power Challenges
  • Open Source Analytics News Service Debuts
  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Flash and Java to be click-to-play in future Firefox

        After more than two years on the back burner, Firefox has finally introduced click-to-play (or “opt-in activation” in Mozilla terms) for all plug-ins, including Flash, Java, and Silverlight. Plug-ins are the single biggest cause of browser slow-downs and security vulnerabilities — and Chrome has had a similar feature for more than a year — so really, it’s about time Mozilla added this to Firefox.

      • Firefox To Require Permission For Plug-Ins

        Mozilla engineers are in the process of improving the security and speed of Firefox by implementing a permission switch for browser plug-ins.

      • Firefox gets click-to-play option for plugins
  • SaaS

    • HP’s Converged Cloud Services: A Very Big Bet on OpenStack
    • Why Open Source Is the Key to Cloud Innovation

      In the 25 years since Richard Stallman wrote the GNU General Public License, free and open source software (FOSS) have become pervasive in computing: Linux, Apache HTTP Server, MySQL and more can be found in large numbers of enterprises across the globe. And open source is now increasingly undergirding cloud computing as well.

      “Open source is certainly at the foundation in terms of building out cloud technologies,” says Byran Che, senior director of product management at Red Hat and responsible for its cloud operations offerings, management software and Red Hat Enterprise MRG, (Red Hat’s Messaging, Real-time and Grid platform). “If you take a look at market share in the server space, as you look at traditional data centers, about 70 percent are running on the Windows platform and about 30 percent are running Linux. As you take a look at what operating systems people are choosing to build applications on in the cloud, the ratio flips completely.”

    • Red Hat and IBM sign on to OpenStack Foundation
    • IT Consultants Build OpenStack Cloud Business Practices
    • OpenStack Wins the Open Source Cloud

      Over the last two weeks there has been a whole lot of news about ‘open’ clouds. From my perspective though there is now one clear winner – OpenStack.

      As opposed to say Eucalyptus or CloudStack, OpenStack has one key item that those other two ‘open’ cloud efforts do not – THE SUPPORT OF EVERY MAJOR LINUX DISTRIBUTION.

    • Open Source ownCloud Debuts Enterprise File Sync and Sharing
  • Databases

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

  • CMS

    • 13 Tips for Better Joomla CMS Security

      With the surging popularity of Joomla, it’s no surprise hackers are drawn to it as well. Don’t panic, however. There are a number of things you can do to strengthen your security and turn your Joomla website into a fortress. Read along as we show you how to guard against the most common exploits and hacks that this open source CMS faces.

  • Healthcare

    • If the Other Shoe Drops, I Want Medicare

      More than five weeks ago, when some of my cancer markers were elevated, I began the process of bartering with the insurance company, doing the tests they said would be covered, and then coming all the way back to the start to finally getting the tests my doctors originally ordered. My full diagnosis and treatment considerations have been pending ever since, and that has given me time to think and to remember. Waiting, worrying, and wondering.

      It’s not that I believe every cancer is a death sentence. I certainly know that isn’t the case. I am a uterine cancer survivor. My mom is a two time breast cancer survivor. But I am 57 years old now — old enough to be an expensive liability in our society, especially if I get sick and need care, but too young to be covered by Medicare. If I face a serious illness like cancer again that costs me an awful lot in out-of-pocket expenses not covered by insurance and lost time from making the money we need for survival, I will doom my husband to struggles he doesn’t need and that are not his fault. Bad enough that one of us should be sick, there is certainly no need for me to take him down with the ship.

  • Business

  • Finance

  • Public Services/Government

    • European public services must follow Iceland’s open-source lead

      The global economic crisis has triggered a series of unprecedented social and political upheavals that have left many governments on the brink of bankruptcy. The high volume of debts have engulfed even the most well-managed economies, triggering a chain reaction in which cuts to public sector spending have become inevitable.

      A high profile casualty of these consequences was Iceland, where a collapse in the banking system led to long-running financial and diplomatic crisis. Significantly, it has recently been announced that Iceland is set to swap its high-cost public sector proprietary software solutions in favour of open source alternatives. Strategists behind the move cited cost savings as a prime reason for the shift in solution and, to their credit, this is a perfectly logical reason for engaging with open source alternatives.

    • Digital Native Government Agency Embraces The Power Of Open Source
    • U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Gets Open Source, Publishes on GitHub
    • Open Government is Go for Launch at NASA

      The new Open Government Plan, “Flagship Initiative,” is the creation of an “accessible, participatory and transparent web environment,” a goal reflected in the new site. Users are welcomed to a colorful, easy-to-read and easy-to-browse database of NASA projects and information — and they’re encouraged to comment on everything.

    • NASA’s Open-Source Open Government Future

      NASA chose its website as flagship for a revamp of its open government plan rolled out yesterday, and — as if to show the agency meant business — did so with a brand-new, brightly colored buzzword-catcher of a website.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Agencies lay out plans for Open Gov 2.0
    • Big Pharmas back open source drug discovery with money and molecules

      Call it crowdsourcing for cures. Fed up with outdated models for finding new treatments that have missed the mark, drugmakers and other public health stakeholders have ignited open source efforts that involve networks of companies and scientists joining forces to discover drugs. And one of the pioneering efforts of this ilk in India is moving ahead with a mid-stage trial for a drug against tuberculosis.

      India’s Open Source Drug Discovery unit, which uses an online infrastructure to connect more than 5,500 scientists and others, revealed late last month with the Global Alliance on TB that the anti-tuberculosis molecule will be investigated in a Phase IIb trial in India, Forbes reported. And the open source group has two more TB molecules in advanced preclinical testing that could eventually enter trials and combat the infectious disease, which kills about 400,000 people annually in India.

    • Linux for Your Electric Car: Techies Create Open Source EVs

      Zero is the Apple of electric motorcycles. The Santa Cruz, Calif.,-based company’s bikes coast out of the factory in gleaming perfection with control software that has been optimized for safety and performance. And, as with iPhones, the source code remains a company secret. Gearheads who like to know every detail of how their machines work or want to modify them either have to jailbreak their devices or start from scratch. They can turn to outside sources but, again, the only option is to buy a motor controller kit from a company that has made all of the configuration decisions in advance.

    • The Tumanako project looks to make electric vehicles open source
    • Better EVs Through Open Source Collaboration

      “People who are into electric vehicles like to be able to tweak them to make them faster and to be able to fix them themselves,” says Philip Court, the director of Greenstage, an electric racecar developer in New Zealand.

    • Boom in Nordic crowdsourcing takes in film, lawmaking
    • How Open Source Drug Discovery Is Helping India Develop New Drugs

      Crowdsourcing can boast of many success stories today, but in 2008, when the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) launched such an effort for drug discovery, there weren’t many. Four years on, its Open Source Drug Discovery (OSDD) network is emerging as a cyber platform to garner resources for developing drugs that pharmaceutical companies don’t find attractive enough.

    • The H Half Hour: Open source and evil genius

      A typical evil genius will attempt to conquer the world and keep his or her plans secret. As any reader of The H knows, that’s no way to build a culture of innovation within the evil genius community. The H was pleased, therefore, to talk to Simon Monk who has been using open source technology, like the Arduino, as the basis for a series of Evil Genius books for aspirant evil geniuses and other people who want to get building open source based gadgetry.

    • Open Data

    • Open Hardware

  • Programming

    • Legit introduces alternate Git workflow
    • Reasons Behind Popularity of Open Source Language for PHP Web Application Development

      PHP as an open source language has gained more popularity from PHP developers and PHP programmers because of its more interactive approach than HTML. Not only it is very fast, secure, economical, and efficiently manages the data but PHP codes can also be incorporated very easily. Moreover, another reason behind its popularity is that a web developer can download it free of cost and customize it according to the project requirements. Several business owners and big corporate are attracted towards PHP custom web application development due to its easy availability and flexible terms and conditions.

  • Standards/Consortia

Leftovers

  • Is Lobbying Closer To Bribery… Or Extortion?

    We’ve certainly talked quite a bit about the institutional-level corruption of the way Congress and lobbying works, but a recent This American Life episode, done in partnership with the Planet Money team takes a much deeper dive into how lobbying works. You absolutely should listen to it. It’s really fascinating, even for folks who follow a lot of this stuff. There is also a full transcript, but hearing the whole thing is quite fascinating. Among the elements that are most interesting are the details of just how much time and effort goes into politicians raising money, and how the various fundraisers work.

  • Whatever happened to Unix?

    Open Source Initiative cofounder Bruce Perens said that, thanks to Apple, Unix is more popular than ever. “We now have more Unix systems than we’ve ever had before. They are in our phones and our access points. I think if you actually set out to count, you could make a graph and show that Unix—if you define Unix as something that serves a POSIX I/O—that Unix is at its peak today,” he said.

    “What’s the difference? We don’t care about the stuff the user doesn’t see. The user doesn’t see Unix. This is something I often have a hard time explaining to companies.”

    And while one of the world’s largest companies—Apple—is based entirely on Unix kernels, that doesn’t mean Unix is on the cusp of a massive comeback. In fact, it would seem that the formal Unix market has essentially stood still in recent years.

  • Security

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • Global Oil Production Update: EIA Revises Two Decades of Oil Data

      With the most recent release of international oil production data, EIA Washington has revised figures back to 1985. This is one of the most comprehensive revisions I have seen in several years. Generally, the totals were revised slightly lower, and this was especially true for the past decade. Data for the full year of 2011 has now completed. | see: Global Average Annual Crude Oil Production mbpd 2001 – 2011.

  • Finance

  • Censorship

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Trademarks

      • Shut your kale-hole

        CHICK-FIL-A sells an average of nine sandwiches per second at its roughly 1,600 restaurants. Bo Muller-Moore paints T-shirts in the garage next to his house in Montpelier, Vermont. In 2011 Chick-fil-A’s sales were more than $4 billion; Mr Muller-Moore (pictured) estimates that his were $40,000.

        [...]

        They warned Mr Muller-Moore that they had successfully pressured other miscreants into dropping some 30 slogans, from “Eat More Dog” to “Eat More Music”. Their letter also alleged that Mr Muller-Moore’s “misappropriation of Chick-fil-A’s EAT MOR CHIKIN intellectual property…is likely to cause confusion.”

04.13.12

Links 13/4/2012: Android on the Wrist, $35 Android ICS Tablet

Posted in News Roundup at 1:14 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • ‘Flashback’ Mac Malware: One More Reason to Switch to Linux

    Given the vast numbers of Macs that are apparently infected with the Flashback Trojan malware, it’s not at all surprising to see that sales of Mac security software are now skyrocketing.

  • Desktop

    • Malaysia Educates the Public About GNU/Linux

      The Government of Malaysia has long used GNU/Linux internally. In their country, many consumers are unaware of GNU/Linux and replace FreeDOS on PCs with illegal copies of that other OS. A program is under way to persuade OEMs and retailers to use GNU/Linux on PCs instead.

    • Google Chrome OS Review: Heading Towards Microsoft Market?

      With an eye on an unseen, distant future the ‘pseudo-modern’ desktops are adopting the single windowed approach. Whether it be Microsoft’s Metro, Ubuntu’s Unity or Gnome’s new shell, they all think PC is nothing more than a smartphone with a touch screen.

      I am one of those who are not big fans of this approach. The ‘pseudo-modern’ desktop Uis are focused on smartphone/tablet like devices where you use one window (one app) at a time. What’s the point of buying expensive CPUs and GPUs (minimum system requirements for modern operating systems) and 27″ multiple monitors when all I can do is run one app at a time?

    • If OSs were Cars

      You are not your car. You can be a hacker and ride a sedan, you can ride a muscle car being a writer and you can go to school in a BMW. For some, the car is important or even has philosophical signifant but for most, the goal is ‘what I’m going with my car’.

  • Server

    • SAP Unveils Ambitious Plans for Database Market

      While HANA and its in-memory capabilities is a key platform for SAP’s database strategy, so too is the Sybase database. SAP acquired Sybase in 2010 for $5.8 billion. Sikka said that Sybase is now able to run the entire SAP business suite.

  • Kernel Space

    • Graphics Stack

      • Open-Source ARM Mali Graphics Driver Achieves…

        The open-source ARM Mali graphics driver, known as the the Lima project, has achieved a major milestone.

        Since delivering the exclusive news of the Lima project as an open-source reverse-engineered ARM Mali graphics driver for Linux back in January, there hasn’t been too much else to report on about this driver that’s still early in its development life. This driver is called Lima since it doesn’t have the official blessing of ARM Holdings and right now has been only running simple demos with Limare. The code is available and is running on the KDE Plasma Active Tablet as was talked about and shown at FOSDEM 2012.

        Fortunately this morning I’ve heard some news from the Lima developers about hitting a major milestone. Joining Luc Verhaegen, the lead developer of the Lima project, have been Ben Brewer (another employee of Codethink) and Connor Abbot have been the latest developers joining the Belgian on this open-source driver project.

      • Open-Source NVIDIA Driver Approaches Stable State
      • Improving Linux DRM For Embedded Systems

        A set of Direct Rendering Manager patches have appeared to ease the development of targeting DRM drivers for embedded systems. There’s also two new DRM drivers using this SDRM layer.

        These patches for DRM on embedded systems provide “helpers” to take care of the DRM device and introduce an “SDRM” layer. The helpers can setup the CRTCs, encoders, connectors, and other components as separate devices rather than having the current monolithic design to a DRM driver. This work is based upon some of the Exynos driver patches by Samsung but was written by Sascha Hauer of the German-based Pengutronix.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • Is Ubuntu Unity Faster Than Gnome Panel?

      One of the most active Ubuntu developers Jo-Erlend Schinstad is also a pro-active defender of Ubuntu Unity and HUD. He tries his best to clarify doubts of users and educate them about the features of Ubuntu Unity. Muktware has published quite a lot of his articles on various topics related to Ubuntu. We recently interviewed him to understand his approach towards Ubuntu and its users. He has now posted a video to compare Ubuntu Unity with Gnome Panel, as people seem to keep saying that they are more efficient with Gnome Panel than with Ubuntu Unity.

    • More details emerge about MyUnity 4.0
    • Report: Aura Window Manager, I’m confused.
    • LMDE MATE/Cinnamon 201204 RC Screenshot Tour

      The Release Candidate of the upcoming Linux Mint Debian Edition 201204 operating system has been announced by Clement Lefebvre on April 11th, 2012.

      Linux Mint Debian Edition 201204 RC comes in two editions: the first one features the MATE 1.2 and Cinnamon 1.4 desktop environments, and the second one features the Xfce 4.8 desktop environment.

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • Calligra 2.4.0 released

        After a long developmental period, Calligra 2.4.0, the first stable version of Calligra, has been released. Calligra is a Qt-based graphic and office suite forked from KOffice in 2010. Note: In some quarters, Calligra is said to be a continuation of KOffice, rather than a fork.

      • The First Version of Calligra Released
      • The Impact Of KDE On 3D Gaming

        Being discussed following the Ubuntu 12.04 Desktops Impact Performance, Power Consumption was the impact that KDE’s KWin compositing window manager (and others that don’t redirect fullscreen windows by default) has on the OpenGL gaming performance.

        Depending upon the driver it can potentially cause a hit as shown in Wednesday’s comparison of Unity, Unity 2D, GNOME Shell, KDE, Xfce, LXDE, and Openbox. All of the desktop environments were tested in their “out of the box” / stock configurations on Ubuntu 12.04. The KDE aspect is being discussed in this forum thread where the usual items are brought up.

  • Distributions

    • ROSA Desktop 2012 beta review
    • Student stiffs penetration tool BackTrack Linux with 0-day

      A student has discovered a critical vulnerability in BackTrack, a flavour of Linux that’s a favourite among security pros.

      The previously undiscovered (hence zero-day) privilege escalation bug in the network penetration-testing distro was discovered during an ethical hacking class organised by the InfoSec Institute.

      Jack Koziol, security programme manager at the institute, explained that the bug in Backtrack 5 R2 (the latest version) allowed the student to overwrite settings to gain a root shell. The flaw was found in wicd (the Wireless Interface Connection Daemon), which has not been tested for “potential remote exploitation vectors” according to Koziol.

    • New Releases

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Mageia 2 Default Wallpapers Chosen

        Last fall Mageia put out the call for artists to participate in their Mageia 2 artwork contest. It’s been eight long months, but the choices have now been made. The new Mageia 2 default and alternative backgrounds have been chosen.

        Submitted by Luiz Fernando, the winning image is a lovely deep blue base with wisps of royal blue cutting across the primary focal lines.

    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

  • Expert witness says most popular Hotfile downloads are open source apps

    Hotfile is determined to outlast Hollywood’s ongoing crusade against file locker services. The company is defending itself against an aggressive litigation campaign that movie studios first brought against it over a year ago. Hotfile’s case may be bolstered by a recent report which shows that the two most widely-downloaded files distributed through the popular file locker service are open source software applications.

    Charges against Hotfile that alleged direct copyright infringement were thrown out last year by a federal court judge. The remaining charges allege that the company is liable for inducing its users to infringe copyright. The answer to that question will hinge on whether the courts find that Hotfile has substantial non-infringing uses.

  • The Benefits of an Open Market, Revisited

    Overall as I developer, I find the ability to instantly push out updates highly desirable. As a consumer I appreciate the fact that submissions are tested and verified to at least technically work and not crash. Is there a perfect system? Not that I know of. What is the perfect system? I don’t know. If there was a way for developers to be able to reach their users quickly with bugfixes and even new features that allow for consumers to not have to wade through extremely low quality and exact duplicate apps, then I would be one happy developer.

  • Open Source Technologies: Saving and Improving Lives

    The thought of ‘open source’ need not always conjure up images of socially removed geeks slamming away at their keyboards.

    There have been instances of the open source ideology saving and improving lives, and this article explores a couple of examples on that aspect.

  • PhoneGap 1.6 Released!

    We are happy to announce the release of PhoneGap 1.6! The PhoneGap/Apache Cordova Community has worked hard to fix many bugs (including the nasty local storage bug caused by the iOS 5.1 update) and added some new features.

  • Events

  • Web Browsers

  • SaaS

  • Databases

    • Oracle previews MySQL 5.6

      Offering a glimpse of the new features some database administrators will be working with before too long, Oracle has posted a preview version of the next MySQL relational database management system.

      The Development Milestone Release (DMR) for MySQL 5.6 comes with a number of new and still experimental features for the open source database system, including improved replication and the ability to bypass the SQL framework for faster data access.

    • Firebird SQL Project Newsletter, Issue 3
    • 10gen announces MongoDB Hadoop Connector

      10gen, the company behind MongoDB, has announced the general availability of a connector for its open source NoSQL database and Apache Hadoop, the MapReduce framework and distributed computing platform. According to its developers, version 1.0 of the connector is the “culmination of over a year of work to bring our users a solid integration layer between their MongoDB deployments and Hadoop clusters for data processing”.

    • MariaDB 5.5.23 arrives with performance improvements

      Version 5.5.23 of MariaDB, a drop-in replacement for MySQL, has been published by the developers at Monty Program. The first stable release in the 5.5 series of the open source database includes performance improvements and “a few added features” over MySQL 5.5.23, which it is based upon.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • How LibreOffice Writer Tops MS Word: 12 Features

      When reviewers look at LibreOffice and its ancestor OpenOffice.org, they inevitably assume that it’s inferior to Microsoft Office. At the very most, they may grudgingly find it acceptable for undemanding users.

      However, when you examine LibreOffice and MS Office without assumptions, the comparison changes dramatically. That’s especially true when looking at the word processors, LibreOffice’s Writer and MS Office’s Word.

      For one thing, features frequently have different names in Writer and Word. Although LibreOffice and OpenOffice.org have a history of conforming to MS Office’s name-choices — for example, in the spreadsheets, data pilots were recently renamed pivot tables to match Excel’s usage — holdouts remain. For example, the equivalent of Word’s AutoSummary in Writer remains AutoAbstract.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Who Cares About Software Freedom?

      Well it’s been a disconcerting kind of week here in the Linux blogosphere, not least because of all the darn construction going on down at the Google+ Grill.

      First it was the hammering giving Linux Girl a headache. Then, on Wednesday, she walked in after lunch and could barely recognize the place. What is this interface sorcery, she wants to know?

      Then, of course, there was the retirement of Linux Girl’s old friend, Maverick Meerkat, in the past few days as well. Alas, dear distro — we hardly knew ye!

  • Openness/Sharing

  • Programming

Leftovers

  • Security

    • New ZeuS-based Trojan leeches cash from cloud-based payrolls
    • End of Windows XP support era signals beginning of security nightmare

      Microsoft’s recent announcement that it will end support for the Windows XP operating system in two years signals the end of an era for the company, and potentially the beginning of a nightmare for everyone else.

      When Microsoft cuts the chord on XP in two years it will effectively leave millions of existing Windows-based computers vulnerable to continued and undeterred cyberattacks, many of which hold the potential to find their way into consumer, enterprise and even industrial systems running the latest software.

  • Finance

  • Copyrights

    • Illegal Copying is not Theft

      Under US law, violation of copyright is not a crime unless commercial use is made of the copy or the value is more than $1K. Even when it is a crime, illegal copying is limited to 1, 5 or 10 years for different levels of severity and this guy was likely in the 1 year category.

04.12.12

Links 12/4/2012: PCLinuxOS 2012.02 Reviews, GNU/Linux in the Punjab Government

Posted in News Roundup at 8:07 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Linux. Do it your way!

    I like to think that Linux is about a flexible an operating system as you can find. But it can be easy to forget just how flexible it is. We can get ourselves stuck in our computing habits and stick with the old and familiar. And sometimes, just trying something new can sometimes seem daunting and just not worth the effort.

  • Server

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • What Inspired Google+ New Design: Gnome 3 Shell Or Ubuntu Unity?

      Humor: Google yesterday rolled out a new layout for Google+, it’s social network. The new UI has impressed a majority of users. If Facebook’s infamous TimeLine was inspired by the horror movies “I Know What You Did Last Summer” to help stalkers and governments,”, Google has gone geek. The new design of Google+ is inspired by Gnome 3 Shell.

      “A critical piece of this social layer is a design that grows alongside our aspirations. So today we’re introducing a more functional and flexible version of Google+. We think you’ll find it easier to use and nicer to look at, but most importantly, it accelerates our efforts to create a simpler, more beautiful Google.” wrote Vic Gundotra on a Google blog.

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • Calligra 2.4 To Be Released Today
      • Akademy Keynote: Dr. Will Schroeder, KitWare CEO

        Dr. Will Schroeder is one of the keynote speakers for Akademy 2012 in Tallinn, Estonia. Will is the CEO of Kitware Inc., a proven leader in the creation and support of open-source software.

      • Simon Listens speech recognition project migrates to KDE

        The KDE Community has announced that the Simon Listens speech recognition project has successfully completed its migration from the SourceForge source code repository to KDE’s Git infrastructure. Often referred to simply as Simon, the program, which is included with some Linux distributions such as Knoppix 7.0, allows users with physical difficulties to control their systems using only their voice.

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Wayland Running Various GTK Applications

        There’s some more progress to report on with Wayland and Weston beyond the Wayland talks at last week’s LF collab summit, including a video showing various GTK applications running within Wayland on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.

        One of the independent developers that has been involved with the ongoing Wayland/Weston work for some time has posted a video and information about running various GTK applications under Wayland with an Ubuntu 12.04 LTS host. Additionally, he’s written an unofficial “State of Wayland” report as of early April.

  • Distributions

    • Slitaz 4.0 Arrives with New TazPanel Goodness

      Slitaz seems to be growing up and playing with the big boys. In the latest release, new original tools highlight the maturing nature of this tiny distro. It’s been two years in the making, but it’s been worth the wait.

    • DoudouLinux: A Starter Distro Where Baby Linux Gurus are Born

      Where do Linux gurus come from? From baby newbies. How do baby newbies become gurus? One good way is with the help of the best child- and beginner-oriented distribution, DoudouLinux.

    • New Releases

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • PCLinuxOS 2012.02 review – Hope?

        Once upon a time, PCLinuxOS used to be one of my favorite candidates for permanent desktop use, but it was back in 2009, with a truly magnificent Gnome release. Such is the trouble with great success, sequels cannot match the original. In the three years since, my experience with the distro has steadily declined. But now, there’s a fresh new release, and this means fresh new hope.

      • PCLinuxOS 2012.2 review

        One of the distributions I used in the years before starting this blog was PCLinuxOS. After I discovered that PCLinuxOS was a spinoff of Mandrake (the first Linux distro I ever used), I gave it a try, and used it for at least a year. It served me quite well but that was many years ago. What is it like these days? Here’s my review of their latest release.

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat Legal Delays F18 Codenaming

        Hopefully you’re not too anxious to know the codename for the future Fedora 18 Linux release, which will serve as the successor to Fedora 17′s Beefy Miracle. Red Hat’s legal department has caused a delay in coming up with the codename for this Fedora release due out in H2’2012.

        Coming up with the Fedora codenames via contributor suggestions has generally been an interesting but odd event with a colorful selection of possible codenames each cycle. With Fedora 17 it’s been arguably the oddest codename with the “Beefy Miracle” title; heck, even Ubuntu developers like it. While many see the Fedora codenames as just good fun, some Fedora users have grown concerned about the names.

      • Red Hat’s Billion Dollars And the Power of Free

        Recently, there was some justified excitement that Red Hat had finally done it, and turned in annual sales of over $1 billion. A couple of years ago, I wrote a post here on Computerworld UK wondering why there were no companies based around open source that had managed to achieve such billion-dollar turnovers, and suggested that the key reason was one put forward by Red Hat’s CEO, Jim Whitehurst:

      • Red Hat clustered storage goes beta

        The first iteration of the Gluster clustered file system that is going through the Red Hat annealing process is coming closer to market with the launch of a the first beta of the tool since Shadowman acquired Gluster last October.

    • Debian Family

      • Debian kFreeBSD vs. Debian Linux vs. FreeBSD 9

        Here are some benchmarks comparing Debian GNU/kFreeBSD with the new 9.0 kernel, Debian GNU/Linux with the Linux 3.2 kernel, and FreeBSD/PC-BSD 9.0.

      • Debian’s diversity statement
      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Further Ubuntu Accomplishments Progress
          • How Canonical’s next moves could repaint the Linux landscape
          • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 260
          • Limpag: New Ubuntu release on its way
          • Interview with lovinglinux
          • Ubuntu Linux Comes Preloaded on Two New Laptops

            As a fan of Ubuntu in particular and Linux in general, I’m always interested when new devices come out with my favorite operating system already installed.

          • Radeon, Nouveau Power Usage On Ubuntu 12.04
          • Gallium3D LLVMpipe Driver On LLVM 3.1
          • Ubuntu 12.04 LTS KVM Virtualization Battles 8.04.4, 10.04.4 LTS
          • Ubuntu 12.04 Desktops Impact Performance, Power Consumption

            How does the choice of desktop environments you make for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS impact your system’s performance and power consumption? Here’s the latest round of benchmarking from the various Ubuntu 12.04 desktop environment choices — Unity, Unity 2D, GNOME Shell, KDE, Xfce, LXDE, and Openbox — when running them on three different laptops.

          • Flippant salvos at a worthy initiative

            It also speaks about the good battery life and the “good value” delivered by Intel Pentium Dual Core B950 based products. In so far as the operating system is concerned, the laptops are being distributed come equipped with the Linux based operating system. Ubuntu 10.10 is distributed as free and open source software. The decision of the government to avail the open source option is important for several important reasons. Firstly, it reduces dependence on proprietary software vendors and secondly it drastically cuts down on the overall cost of the machines. Since they are not bundled with expensive licensed software such as Microsoft Office they are cost-effective and provide value for money, an important factor for the government to consider which has an inherent responsibility and fiduciary duty to the taxpayers.

            Open source is also a catalyst for development as it allows users to adapt the software to their own needs. This can improve IT and programming skills that in turn promote innovation. The Ubuntu OS comes installed with Libre Office and the internet browser Firefox. Additional software that is not installed by default can be downloaded and installed using the Ubuntu Software Center without paying any additional charges – an added bonus, since this would be illegal with proprietary software. Also, Ubuntu does not need an antivirus as its kernel is designed in such a way that no spam or virus can affect it.

            UBUNTU is getting popular globally due to its open source and freeware feature. It is not only being used by students but the LINUX enterprise OS offerings are being used by world renowned education institutes for their enterprise deployments and universities in Pakistan are also using it. The primary purpose to bundle the UBUNTU OS in the machines was to save cost and promote students to take advantage of this free OS which has some great features, is easy to use and comes with a UBUNTU Liber Office (just like MS office) and also has the world renowned Fire Fox Internet Browser (similar to MS Internet explorer).

            The Punjab Government has also saved cost on bundling MS Office which is even more expensive that Windows OS. Ubuntu also has another advantage; it does not need an Antivirus as its Kernel is designed is such a way that no Spam or Virus can affect it which in turn saves cost. The selection of bundling the UBUNTU was done in order to take advantage of all the features free of cost to the government. In this regard, it is further advised to instruct all educational institutions to discourage any ads that are placed on their notice boards with regard to installation of the Windows OS as the people who are offering the students to install a Windows OS for Rupees 500/- are also using pirated versions and thus misguiding the students. Furthermore, a DVD has been provided with every laptop which contains drivers for not only UBUNTU but Windows OS as well.

          • Say Goodbye to Ubuntu Linux 10.10 ‘Maverick Meerkat’
          • Flavours and Variants

            • Kubuntu Linux Gets New Sugar Daddy

              Kubuntu — the version of Ubuntu Linux that uses the KDE desktop interface rather than the standard Unity desktop — has a new sponsor.

            • Farewell, Apple. Hello Linux Mint!

              That’s right, I packed it in. My MacBook Pro is now on the shelf. In a while, it goes on Craigslist — not because it’s been obsoleted by the latest version of Mac OS — Mountain Lion as mine will work okay (some MacBook Pros will not). Instead, there’s a cushy comfort zone that’s dangerous for a product reviewer to fall into.

            • Deepin: An Elegant Ubuntu-based Distro For The Chinese

              The beauty of Linux lies in the fact that there is a distro for everyone. It doesn’t matter whether you are a geek, beginner, Apple fan, Windows fan, gamer or developer, there’s surely one distro for you. And yes, if you are a Chinese, there is this distro just for you, and it is elegant and well-polished.

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • Security

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • North American Natural Gas Breaks Below Two Dollars, for a Million BTU

      Natural gas in North America broke below the $2.00 barrier today, for the first time in ten years. It’s important to remember that, unlike oil, natural gas does not trade at a converged, global price. Accordingly, a million BTU in LNG form currently trades for over $9.00 in the UK, and over $15.00 in Japan. Such low prices for natural gas unquestionably give the US a competitive advantage. But, it will take a resurgence in manufacturing and related industrialism to fully capture the price disparity. After all, the US is still very much an oil-based economy.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • A Silver Bullet That Would End Secret Tax-Exempt Money In Elections

      No doubt about it, large unlimited donations are flowing into SuperPACs from rich individuals and corporations aimed at influencing who is elected at all levels of government in 2012. With the SuperPACs and other forms of political committees regulated by the federal and state election agencies, or by the IRS under section 527, at least we know who the donors are.

      But when political campaign expenditures are made by various forms of nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations, such as 501(c)(4) social welfare groups (like Crossroads GPS) or 501(c)(6) business associations (like the US Chamber of Commerce), there is no general law requiring their donors to be identified. So secret money in the millions, once again, flows in.

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