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10.09.11

Links 9/10/2011: Kororaa 15 “Squirt”, Android 4.0 Expected Soon

Posted in News Roundup at 6:03 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Kernel Space

    • Graphics Stack

      • Colour Correction Concepts for Monitors
      • Intel i915 Gallium3D Driver Continues Advancing

        The Intel “i915″ Gallium3D driver continues to advance thanks to love from Google. A new Intel employee is now even contributing to this unofficial driver too.

        Over the summer we have seen a number of changes to the Intel Gallium3D driver that supports the older i915/i945 era hardware. This driver is not officially supported by Intel, but Google’s after it for use in their Chromebooks as their netbooks can do better since this Gallium3D driver has faster CPU-based code generation of vertex shaders than the classic Intel DRI driver. The work has mostly been done by Stéphane Marchesin, the former Nouveau driver project lead who is now part of Google’s Chromium team.

      • First Look: AMD Trinity APU, Linux Already Runs Well
  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • KDE SC 4.7.2 update arrives

        The KDE project has released the second point update to version 4.7 of its KDE Software Compilation (KDE SC). According to the developers, the maintenance update to the Linux and Unix desktop contains a variety of translation updates and bug fixes; as expected, no new features have been added.

    • GNOME Desktop

  • Distributions

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat Is On Track To Become A $1 Billion Company

        Red Hat has acquired Gluster, a company that uses software to tackle storage problems in a new way.

        We had the opportunity to talk to Jim Whitehurst, CEO of Red Hat, about the acquisition, how Gluster’s product works, and what it means to be steering a company into the $1 billion revenue mark.

      • Fedora

        • Review: Kororaa 15 “Squirt”

          I’ve been swamped these past couple weeks. I mean, I’ve been absolutely, completely, and totally bogged down by work. I had 4 problem sets to do, on top of my recently-started UROP and other work-study stuff I’m doing, so I seriously had no room to breathe, until now. I briefly thought about starting work for next week tonight, but then I realized that whatever sanity I had left at this point would go out the window if I worked any more. I needed a break, so what did I do instead of working? I wrote this review! (This is my pre-emptive excuse if some people may feel that this is not thorough enough, or whatever. Yeah, yeah, sue me.)

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Not So Great Video About What Makes Ubuntu 11.10 So Great

            Ubuntu’s YouTube channel has uploaded a new video introducing the latest version of Ubuntu which is 11.10. The video gives and overview of some of the new features of Ubuntu 11.10 but lacks the quality and professionalism. It doesn’ show all the new features of Dash, which include refined search.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Linux dark autumn clouds – Bodhi Linux is there!

              Not only for Windows, but also for Linux the hour of truth comes near. October-November are months with new releases and upgrades. Let’s forget about Windows 8 for now; it’s still an early Beta. However Ubuntu 11.10 and Linux Mint 12 will come out soon. So are updated desktops: Gnome and KDE to name but two. It’s no secret that I am still not convinced that the Gnome based Gnome 3 shell and Ubuntu’s Unity desktops are matured enough to compete with either Windows 8 Beta or Apple’s OSX. What’s more, I still don’t like either of the two. So do many more Linux-users. The one UI fails this here, the other is messy there, which isn’t inspiring and inviting me to even test these releases. I am running Mint 11 for now and will continue to do so with its ‘old’, but for me far more productive, more flexible Gnome 2 desktop, better suited to run production software.

            • Zorin OS: Promising, but Still Typically Linux

              Zorin OS also comes with a Zorin Look Changer which allows easily changing the layout of the desktop to match the look of Windows XP and Linux GNOME in addition to this default Windows 7 look. In a Zorin OS video presentation I’ve also noticed Mac OS X, but it wasn’t present in my install. Perhaps it is available for install from repositories or as part of a Premium version.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Linux-based access point uses Wi-Fi and Bluetooth for proximity marketing

      iSign Media Solutions announced a Linux-based device designed to send out marketing messages via either Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. Including an integral web server and the ability to communicate with digital signage PCs, the “Smart Antenna” is an all-weather device that draws five Watts of power over an Ethernet cable, says the company.

    • Audio streaming device shrinks size, power, cost
    • Phones

      • Android

        • India Now Aims For $10 Android Tablet

          India is one of the champions of making cheap stuff. Tata’s Nano, the world’s cheapest car, is now dethroned by Aakash, one of the cheapest Android tablets. India created quite a buzz with the launch of $35 Android tablet which had the backing of the Indian government.

          The HRD minister of India Kapil Sibal is now aiming at $10 tablet. The minister has reportedly invited companies to make a cheaper Android tablet. With low income a majority of Indians can’t buy expensive $500 tablets, thus being left behind. Given India’s next to chaotic power outage situation where you don’t even get electricity for 24 hours a day, a tablet may keep users well connected.

        • Google Nexus Prime Video Leaked, Coming Next Week

          Apple is not the only champion of creating hype about its products before they are launched. Unfortunately, iPhone 4S release was a major disaster as hype-mongering sites were calling it the iPhone 5 and some even said it had a bigger screen. Lesson: don’t listen to the hype created by Apple fans, it’s mostly vapor.

        • Android apps to run on iPad with Alien Dalvik 2.0

          Android apps will now be able to run on Apple’s iPad and a host of other non-Android devices, courtesy of new software from the crew at Myriad Group.

        • Android 4.0 Launch Canceled, To Honor Steve Jobs
    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Sixth and most powerful E-Fun NextBook tablet surfaces

        E-Fun announced the sixth, highest-end member of its Nextbook family of Android tablets. Running Android 2.3 on a Rockchips RK2918 Cortex-A8 processor, the $300 Nextbook Premium 8 offers an eight-inch, 800 x 480 capacitive display, 4GB of internal storage, a microSD slot, Wi-Fi, and a front-facing camera, and a Kobo eBook Store app, says the company.

      • Open fire

        AMAZON’S Kindle Fire was always going to set the tablet world ablaze. Even before it starts shipping in November, though, it has managed to reignite the debate over the relative merits of open versus closed software. Supporters of openness trumpet it as a way to promote ideas and competition, leading to greater consumer satisfaction and optimal prices. Closed systems, goes the argument, remove choice and ramp up prices. If only it were that simple.

        For a start, the distinction between open and closed is fuzzy. The Fire, for example, relies on Google’s Android operating system (not the latest, tablet-spec version 3, but an earlier one designed for smartphones). Android is open—in the sense that anyone may view, modify and employ the source code in free or commercial applications without a license (other than that which comes at no cost with the code). Modifications to the code may have to be distributed publicly, depending on the specific license in question. (Android is a melange of code from many open-source projects and licensing terms for the ingredients vary.)

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • Copyrights

    • The Economics of the Writing Business – Updated

      If you went through a publisher and agent, assuming you could find a publisher and agent willing to talk to you, you’d only earn $1,875.00. Why would you give away $6,875.00 to someone else when you could do it yourself, including hiring a cover artist, an editor, etc. There are places that charge a flat rate of less than $100.00 to do this for you if you can’t do it…

10.08.11

Links 8/10/2011: Ubuntu at HP, Next Release Next Week

Posted in News Roundup at 11:29 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Softpedia Linux Weekly, Issue 168
  • The Death of Zune, the Resurrection of WebOS & Kernel.org Returns
  • Windows to Linux Considerations

    I have been asked by several people recently, both through here and privately, about the steps involved and the decisions to be made in converting a PC running Windows to Linux. After repeating the whole thing a few times, I decided to put it here for reference. These are based on my own experiences – anyone who has different, better or additional ideas should add them in the comments.

    - First, especially if you are starting with a new PC, make sure that you have complete Windows recovery media. This is even more important (and potentially tricky) today than it has been in the past, because a lot of new systems today do not come with Windows installation CD/DVDs included, they only have a “recovery partition” on the hard drive. In this case make sure that you use whatever the manufacturer’s “recovery media creation utility” might be to create yourself a set of disks – it will usually be about 3-5 DVDs. Yes, I know, we all hate Windows and we will be glad to see it getting wiped from the disk, never to return… but you never know what is going to happen to that PC, and perhaps someday you will want to sell or pass it along to some poor schmuck who insists on running Windows…

  • How to Build a Compact, Energy-Efficient PC

    Ideally, I’d be able to skip the Windows fee entirely by installing Ubuntu or another user-friendly Linux distro. However, the other family members would probably throw several small objects at me if I tried to foist Linux on them. But other households might be different, so a good Linux distro like Ubuntu could be a good fit.

  • Kernel Space

    • Kernel Developers Share Security Tips

      As most folks know by now, a security breach affecting kernel.org was discovered in September. While that didn’t affect kernel sources, it did get Linux kernel developers to thinking about their personal system security–and it might not be a bad idea for others to do the same.

    • A Plumber’s Wish List for Linux

      We’d like to share our current wish list of plumbing layer features we are hoping to see implemented in the near future in the Linux kernel and associated tools. Some items we can implement on our own, others are not our area of expertise, and we will need help getting them implemented.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • activities

        Several years ago now I had a minor epiphany while doing field research in the offices of friends and work associates on how people use their computers. The ideas led to the concept of “Activities”, which I originally called “Projects” (we changed the name because it was about more than just things we could call a “project”).

        [...]

        So it was that the beginnings of Activities were as different widget layouts in Plasma Desktop. You could zoom out and see each collection of icons and widgets and switch between them. It let you, for instance, open different folders in a folderview for different projects you were working on. Some people got it right away and started using Activities. Most people didn’t, and I don’t blame them at all: it was very hard to communicate something that was new to me as well and which we had only the basic sketches of implementation to demonstrate.

      • KDE’s October Updates Improve Kontact Performance
  • Distributions

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat Is A Prudent Play On Open Source

        Red Hat (RHT) is a leading provider of open-source and cloud solutions to enterprises around the world, including Europe. It is true that some companies will be less profitable because of Europe. Not Red Hat. On its conference call, CFO Charlie Peters stated that “Europe for us was also strong. And as I said, all geographies were 25-plus percent growth. I would say we had company-specific growth in Europe, which maybe is different than what others are experiencing, but not only the growth, but really the pipeline looks good.” Red Hat’s subscription-based model provides the company with a stable, dependable revenue stream.

      • CloudLinux to Show How to Increase Server Efficiency

        CloudLinux Inc. makers of CloudLinux OS, the only commercially-supported Linux OS (operating system) made specifically for shared hosting, will advise attendees at the upcoming annual Automation Bootcamp cPanel conference in Austin, Texas from October 10-12 how they can become more efficient by switching to CloudLinux. The director of operations at A Small Orange will lead a session on how the company converted to CloudLinux.

      • Red Hat will wait on Progress

        Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst said the Linux software company can afford to delay its move into one of Progress Energy’s two downtown Raleigh buildings while the utility overhauls its merger plans with Duke Energy.

        In August, Red Hat announced it would shift its headquarters from N.C. State University’s Centennial Campus to downtown Raleigh, where Progress plans to exit one of its buildings in conjunction with its merger with Charlotte-based Duke. But a glitch emerged last week when federal regulators sought assurances that the merged company won’t manipulate electricity rates.

      • Fedora

        • Fedora 16 Review: A Big Change or A Little Editing? (With Screenshots)

          Unwilling to wait for Fedora 16 final to come out, I went ahead and installed Fedora 16 beta. So much has been fixed in Fedora 16 that was wrong in Fedora 15 I can hardly see why this is called a beta. However, there are a few things I’ve noticed that go awry with Fedora 16 that will hopefully be fixed by the time the final release comes out.

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu Powers HP Public Cloud

            Today our CEO Jane Silber announced at the OpenStack Conference in Boston that HP has chosen Ubuntu as the lead host and guest operating system powering their Public Cloud. HP and Canonical are working closely together during the current private beta to make certain that we provide the most secure, scalable, business-class cloud to companies of all sizes. We are excited to join with HP in recognizing that open and interoperable cloud infrastructure and services are critical in delivering the next generation of cloud-based services to developers, ISVs and businesses. Both companies share a common commitment to open source and both embrace the OpenStack community. With over 117 member companies the momentum behind OpenStack is truly game changing and promises to position it at the center of the next wave of computing.

          • Ubuntu Server Trenches, The Big Picture

            Ubuntu Oneiric 11.10 is shaping up to be a fantabulous release from the server team! I’m starting early celebrations for Oneiric by pushing out a series of Ubuntu Server from the trenches articles. Get to know all the hot new features landing in Oneiric server, as well as the people behind them! I start by interviewing Robbie the Ubuntu server team manager. Robbie is just great, always fun to be around! Ahmed Kamal (AK) will be asking Robbie to introduce the newest features of 11.10 as well as shed some light on the way forward. Let’s get started

          • From ‘Warthog’ to ‘Pangolin’: Up Close With Ubuntu Linux Mascots

            If you’re a fan of Ubuntu Linux, there’s a good chance you’re among the many who have been wondering in the last day or so what, precisely, a pangolin is.

          • Ubuntu 12.04 will not be a Perky Penguin
          • An Update On The Linux Power Situation In Ubuntu

            While I was away for three weeks, there was an update on LP bug #760131, the infamous bug report on the power consumption being raised significantly higher in Ubuntu Natty. This bug report of high importance now indicates a fix being committed to Natty and a fix being released for Oneiric, but what has changed? Here is an update.

          • Indian Supreme Court Replaces Red Hat Enterprise Linux with Ubuntu in More than 17,000 Courts

            Indian Supreme Court has given a customized DVD of Ubuntu 10.04 LTS to more than 17,000 courts across the country. All the systems in these courts were running Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 for last 4-5 years and now it will be replaced by Ubuntu.

            Many helpful links and materials are being provided to these courts. An SMS channel has also been setup which will provide helpful Ubuntu tricks and information to these courts.

          • Ubuntu Powers HP’s Public Cloud
          • Ubuntu 11.10 Will Feature ARM Support, Ships Soon

            This week during the OpenStack conference in Boston, Canonical CEO Jane Silber revealed several new features that will be included in the next version of the company’s Ubuntu Linux distribution, Ubuntu 11.10. She also announced that both the desktop and the server editions will be released next Thursday, October 13.

          • From ‘Warthog’ to ‘Pangolin’: Up Close With Ubuntu Linux Mascots

            That, of course, is because Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth just declared Precise Pangolin the nickname for the next Ubuntu. I’m betting there’s been a sudden surge in Google searches on the term since the announcement was made.

            Keeping up with the Dr. Seussian name choices for Ubuntu mascots is never easy, so to make matters more clear for all of us, here’s a brief history with pictures of all the mascots Ubuntu has had so far. The only question now is, what will it be for Ubuntu 12.10: Quirky Quail, Quahog, Quarterhorse or Queen Bee?

          • Ubuntu 11.10 to Feature Arm Support, Cloud Orchestration

            The next version of Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux distribution, to be released next week, will be the first to run on the Arm architecture, as well as the first edition to offer a new cloud service orchestration engine, called JuJu.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Want to Revive an Old Netbook? Try Lubuntu

              Raise your hand if this sounds familiar: You bought a netbook a couple years back, thinking it would be your go-to travel PC, but quickly became dissatisfied with its sluggish performance–and stuck it in a closet.

              Hey, that’s a perfectly good PC you’ve got in there. It just needs a better operating system, one that fares better with less horsepower. Last year I wrote about Joli OS (formerly known as Jolicloud), which accomplished that very goal–but with a somewhat unfamiliar-looking interface that didn’t appeal to everyone.

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

  • What community?

    Wow! That’s a diverse target audience, and a very wide ranging list of ways you can help out. But is it really helpful to scope the project so wide, and try to cater to such a wide range of use-cases from the start? And is the project at a stage where it even makes sense to advertise itself to some of these different types of users?

    I have talked about the different meanings of “maintainer” before, depending on whether you’re maintaining a code project or are a package maintainer for a distribution. I have also talked about the different types of community that build up around a project, and how each of them needs their own identity – particularly in the context of the MeeGo trademark. I particularly like Simon Phipps’s analysis of the four community types as a way to clarify what you’re talking about.

  • Why free software really isn’t (and shouldn’t be) free

    If you’ve looked into buying software licenses, you know that they can be expensive. Big Guns from Big Corporations charge a lot for their work – the work of their programmers, the marketing department, and so on.

  • The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache TomEE Certified as Java EE 6 Web Profile Compatible
  • Web Browsers

    • Chrome

      • Chrome OS: the verdict

        Is Google’s “web only” OS ready to take on Windows, Mac and Linux? We give it a real-world road test

      • 20 of the best Chrome OS apps

        Google uses a rather woolly definition of the word “app”: many of the so-called applications that you’ll find in the Chrome Web Store are nothing more than bookmarks to websites that you can use from pretty much any internet browser.

  • SaaS

    • Akamai Joins OpenStack Community to Add Global Application Performance, Scale, and Availability Experience to Open Source Initiative

      Akamai Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ: AKAM), the leading provider of cloud optimization services, today announced the company has joined the OpenStack™ community. Akamai plans to provide the OpenStack community with advice and guidance on best practices for platform design and architecture to help overcome the availability, delivery, performance, and scale challenges inherently faced by globally distributed cloud infrastructures and applications.

    • CloudBees Open Source Choice

      CloudBees is made up of Open Source veterans. Sacha Labourey was the CTO of JBoss, Kohsuke Kawaguchi is the Founder of Jenkins and Hudson, Michael Neale, Adrian Brock, Ryan Campbell, Paul Sandoz, Harpreet Singh Vivek Pandey, and many others have spent most of their careers developing open source software. On the business side, David Skok and I are two well known advocates for the open source business model.

    • Reality Check: Contributions to Apache Hadoop
    • OpenStack Foundation Breaks Corporate Ties

      OpenStack is set to begin the second stage of its existence as an open standard with the formation of a non-profit-making foundation which will solely be in charge of the intellectual property and the management of development projects.

      The OpenStack Foundation was announced at the organisation’s conference in Boston, Massachusetts, today and it is hoped to officially open for business in 2012, though an actual date has yet to be set.

    • Rackspace to spin off cloud standards-setting OpenStack project to foundation

      NASA and Web hosting company Rackspace jointly launched a new cloud computing project last year called OpenStack. The goal is to produce a standardized set of open source software components for building out self-hosted elastic cloud computing environments.

    • Rackspace Opens Up OpenStack With Planned Foundation

      During the course of the past year, the OpenStack open source cloud project has grown significantly from its origins as a joint effort of Rackspace and NASA.

  • Databases

    • Overview of the Oracle NoSQL Database

      Oracle is the clear market leader in the commercial database community, and therefore it is critical for any member of the database community to pay close attention to the new product announcements coming out of Oracle’s annual Open World conference. The sheer size of Oracle’s sales force, entrenched customer base, and third-party ecosystem instantly gives any new Oracle product the potential for very high impact. Oracle’s new products require significant attention simply because they’re made by Oracle.

    • Google Cloud SQL: your database in the cloud

      One of App Engine’s most requested features has been a simple way to develop traditional database-driven applications. In response to your feedback, we’re happy to announce the limited preview of Google Cloud SQL.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • DTrace for Linux

      Even among Oracle employees, there’s uncertainty about what was announced. Ed Screven gave us just a couple of bullet points in his keynote; Sergio Leunissen, the product manager for OEL, didn’t have further details in his OpenWorld talk beyond it being a beta of limited functionality; and the entire Solaris team seemed completely taken by surprise.

    • Oracle Brews a Stronger Cup of Java

      Oracle put the focus on Java recently with previews of developments yet to come. “I would say that Java is in better strategic shape on several levels,” Al Hilwa, a research director at IDC, told TechNewsWorld. “The most important aspect is unblocking some of the politics and moving forward with the [Java] SE 7 and SE 8.”

  • Education

    • What newsrooms can learn from open-source and maker culture

      “Newsosaur” blogger and media consultant Alan Mutter some time ago suggested that journalism has become a lot more like Silicon Valley. Newspapers are too risk-averse, he said, and so they “need some fresh DNA that will make them think and act more like techies and less like, well, newspaper people.”

  • Business

    • SugarCRM: The open source customer relationship management software

      SugarCRM is the world’s largest open source CRM (customer relationship management) software. Founded in 2004, over 7,000 customers and more than half a million users rely on SugarCRM to execute marketing programs, grow sales, retain customers, and create custom business applications. These custom business applications can be used in a multitude of ways, such as to power sales teams, run customer support organizations, and manage customer information databases.

  • Public Services/Government

    • Bristol Council gets open source go-ahead after CESG discussions

      Bristol City Council has been cleared to build an IT infrastructure using open source software after a visit from CESG, the cyber security arm of the UK intelligence services.

      Complaints about CESG’s obstruction of open source software were branded “folk-law” at a meeting the security body held in Bristol yesterday with council leader Barbara Jenke and others including Bristol IT chiefs Paul Arrigoni and Gavin Beckett, and executives from the Cabinet Office.

      The security body, an arm of GCHQ, denied its Code of Connection (CoCo) and guidance on information assurance prevented public bodies using open source software.

      The meeting heard how CESG rules, by which public bodies determine what systems they should use, were being interpreted incorrectly.

      Liam Maxwell and Bill McCluggage, Cabinet Office directors of ICT futures and ICT policy respectively, joined the meeting to tackle what they believed was a misperception that had been thwarting their policy to increase the use of open source software in government.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Open Hardware

      • Getting to Know Arduino

        Have you ever spent time with Arduino? It’s an open source electronics platform based on a microcontroller and microprocessor with I/O capabilities that allow it to drive many kinds of inventions. We’ve covered the platform and the community that creates with it before. The project has come a long way in recent years, and here are some of the highlights as they stand now.

Leftovers

  • Health/Nutrition

    • Readers respond: Control is an issue for open source pieces of DoD/VA joint EHR

      The massive undertaking to create a dual-agency EHR that serves both DoD and VA patients with a system woven from existing proprietary and open source components might demand something to which the federal government is largely unaccustomed.

      “The government tends to have this view of, ‘We’re the ones in charge here,’” said John Scott, author of the report “Open Technology Development for Military Software,” a member of the Military Open Source Software (Mil-OSS) community and senior systems engineer and open technologies lead at RadiantBlue Technologies.

    • Wisconsin Judge Rules Against Food Rights

      Wisconsin dairy farmers are appealing a state judge’s ruling that they do not have the right to own a dairy cow or drink the unprocessed milk from their own cows.

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • Wisconsin Becomes Part of Gas Industry’s Land Grab

      The methane gas industry is snapping up land across the United States, and it’s not only regions with gas reserves its after. Part of the controversial process of hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” which has become big business in the nation, requires a fine silica sand. The sand is most easily accessible in the state of Wisconsin, which means the industry is looking to scrape the Midwestern state of it’s rolling hills by extracting its sand. This new scramble for sand mining has local residents concerned about the health and environmental impacts on their communities.

  • Finance

  • Copyrights

    • Time zone database axed by astrology
    • Bill C-11: Locks, Limits, Levies, Litigation & Now RIP “Rip, Mix & Burn”

      If laws about digital locks like Bill C-11 had been in place in 1980, we would have never seen the astonishing evolution of the “Rip, Mix and Burn” zeitgeist that Steve Jobs created. Not only has Apple gone from the brink of bankruptcy two decades ago to become the world’s very most valuable company at various recent times on the stock exchanges. It’s also incontrovertible that Steve Jobs changed the world in the process – and much for the better.

      “Rip, Mix & Burn” became an iconic mantra. Laws like Bill C-11 would have made much of what “rip, mix and burn” was all about illegal. Here’s the transcript of a brilliant and prescient 2004 lecture by Princeton’ celebrated Prof. Ed Felten about “Rip, Mix and Burn”, and efforts to stifle the notion through copyright law. He makes a number of references to Apple. And when he talks about the promise of a future with a “universal media machine”, just substitute the term “iPad”. Prof. Felten asks in 2004 whether society should embrace the change that could come from the “universal media machine”, and the spirit of the “Magna Carta” Betamax US Supreme Court decision of 1984, or whether we resist it.

    • Astrology outfit takes time-zone database down
    • Publisher Claims Ownership of Time-Zone Data

10.07.11

Links 7/10/2011: KDE SC 4.7.2, Thunderbird 8 Beta

Posted in News Roundup at 5:10 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • KDE SC 4.7.2 Is Available for Download

        The KDE team proudly announced last evening, October 5th, the second maintenance release for the KDE Software Compilation 4.7 environment.

        KDE Software Compilation 4.7.2 is a version that is focusing on fixing last-minute bugs and finishing the required documentation and translations.

  • Distributions

    • IPFire open source firewall gets ARM port

      The IPFire project development team has announced the first beta release of an ARM port of version 2.11 of its open source firewall. IPFire is a Linux server distribution that can be booted from a CD or USB drive, or installed to a computer’s internal drive.

    • Debian Family

  • Devices/Embedded

    • FlashSoft Extends SSD Support To Linux
    • Qbo open-source robot gets Android control app

      What if you had a robot that could roll around the office, speak with your coworkers, and act as your eyes and ears when you’re 10,000 miles away? How about if that robot’s control system was simply an Android app you could download for free? We’ve been covering the open source Qbo robot project for quite some time now, and this is without a doubt probably the most awesome advancement the project has made in its relatively short history – if you ask your narrator, that is. You must simply download the app, identify yourself and connect, then control away!

    • Phones

      • Android

        • ACRyan Veolo Android Mediaplayer

          ACRyan known from its bestseller Linux based mediaplayer, the PlayonHD now introduces an Android based mediaplayer, the Veolo.

        • Sony Itches to Return to Mobile Arms Race

          In a sign of the central role smartphones will play in its future consumer-electronics strategy, Sony Corp. is nearing a deal to buy out Telefon AB L.M. Ericsson’s stake in their mobile-phone joint venture, people familiar with the matter said.

        • Ice Cream Sandwich to launch next week

          A placeholder video on the official Android developers channel.

          Google is expected to serve up Ice Cream Sandwich–the newest version of Android–on Tuesday at the Samsung Unpacked event in San Diego.

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Eight-inch Android 2.3 tablet sells for $229

        Pandigital SuperNova announced an eight-inch Android 2.3 tablet that costs just $229 and offers one-stop access to Barnes & Noble’s eStore. The SuperNova offers a 1GHz Samsung Hummingbird processor, 4GB internal storage, a seven-inch, 800 x 600 screen, and Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 2.1 connectivity, says the company.

      • Lubuntu Gives You A Full-Fledged Desktop On Your Netbook

        I bought my netbook hoping it would be the perfect portable companion for those quick jobs when I’m out and about — like updating one of my posts, or touching base with my boss without using my phone. The problem is, those “quick” jobs seemed to take ages on the netbook. Starting up Firefox in Windows seemed to take forever, and forget about opening multiple tabs. Even on Ubuntu, everything moved a little more sluggish than I’d like. Sure, netbooks are always going to be a little bit slower, but when they move at the speed of molasses, it seems to defeat the entire purpose of having one.

      • HP Investigating Android TouchPad Shipments
      • HP Investigates Android TouchPads

        HP is investigating how several TouchPads reportedly shipped to end users running Android, instead of webOS.

        Shortly after HP announced it would stop selling TouchPads and began offering the remaining tablets for US$99, reports surfaced from a few users who say they received TouchPads that run Android instead of HP’s webOS software. At the same time, developers have been working on porting Android to the TouchPad, since it’s uncertain how much support and development HP will dedicate to webOS in the future.

      • HP Claims Someone Snuck Android Onto Its TouchPads, Opens Investigation

        With the TouchPad’s fire sale, which saw units selling for as little as $88 USD, the short-lived Hewlett-Packard Comp. (HPQ) webOS tablet is chic again. Given that webOS, appears on its last legs in terms of support from HP, developers are rushing to port Google, Inc.’s (GOOG) Android OS to the device to extend its lifetime.

      • India’s Small Cheap Tablet PC Arrives

        They are at 100K units per month and they need millions to reach 220million children.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Why Do Volunteers Write Better Code?

    Volunteers write better code, and maintain it better. At least that’s what Michael Meeks, SUSE’s desktop architect and senior LibreOffice developer says.

  • Free and open-source text editors for devs
  • SOGo 2.0: open source groupware with Outlook connectivity

    The SOGo developers have released the first beta of version 2 of their open source groupware solution. The most significant new feature is native support for Microsoft Outlook: the developers say that Outlook 2003, 2007 and 2010 can connect directly to SOGo as if it were an Exchange server, without the need for additional plug-ins; this is achieved through the use of the SOGo OpenChange middleware.

  • Does “open storage” put the hardware factor into open source?

    OpenStorage provider Nexenta Systems is aiming to use its forthcoming appearance at VMworld Europe later in October to showcase VMware’s so-called ‘Hands on Lab’ (HOL) demos. The company will be at pains to convince attendees that its open storage concepts can deliver “enterprise performance for a fraction of the cost of traditional, legacy storage solutions”, so is there substance behind these claims?

    Nexenta’s HOL, classified as a true public cloud, will aim to emulate what was achieved at VMworld US where the company ran four out of eight HOL vertical application areas for the duration of the show.

  • Opening the Door to Innovation

    The link between open innovation and open source has long been documented. That there is a significant correlation is obvious and not arguable, but to what extent is there causation? And in what direction?

    Open innovation describes a process, whereas open source — as well as its predecessor, free software — has traditionally described a product or end result. The ultimate determination of whether a software project qualifies as open source is the license under which it is released.

  • Events

    • Embedded Linux Conference Europe features Torvalds, free LinuxCon Europe pass

      The Linux Foundation and CE Linux Forum announced a schedule for the Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE), set to take place Oct. 26-28 in Prague. Co-located with LinuxCon Europe, ELCE 2011 offers 50 presentations on Linux and Android — including projects such as Genivi, Yocto, Linaro, and possibly Tizen — plus speakers ranging from Linus Torvalds to Intel’s Dirk Hohndel.

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Mozilla releases Thunderbird 8 Beta

        Mozilla has published the first beta of version 8.0 of the open source Thunderbird news and email client. Compared to previous Thunderbird version updates, the development release offers very few changes, some of which focus on add-ons. According to the Releases wiki, it will arrive in a stable production-ready form on 8 November.

  • SaaS

    • Who Wrote Hadoop? It’s the Community, Stupid

      One of the questions that comes up frequently in open source projects is “who’s contributing to this thing?” For single-company efforts like MySQL, it’s usually pretty obvious where the bulk of contribution is coming from. But for projects like the Linux kernel or Hadoop, a little digging is in order. The problem with measuring contributions to projects is it’s not trivial figuring out how to credit contributions from individuals as they move from one company to another. Consider, for instance, the question of who really wrote Hadoop. Hint: It’s not just Yahoo and Hortonworks, as some might have you believe.

    • OpenStack: We Are The Open Cloud Alternative

      OpenStack will be the open alternative to proprietary cloud players, the open-source cloud initiative’s driving forces said Thursday at the OpenStack Conference in Boston.

      And as the Rackspace-led OpenStack open-source cloud initiative moves headlong into its second year and experiences a groundswell of interest and participation within its community, 2012 is the time to “think bigger” and prove itself as the open alternative.

    • HP: ‘We’re Completely Committed To OpenStack’

      HP’s cloud strategy will rely heavily on its participation in OpenStack open source cloud community, the tech titan said Thursday at the OpenStack Conference in Boston.

      “We are completely committed and on-board with OpenStack,” said John Purrier, HP’s vice president of cloud infrastructure, at the event.

    • New Chef Cookbooks Developed With Dell and Rackspace

      Opscode Chef Cookbooks is a software tool designed to help deploy core components of the newly released version of the OpenStack open source cloud computing platform, codenamed “Diablo.” In collaboration with Dell and Rackspace, Opscode says it developed Chef Cookbooks to address automation and management of OpenStack.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

  • Education

    • Leading Open Source in the Community College

      But Belarmino, who retired Oct. 1, pointed to his institution’s commitment to open source as its single most significant move under his leadership. It was just seven years ago when he and his president at the time, Raul Rodriguez, decided that in order for the college to best leverage technology to support the institution’s mission, it should join with other leading institutions in the community source model.

  • Semi-Open Source

  • Public Services/Government

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Intellectual worlds collide at ‘indie spirit’ Open Source Project cafe

      It’s no wonder Open Source Project cafe attracts hipsters, jocks, DJs, graffiti artists, techies, chess savants and coffee connoisseurs. An eclectic clientele is to be expected when a Tempe singer and painter with a penchant for mosh-pit dancing, a former Scottsdale resident with a business degree, and a global-studies student earning a living as a coffee barista decide to go into business together.

      Open Source Project is the brainchild of Tempe native and musician/painter Ryan Gentry, 35, and Michael Witham, 26, an Arizona State University W.P. Carey School of Business graduate. After graduating last year, Witham decided to move to Tempe to open his dream business.

    • Open Access/Content

Leftovers

  • We Are All New Immigrants to the Hyperconnected World

    “We all have to bring something extra in this hyperconnected world,” were Tom’s parting words to the THINK Forum audience. In the end, the fundamental question we all need to wrestle with is whether the US is slowly but surely on the way down, or whether it can arrest its decline, recapture its immigrant heritage and bring whatever something extra is needed to lead in our emerging hyperconnected world.

  • Security

    • Stanford Hospital Data Breach Exposes 20,000 Patient Records

      A medical data breach exposed the 20,000 private medical records of emergency room patients at Stanford Hospital in Palo Alto, Calif. incorporating detailed information such as names, diagnosis code and discharge dates.

      Altogether the leaked information included patient names, diagnosis codes, account numbers, admission and discharge dates and billing information for patents at Stanford Hospital’s emergency room during a six-month period in 2009, according to The New York Times.

      The hospital confirmed the breach to CRN, but could not immediately provide details.

  • Finance

    • Too big to fail is too big
    • Obama Flip-Flops Off Trade Cliff

      Apparently, Obama has a plan for winning re-election that does not involve Ohio… oh, and he is tired of talking about job CREATION.

      Yesterday, after months of seeming ambiguity about whether to really take ownership of the three job-killing, Bush-signed, NAFTA-style Free Trade Agreements with South Korea, Colombia and Panama, he sent them to Congress for approval. Keep in mind that even the official U.S. International Trade Commission studies show that the Korea deal, the most economically significant since NAFTA, will increase our trade deficit. It’s projected to cost 160,000 jobs — many in the jobs of the future categories like high-speed trains, solar, computers etc.

    • Senate vote on free-trade deals may happen next week, Reid says

      Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said Thursday that he is hopeful the Senate will vote next week on proposed free-trade agreements with Colombia, Panama and South Korea.

      “In spite of my not feeling so strong about these — I’m not a big fan of these matters — I’m doing my best to advance this so we can have a vote; hopefully as early as Wednesday of next week,” he said on the Senate floor.

    • United in Disdain for Dodd-Frank, Wall Street Is Split on the Details

      While the biggest rivals on Wall Street share a common disdain for new constraints on financial risk-taking, they’re fighting over exactly how to tame the sprawling regulatory overhaul.

    • Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan: ‘A right to make a profit’

      Under fire from President Barack Obama, Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan defended his company’s new $5 monthly fee on debit cards, arguing that “we have a right to make a profit.”

      “I have an inherent duty as a CEO of a publicly owned company to get a return for my shareholders,” Moynihan said in an interview with CNBC’s Larry Kudlow at the Washington Ideas Forum.

    • The 4 Trillion Euro Fantasy

      Some officials and former officials are taking the view that a large fund of financial support for troubled eurozone nations could be decisive in stabilizing the situation. The headline numbers discussed are up to 2-4 trillion euros – a large amount of money, given that German GDP is only 2.5 trillion euros and the entire eurozone GDP is around 9 trillion euros.

    • Short list of articles on Occupying XX

      Mark Engler, Five Things That #OccupyWallStreet Has Done Right

      Micah Sifry, #OccupyWallStreet: There’s Something Happening Here, Mr. Jones.

      Mike Konczal, Understanding the Theory Behind Occupy Wall Street’s Approach

      Doug Henwood, The Occupy Wall Street non-agenda

      Glenn Greenwald, What’s behind the scorn for the Wall Street protests?

    • Obama to GOP: Act on jobs or get run out of town

      A combative President Barack Obama challenged a divided Congress on Thursday to unite behind his jobs bill or get ready to be run “out of town” by angry voters. Hoping to use public frustration and economic worry as leverage, he called his proposal an insurance plan against a painful return to recession.

      In a news conference long on restatements of his ideas, Obama laid bare the dynamic that now is Washington: The era of compromise is over.

    • Obama acknowledges Wall Street protests as a sign

      Concerns over Wall Street practices and economic inequality that have led to sit-ins and rallies in New York and elsewhere reverberated up to the White House on Thursday, with President Barack Obama saying the protesters are expressing the frustrations of the American public.

      Thousands of protesters, including many in union T-shirts, marched the day before in lower Manhattan, joined by labor leaders who say they will continue to support the protests with manpower and donations of goods and services.

    • Obama calls Wall Street protests an expression of the public’s frustration

      Concerns over Wall Street practices and economic inequality that have led to sit-ins and rallies in New York and elsewhere reverberated up to the White House on Thursday, with President Barack Obama saying the protesters are expressing the frustrations of the American public.

    • Michael Bloomberg tells Occupy Wall Street protesters to lay off banks

      New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg slammed the Occupy Wall Street protesters on Friday, saying their attacks on banks could harm one of the city’s major employers.

    • Obama: Wall Street rally reflects frustration

      US President Barack Obama has said that the “Occupy Wall Street” protests in New York and other US cities reflect “broad-based frustration” among Americans with how the US financial system works.

    • Labor Unions To Participate in Occupy Wall Street
    • Occupy Wall Street Has No ‘Message’, But It Has A Reason

      One of the most well-rehearsed axioms of the Occupy Wall Street event is that “the media does not know how to talk about it,” and, as a result, is talking about it to as minimal an extent as is possible. Fortunately for the occupation’s supporters, their presence is getting harder and harder to ignore. And so the media’s problem is slowly but steadily becoming the nation’s problem.

  • Copyrights

    • Copyright discourages innovation, the more the worse

      He writes in response to PETER DECHENEY’s piece which provides details on US trade agreements and legislation that extend copyright to foreign copyrighted works that had not previously been covered as they were in the public domain and the period of copyright by another 20 years link here. Yglesias point was a simple one: that so much of what is produced in the arts is derivative (i.e., it has a hard time being anything else), covering more and more works with copyright greatly complicates and raises the cost of producing new works you have to get “rights” or permission at cost in both time and money.

    • Chaos feared after Unix time-zone database is nuked

      The internet’s authoritative source for time-zone data has been shut down after the volunteer programmer who maintained it was sued for copyright infringement by a maker of astrology software.

      David Olson, custodian of the Time Zone and Daylight Saving Time Database, said on Thursday he was retiring the FTP server he’s long maintained. Also known as the Olson database, it’s the official reference Unix machines use to set clocks to local time and is used by countless websites and applications to reconcile time differences across the world.

    • ACTA

10.06.11

Links 6/10/2011: Linux 3.1 is Imminent, Android Extends Lead Over iOS

Posted in News Roundup at 7:19 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Adventures in Brickdom: Installing Windows 8 on a CR48
  • 20 ways to break Linux
  • Audiocasts/Shows

  • Kernel Space

    • Linux 3.1-rc9
    • Graphics Stack

      • 3 independent displays are getting really close..

        Continuing my updating on latest intel linux graphics-related activity, some hours ago Jesse Barnes’ patches which add support for 3 display pipes to our Linux i915 driver have landed onto intel-gfx mailing list. This is one feature I am particularly very interested in, and it is great to have those patches available in the open-source world now – months before the IVB-based hardware will arrive at the consumer market.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • KDE to Celebrate 15th Birthday

        KDE is having a global birthday party to celebrate 15 years and everyone is invited. Well, since we all can’t actually get together in one spot, they’d like to inspire a bunch of parties happening simultaneously across the globe on October 14.

        It all began much the way Linux began, with a message to a Usenet usergroup. Matthias Ettrich posted, “Programmers wanted!” for a “New Project: Kool Desktop Environment (KDE)”. The rest is history. 15 years ago Ettrich was looking to create an interface for endusers – the regular desktop user and he and his fellow developers succeeded. KDE became the most popular desktop environment for free Unix desktops and remained so until the rise of Ubuntu propelled GNOME into that position. It will be interesting to see where the dueling desktops end up in the coming years.

      • KDE’s October Updates Improve Kontact Performance

        September 7, 2011. Today KDE released updates for its Workspaces, Applications, and Development Platform. These updates are the second in a series of monthly stabilization updates to the 4.7 series. 4.7.2 updates bring many bugfixes and translation updates on top of the latest edition in the 4.7 series and are recommended updates for everyone running 4.7.0 or earlier versions. As the release only contains bugfixes and translation updates, it will be a safe and pleasant update for everyone. KDE’s software is already translated into more than 55 languages, with more to come. The October updates are especially interesting for those using the new Akonadi-based Kontact Suite, as it contains many performance improvements and bugfixes for applications such as KMail, and others retrieving information using Akonadi.

      • Freedom. 15 years. Party!
    • GNOME Desktop

      • GNOME 3.2: Tactical Brilliance and Strategic Stubbornness

        If you’re still waiting for the GNOME 3 series to tolerate more than one work-flow, then GNOME 3.2 is going to disappoint you.

        Although the new release contains dozens of improvements, both practical and aesthetic, it still supports only a single work flow, just like GNOME 3.0. Despite six months of protests, the GNOME team seems to have decided that, if it just ignores the complaints, eventually they’ll go away.

        That said, some of the improvements might just be enough to reconcile you to the GNOME 3 series. While some improvements are useful but minor refinements, others ranging from task-oriented documentation and accessibility improvements to online integration tools, would be welcome additions to any desktops.

      • Official GNOME Shell Extensions Available In The WebUpd8 GNOME 3 PPA For Ubuntu 11.10
  • Distributions

    • ArchBang Is Lightweight & Always Up To Date [Linux]

      Install a lightweight operating system that’s always up to date. Featuring the speedy Openbox desktop and built on the rolling release Arch Linux, Archbang delivers both minimalism and up-to-date software. Best of all, it’s a lot easier to set up and use than a vanilla Arch installation.

    • New Releases

      • Salix OS 13.37 Features Ratpoison Window Manager

        George Vlahavas from the Salix OS development team, proudly announced on October 4th that the a new edition of the Salix OS operating system is now available for download, featuring the Ratpoison window manager.

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • PCLinuxOS Build server moved to rpm 4.8.x

        The build server that produces RPMS for the software repository for PCLinuxOS has switched over to RPM 4.8.x as of today. This comes after a month worth of notices and reminders posted.

      • Mageia 1 review – Confusing

        My test box was the old and abused T60 laptop, with 2GB RAM and an ATI graphics card. It never had hardware issues with Mandriva or PCLinuxOS or many other distributions, which indicates there might be some deep problem in the Mageia core. A shame really, as I wanted to see what the distro could do when committed to hard disk and running.

        Based on the live session testing and the installation, there’s a lot to be done still. Mageia needs a lot of bug fixing and polish. There are too many bugs and errors to allow a smooth and seamless desktop experience. The visual aspect also needs improving. My biggest gripes were the slew of errors and warnings that the user just need not see, the archaic layout of the desktop and the selfish installation that simply ignored my Windows.

        I ought to give the Mageia team some slack, given the fact this is their first release. So yes, more work is needed, and the distribution will mostly likely improve over time. I hope some of my finding will make into the future editions. For the time being, based on my testing, Mageia is not mature enough for desktop use. Will keep in touch.

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.2 Beta is out now

        When you’re talking serious server Linux, chances are you’re talking Red Hat’s Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) , so it’s good news that the beta is now ready for the next edition: RHEL 6.2

        Coming on the heels of the news that Red Hat is acquiring Gluster, a cloud-storage software company, it should come as no surprise that it will offer improved cloud deployment support. Of course, there’s a lot more here than just better cloud support.

      • Red Hat (RHT) Shares Given New $50.00 Price Target by UBS AG (UBS) Analysts

        Equities research analysts at UBS AG (NYSE: UBS) lowered their price target on shares of Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) to $50.00 in a research issued note to investors on Wednesday. They currently have a “buy” rating on the company’s shares.

      • Video: Default to Open

        Red Hat produced a video entitled Default to Open: The History of Open Source and Red Hat. Since it is about history, it has a number of older clips… bits and pieces I’ve seen before but quite a bit of new stuff too. Enjoy it embedded in webm format or use the link below to download it for local playback.

      • Gluster is Likely to Be One Among Many Upcoming Red Hat Buys

        It’s no secret that as the last remaining public, U.S company focused on open source (after the acquisitions of Novell and Sun Microsystems), Red Hat is on a tear. The company is on track to become the first $1 billion a year open source firm, and we’ve predicted before that acquisitions are on the horizon for the company as it rakes in the revenues. Sure enough, enhancing its increasing focus on cloud computing and Big Data, Red Hat has announced that it is paying $136 million for Gluster, a privately held storage firm. This is just one of what will likely be several upcoming acquisitions from Red Hat.

        As the Register notes, Gluster’s name comes from the combination of GNU and cluster, and the firm specializes not only in storage solutions but in solutions that help organizations crunch and manage large data sets. Gluster was originally created at California Digital Corp., which makes supercomputers.

      • Beta version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.2 released
      • Oracle previews RHEL-ish 2 Linux kernel

        As part of the OpenWorld extravaganza being hosted by Oracle in San Francisco this week, Edward Screven, chief corporate architect at the software giant and the guy who is responsible for the company’s Linux and Xen hypervisor variants, gave a brief preview of the next iteration of Oracle’s homegrown Linux kernel.

      • Fedora

        • Fedora 16 Beta Has GNOME 3.2 and Linux Kernel 3.1

          The Fedora Project proudly announced last evening, October 4th, the immediate availability for download and testing of the Beta version of the upcoming Fedora 16 operating system, due for release in November 2011.

        • F17 Might Be The Beefy Miracle To The Precise Pangolin

          Yesterday there was the announcement by Mark Shuttleworth that Ubuntu 12.04 is codenamed Precise Pangolin. But what will its friendly competition be called? The voting is taking place right now for the Fedora 17 codename. Beefy Miracle is again a contender for the next release of this Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution.

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Community-Canonical Relationships – The honeymoon might be over, but the love is still there.

            When I got home yesterday I had a few messages asking about whether or not I had seen yesterday’s CC (Community Council) Meeting. I was away from my computer for most of the day yesterday so I didn’t get a chance to read the log of the meeting until late last night. This is one CC meeting I wish I had been able to attend.

          • P is for…

            Balancing all of those options, I think we have just the right mix in our designated mascot for 12.04 LTS. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the Precise Pangolin.

          • Ubuntu 12.04 LTS named “Precise Pangolin”

            Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth has announced that Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Long Term Support) will be named “Precise Pangolin”. Shuttleworth’s inspiration came when he “recently spent a few hours tracking a pangolin through the Kalahari”, and noted their precision and toughness. Many alternative suggestions including “Perky Penguin” and “Porangi Packhorse” were rejected for a variety of carefully considered reasons.

          • Well That’s One Way to Pimp Ubuntu…
          • Interview with Rubi1200
          • Million Cloud Monkeys create MonkeyBeth

            AK: Your story about how “A Few Million Monkeys Randomly Recreated Shakespearean work” Got you featured on many tech-news websites. Can you introduce yourself to cloud.ubuntu.com readers. (Your background, Studies, where you work, your hobbies, your future dreams…etc)

            I work at Intuit in Reno, NV as a Senior Software Engineer. I love watching The Simpsons (which finally paid off). I like to try out new technologies and try to do things that have not been done before. Trying out these technologies usually leads to a personal project – none of which has been as successful as the Million Monkeys project.

          • Computers provide path for humanity to others

            Is it possible to reduce the need for upgrading by reusing a computer? Absolutely! There is a very green solution that can extend the useful life of any PC. It can result in less frequent purchases of new hardware and software, or breathe new life into a computer that can then be reused by someone else who could benefit from it. It’s called Ubuntu.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • How to make a voice-controlled robot arm for $55

      Okay, so we might have made most of that up, but the developer of the robotic arm really is an aerospace engineer, he really does have a broken wrist, and he really did create a voice-controlled arm for under $60 — and better yet, he did it using an open-source operating system (Linux), a bunch of open-source tools, and of course he made all of his work open source so that you too can make your own robotic helping hand.

    • Phones

      • Intel and Samsung Mount Android Attack

        The Limo Foundation along with the Linux Foundation are joining forces to create Tizen as an open source alternative to Google’s Android. The game plan will launch with a SDK in early 2012. This means Intel will say bye-bye to MeeGo.

        Adobe folks must be feeling the roller coaster ride of the Kindle Fire supporting Adobe’s Flash, while Tizen will be HTML 5 based.

        Tizen is aimed at tablets, smartphones, netbooks and in-vechicle systems.The Limo Foundation has a number of backers with Motorola, NEC, Panasonic, Orange, Samsung and others. Add Fujitsu, Hitachi, IBM, Intel, Qualcomm and others in the LinuxFoundation.

      • Android/Ballnux

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Government of India launches the elusive $35 tablet, retail availability in November

        When Tata Motors unveiled the Tata Nano—the $2500 car, the automative world was taken by storm. The engineering minds behind the cheapest family car pulled off something no other company could. The Government of India had similar plans for computers. The OLPC project showed promise but did not catch up. They (the organization behind OLPC) have however been able to attract some state governments to join them.

      • OLPC XO-1.75 Laptop Preview

        Last month at XDC2011 Chicago, I managed to get my hands on what should be the production hardware model of the XO-1.75 laptop that is expected to be released in the coming months by the OLPC project. The low-cost OLPC laptop targeted for students is now ARM-based and consumes very little power.

      • India’s $35 Tablet ‘Aakash’ Launched, Runs Android 2.2

        India’s much talked about US$35 tablet running Android 2.2 Froyo is finally launched. World’s cheapest tablet will be called ‘Aakash’ and it’s exact price is Rs.2,276. At current rates, final cost will be around US$50, which still makes it the world’s cheapest tablet. If the price point of this Android tablet impressed you already, specifications are going to impress you even more.

      • ‘$35′ Android tablet launches in India, but it’s now $61

        India’s “$35″ tablet has launched at a price of $61, but may be subsidized by the government to as low as $30 for students, according to one report. Developed by U.K.-based Datawind, the “Aakash UbiSlate 7″ tablet runs Android 2.2 on a 366MHz Conexant processor, with 256MB RAM and 2GB flash, and features a seven-inch, 800 x 480 resistive display.

      • Pondering the Prospect of a Completely Open Linux Tablet

        “In the end it won’t be Linux that makes it a niche, it will be simple economics,” said Slashdot blogger hairyfeet. “Nobody will pay even close to iPad pricing on anything but an iPad, and ZaReason will have to charge close to iPad money to get decent hardware in the thing.” So, ZaReason will likely “sell enough to stay in business and make a little profit, but it won’t set the world on fire.”

      • ZTE’s V55 Android Honeycomb tablet hits the FCC on its way to Sprint

        ZTE is better known for its OEM feature phones, but the company has recently started to roll out a suite of Android tablets. Today, one of the company’s latest tablets, the V55, won FCC approval and judging from the label pic above the device appears to be headed for Sprint.

      • ASUS Not Scared By Kindle Fire Threats, Will Release Transformer 2 As Planned

        Jerry Shen, the CEO of ASUS, has recently gone on the record about the new tablet arena that Amazon’s Kindle Fire has created. First off, he said that he has no immediate plans to slash the price of the original ASUS Eee Pad Transformer to keep up with the Fire. We have already seen some companies do this in the wake of Amazon’s rumored 100,000 pre-orders of their new tablet, but ASUS says they are still gaining successful results from their tablets.

      • Amazon Kindle Fire pre-orders over 2,000 per hour

        With Apple news everywhere today because of the iPhone 4S release, it’s hard to remember other new products. But it’s hard to ignore a leaked screenshot of Amazon’s order system showing Kindle Fire orders coming in at over 2,000 per hour.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Interview: Alan W. Irwin, developer of Time Ephemerides

    F4S: Please, give us a brief introduction about yourself.

    I got my Ph.D in astronomy in 1978, and my research work afterwards has been primarily concerned with developing Fortran and C software to support my astronomical research. My development environments over the years have been IBM System/370, VAX minicomputers, Solaris boxes, and then Linux on PC’s from 1996 to the present. That Linux development environment has been an enormous benefit for me so I have been happy to contribute back by participating in such open-source projects as PLplot (plplot.sf.net), FreeEOS (freeeos.sf.net), and now the Time Ephemerides project (timeephem.sf.net).

  • Events

    • Videos: KVM Forum 2011 Presentations

      The KVM Forum 2011 was held at the Hyatt Regency in Vancouver, Canada on August 15-16. It was co-located with LinuxCon North America 2011.

      LinuxCon and the KVM Forum were both sponsored by The Linux Foundation who recorded a large number of videos from both events. Unfortunately, The Linux Foundation had few security breaches to deal with on their kernel.org and linux.com domains which (I’m guessing) has greatly delayed them doing post-production work on the recordings and posting them publicly.

  • Web Browsers

    • Chrome

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox for Tablets available for download in Aurora Channel

        It’s been quite a while since we did that post on Firefox’s upcoming tablet User Interface, and guess what, it’s finally here! Firefox for Tablets has just landed in Aurora channel, which means, you can now download it, test it, and make the product even better. The tablet version includes all the features we discussed in our earlier post along with some additional features. Here’s more about it :

      • Firefox and SeaMonkey users warned to disable McAfee ScriptScan

        A major incompatibility between Mozilla’s browsers Firefox and SeaMonkey, and McAfee’s ScriptScan plug-in has caused “a high volume of crashes”, according to Mozilla. The problem first came to light in September, when members of the McAfee forum began reporting problems with version 14.4.0 of ScriptScan, a tool which checks web pages, as they are loaded into the browser, for malicious code. This is the first time since July that Mozilla has found it necessary to block a plug-in.

      • Privacy Extension for Firefox, Priv3
  • SaaS

    • EngineYard Brings JRuby to Cloud

      “This is the first commercially supported way to run applications on JRuby in a production environment,” Mike Piech vice president of product management and marketing for Engine Yard told InternetNews.com. “JRuby is really important to both the Ruby and Java world.”

    • OpenStack Foundation to Form in 2012: A Spin-Out from Rackspace

      It’s official: After some early posts that reported that the OpenStack cloud computing platform will be spun out from Rackspace, OpenStack officials have confirmed that a new nonprofit foundation will oversee development and evangelism beginning in 2012. OpenStack is presenting significant challenges to proprietary cloud computing platforms and offering a flexible, open source alternative, so this promises to be good news. OpenStack’s oversight will also differ significantly from some of the open source cloud platforms backed solely by commercial entities.

    • Rackspace to create an OpenStack Foundation

      Rackspace says that it is planning to create an OpenStack Foundation next year to take over the governance and ownership of the OpenStack trademark. The OpenStack project was launched in July 2010 to manage a new open source cloud platform created by Rackspace and Nasa; since then Citrix, Dell, Intel, AMD, HP, Cisco, Canonical and others have joined the initiative. However, there have been concerns about the governance of the project, specifically that Rackspace has too much control since buying Anso Labs which gave it a majority of seats on the project board. A reformation of voting processes within the project in March this year did little to reduce those concerns.

    • Linux Labs Unveils Strategy for Its SaaS Business With Full Launch Targeted for Next Quarter; Software as a Service (SaaS) Market Forecasted to Reach $40.5 Billion by 2014
  • Databases

    • Oracle Goes Big for NoSQL

      There is a lot of buzz around the term “big data.” It’s a topic that Oracle is now jumping into with both feet with a new big data engineered system as well as new Hadoop and NoSQL software offerings.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • Oracle Updates Linux, Sticks with Intel and Promises Solaris

      Oracle remains committed to Intel and to Linux even as it continues to promise the delivery of Solaris 11. That’s the message that Oracle executives delivered during a keynote at the OpenWorld conference this week.

      The commitment to Intel is particularly key, since Oracle CEO Larry Ellison’s comments during the company’s recent earnings call. Ellison said that he didn’t care if Oracle’s Intel x86 server business dwindled down to zero. Oracle Executive Vice-President John Fowler said during his OpenWorld keynote that he received a few calls about his boss’ comments. He stressed that Oracle remains comitted to Intel.

    • Java 8 delayed, but only a little

      During his keynote on Oracle’s Java strategy at the JavaOne conference, the Vice President of Development for the Fusion middleware, Adam Messinger, had to announce that the release date of Java 8 has been postponed. Instead of late 2012, the new version is now only likely to be released six months later, in summer 2013. Around nine million Java developers, as counted by Oracle, had to wait more than four-and-a-half years for Java 7, which was released this summer after repeated delays. To make up for the postponed release date, Oracle’s Java developers plan to use the extra time to extend the feature set.

    • New fonts, unique features for LibreOffice DTP

      Based on the excellent SIL Graphite font technology and Philipp H. Poll’s Libertine Open Fonts project, LibreOffice has got extraordinary DTP capabilities with the extended Graphite version of Linux Libertine and Biolinum font families.

    • Lively Alphabet – coloring book and DTP example
    • Oracle’s Plans for Java Unveiled at JavaOne

      Oracle made a number of announcements about current and future versions of Java at the annual JavaOne conference this week, including the availability of an early access version of JDK 7 for the Mac OS, plans to “bridge the gap” between Java ME and Java SE, an approach to modularizing Java SE 8 that will rely on the Jigsaw platform, a new project that aims to use HTML5 to bring Java to Apple’s iOS platform, the availability of JavaFX 2.0, a pending proposal to open source that technology, gearing up Java EE for the cloud and a delay in the release of Java 8.

    • VirtualBox 4.1.4 features automatic extension updates

      The Mac OS X version of VirtualBox has seen comparatively few changes, with an issue that caused the VirtualBox GUI (Graphical User Interface) to lock-up during the start-up of a VM being one of the major fixes. For Linux, a bug that prevented removable storage from being detached after restoring a VM snapshot has been fixed, and hard-links that caused the installation of VirtualBox to fail on file systems such as OpenAFS have been removed. Two hardware acceleration issues, one causing incorrect rendering and potential crashes when switching to/from full screen, the other causing problems when using Compiz under Ubuntu 9.10, have also been fixed.

    • As LibreOffice Turns One, a Peek Ahead at What’s to Come

      It was just about a year ago that I was writing about the launch of LibreOffice, and now here we are today, marking the free productivity software suite’s first year.

    • LibreOffice – a dive into the unknown

      The Document Foundation (TDF) and LibreOffice turned one year old last month, and it has been a good year. LibreOffice was a dive into the unknown, and an opportunity to prove what the community already knew: that a chance to swim free could only bring positive results.

  • Healthcare

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

  • Project Releases

    • Gephi 0.8 beta released

      The latest beta version of Gephi has been released, download it for Windows, Mac OS and Linux platforms. This release focus on new features for both users and developers, and the new license unlocks opportunities for business. The Ranking and Preview modules have been completely rewritten in a modular way and can be now extended with plug-ins! Preview can now be extended in many ways, for instance group shapes or edge bundling. Moreover, continuous progress have been made on the dynamic network support and we release today the last big part: statistics over time, available from the Statistics module when the network is dynamic. Thanks to users who reported bugs, it’s the only way to fix them.

  • Open Hardware

  • Programming

Leftovers

  • Google Docs Still Not Ready For Tablets

    Google has updated its Google Docs app for Android tablets, but the cloud-based office suite is far from ready for the prime time on Android tablets.

    The app doesn’t come with and WYSIWYG text editor which may enable a user to do any ‘real’ work on Google Docs using the tablet. All you get is a simple text editor where you can type content.

  • Finance

    • Christie Speculation Gives Campaign Top Billing

      Depending on how you count, anywhere from seven to more than a dozen Republican candidates are running for president. But it was a non-candidate who fueled one of the biggest weeks of campaign coverage to date.

      Speculation that New Jersey Governor Chris Christie might enter the fray made the 2012 presidential election the No. 1 story in the news media the week of September 26-October 2, according to the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. Coverage of the campaign accounted for 15% of the newshole studied last week. That was the third-biggest week for campaign coverage this year—and the biggest not to involve a candidate debate.

    • Coverage Grows for Wall Street Protest
    • Goldman Sachs Requests A Correction

      And, the GS sp0kesperson reminded me, since Goldman bought part of Abacus for itself, I w as not permitted to describe the entire event as a “fraud.”

  • DRM

    • The Daily Digital Lock Dissenter, Day 4: Canadian Council of Archives

      The Canadian Council of Archives is Canada’s leading archivist organization, with a mandate “to preserve and provide access to Canadian documentary heritage by improving the administration, effectiveness and efficiency of the archival system.” The CCA’s comments on the C-32 digital lock provisions:

  • Copyrights

    • Astrologers Attack TZ Database

      Just when you think you have seen it all a case of copyright violation has been filed by an astrology publisher against a keeper of a timezone database. This has caused the TZ database to shut down pending further proceedings. TZ is widely used in the GNU/Linux world.

10.05.11

Links 5/10/2011: India’s $35 Linux Tablet, OpenNebula 3.0

Posted in News Roundup at 7:20 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Computer-Aided Engineering in Linux

    Engineers are some of the heaviest number-crunchers around. If you are a grad student, post doc or undergrad, you usually get whatever is lying around as your work machine. Also, depending on how inflexible your local IT department is, you may be forced to use one of the commercial operating systems around these days. What are lowly students to do when they need to do heavy computational work? You may be interested in looking at CAELinux (Computer Assisted Engineering). This project provides a live CD that gives you all the open-source tools you might need for your engineering work. And, because it is a live CD, you can use it without touching the local drive of the machine you are using.

  • Desktop

    • The Linux Desktop Advances

      Many different things make the Linux Planet go around, and one of them is the desktop. This past week, two key Linux desktop technologies advanced — the new GNOME 3.2 release and the 1.0 release of PulseAudio.

  • Server

    • Dell building its own Exadata killer

      Way back when, before Oracle bought Sun Microsystems, and even before Hewlett-Packard became hardware buddies with Big Red with the original Exadata Database Machine, Dell was Oracle’s chosen buddy for running parallel Oracle databases using Real Application Cluster on top of Linux. But now Oracle is in the hardware business, and it looks like Dell is fixing to take the parallel Oracle database fight to Oracle.

    • Oracle Big Data Appliance stakes big claim

      With its latest appliance, Oracle has officially embraced big data, including Hadoop and NoSQL.

  • Kernel Space

    • Kernel.org partially back online

      The kernel.org web servers are back on line and are once again delivering the Git repositories of some Linux developers – including the main repository of the development branch of Linux maintained by Linus Torvalds. However, the frontpage links to the archives with the sources for the Linux kernel point to files that have yet to be uploaded. Following four weeks of downtime, kernel.org is thus at least partially back in business. The administrators took the servers offline for maintenance work around a month ago, following the discovery in late August that an attacker had obtained access to some servers.

    • Changes in Enterprise Computing Bring New Members to Linux Foundation

      Eucalyptus Systems, Nebula and Virtual Bridges look to Linux to enable innovation in the new enterprise

      SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., October 5, 2011 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, today announced that three new members have joined the organization: Eucalyptus Systems, Nebula and Virtual Bridges.

    • There’s A Linux 3.1-rc9 Kernel Release
  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Top 8 Gnome Shell Extensions

        The power of Gnome Shell lies in its extensionability. It is this power that transforms the barely unusable vanilla Gnome Shell desktop environement into a powerful and extremely usable and productive desktop environment. Gnome shell has a number of useful installations to enhance the user experience. To learn how to install and enable them using the Gnome Tweak tool check out our post on Installing and using Gnome Shell. In this post we will look at some must have Gnome shell extensions

  • Distributions

    • Deep in the heart of TexOS

      The link in question is for TexOS, the Texas Open Source Project. The Texas Open Source Project, according to its site, “is working with local, non-profits in the San Angelo, Texas, area to provide technology to students who don’t have access to it at home.”

    • New Releases

      • AgiliaLinux 8.0.0
      • Clonezilla 1.2.10-16
      • Salix Ratpoison 13.37

        Salix Ratpoison 13.37 is released! This is probably the first ever linux distribution release featuring Ratpoison as the main window manager. The aim of the Ratpoison edition is to create a system that is fully usable with the keyboard only, no mouse required! For everyone that is not familiar with Ratpoison, Ratpoison is a window manager for X “with no fat library dependencies, no fancy graphics, no window decorations, and no rodent dependence”. Ratpoison uses a workflow that is similar to that of GNU screen, which is very popular in the terminal world. All interaction with the window manager is done through keystrokes.

      • 10/2/2011: Parted Magic 6.7

        Major enhancement release with many updates. Most notable updates include, Linux 3.0.4 and GParted 0.9.1. We have dropped the legacy PCManFM for PCMan-Mod, and man is it nice. Lots a little PCManfm bugs that have existed for years are now quashed. Xfburn replaces SimpleBurn for burning CDROM/DVD media. Chntpw was added to the boot menu. Adding Luxi fonts improved international language support. Although it’s not the newest released, Firefox is updated to firefox-6.0.2 and is compiled for i486 (official branding included) with permission from the Mozilla Foundation. OpenSSH is updated to 5.9p1 with the ecdsa key created by default. People have been complaining about Parted Magic being hard on laptop batteries, so CPU frequency scaling on anything with a battery is now set to “on-demand” at boot. See the changelog for all the updates. There are many.

      • Now, pay attention to the latest Calculate Linux 11.9

        typically ‘calculates’ the necessary utilities for configuration, building and installation of systems.

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Mageia, Mandriva and IBM: Battle of Giants

        My laptop is very old, so old that many people don’t even remember the model. This is one of the last models designed and actually produced by IBM before it was sold to Lenovo – a good old IBM X31, upgraded to 2Gb RAM at the day of purchase in 2005. There is no single thing it cannot do for me – it works just perfectly for many years, and, perhaps, for a few years to come.

    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

      • Help release Debian from the French!

        Debian gurus Raphael Hertzog and Roland Mas, are looking to raise money to fund the translation of their seminal Debian book “Cahiers de l’Admin Debian Squeeze” into English. The pair have set up a crowdfunding campaign here to finance the three-month task of translating the book’s 450 pages.

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • uBuntu 11.10 aka Oneiric Ocelot: This Is The Countdown!
          • Official Oneiric T-Shirts Appear in Ubuntu Shop
          • Flavours and Variants

            • Linux Mint – The Trio

              Linux Mint’s claim to fame is usability and the search for the perfect Linux desktop. As a distribution Mint arrived on the scene in 2006 with release 1.0 code named “Ada”. It never formally made it as a stable release, resulting in little fan fare. However with release 2.0 codenamed “Barbara” Linux Mint made its mark on the community. Over the next 2 years Mint released 5 versions and if you haven’t guessed it already they were all codenamed after feminine first names.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • RoweBots Transforms Medical Equipment Design – Unison Ultra Tiny Linux Supports Xilinx FPGA Microblaze Softcore

      RoweBots Inc., the leading supplier of tiny embedded Linux-compatible real-time operating systems (RTOS) products, today announced that the Unison™ Operating System (OS) is a core component in a variety of medical equipment. The Unison OS controls operating room equipment, intelligent eyewear and other advanced medical devices for the home, physician’s offices and hospitals.

    • Phones

      • Will the Mer Project Keep MeeGo Alive?

        In a message on the MeeGo email list today, Carsten Munk proposes the Mer project as a sustainable way for MeeGo and other communities to work with Tizen. Munk explains that many MeeGo project contributors originated from the Mer project, which stood for Maemo Reconstructed. “We were big on open governance, open development and open source,” he says.

      • The Power of Asterisk Revealed: What the Open Source Software Can Do for You

        Nokia is rumored to be developing an open-source OS for its low-end handsets, codenamed Meltemi, despite having failed to drive MeeGo to the point where it could save the company’s smartphones. Apparently being led by Nokia EVP of Mobile Phones Mary McDowell, so the WSJ‘s sources tell them, Meltemi named after “the Greek word for dry summer winds that blow across the Aegean Sea from the north.”

      • Linux is just good for Nokia business

        So why would Nokia appear to do a 180 and try a product release based on another form of Linux, codenamed “Meltemi”? Wasn’t MeeGo good enough? And what about Symbian, which Nokia just completed outsourcing development and support to Accenture?

        Like any detective, I started out making a list of possibilities.

      • Nokia working on new Linux OS for low end smartphones

        By going for the Windows Phone platform, Nokia has put itself in a difficult spot as far as low end phone segment is concerned.

      • From Moblin to MeeGo to Tizen, Oh My!
      • Android

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • The $35 android tablet, a snip at $50

        The Aakash is designed and built by UK firm Datawind, known for their cheapo web-browsing kit. It features a resistive screen, a 366MHz processor and 2GB of storage, along with a couple of USB ports and space for a micro SD card. Connectivity is Wi-Fi, though cellular is already in production, and the government will be selling it to students for a shade under £20 a pop.

      • OLPC India head disappointed with govt’s $35 tablet
      • India’s $35 tablet computer meant for students to be launched today

        India’s Human Resources minister Kapil Sibal will unveil the country’s $35 tablet computer meant for students, officially on Wednesday.

        The tablet was developed as part of the National Mission on Education as a low cost alternative to high-end tablets which were available at $200. Even the latest tablet made by an Indian company called Pepper was priced $99.

      • Linux Tablet Will Be Fully Open Source

        It’s possible the launch of Tizen will eventually add some more variety to the mix, but in the meantime a California vendor of Linux PCs has set its sights on delivering what it believes will be the first fully open source tablet.

Free Software/Open Source

  • PhoneGap Build in Open Beta
  • Adobe Acquires Developer Of HTML5 Mobile App Framework PhoneGap Nitobi
  • Adobe buys PhoneGap, TypeKit for better Web tools
  • PhoneGap Creator Nitobi Acquired by Adobe
  • PhoneGap Applies to Apache Software Foundation, Contemplates Name Change
  • PhoneGap to become an Apache project as Adobe acquires Nitobi

    Adobe has entered an agreement to acquire Nitobi, the startup behind PhoneGap. Alongside news of the acquisition, Adobe and Nitobi have jointly announced plans to donate the PhoneGap project to the Apache Software Foundation.

    PhoneGap is an open source mobile development framework for building applications with standards-based Web technologies. The project provides a cross-platform Web runtime that allows application developers to reach multiple mobile operating systems with a single code base. It includes a custom API stack that enables platform integration and exposes device capabilities.

  • Adobe Announces Agreement to Acquire Nitobi, Creator of PhoneGap
  • IBM open sources Blue Spruce to aid medical research

    Big Blue has passed the code to the Dojo Foundation’s Open Cooperative Web Framework (OpenCoweb), where it is already being used in a National Institutes of Health funded study of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPDGeneR). The COPDGeneR team is studying the CT scans and medical records of over 10,000 patents in an attempt to understand causation factors and find cures.

  • The open source code “provenance” audit concept

    Proprietary software vendors like to scaremonger over the use of open source software. They like to highlight the “inherent dynamism” that exists in open source libraries that are exposed to community development at all times.

  • 26 helpful open source network management tools
  • Gnucash accounts for a successful summer
  • Events

    • The art of the Linux conference

      When Ballarat makes its debut in January 2012 as the first regional centre to host Australia’s national Linux conference, it will also see a number of first-timers involved on the organisational front.

  • Web Browsers

    • For Fast, Light Web Browsing, Dillo’s No Dallier

      First things first: Unless you visit only very simple websites, Dillo will probably not be your one and only Web browser. However, you may find it very useful as a secondary browser because of its speed. It loads in under a second and renders just as quickly. It can be your go-to tool when you want a fast means to enter a site and find key information.

    • Chrome

    • Mozilla

      • The current (and poor) state of Firefox

        Firefox 7 was recently released. That’s right, less than a month after the release of Firefox 6 comes numero 7. But why? Why would one of the most popular browsers out there put out major releases so close together? Could it be the fact that 6 was so bad they wanted to call “do-over!” to try to make things right?

      • Mozilla aims to add silent updating to Firefox 10

        A year after it pulled the plug on silent updates in Firefox 4, Mozilla said it will debut most of the behind-the-scenes feature by early next year.

      • Firefox developer reveals changes and new update service

        In a post on his blog, developer Brian R. Bondy says that, while Mozilla’s rapid release process has allowed the development team to release a new version of the Firefox browser every six weeks, modifying restricted files under Windows has been difficult due to the introduction of User Account Control (UAC). By default, UAC prevents software from making changes to c:\Program Files\ without the user’s permission, in the form of a confirmation dialogue box. Bondy argues that “if a user with administrative access gives permissions to Firefox one time via a UAC prompt, and that user has automatic updates on, then there is no reason we should continue to ask them to elevate the permissions each and every time we want to apply an update.”

      • Firefox 3.6 Update To 7.0

        Firefox users who are still running a 3.6 version of the web browser should prepare themselves for receiving an advertised update on Thursday. Users will receive a prompt with the option to update the browser from their version to the very latest. Mozilla is quick to note that this has “no bearing on support levels”, which means that Firefox 3.6 will continue to receive updates after the update prompt has been launched.

  • SaaS

    • The Community Effect

      Owen O’Malley recently collected and analyzed information in the Apache Hadoop project commit logs and its JIRA repository. That data describes the history of development for Hadoop and the contributions of the individuals who have worked on it.

    • OpenNebula 3.0 features ACLs and updated interface

      Version 3.0 of the open source cloud toolkit OpenNebula has been launched; according to its developers this is used by thousands of organisations to build IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) clouds. The release includes “new innovative features” which have been “developed to fulfill the needs of leading IT organizations running production environments”.

    • Mirantis Establishes Center of Excellence for OpenStack
  • Databases

    • Firebird 2.5.1 is officially released

      Firebird Project is happy to announce general availability of Firebird 2.5.1 This sub-release introduces several bug fixes and many important improvements – for example, performance improvements during a database restore, the ability to write to global temporary tables in read-only databases, etc. For the full list of changes please refer to the Release Notes, Chapter 2 “New in Firebird 2.5″. Firebird 2.5.1 has 100% compatible on-disk structure with Firebird 2.5.0, so it is recommended to migrate to 2.5.1 as soon as possible.

    • Amid NoSQL hubbub, Oracle tweaks fan-fave MySQL

      Oracle’s rumored NoSQL database made its splashy debut, along with Oracle’s Big Data Appliance, on the Oracle OpenWorld 2011 main stage Monday. Less trumpeted was news that MySQL, the venerable open-source database, got an update that vows to speed query and improve cluster capabilities.

    • Oracle Defies Self With ‘NoSQL’ Database

      Oracle’s extended diatribe against the NoSQL crowd — including Cassandra, MongoDB, CouchDB, and Redis — sought to expose their limitations and sow some serious doubt over their open-source roots. But the white paper has now vanished from Oracle’s website, surviving only through Google’s search cache, and Oracle has launched a new attack on the NoSQL movement. On Monday, at its massive Oracle OpenWorld conference in downtown San Francisco, Oracle unveiled its own NoSQL database.

    • Oracle tweaks MySQL with milestone update

      While the news about NoSQL has garnered much attention, Oracle has quietly published a development milestone release (DMR) for MySQL.

      The MySQL 5.6.3 DMR includes a major revision of the software’s optimizer, which the company claims will make file-sort optimizations up to three times faster by searching more intelligently and dumping unneeded data during the process.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • VirtualBox 4.1.4 for Linux Supports X.Org Server 1.11

      Oracle announced last night, October 3rd, a new maintenance version to its popular and powerful VirtualBox virtualization software, VirtualBox 4.1.4, which brings many improvements and lots of bugfixes.

    • ODF 1.2 has been approved as an OASIS standard

      Standard document formats are key for liberating the user from the lock in of proprietary formats. ODF has been developed by OASIS based on OOo document format, and is now supported by most personal productivity software and many other computer programs. TDF is committed to supporting ODF and contribute to its development. ODF will be one of four main topics at the upcoming LibreOffice Conference in Paris.

    • Java FX 2.0 tries again

      The first time round, JavaFX was a closed source attempt to dislodge Flash, Silverlight and the other plugin runtimes from being the way that people delivered rich applications on the internet. This time around, Oracle has released version 2.0 of its JavaFX RIA (rich internet application) technology as an open source based platform. The release was announced at JavaOne, which is being held in parallel with the company’s in-house OpenWorld conference in San Francisco.

      In contrast to previous attempts, in the opinion of many of the Java experts who have been testing the beta since February, it comes across as a much more rounded product. Whether Oracle will be able to compete with alternatives such as Microsoft’s Silverlight or Adobe’s AIR/Flex is, however, open to question, especially as those platforms are already under pressure from the emerging HTML5 ecosystem.

    • Oracle v. Google – Settlement Discussions Continue
    • Oracle v. Google – Google Files Case Management Statement

      Oracle filed its case management statement last Friday specifying the claims it would assert. (Oracle v. Google – Oracle Specifies Claims It Will Assert) In its statement Oracle identified 26 claims it would be asserting, although it also suggested that there were only 15 unique sets of claims because of what Oracle described as “claim mirroring.” Monday Google responded with its own case management statement identifying the grounds for invalidity it would assert against each of Oracle’s asserted claims.

    • Oracle v. Google – Stay or Not to Stay, That Is the Question – Redux

      Each of the parties has now come forward and filed an additional Case Management Statement (Google Statement – 480 [PDF]; Oracle Statement – 481 [PDF]) on the issues of the patent reexaminations; whether the case should be stayed pending those reexaminations; the amount of time required for direct and cross-examination at trial, and the issue of damages. Not surprisingly, the positions of the parties are diametrically opposed.

  • Education

    • iSchools bats for open-source in Software Freedom Day

      The iSchools Project, a government-funded ICT for education integration initiative, recently made a push for open-source software during the Software Freedom Day (SFD) 2011 held at St. Paul’s University in Tuguegarao, Cagayan Valley last September.

      Working on the theme “Smarter Communities Choose to be Free”, this year’s SFD aimed to educate and convince technology users to choose open-source software instead of using proprietary software or unlicensed software.

  • Business

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Nominations are open for the 14th annual Free Software Awards

      The Free Software Foundation Award for the Advancement of Free Software is presented annually by FSF president Richard Stallman to an individual who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software, through activities that accord with the spirit of free software.

      Last year, Rob Savoye was recognized with the Award for the Advancement of Free Software for his contributions to compiler and testing tools, and his leadership of the GNU Gnash project, a fully-free replacement for Adobe Flash. Savoye joined a prestigious list of previous winners including John Gilmore, Wietse Venema, Harald Welte, Ted Ts’o, Andrew Tridgell, Theo de Raadt, Alan Cox, Larry Lessig, Guido van Rossum, Brian Paul, Miguel de Icaza and Larry Wall.

    • Merging In The GNU D Language Compiler To GCC

      Nearly one year ago I wrote about Digital Mars wanting to merge the GNU D Compiler into GCC. Finally it looks like merging the compiler for the D programming language is nearing a point of reality.

  • Public Services/Government

    • The Kerala State Electricity Board Saves a Whopping Rs 8 Crore, Using FOSS

      For the last four years, KSEB has created over 840 databases across the state. Almost all its applications in major functional areas, operating either in a centralised or local architecture, use PostgreSQL. About 700 PostgreSQL databases have been used in the Oruma project, and over 4,000 employees of KSEB access these databases on a daily basis. Saras has about 140 databases, which are used by about 1,000 users for daily transactions. Three projects under implementation (the Human Resource Information System or HRIS, the Supply Chain Management or SCM, and HT/EHT billing software) also use PostgreSQL databases. The HRIS will have a single database, and over 500 users are expected to use it on a daily basis. The SCM system uses PostgreSQL, and about 1,000 users are expected to access this centralised database for daily transactions. And about 30 people will use the HT/EHT billing software, every day.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • OCCUPY WALL STREET (the theory)

      Occupy Wall Street is an open source protest.

    • Open Data

      • Synchronously Replicating Databases Across Data Centers – Are you Insane?

        Well actually….no. The second Development Milestone Release of MySQL Cluster 7.2 introduces support for what we call “Multi-Site Clustering”. In this post, I’ll provide an overview of this new capability, and considerations you need to make when considering it as a deployment option to scale geographically dispersed database services.

        You can read more about MySQL Cluster 7.2.1 in the article posted on the MySQL Developer Zone.

        MySQL Cluster has long offered Geographic Replication, distributing clusters to remote data centers to reduce the affects of geographic latency by pushing data closer to the user, as well as providing a capability for disaster recovery.

    • Open Access/Content

      • Open-access R&D for drug industry

        LONDON: Drug companies are learning how to share. In a bid to save both time and money, some of the industry’s biggest names are experimenting with new ways to pool early-stage research, effectively taking a leaf out of the “open-source” manual that gave the world Linux software.

  • Programming

  • Standards/Consortia

    • UK.gov coder defines open standards: ‘A lot like porn’

      As the government works on drawing up yet another definition for open standards, the man in charge of the Cabinet Office’s team of IT coders is keen to talk about a future where all government tech is based on, well, open standards.

Leftovers

  • Health/Nutrition

    • Food Rights Network Interviews Food & Farm Hero John Kinsman

      This month, the Center for Media and Democracy’s new Food Rights Network launches a series of interviews with “food and farm heroes.” It’s easy for an organization dedicated to exposing corporate spin to focus on negative corporate propaganda with its ubiquity, but we would be remiss not to highlight courageous people who fight corporate agendas and spin in other ways, large and small. Some devote their lives to it.

    • Los Angeles and Kern County’s Epic Sewage Sludge Battle

      Sewage sludge can contain heavy metals, pesticides, dioxins, flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, perfluorinated compounds, nanoparticles, pathogens, known endocrine disruptors, and more. Of those, only 10 heavy metals out of dozens are regulated in sewage sludge that is applied to land where animal feed is grown as fertilizer. The strictest regulation, which the EPA calls “Class A Biosolids” (“biosolids” is a term the sewage industry made up to make sludge sound more palatable), has the same restrictions on heavy metals, plus two other criteria: it must have no detectable salmonella or fecal coliform, and it must be treated so that it is not attractive to disease-carrying organisms like rats or flies. But this leaves in and unaccounted for numerous other pathogens, as well as an array of heavy metals and other substances like PBDEs concentrated in the resulting sludge.

  • Finance

    • O.co aka Overstock.com vs. Goldman Sachs: A True David & Goliath Story

      For six years Overstock.com has waged a war to expose Wall Street mischief. We did not go looking for a fight, but our company was attacked, and we learned we were not alone: the same manipulation-for-profit tools that Wall Street had deployed against us had also been deployed against many American companies, harming job creation, innovation, and economic growth. We knew that if left unchecked and unexposed, Wall Street’s games could ultimately damage U.S. capital markets.

      So in 2005 and 2007 we filed two lawsuits. The first case was against a hedge fund (Rocker Partners) and hatchet-job-for-hire research team (Gradient Analytics), both with ties to Jim Cramer. The second case was against a group of eleven Wall Street prime brokers, culminating in Goldman Sachs. The hedge fund in question (Rocker Partners) hired famed lawyer David Boies, and the prime brokers showed up with an army of the most prestigious law firms in America. Our lawyers were Dore Griffinger, Ellen Cirangle, Jonathan Sommer and Catherine Jackson of Stein & Lubin, a small but excellent San Francisco law firm.

    • Ratigan With Denninger: How To Get Money Out Of Politics

      Three years ago, I left my 15-year career as a financial professional, because I was disgusted and disturbed by the rampant evidence of corruption in the relationship between our banking system and our government.

      At the time the Tea Party was emerging and I was confident that between their exploding wave of anger and our newly minted president’s soaring aspirations for all of us — we would align to confront and resolve the blatantly corrupt relation ship between banking and our government and more broadly BUSINESS and STATE.

    • Molly Crabapple’s Occupy Wall Street “Vampire Squid” poster, for your printing/stenciling pleasure
  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • Koch Industries Exposed for Bribery, Secret Iran Sales and More

      Late Sunday night, after a flurry of PR flack-directed prebuttals that had eyebrows arching and anticipation building, Bloomberg Markets Magazine released an epic exposé about Koch Industries’ misdeeds during the last three decades.

      Fifteen Bloomberg journalists from around the world contributed to the story.

    • U.S. House Passes ALEC-Inspired TRAIN Act

      The TRAIN Act, introduced by ALEC alumnus Rep. John Sullivan (R-OK), “would create a special committee to oversee the EPA’s rules and regulations, and require the agency to consider economic impacts on polluters when it sets standards concerning how much air pollution is too much.”

  • Censorship

  • DRM

    • The Daily Digital Lock Dissenter, Day 3: Retail Council of Canada

      The Retail Council of Canada represents more than 43,000 store fronts of all retail formats across Canada, including department, specialty, discount, and independent stores, and online merchants. It board of directors include representation from Canada’s largest retailers. The RCC’s comments on digital locks in Bill C-32:

10.04.11

Links 4/10/2011: Parted Magic 6.7, Red Hat’s Latest Takeover, Fedora 16 Beta

Posted in News Roundup at 7:18 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • Web Browsers

    • Chrome

    • Mozilla

      • Rapid Release Follow-Up

        My recent post on the rapid release cycle generated a lot of response, some very thoughtful and some also very frustrated. Many of the comments focus on a few key issues listed below. We’ve been working on how to address these issues; I’ll outline our progress and plans here.

      • Mozilla releases Rescuefox prototype

        Mozilla’s Gladius game engine is part of the outfit’s Paladin project, which is trying to push 3D gaming in the Firefox web browser. The Rescuefox prototype was used to highlight any problems between the Gladius game engine and Firefox’s Gecko rendering engine, and it also works on Google’s Chrome.

      • RescueFox: The Value of a Prototype
  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • LibreOffice Is One

      Once in the mists of time, I was the head of open source at Sun Microsystems. One of my chief delights in that role was the OpenOffice.org project. I attended the Open Source Convention (OSCON) in Monterey, California in 2000 where the project was created out of a product Sun had acquired the previous year, StarOffice. I watched as it grew in polish and capability. I also helped as it submitted its ideas to the OASIS standards group for an “Open Office Document Format”, a project that evolved into ODF and changed the world of enterprise document handling.

  • Education

    • On the University migration to Free Software

      Megatotoro described here how the recently announced University migration to free software made a big splash in national newspapers and even on TV news. The idea is to start by replacing MS Office suites by free software equivalents (Open Office.org/Libre Office) and, eventually, dump Windows and implement Linux.

      I visited the online page of one of those newspapers to see the coverage and the comments I read were, for the most part, very encouraging and positive. Of course, the public is congratulating the University for the initiative of saving a LOT OF MONEY (that was used to pay MS licenses) through the use of Free Software and to invest this growing amount on improving the campus and on resources available to students.

  • Funding

  • Project Releases

  • Openness/Sharing

  • Programming

    • Sinatra 1.3 adds streaming

      The developers of Sinatra, the light-weight web framework for Ruby programmers, have announced the availability of a new feature release, Sinatra 1.3.0, which allows applications to keep connections open over time while still delivering data over the connection.

Leftovers

  • Finance

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • Synagro’s Shiny New Patina

      Synagro is in the business of marketing sewage sludge as “compost,” or, as the company’s new, PR-approved website puts it, “Transforming natural waste challenges into sustainable, planet-friendly solutions.” The company is a subsidiary of the Carlyle Group, the largest private equity firm in the world. Carlyle is also a sizeable part of the military-industrial complex with ties to numerous national politicians, including former British Prime Minister John Major, Alice Albright (daughter of former Secretary of State Madelyn Albright), and both George W. and George H.W. Bush.

  • Privacy

    • Open Data Community Demands a Real Debate on Public Data Corporation

      Earlier this week dozens of people from the loose open data movement gathered in London to discuss the current government consultations on this policy area. Open Rights Group had organised these workshops to present the policy proposals and our initial views, but also to gather feedback from the community. The main message we took home is that the Public Data Corporation in is current shape is widely perceived as a missed opportunity and huge step backwards, while the Making Open Data Real paper got a much more nuanced response.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • Red Hat

        I am happy to announce that today the party is kicking off its public policy process. To get involved simply take a look at www.pirateparty.org.uk/policy2011 and then go to piratethispolicy.co.uk to let us know what you think.

        As you know, over the last year I have been listening to members, voters and the public as well as going out and speaking to the people who had an opportunity to vote for one of our candidates in Gorton, Oldham and Bury. I watched as our brothers and sisters in Berlin reinvigorated their voters and overturned a legacy of decline and apathy. I saw that it was not just because they had money, not just because the electoral system in Berlin is fairer, but because they had ideas that people could vote for; ideas that came from the same guiding principles as our own, ideas that were well presented, sensible and relevant. They were ideas that won 8.9% of an election and they were good ideas.

Links 4/10/2011: Next Ubuntu Imminent, OpenEMR 4.1

Posted in News Roundup at 5:59 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • How Linux is advancing astronomy

    Head into the professional world of astronomy, though, and Linux machines are ubiquitous. Speaking to science colleagues, fellow developers and reading this very magazine, it becomes clear that there are a wealth of options out there for avid stargazers and the same names and distros crop up again and again.

  • Flexibility of GNU/Linux

    I have often used GNU/Linux to examine systems for many reasons: hardware identification, testing, rescuing data from hard drives, and installation, of course. KNOPPIX is often used but SystemRescueCD is designed for the purpose and has a ton of great features such as chNTpass and memtest. Then there is CloneZilla which does efficient disc imaging to/from a device or a server and, with a server, multicasting. The world is “solution-rich” with GNU/Linux.

  • Open Source: Niche Markets, Linux and Microsoft

    If you are a Linux protagonist who has been around as long as, or longer than, I have, you have seen responses like these over and over as to why Linux distributions will never go mainstream on the PC desktop:

    * “Linux will always remain a niche platform because it does not have a native release of Adobe (Photoshop / Creative Suite / etcetera)!”
    * “Linux does not have Microsoft Office and Microsoft Office power users require Microsoft Office!”
    * “The web portal at (insert portal here) needs Internet Explorer. There is no native release of Internet Explorer for Linux, so no one will want to use Linux!”
    * “Program X does not have a Linux version or equivalent!”
    * Or other claims along the same lines …

    [...]

    To me this suggests that the Microsoft platform is the niche platform:

    * Do you “need” Adobe (Photoshop / Creative Suite / etcetera) for your job? Then you are a niche user.
    * Do you “need” Microsoft Office because you are a “power user”? Then you are a niche user.
    * Do you “need” access to an IE only web portal? Then you are a niche user.
    * Do you “need” to run Program X on your PC? Then you are a niche user.

  • Six ways to use Linux Live CDs in your business

    It was true for me up until a certain point. Things changed when Knoppix Live CD was released by Klaus Knopper in 2000.

  • Desktop

    • Gummersbach: ‘Open source desktops much easier to manage’

      Easier management is one of the main reasons for the German city of Gummersbach to switch its almost 350 PCs to the open source operating system GNU/Linux, a move that began already four years ago. One of the IT administrators, Dirk Hennrichs: “Our Linux desktops need close to zero maintenance, making them light years easier to manage than their proprietary predecessor.”

      Following the move to GNU/Linux, time spent on desktop maintenance was rationalised by one full time equivalent. Hennrichs: “Had the city stayed with the proprietary alternative, it would force us to increase the number of IT administrators.”

    • Flashdrive Linux Saves the Day

      As I have mentioned previously on this blog, I never go anywhere without a bootable Linux flashdrive. The fact that Linux is so portable is one of my favorite things about it. I have at various times kept Fedora, Linux Mint, and Puppy on my flashdrive, but for the last couple months, my mobile distro of choice has been Knoppix.

  • Server

    • Mad Dog 21/21: Bier Or Hospice, That Persistent Thirst For Legacy

      It’s possible–and I think likely–that IBM could not sustain either legacy business, and particularly the mainframe legacy portion, without the highly visible z/Linux offering. Unfortunately for IBM, a key technological capability that distinguished z/Linux from rivals in the form of non-z servers, is losing its advantage.

    • Linux on Mainframes – an IBM update

      IBM presented an update on Linux on its mainframe line of computers. It was refreshing to learn about the success Linux has been having outside of the realm of industry standard X86-based systems. Here’s a quick summary of the session.

  • Kernel Space

    • Btrfs File-System For Old Computers?

      Recently I published benchmarks of Btrfs from a Serial ATA 3.0 SSD (the excellent OCZ Vertex 3 SSD) and those results were interesting, but most people aren’t running 6Gb/s solid-state drives, so how does this next-generation file-system perform on the opposite end of the spectrum? In this article are EXT4 and Btrfs benchmarks from an old Core Duo notebook with a 5400RPM mobile hard drive.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • KDE to Say Buh-Bye to Screensavers

        Developers are addressing a security “constraint” in KDE’s screen-locking routine, which I guess some folks may welcome. But as a result, screensavers will be rendered inoperative. They hope to include a fallback in 4.8, but will remove that in 4.9. Martin Graesslin says they wish to replace the current engine with a “new solution” built using Qt Quick and they hope users will start to contribute new screensavers.

    • GNOME Desktop

      • GNOME 3′s Default Wallpaper – Ubuntu Style

        Whether or not you’re a fan of GNOME 3′s default ‘stripy blue’ wallpaper there’s no denying that it is striking.

        If you plan on using GNOME Shell in Ubuntu 11.10 (it’s just a click away) – or if you’ve made the ultimate sacrifice and have it installed it in 11.04 – the following Ubuntu-flavoured variant of GNOME’s default wallpaper can add some Ubuntu-flavoured purple warmth back to your desktop.

      • GNOME 3.x Revisted

        The last time I tried both of GNOME 3′s official ISOs, things didn’t go as planned. But the recently released 3.2 version deserved another chance, seeing its apparent slew of new features. I downloaded the 946 MBs of data, burnt it and booted from it. This time around, the live environment loaded up pretty quickly and with, I’m happy to report, 0 errors or hiccups. Yay! The “revolutionized” interface worked as expected and I was able to rapidly get to the “Live Install” button that was sitting boldly on top inside “Activities”. Oh, the base for this GNOME 3 showcase is openSUSE. The installation process is quite easy to go through. As I chose to place the distro on my second HDD, I also wanted the bootloader to be installed on the same HDD, so as not to interfere with the primary drive arrangement. Sadly, and I tried several options, the bootloader wouldn’t be correctly installed. I finally conceded and overwritten the main one.

      • Gnome 3.2 More Evolution than Revolution
  • Distributions

    • One Year of Rolling with Arch/Bang

      It’s just a little over a year now that I first installed ArchBang with 2010.09 that had just been released. In comments to my following review a poster expressed the opinion it would be interesting to see how this would develop and if it would still be working in a year from then. So here we are. I’ve tweaked the install and kept it updated at my leisure, and it is still working fine. Over time the ArchBang base I started out with has turned into Arch Linux, as you would expect it to when pointing at Arch repositories.

    • A Review and Endorsement of Sabayon LXDE

      Before moving to Lubuntu, I briefly gave Sabayon Xfce a spin. It was interesting, but there was a little bit more of a learning curve than I was prepared to commit to at the time.

      But once I had my new machine working, I decided to try out Sabayon on the old one, a ThinkPad T43. Since I’ve fallen in love with LXDE as a desktop environment, I wanted to see Sabayon’s take on it. I liked it so much on the T43, I wound up installing it on the T420, my everyday laptop.

    • Re: Rethinking the Linux distribution

      Bundles are a great idea, actually, to solve the problem of 3rd party software developers (mostly proprietary) saying “I won’t develop for Linux because packaging for each distro is too much work”. But having a read only file system, and killing existing package management is just not the right solution. Making bundles the only way to install software destroys all advantages of a package management system.

      I assume (mainly because I saw some gnome designers oppose to package management) that this is going to be the way you install software in GNOME OS. Am I right? Well, I hope at least you’ll develop it as a freedesktop spec and not only in GNOME.

    • New Releases

      • Softpedia Linux Weekly, Issue 167

        · Announced Distro: Tiny Core Linux 4.0
        · Announced Distro: DoudouLinux 1.1

      • Calculate Linux 11.9 released

        Calculate Linux 11.9 has been released. All of our distributions are available for download: Calculate Directory Server (CDS), Calculate Linux Desktop with KDE (CLD), GNOME (CLDG) or XFCE (CLDX), Calculate Media Center (CMC), Calculate Linux Scratch (CLS) and Calculate Scratch Server (CSS).

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • They make Mageia: Samuel Verschelde

        I discovered linux during my studies, in 2003. It was exciting to discover a whole new world I didn’t know, having only used computers with Microsoft systems on them for many years. The first distribution I installed was Debian potatoe, and it probably wasn’t the best choice for a beginner not familiar with unix command line :)
        Then I used Red Hat for some time and finally settled to Mandrake in 2004.

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu Restores Xen, Adds Juju to Version 11.10
          • New Set of 14 Wallpapers for Ubuntu 11.10 is Perhaps the Best Collection Yet

            Every Ubuntu release cycle churns out fresh new collection of wallpapers. These wallpapers are carefully chosen from a huge cache of user contributed images in Ubuntu Artwork Flickr pool. Oneiric release cycle is no different. 14 gorgeous new wallpapers have arrived in Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric already and they are by far the best I have seen in any new Ubuntu release.

          • How Ubuntu is built: the inside story

            Every six months we release a new version of Ubuntu. Each one brings together hundreds of developers, translators, testers and documentation writers to integrate the latest and greatest upstream applications, as well as new and innovative Ubuntu technologies.

          • Excited for Ubuntu Linux 11.10? The Official Countdown Has Begun

            Among the new additions in that second beta version are a new kernel, now based on version 3.0.4; an updated GNOME desktop (currently version 3.1.92 on the way to GNOME 3.2); and improved support for installing 32-bit library and application packages on 64-bit systems.

          • The countdown to Oneiric Ocelot begins, Ubuntu 11.10 arrives October 13th

            A whole new world? A whole new computer? Those are some pretty epic promises coming from the folks at Canonical, especially since we’ve seen the most recent beta and Ubuntu 11.10 and, while its packed with welcome improvements over Natty, it’s not exactly revolutionary. Still, we’re excited that on October 13th the final release of Oneiric Ocelot will be hitting the web with an improved Dash that integrates search Lenses, new default apps, a spiffed-up app switcher and application syncing across multiple devices. There are plenty of other little tweaks and improvements that add polish to the popular Linux distribution — more than we could possibly cover without inspiring a string of TLDR comments. If you’re the adventurous type you can download the second beta now, but we suggest you wait till the timer at the source link reaches zero. If you want to spread the Gospel of Ubuntu you’ll also find a printable flyer at the source with a QR code and tear-off URL strips that lead to ThisIsTheCountdown.com.

          • The Best Indicator Applets for Ubuntu

            Earlier, many folks were unhappy about the dozens of applications that ate up valuable space on their system tray. Often, people would have overly crowded panels that would look ugly in most cases. To address this problem, Canonical came up with Indicator Applets. It was not only a huge step forward in usability; it was also the foundation of a more clean and uniform user interface.

            Unlike Windows, where you’re clumsily right-clicking the tray, indicator applets allow you to interact with multiple applications at once without clicking more than twice. Now, if you take a look at the top panel, it looks much more uniform, with properly spaced icons and easy-to-navigate menus. As Canonical has released the API out in public, many developers have come up with some nifty indicator applets.

          • Interview with John Lenton

            In this continuing Ubuntu One interview series, Amber Graner talks to John Lenton, Senior Engineering Manager for Ubuntu One. Lenton give a little about his history with FOSS and how he found his way to Canonical. He addresses reader comments about the Ubuntu One proxy issue and gives users and developers links and information on how to participate in the Ubuntu One project and more.

          • Is the Ubuntu App Developer Portal a Game Changer?

            Canonical has recently announced the creation of the Ubuntu Developer Portal. The portal’s goal is fairly straight forward: it’s basically been designed to get more mainstream developers creating software for Ubuntu.

            In this article, I’ll look at the motivation, tools and resources that will be made available to those using the Ubuntu Developer Portal. I’ll also look at whether this is an effort that is going to be a “game changer” for Ubuntu or merely a weak publicity stunt that backfires on everyone involved.

          • Seven Minutes in Ubuntu

            For a while now, I’ve been using my home machine with MAMP to develop a research prototype. But last week, I got my hands on a PC to use as a web server (thanks Andrea!). Before I could get started on it though, I needed an operating system to install — ideally one that would get the job done with minimal setup and training on my part. After a bit of reading online, I chose Ubuntu.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Xubuntu Review: It Packs a Punch! (With Screenshots)

              Xubuntu 11.04 is a fast, stable operating system for older systems or systems that could use the performance boost. It is beautifully well put together and easy to use.

            • DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 425: Questions and Answers: A Look Behind The Curtain

              In the end of the day, money is only a metric to measure time and power and it doesn’t measure it all. Sometimes we spend money on things we can get for free, because the time we don’t spend in getting them is more valuable than the money itself. So how do we do? We can tackle any problem and pay for what we need. We can engage in expensive projects (we recently decided to mirror Debian for instance and we’re now confident enough in our new servers to have all LMDE users point to them). We’re almost ready to scale up, to hire, to rent offices, the financial aspect of this isn’t the main issue anymore. Our biggest problem is to buy time. Because unlike everything else in the project that’s been getting better and better since the start, finding the time to achieve what we have in mind has become harder and harder. Do you achieve twice as much when you’ve got twice as many developers? What are big companies and their large IT staff doing wrong to let small projects like ours challenge them? How do we manage to become more productive and to take on bigger projects? We don’t need to worry about the money, the community removes that problem for us and allows us to focus on what really matters, finding the time that we need. This is the real challenge.

            • elementary OS 0.1 ‘Jupiter’ review

              elementary OS (another one that forgoes capital letters in it’s name) is a relatively new kid on the Linux block. It’s based on Ubuntu 10.10, and uses a customised version of the GNOME 2.32 desktop.

              On visiting the elementary OS website, one has to be impressed with the polish. I may admit to temporarily wondering if I’d accidently gone to Apple’s site instead. This being said, if the developers have taking this much care with their operating system as they have with the website, we could be looking at a good thing.

              Testing environment: Acer Aspire 3410 laptop, Intel Celeron ULV 1.2GHz processor, 3GB RAM, integrated Intel graphics.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Ex-NASA Man Squeezes Cloud Onto USB Stick

      Set for an unveiling at next week’s OpenStack conference in Boston, this “cloud key” also includes Piston’s Linux-based PentOS.

    • 100 Greatest Gadgets

      That digital cameras, perfectly printed pages and email are now all as platitudinous, quotidian and meretricious as takeaway coffee is easy to take for granted and I certainly don’t expect credit for being an early adopter or some kind of wise prophet. I was also an early adopter of many disastrous failures. The Newton, the Microwriter AgendA, early, bulky and dreadful Sony electronic books, iRex iLiads weird tone-dialling devices – any number of freakish gadgets that were either before their time and technology or simply deluded and hopelessly hopeful were all grist to my crazy mill.

    • Phones

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Kindle Fire: Take three tablets and call me in the morning

        Right now my boys, ages 5, 7 and 9 all have iPod Touches that have served them well despite having been many times lost, spilled on, and in one case very lightly driven over by a car. But the Touches, which also cost $199 as I recall, are getting old, their batteries recharged so many times to where they now barely last an hour. It’s time for something new, which in the eyes of my boys means something better.

      • Nokia readies Linux mobile OS for cheap smartphones

        Let’s start gingerly, with Nokia. You’ll recall the indignation when Nokia threw Symbian under the Windows Phone 7 bus and osborned its existing product line. Nokia dead-ended Symbian handsets, causing sales to plunge while everyone waited for the new MicroNokia smartphones.

        The company didn’t stop there.

        It then presented Meego, the offspring of Intel’s Moblin (as in Mobile Linux) and Nokia’s own Maemo (also Linux-based), as their weapon of the future. This was their killer smartphone OS.

        But Nokia gave up on Meego. The result was a risky but greatly simplified product strategy: One OS, WP7, instead of three or four versions of Symbian, S40, S60, Symbian^3, and Meego.
        Such simplicity couldn’t last.

      • Amazon Sells Kindle Fire at Low Profit Margin to Promote Online Merchandize Sales

        An IHS analysis reveals Amazon’s business model for its new Kindle Fire tablet, with the company willing to settle for a razor-thin margin on sales of devices and digital content in order to achieve the larger goal of promoting merchandize sales at its online store.

        A preliminary virtual estimate conducted by the IHS iSuppli Teardown Analysis Service places Kindle Fire’s bill of materials (BOM) cost at $191.65. With the addition of manufacturing expenses, the total cost to produce the Kindle Fire rises to $209.63.

Free Software/Open Source

  • The Road To Open Source Code Provenance

    Data digging company OpenLogic has rolled out a new version of OLEX Enterprise Edition, a code analysis and audit kit designed to “uncover the provenance” of code within open source projects. In light of comments made this week by the German IT security watchdog, open source security issues may be on more corporate radars at the moment if recent warnings by the ombudsman are to be heeded.

  • Fraunhofer FOKUS axes BerliOS open source portal

    On 31 December, the Fraunhofer Institute for Open Communication Systems (FOKUS) is to close BerliOS (Berlin Open Source), its open source software (OSS) repository. According to an announcement made on Friday 30 September, the institute finds itself compelled to take this step as it has been unable to find a successor or to secure further funding.

  • Web Browsers

  • SaaS

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • Oracle has a Sun spot

      Oracle’s nothing if tenacious, and they’ve ignored hardware earnings losses to take the recently acquired Sun hardware platform to its next level and renewal with the announcement of the T4 CPU UltraSparc family for its servers. Sun was always a maverick, and its Sparc and UltraSparc processors became the standard bearer for server-based RISC technology. Now it’s dragging Oracle down. Larry Ellison seems to have had a fixation over delivering the Full Meal Deal® to its customers — hardware, software, services, applications, and integration support. The idea has worked well for others, yet others haven’t publicly bruised so many on the way up.

  • CMS

    • Giving a Clunky Old CMS the WordPress Treatment

      When it became clear eMusic’s old, custom-built content management system was becoming a drag on the company, the search was on for a replacement. WordPress offered an open source tool with a passionate developer community. The CMS switch worked out well for eMusic in the end, but it wasn’t always easy. Here are some lessons learned in the process.

  • Project Releases

  • Standards/Consortia

    • ODF 1.2 includes new spreadsheet standardisation

      An official announcement has yet to be made, but on a mailing list of the OASIS group, Chet Ensign, Director of Standards Development, announced that ODF 1.2 has been approved. ODF 1.2, Open Document Format for Office Applications, was last updated four years ago in Feb 2007 with the approval of ODF 1.1.

Leftovers

  • Apple is now Public Enemy No 1

    With all of the patent suits Apple is currently filing against its tab and smartphone competitors, the title is more than justified. But the following is a personal rant that I believe exemplifies what is wrong with Apple. [Rant warning]

    This may be a hypocritical title, considering that I am writing it on a MacBookPro, and I own an iPod touch and an iPad. Yet Apple products continue to produce the sort of anger that I used to reserve for Microsoft software. You know the kind, you love and hate your technology, you cannot live without it, but you know it’s wrong.

    The smartphone market is now mature enough that it allows choice beyond the iPhone, with several Android handsets giving Apple a run for its money in both cost and hardware specifications. I am yet to hear a bad word about the Samsung Galaxy S-II, and I’m still very happy with my HTC Desire Z. Android offers a number of features that are quite simply forbidden in Apple-land: multitasking, connectivity, contextual menus, flexibility and configurability (is that a word?). On the other hand, my iPod gives me an indication of the iPhone world, and I do not like what I see.

  • No One Uses 32-bit Anymore… Right?

    Judging by some of the discussions I’ve seen on the subject, some users aren’t convinced there’s a significant advantage. Where ever you land in the discussion, it appears you are not alone. A 44 to 56 split could almost be a statistical tie. Did you know it was still pretty much half and half? I expected lots more 64-bit users.

  • Windows Cold Call

    So nope, there really isn’t anything that my cold-caller from so far away can help with. But good luck to Microsoft, and even though I blow off the calls, good luck to the call-center minions too, and I hope their next job is better.

  • How ICT helps developing countries – some Kenya case-studies

    It’s the first time ever the IGF has been held in sub-Saharan Africa. And this gave me an opportunity to explore something that’s interested me for some time – the role of ICT in the developing world.

  • Security

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • Inside the World’s Largest Embassy

      In 2009, Peter Van Buren, a two-decade veteran of the Foreign Service, volunteered to go to Iraq. Drawn by “the nexus of honor, duty, terrorism, and my oldest daughter’s college tuition,” he signed on as the head of an embedded Provincial Reconstruction Team, part of a “civilian surge” to rebuild the country and pave the way for the withdrawal of American combat troops. He’d joined the biggest nation-building exercise in history, a still-unfinished $63-billion effort that Van Buren compares to “past[ing] together feathers year after year, hoping for a duck.” Van Buren’s acerbic new memoir, We Meant Well: How I Helped Lose the Battle for the Hearts and Minds of the Iraqi People, recounts his two years as an official feather-paster in a country that’s become an afterthought to most Americans.

  • Finance

  • Privacy

  • ACTA

    • Will ACTA Be Killed in the EU?

      Several of the “like-minded” States that negotiated the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) will attend the signing ceremony this Saturday in Tokyo1. The European Parliament, which will have the final word, will now face its key responsibility towards European citizens: will it accept a text that forces new broadly applicable criminal sanctions, deeply impacting fundamental freedoms, innovation and competition? Will it seize the opportunity to reject once and for all a text that was negotiated outside democratic arenas?

    • Alert To Activists: Customs Enforcement of IPR

      A very worrying proposal called ”Customs enforcement of intellectual property rights” has arrived from the EU Commission, and will be handled by the European Parliament this autumn. It is an attempt to introduce by the Commission to expand enforcement of intellectual property rights in line with the ACTA agreement, before ACTA has even been signed. Some of the provisions even go beyond ACTA in scope.

10.02.11

Links 2/10/2011: More Android Tablets, Protesters — Not Bankers — Arrested at Occupy Wall Street

Posted in News Roundup at 11:44 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

    • Deja Dup, the backup simple and fast is served

      Today we talk about Deja Dup, the tool I used to make a backup of files before the upgrade of my Lubuntu at release 11.04 (most probably this arrive a little late, but the program is worth a blog post) . It is indeed a great software to create backups (so that it’s part of the standard packages in Fedora 13 and if everything goes in the right way it will also be added to Ubuntu 11.10), but the reason for the post is not just that, a large plus of Deja DUP is its extreme ease of use, it takes a couple of clicks to configure it and save our precious documents, even “in the cloud”.

    • Transmission 2.33 Review
    • Instructionals/Technical

    • Games

      • ZOD Engine – Game Review

        Today we’ll take a look at a remake of the classic game Z. Z was a real strategy pc game by Bitmap Brothers launched in 1996. It is about two armies of robots (red and blue) battling to conquer different planets.

        The remake it’s Zod Engine is an open source remake written in C++ using the SDL library and available for Linux/ e Windows.

        The Zod Engine is a multiplayer oriented game where as Z is a single player oriented game. Here you will be able to for the first time do things such as play games against multiple bot players, or play the original levels with friends helping you on the same team.

  • Distributions

    • New Releases

      • DoudouLinux Gondwana update 1

        For the peopel that don’t know what’s doudoulinux, this it is not a new distribution, but a Debian tailor-made for children, the designer Jean-Michael says that is usable by children two years old.

        And in fact by starting this live meta-distro you get a rich and colorful menu from which childrens can choose what to play or learn.

    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

      • Linux Mint Debian Update Pack 3 Released

        I noticed yesterday evening that one of my systems running Linux Mint 201109 Gnome was offering to install Update Pack 3. This morning I see the release announcement for it. This is going to be particularly good news for some users with very new hardware, because it upgrades to Linux kernel 3.0. On my HP dm1-3105ez, for example, this means that it now includes the driver for the Ralink 5390 WiFi adapter. Of course, there are a lot more changes and improvements in this update. If you have been running the normal distribution with Update Pack 2 installed, it will probably install something like 480 updates.

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Oneiric Ocelot (Ubuntu 11.10) Launching October 13th In A Shroud Of Mystery

            Lion and Windows 8 may be stealing their share (and then some) of the spotlight, but that’s not to say that other operating systems are just sitting on their laurels. Ubuntu, perhaps the most popular flavor of Linux for the consumer world, is about to release their newest version. Oneiric Ocelot is on the edge of launch, with Ubuntu 11.10 arriving October 13th.

          • Ice Cream Sandwich, Jaunty Jackalope, and other bizarre code names
          • Award-winning Airtime releases new packages for Ubuntu & Debian

            Airtime 1.9.4 has been released with new DEB packages for Ubuntu and Debian that keep installations automatically updated with the latest version. Airtime is Sourcefabric’s open source radio software for scheduling, automation and remote station management via any web browser. It can be downloaded free from www.airtime.sourcefabric.org

          • Ubuntu eyes speedier releases

            The pace of technology change has always been fast, but now even technology companies are feeling the pinch.

            There was a time when new software updates were released years after one another. Then that changed to releases that were released months apart. Today more and more software companies are putting their foot down and accelerating releases to an almost weekly basis.

            Google releases new Chrome versions faster than most people can keep up. Version 14 of the increasingly popular browser was released this week as a stable release. Already version 15 and 16 are well into development. By the end of the year both of those may have been released formally and version 18 will be in sight.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Teach your router new tricks with DD-WRT

      With each passing year, hardware devices grow less dependent on proprietary components and more reliant on open source technologies. Network routers are among the main beneficiaries of this trend, especially those that can support a variety of third-party open source firmware projects. One variant, DD-WRT has become a common out-of-the-box option for many routers, but also exists in stand-alone implementations that can be placed on routers that support it. Hundreds of routers can run DD-WRT firmware, including nearly 100 Linksys models alone.

    • Phones

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • ThinkPad Tablet holds its own against iPad in enterprise, says review

        Lenovo’s 10.1-inch ThinkPad Tablet is a reasonable alternative to the iPad 2 for enterprise users, says this eWEEK Labs review. This capable Android “Honeycomb” tablet offers business-focused extras like built-in enterprise software, full-size ports, and an effective digitizing pen.

      • India Gets a $35 Tablet: Is the U.S. Next?

        The Amazon Kindle Fire promises a lot of great features, including free cloud storage, an innovative Web browser and access to all of Amazon’s multimedia services, but the most eye-catching part of Wednesday’s announcement was the price point: The device will cost just $200, far less than the $500 base price of the iPad 2.

        That’s hardly the cheapest tablets can get, though. The Indian government has announced that a long-awaited $35 tablet intended for students will be coming out next month.

      • Sony Tablet S review

        It has taken two years for Sony to enter the tablet market, and in that time every manufacturer and their budget Taiwanese spin-off have colluded to fill the tablet market with dross.

      • 12 best Android tablets in the world

        Some have ten-inch screens, others seven, and there are big differences in battery life, processing power and on-board RAM. So while we wait for the likes of the Asus Eee Pad Slider, Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7 and Amazon Kindle Fire, let’s see what the current best tablets are…

Free Software/Open Source

  • Google open sources JavaScript testing tools

    Google is open sourcing one of its key JavaScript testing tools in an effort to get developers to speed up web applications.

    Google JS Test is used internally on the V8 JavaScript engine using in Chrome. Google has attributed much of the speed increases it claims for the browser to the performance of the V8 engine, and the company is clearly hoping this will improve matters further.

  • Google open sources JavaScript unit testing framework

    On the Open Source at Google blog, Google has announced the release of JS Test – the JavaScript unit testing framework that it uses in-house – as an open source project. The tests run on Google’s V8 JavaScript engine, the same open source JavaScript engine used in Google’s Chrome web browser. In developing JS Test, the creators of the framework were inspired by googletest, an open source framework for writing C++ unit tests.

  • X2Contacts Emerges From Stealth With Open Source Beta Release
  • A Few Sparks of Open-Source Virtualization

    VMware dominates the virtualization market and is likely to do so for some time. Why, then, does an intrepid band of tech firms continue to put stock in open-source technology?

  • Twitter Storm: Open Source Real-time Hadoop
  • The Apache Software Foundation Announces 10th Anniversary of Apache Lucene
  • Events

    • Looking to JavaOne 2011 with Apache expert Rob Davies

      JavaOne 2011 will be a novel experience for some, but Rob Davies is an old hand at the event. Last year was the first time in ten years that Davies, now CTO with FuseSource, missed the conference. He’s often been a speaker or presenter on Apache projects, especially Apache Camel, and other open source development issues. Still this year promises to be a new experience even for him, because last year was also the first year that Oracle had taken the reins of JavaOne.

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox 8 Beta arrives with Twitter search

        As expected following the arrival of the stable version of Firefox 7, Mozilla has announced the release of version 8.0 of Firefox into the web browser’s Beta Channel. Available for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux, Firefox 8 Beta is based on the Gecko 8 engine. According to the Releases wiki, it is scheduled to arrive in a stable production-ready form on 8 November.

      • Firefox Aurora for Android likes big buttons and cannot lie

        While some solid changes to JavaScript rendering and other under-the-hood code have landed in the latest Firefox developer’s build, the bulk of what’s new focuses on the second version of the recently introduced Android version of Aurora. Aurora 9 for Android includes some big interface changes designed to improve its usability on tablets, support for native camera apps, faster start-up times, and broader language support.

  • SaaS

    • Experimentation, Open Source and Big Data

      More than ever, today intelligent businesses are trying to make sense of millions of tweets, blog posts, comments, reviews, and other form for unstructured data. The obvious question becomes, “How?”

    • Revolution speeds stats on Hadoop clusters

      Revolution Analytics, the company that is extending R, the open source statistical programming language, with proprietary extensions, is making available a free set of extensions that allow its R engine to run atop Hadoop clusters.

  • Databases

    • Google VP backs open database processing tools

      Basho CEO Don Rippert suggests that Riak’s openness means that developers have been able to, “More easily build and maintain powerful business applications on top of our platform.” He also says that, “Riak has already proven its stability, ability to scale and provide absolute fault-tolerance in a highly distributed deployment.”

  • Education

  • Healthcare

    • Open Source and EHRs: A proven reality and invaluable opportunity

      The marriage between open source technology and electronic health records is at first blush, greeted by many with skepticism regarding robustness and efficacy. In truth, persistent myths obscure an intriguing reality: Open source EHR systems are not only possible but already in place.

  • Semi-Open Source

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

  • Public Services/Government

    • NASA’s open source space applications challenge

      NASA, the US space agency, is organising an international open source application competition next year which it hopes will deliver a new generation of software to address global issues. The agency plans to liaise with other space agencies to create the International Space Apps Challenge that will encourage “scientists and concerned citizens” to create new solutions using open technology, open data and open source.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • WMMNA: Open Source Biological Art

      Hackteria is a collection of Open Source Biological Art Projects started in 2009 by Andy Gracie, Marc Dusseiller and Yashas Shetty. They have since been joined by Anthony Hall, Urs Gaudenz, and a growing community of people keen on making experiments and developing their own projects in the field of biological art and science.

    • The New World of Open-Source Mentoring

      Kathleen Lim wanted to move up the learning curve. At 24, she had just been promoted to billing operations manager at Box.net, a $10.7 million cloud-computing company in Palo Alto, California. It would be her first management job at her first postcollege employer. Box.net also wanted her to strengthen its collections department, not previously a focus. “I was looking for guidance, from best practices to how to structure my team,” says Lim. “And there was this curiosity about what else is out there. How do other organizations do it?”

    • Open-source R&D advocates prep $150M cancer drug project

      After watching the cost of drug research escalate year after year with only a small annual crop of new drug approvals to point to, a number of the Big Pharma companies have begun to question all the fundamentals of the grossly inefficient game. And one of the biggest assumptions–that you have to keep your drug IP carefully sequestered behind a legal firewall of patents–will be put to the test by a new project being hatched by some of the leaders of the open-source research movement in biopharma.

  • Programming

    • Engine Yard’s PaaS adds support for JRuby

      Engine Yard, a San Francisco-based company that provides a Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) solution for Rails applications, has announced that developers can now use JRuby, the Java implementation of the Ruby scripting language, in the Engine Yard cloud. Other supported Ruby implementations include CRuby (Ruby MRI), which was written by Ruby creator Yukihiro Matsumoto, and Rubinius. It is no surprise that support for JRuby has been added, as three of the four main JRuby developers are employed by Engine Yard.

    • A Look at Phabricator: Facebook’s Web-Based Open Source Code Collaboration Tool
  • Standards/Consortia

Leftovers

  • Finance

    • Hundreds of Occupy Wall Street protesters arrested

      More than 700 people from the Occupy Wall Street protest movement have been arrested on New York’s City’s Brooklyn Bridge, police say.

    • Occupy Wall Street protests grow amid Radiohead rumour

      An estimated 2,000 people have gathered in Lower Manhattan, New York, for the largest protest yet under the banner Occupy Wall Street.

      Demonstrators marched on New York’s police headquarters to protest against arrests and police behaviour.

    • SEC finds ‘apparent failures’ at credit rating agencies

      The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has discovered “apparent failures” at 10 credit rating agencies.

      It said it was concerned that the agencies – including Standard & Poor’s (S&P) and Moody’s – were not making timely and accurate disclosures or managing conflicts of interest.

    • Wall Street’s unwelcome warriors hang on to protest

      All are anti-Wall Street protesters, but with barricades and swarms of police officers in front of the New York Stock Exchange the closest they can get to their target is Liberty Street, a good three streets away.

      An online activist group called Adbusters organised the gathering and the word spread through social media.

    • In pictures: New York mass arrests

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