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07.18.12

Links 18/7/2012: KDE Workspaces 4.9, Raspbian

Posted in News Roundup at 7:22 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • What Large Brazilian Organizations Thinks of GNU/Linux

    A large retail chain, Casas Bahia, with 53K employees and $billions in revenue (2008) ran Suse GNU/Linux on mainframes and POS (point-of-sale) systems with zero failures in five years giving real-time information on every transaction with security.

  • Motoring on Linux

    Years ago, an old friend of mine remarked that if his car was controlled by the Windows operating system, it would take him ages to get anywhere.

    He reached this conclusion after spending many mornings downloading updates to his Windows-based system and then rebooting it before he could start work. From this, he surmised that if such Windows software was used to control the electronic systems in his car, he would spend an equal amount of time in the driver’s seat waiting for updates before he could even put his key in the ignition.

    My friend, of course, was a complete and utter technical Luddite — one of those chaps that would rather have lived in the age of steam where at least he would have some vague notion about how large amounts of very hot water could be used to propel vehicles along a track.

  • Softly on a budget

    The primary freeware photo-editing option on a Linux system is the ”ugly and cranky” GIMP.

    MICROSOFT is about to drop Windows 8 on us and Apple has an operating system update coming soon. They will cost money. And do we need them? What if you could get all the photo-editing and other essential software absolutely free? Well, good news – you can.

    Linux, the open-source operating system, has come of age. Not so long ago it was too geekily intimidating for the average mortal to even consider as an alternative to the big two, but the latest versions are not much harder to use than Windows or OS X.

  • Linux distributions that can run on an MK802 Mini PC

    The MK802 is a tiny computer that looks like a USB flash drive, and which ships with Google Android 4.0 and sells for around $80 or less. It’s designed to be something you can plug into a TV to surf the web, watch video, and play games on the big screen.

  • Desktop

    • Dell Gives Linux Laptops Another Chance

      Today Dell announced its official re-entry into the Linux laptop market. Project Sputnik, first announced in May, is graduating from Dell’s internal incubator program into a real product. According to project lead Barton Geroge, Dell will sell a special “developer edition” of its XPS13 Ultrabook starting this fall.

      The laptop will come pre-loaded with Ubuntu, a user friendly distribution of the open source operating system Linux (or GNU/Linux to purists). George said the laptop won’t be able to dual boot Windows. But Dell made available an Ubuntu install image customized for the XPS13, so you could buy the Windows version and install Ubuntu yourself if you require dual booting. George says the developer version will be the high end configuration of the XPS13, with 4GB of RAM, an Intel Core i7 processor and a 256GB solid state hard drive. This model currently sells for $1,499, and George says the Linux version will sell for a little bit less than the Windows version.

    • Fail Client: How Linux Fails At The Corporate Desktop

      My work takes me in and out of busy offices all day long. I see Macs, I see PCs, I see servers and printers. I see PCs running Windows which is no surprise, but what I never see are PCs running Linux. “Why is this?” I always ask myself. I mean, the benefits of open source far outweigh the risks and from an administrative viewpoint, the OS is a lot easier to manage. So what is it that is holding Linux back? It’s not spreadsheets and documents –word files and excel files can be easily handled in LibreOffice– nor is it Access/database related as you can get KEXI running in no time. No, I will tell you what is holding Linux back and the answer is simple. Outlook.

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

    • Shotwell Faces Tool: Weekly Report 07 & 08

      This last two weeks I’ve continued the work on the test suite, adding face recognition using Philipp Wagner’s FaceRecognizer class and some scripts to help doing the testing. I’ve also wrote the instructions to use all those tiny programs at [1] —it could be incomplete, please ask whatever you need ;)

      This face recognition thing seems to be more about collect people faces to make a decent and realistic database to train the face recognition model and then try to recognize this same people in other photos. There is really few code to show: Since I discover, read and understand the new OpenCV FaceRecognizer class [2], the written code is really simple [a] —in fact, the main task of this last two weeks has been mainly to do tests, trying to make a decent faces-database of my friends to improve the results I’m getting from my tests: About 30% of accuracy recognizing people —in the articles I’ve read there are people talking about more accuracy, but such accuracy seems to be not so real, because they use face-databases like the one at [3], and we can’t expect Shotwell users making that kind of photos.

    • Information Grows Strong Roots With TreeLine

      Part of what makes TreeLine such an easy information organization tool is its tree structure. It lets you configure the note-entering process to fit a variety of informational types. So you do not have to shoehorn information into a make-do mess. TreeLine may take some effort to learn to use at 100 percent effectiveness, but once you do, it will be worth the effort.

    • Proprietary

    • Instructionals/Technical

    • Wine

    • Games

      • OUYA Approaches $5 Million In Backing, Attracts 5x Goal (So Far)
      • Unigine Hosting Open Air Game Conference

        Unigine Corp is hosting an interesting “open air” game development conference later this week in Tomsk, Russia.

        Unfortunately it’s on short notice, but hopefully it will become an annual thing: Unigine OpenAir. This is perhaps the most interesting and unique game development conference I’ve yet to hear about: it’s camping in tents outside the city of Tomsk for two days filled with gaming-related talks. There is no Internet connection at Unigine OpenAir, but to make up for it Unigine is hosting a whiskey party, barbecues and kebabs, the best DJ from Siberia, fires, and other special events.

      • Linux Gaming Begins Gathering Steam

        “Steam remains one of the best assets in the gaming space today that doesn’t get much attention due to the console cycles and the rise of social gaming,” said P.J. McNealy, consultant at Digital World Research. “However, it’s right in the thick of the emerging business models for gaming, and being available on Linux certainly can’t hurt.”

      • 100 “Funnest” Open Source Games and Apps

        It’s become something of a summer tradition here at Datamation to take a break from featuring open source apps for businesses and concentrate on open source apps that are just plain fun. This year, we’ve updated and expanded our list of the open source movement’s “funnest” apps with 100 titles in all. We’ve added two entirely new categories: board games and sports games, and we found plenty of good games that we had overlooked on previous versions of this list.

      • 5 Blogs You Should Follow For Linux Gaming
      • Valve Games and Steam on Ubuntu 12.04

        Yesterday, the Valve Linux team publicly announced their ongoing work to bring Steam to Linux. A major part of that announcement is the choice of Ubuntu 12.04.

        Valve has been a major force in gaming since 1996. Gabe Newell and the Valve team have created some of the best game series EVER. Half-Life, Counter-Strike, Day of Defeat, and most recently Portal are extremely popular, and quite addicting.

      • With Valve On Linux, Has LGP Lost All Relevance?

        Aside from how Valve can better embrace Linux and open-source, another thing to ponder with Valve officially writing about Steam/Source on Linux, is the future of Linux Game Publishing.

        Linux Game Publishing got a new CEO in January and aside from a brief company update in February, nothing new has come out since. The company hasn’t released any new Linux game ports in years, their blog has been silent, and there hasn’t been any rumblings of new projects to be announced soon.

      • Steam’d Penguins
      • Steam on Ubuntu
  • Desktop Environments

    • New Features Of Enlightenment Desktop : Tooltips and Wallpaper Background Fill Colors

      The Enlightenment desktop is heading for a stable release finally, and new features are being added everyday. You can also submit your feature ideas in their Trac page and if you are lucky and your feature charming enough, the developers will add it to the next Enlightenment release. Recently, the developers closed two feature request tickets and added them in default Enlightenment desktop.

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • QtNetworkManager To Be Improved

        If you are a Gnome user, you are lucky enough to face no problems in connecting with wireless and wired Internet networks.

      • Phonon-GStreamer Update Fixes Gapless Playback Bug

        If you are a KDE fan and felt irritated because you were unable to experience gapless playback, you will be relived to know that phonon developers have finally got this issue fixed. Phonon-Gstreamer 4.6.1 is a bugfix release, and along with this bug, developers have also fixed a handful of major bugs like:

      • Moun Suite 1.4 RC Released

        Kubuntu developer, Jonathan Thomas, blogged about the release of Moun Suite 1.4. Some of the major improvements in this release includes enhancements in Moun Discover, update manager and a bug fix in language support.

      • KDE 4.9: More Change Than You’d Expect

        KDE 4.9 is a mature release, so you wouldn’t expect major renovations. However, to judge from the second release candidate (technically, the 4.8.97 release), that expectation is no more than half correct.

        Yes, the release is full of the small refinements that characterize an incremental release. However, it also includes some more important features, most of them to do with Activities, as the development team continues its efforts to make the release series’ most major innovation more appealing and useful to users.

        Users wishing to try the release candidate can always compile from source, or check the development repositories of their distribution.

      • Sprint News and Pre-Alpha Release of Kolab 3.0
    • GNOME Desktop

      • Why I Went Back To Gnome From KDE

        I recently became a KDE user, that was the time when Gnome Shell was going through transition and extensions were missing and I was looking for something which I could use without much frustration. One of the things that I love the most about KDE is the polishes interface and total control over your desktop. You can customize almost every aspect of KDE. In addition, the familiar UI (simple and aimed at the traditional desktop) makes it easy to continue to work without having to learn new tricks.

      • Future Releases Of Gnome May Include PIN Unlock Facility

        If you find hard to type long passwords in your touch devices, you may get relief soon. Gnome developer Giovanni Campagna is currently working on a PIN unlock feature, similar to mobile phones, that is aimed at being touch friendly replacement of passwords.

      • Why Look Forward to GNOME 3.5.4

        Matthias Clasen routinely posts previews to upcoming GNOME releases and recently he did it again. In a post on his personal blog, Clasen, a GNOME developer, highlighted some of new features coming to GNOME 3.5.4. He is joined by Alex Diavatis, of www.worldofgnome.org, who offers a closer look at some of the new features as well.

        The first mention in Clasen’s post is of Nautilus. He said, “Nautilus has received a major face-lift, and looks very much like a GNOME 3 application now.” Diavatis writes, “Nautilus menu moved into a single button on top right” and “the symbolic icons on the left, which seems pretty.”

      • This is how Nautilus looks in SolusOS
      • Making GTK3 themes – Part 1: Basics

        I’m Satya. I’ll be writing some tutorials about making GTK3 themes here at World of Gnome. Thanks to woGue for giving me a chance to write here :)

        In this post I’ll discuss some basic things about GTK3 themes. So let’s start…

        The new trend is to use the web technologies everywhere, be it smartphone or desktop. Web technologies are generally easier, and that’s why they are so widespread. So what it has to do about GTK3 themes? A lot, because GTK3 themes use CSS syntax, which is widely used in the web. CSS stands for Cascading Style Sheets. The CSS syntax is very easy to understand and and use. For example, if we want to set a blue background and white text color in a paragraph (represented as p in HTML), the CSS syntax will be,

      • Oops!… I crashed it again ;)
  • Distributions

    • Linux Deepin 12.06 preview
    • New Releases

      • SystemRescueCd 2.8.1
      • Canaima 3.1-VC3
      • Alpine 2.4.5 released

        The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availablity of version 2.4.5 of its Alpine Linux operating system.

      • SystemRescueCd update includes version 2.00 of GRUB

        The latest 2.8.1 release of SystemRescueCd upgrades a number of the live system’s bundled tools as well as its underlying components, such as the GRUB bootloader. The Gentoo-based GPLv2-licensed distribution for administering and repairing systems includes the recent stable GRUB 2.00 bootloader release and updates the standard long-term kernel to Linux 3.2.23; the alternative kernel is now at version 3.4.5.

      • Softpedia Linux Weekly, Issue 208

        · Announced Distro: CentOS 6.3
        · Announced Distro: OS4 12.5
        · Announced Distro: Linux Mint 13 RC KDE
        · Announced Distro: Finnix 105

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Mageia has been visiting Europe

        Like last year, Mageia had a presence at Linuxtag in Berlin, one of the biggest Linux and OpenSource events in Europe.

        And like last year we shared a booth with the German MandrivaUser.de community. At Linuxtag, we had some prominent members of the Mageia project there, some of them (Nicolas and Marja) coming all the way from France and the Netherlands.

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat, Burt’s Bees among Social Madness winners

        At long last, local winners have been crowned in their respective categories in the nationwide social media contest dubbed Social Madness.

      • Red Hat Taking Advantage Of Turmoil In Europe
      • Why the Street Should Love Red Hat’s Earnings

        Although business headlines still tout earnings numbers, many investors have moved past net earnings as a measure of a company’s economic output. That’s because earnings are very often less trustworthy than cash flow, since earnings are more open to manipulation based on dubious judgment calls.

        Earnings’ unreliability is one of the reasons Foolish investors often flip straight past the income statement to check the cash flow statement. In general, by taking a close look at the cash moving in and out of the business, you can better understand whether the last batch of earnings brought money into the company, or merely disguised a cash gusher with a pretty headline.

      • Switch your CentOS systems to Oracle Linux
      • Fedora

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu App Showdown : Judges’ Voting On
          • Ubuntu 12.10 To Include Gwibber, Photos Lens By Default

            Ubuntu 12.10 scheduled to be released this October will include Gwibber and Photos lens by default. These lenses add up to the existing collection of lenses namely applications, files, music and videos.

          • Testing in Cadence

            Last month, an interesting thread emerged on ubuntu-devel. A proposal to change the way we as ubuntu look at testing and quality. In many ways it was more of a codification of ideas and thoughts from the precise cycle than a proposal.

            One of the outcomes of this was a change to how to test isos. Rather than focus on arbitrary moments in time, we’ve been asked to stick to a two week cadence for testing. What that means is a regular checkup of our images every two weeks. Quite a task, but not impossible! Given the fact the change happened mid-cycle, there has been some confusion over what exactly this means. I decided to put together a post detailing exactly what’s on the table for us as a community and more importantly how you can help!

          • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 274
          • Steam arrives on Ubuntu, Valve announces it from their new Linux blog
          • Your very own ARM-based Ubuntu servers in the cloud… for free

            Not content with dominating the world of smartphones and tablets, makers of low-power ARM chips are setting their sights on the server market. While x86 servers are still the norm, there have been hints for some time that ARM might become a presence in the data center. Another small, early step toward an ARM future was taken this week as the makers of an infrastructure-as-a-service testbed added ARM servers as a free option for developers.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • You Asked For It, PC-like Performance From A Small Cheap Computer

      While the Raspberry Pi is interesting to everyone, it is most suitable for absolute newbies learning software, it’s target market.

    • Want to buy more than one Raspberry Pi? Now you can!

      Up until now, we’ve had to restrict purchases of the Raspberry Pi to one per customer because the demand has been (and continues to be) so high. Both of our manufacturing partners have been working at building capacity so you we can lift that limit – right now, 4000 Raspberry Pis are being made every day. As of this morning, you’ll be able to buy as many Raspberry Pis as you want from both RS Components and element14/Premier Farnell. (See below for ordering instructions.)

    • Raspbery Pi’s Own Raspbian Gets SD Card Image

      Raspberry Pi foundation has announced the release of the first SD card image based on the Raspbian distribution. The image will make it easier for Raspberry Pi users to switch from ‘generic’ Debian Squeeze to this ‘optimized’ image.

    • Raspbian Linux now available for Raspberry Pi: Up to 40 percent faster than Debian

      Raspbian is a Linux-based operating system optimized for the Raspberry Pi, a low power, inexpensive mini-computer with a 700 MHz ARM11 processor. Up until recently, the folks behind the little computer had recommended using Debian Linux for an operating system. But benchmarks show Raspbian to be up to 40 percent faster at some tasks.

    • Raspbian-based SD card image released
    • Phones

      • MeeGo Revived: Interview With Jolla CEO

        MeeGo was one of the most promising open source mobile platform developed by Intel in conjunction with Nokia. I have been tracking Intel’s MID (Mobile Internet Devices) efforts from my Linux For You days when I asked about it during an Intel event in Jaipur (India) and Intel director Narendra Bhandari took it to himself to explain about the project.

        Intel worked with Nokia to transform its Maemo platform into MeeGo to help Intel realise its MID aspirations. Everything was going of well, despite the slow yet promising development of MeeGo. Then came Microsoft’s Stephen Elop who infamously killed almost all of Nokia’s open source projects and reduced the once market leader into a hardware dilevery truck for Microsoft’s failed mobile OS.

      • Android

        • Android-X86 4.0.4 (ICS) RC2 Released With ARM Translator, More [Android For Netbooks Or Laptops]
        • Android 4.1 Jelly Bean is Hard to Crack, Says Security Expert

          Google’s latest Android OS, version 4.1 Jelly Bean, is properly strengthened against hacking exploits and malware, according to mobile security researcher Jon Oberheide.

          The analysis, posted on Duo Security’s bulletin on July 16, says that Android has “stepped its game up” in protecting against malicious exploits.

        • Fujitsu to offer smartphone specifically designed for elderly users

          Japanese electronics firm Fujitsu unveiled a new smartphone yesterday designed for elderly users, featuring a unique touchscreen and Android user interface that’s been simplified. Called the F-12D from Fujitsu’s RakuRaku product line where “rakuraku” can be translated from Japanese to mean “easy” or “comfortable,” the company will primarily be aiming to target Japan’s aging population with this particular model.

        • XBMC Now Available For Android

          XBMC, an advanced, full-featured and attractive open-source media center is now available for Android. As per the announcement in XBMC blog, this version can be run on phones, media players, set-top boxes, tablets and all devices that are powered by Android.

          The program is in beta stage and not yet available in Play Store. XBMC developers are looking for people who can test this on their devices, so if you want to be one of their beta testers, head over to their blog.

        • CyanogenMod 9 running on the Nexus Q
        • Sony officially launches Sony Xperia S, P and U in the U.S
        • Android now powers 51.8% of US smartphones, growth continues

          Popular analyst company Nielsen has published its report on the US smartphone market in the second quarter of 2012. The quarter saw smartphone growth continue as two thirds of all new customers picked a smartphone.

          Android continues to be in lead, powering 51.8% of all US smartphones and 54.6% of the ones purchased over the past three months. And that was the quarter before the Samsung Galaxy S III was launched.

        • Meizu MX 4-core is now available globally, pricing still steep

          The original (dual-core) Meizu MX is one of the most popular smartphones in China. Shortly after the launch there, it was quietly made available around the world from various retailers. Later, after the huge success of the MX, Meizu announced a quad-core version – the MX 4-core.

        • sony xperia z: Leaked Details
        • Jelly Bean is the safest version of Android yet
        • Sony Xperia ion now available at Rogers, can be yours for $549.99 outright

          Here it is Canada… Sony’s first LTE-enabled smartphone has officially launched at Rogers, plus I think they are also first in North America to make this available. The Xperia ion can now be yours, as expected, for $49.99 on a 3-year and ranges north to $549.99 outright. The ion comes seriously stacked with specs: 4.6-inch display (1280 x 720), 12MP Sony Exmor R camera that shoots 1080p videos, LTE connectivity, has a 1.5GHz dual core processor and is 10.8 mm thin. Now, the ion currently runs OS 2.3 Gingerbread but is on a path towards Ice Cream Sandwich sometime “soon.”

        • MIPS Works with Android 4.1, Focused on Low-Cost Tablets

          Among chip makers that have worked steadily with the Android mobile OS, you don’t hear MIPS Technologies mentioned much. But MIPS has, in fact, worked with Android since the birth of the OS, as we noted all the way back in 2009. When it comes to low cost Android tablet devices, you hear much discussion of devices running ARM chips, but MIPS has in fact been a competitive player in this space. Tablets based on MIPS chips and priced under $100 have made a mark around the world. Now there is news that MIPS will develop around Jelly Bean, otherwise known as Android 4.1.

        • Tikl Me, Elmo

          If you don’t have the push-to-talk (PTT) feature from your cell-phone provider, you can download the free Tikl app from the Android Marketplace. Tikl allows you to use PTT technology with any other users that have Tikl installed on their phones. Because Tikl is available for both Android and iOS, it covers a wide variety of smartphones.

        • ZTE Grand X coming to UK for £190 pay-as-you-go: 4.3-inch qHD, microSD, stock Android 4.0

          If this is the “advanced gaming smartphone” that ZTE teased a few days ago, then we can’t help but feel a little miffed. It’d be fairer to describe the Grand X as the most advanced phone in ZTE’s growing budget line-up, and if you look at it from that perspective then it’s rather more impressive. For £190 PAYG with Virgin Mobile in the UK, you’re getting a 4.3-inch qHD LCD touchscreen, dual-core 1GHz Tegra 2 processor (no Nexus 7 guts here unfortunately), microSD expandable storage (plus 4GB built-in and 512MB RAM), 5-megapixel rear camera and VGA front-facer, sub-10mm thickness and — ta-da! — stock Ice Cream Sandwich, albeit accompanied by legacy Gingerbread navigation buttons. We’d have liked to see the proper, up-to-date Android 4.0 button layout, but in any case the absence of ZTE’s Kanzi skin or indeed any other customization is a welcome change, because Google juice tastes fine served neat.

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

Free Software/Open Source

  • Chef Offers a Recipe for the Open Source Cloud

    As one of the original architects of Amazon’s EC2, Opscode CTO Chris Brown witnessed firsthand what happens when you make ubiquitous and nearly infinite computing power available to engineers who were used to working with a handful of machines. In short, you become very, very popular.

  • Multi-touch in WebKit-Clutter

    Following my past work on multi-touch support in Clutter, have been playing lately in implementing the W3C Touch Events API in the Clutter port of WebKit.

    A lot of code can be reused from WebCore without problems, but we’ll need to do some mildly complex event translation because the W3C API and the one in Clutter (and in XInput and in Gtk+) are very different.

  • Open source offense could be our best defense against cyberattacks

    A core dilemma for IT today is how to properly protect the organizations’ information systems and assets given security tools often seem like a black hole sucking down both time and money. But a strong defense doesn’t have to be expensive, and a good place to start is assessing what information is publicly available and figuring out how to safeguard it from attack.

  • Open Compute Project Driving Open-Source Hardware Development

    The open-source hardware movement behind the year-old Open Compute Project is gaining traction.

  • Eaves: Open source communities need simple social “hacks?

    Turns out the open source development model has some flaws after all. Or is it just a case of geeks being geeks?

    David Eaves, principal of Eaves Consulting, told attendees during his opening keynote at OSCON 2012 today that a lot of the “soft” skills that hard core coders often scoff at are actually important when it comes to producing flawless code.

  • Twitter’s Open Source Big Data Tool Comes to the Cloud Courtesy of Nodeable

    Usually when we think of a pivot, we think of a company that has decided to drop its core offering and market a different product or service. Obvious Corporation put ODEO up for sale and focused on Twitter. BRBN shuttered its location check-in service and became Instagram. But Nodeable‘s pivot isn’t that sort of pivot.

    Today Nodeable launched a new service called StreamReduce, a cloud-hosted real-time big data analytics product. StreamReduce is based on the same architecture as Nodeable’s existing IT operations monitoring tool. The company is keeping its current service, but is expanding its scope by marketing beyond its current base of developers and system administrators.

  • Web Browsers

    • Chrome

    • Mozilla

      • New Security and Developer Features Now in Firefox [14]
      • Firefox 14 is now available

        Firefox 14 is now available as a free download for Windows, Mac, and Linux from http://www.mozilla.org/firefox/new/. As always, we recommend that users keep up to date with the newest version of Firefox for the latest features and fixes. The release notes for Firefox 14 are available at http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/14.0.1/releasenotes/. Firefox 14 is also now available for Android. The associated release notes are available at https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/mobile/14.0.1/releasenotes/index.html.

  • SaaS

  • Databases

    • 7 hard truths about the NoSQL revolution

      The NoSQL buzzword has been metastasizing for several years. The excitement about these fast data stores has been intoxicating, and we’re as guilty as anyone of seeing the groundbreaking appeal of NoSQL. Yet the honeymoon is coming to an end, and it’s time to start balancing our enthusiasm with some gimlet-eyed hard truths.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • LibreOffice 3.6 RC1 Released
    • Will open source office suites go the way of Thunderbird?

      Microsoft’s latest entry in the office productivity is such a blatant move towards convergence of mobile and desktop, you have to wonder if they are going too far, too fast.

      If mobile and cloud is indeed the new direction of productivity apps, open source office suites must innovate quickly or die.

      Microsoft wants to embrace desktop and mobile users as much as possible with their upcoming Office 2013 release, and right now it feels like Microsoft just pulled away from LibreOffice and Apache OpenOffice, leaving the venerable open source office suites eating Microsoft’s dust.

  • Education

  • Healthcare

    • Open source hospital information system to be packaged for Debian

      The Veterans Health Information Systems and Technology Architecture (Vista), an open source hospital information system used in 160 hospitals, several hundreds of clinics and more than a hundred nursing homes, will become part of the Debian free software distribution. This was announced at the Libre Software Meeting (LSM/RMLL) in Geneva, last week Wednesday.

  • BSD

    • FreeBSD 9.1-BETA1 Available…
    • FreeBSD 9.1 enters beta

      The developers at the FreeBSD Project have released the first beta for version 9.1 of the open source FreeBSD operating system. Aimed at developers and testers, the first test build of FreeBSD 9.1 was originally expected to arrive on 6 July but later fell behind schedule. In the mailing list announcement, Ken Smith, a member of the Release Engineering Team, says that the developers “hope this will be the only BETA build”, noting that it will be followed by two release candidate builds.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • The FSF Compliance Lab Doubles

      Last month, Joshua Gay and Donald Robertson III, two long time employees, took on responsibility for the Free Software Foundation’s (FSF) compliance lab (http://www.fsf.org/licensing/). Already, they are finding that having two people not only allows them to do more, but to organize more for future growth as well.

      “Already, we’re doing all the things Brett was doing and rolling out new projects,” Gay and Robertson say. They are referring to Brett Smith, the former solo employee for the lab, who is now employed by the W3 Consortium.

  • Project Releases

  • Public Services/Government

    • Helping the European Parliament to release its own free software

      For the first time, the European Parliament is about to release one of its own programs as Free Software. The program in question is called AT4AM, short for “Automatic Tool for Amendments”. The Parliament is in the business of making laws, and AT4AM automates a lot of the formal stuff associated with the production process.

      To understand what AT4AM means for MEPs and their staff, have a look at how amendments were filed before, and how it works now. (Vimeo. Flash required, sorry.) Parliament staffer Erik Josefsson compared the introduction of AT4AM to the arrival of version control for developers. It’s been in use inside the parliament for about 18 months, and it’s a pretty fundamental tool for the people working there.

  • Licensing

    • Can the Terms of the GPL Prevent GNU/Linux being used for War?

      There’s been a lot of noise on the internet recently about the fact that the Windows-based software being used in the remote control system of drones use by the American military has been hit by a virus and this has caused the Department of Defense (DOD) to use GNU/Linux which is a more secure option. This has, predictably, caused raised eyebrows and demands by some that any military organisation should be prevented from using GNU/Linux in offensive weapons systems. The use of Drones in Afghanistan is a highly controversial issue but it is not the purpose of this article to debate the morality and ethics of deploying drones in an area of asymetrical conflict but rather to explore if it is actually possible to use the terms of the GPL to legally prevent the deployment of software or operating systems by any government’s military.

    • Now You Can Also Join The Open Source Initiative

      The Open Source Initiative (OSI) is accepting applications for Individual Membership, starting immediately. Open source community members worldwide are invited to join OSI now at opensource.org/join and help shape the future of open source.

      “The transformation of the OSI into a member-based organization is a timely and important step for the worldwide open source community,” said Simon Phipps, OSI President.”I encourage everyone to visit opensource.org/join and take a stand for open source.”

    • New life for the Open Source Initiative

      OSI, an important, but long quiet, open-source organization is seeking to revitalize itself with a new membership program.

    • OSI Announces It Will Open the Organization to Individual Members

      Wednesday, July 17, at the O’Reilly Open Source Conference in Portland, Oregon, the Open Source Initiative (OSI) announced a new initiative to open up the organization to individual members. Historically, the organization was open only to affiliate members, so this announcement marks a significant new direction for the open-source advocate. The shift represents a move from a governance model of volunteer and self-appointed directors to one driven by members.

Leftovers

  • Finance

    • Is The Wall Street Casino Closing?

      In a powerful sign of tough times for the casino business, Wall Street powerhouse Goldman Sachs is actually going to use their bank charter to do what banks do – expand loans.

    • Goldman Settles Class-Action Over $698 Million Offering

      Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (GS) reached a class settlement with investors in a $698 million mortgage- backed securities offering, a lawyer for the plaintiffs told a federal judge in New York.

      David Wales, who represents the Public Employees’ Retirement System of Mississippi, told U.S. District Judge Harold Baer in a letter made public today that both sides had accepted a settlement proposed by a mediator. Details of the agreement weren’t disclosed.

  • Civil Rights

    • NSA Mimics Google, Pisses Off Senate

      In 2008, a team of software coders inside the National Security Agency started reverse-engineering the database that ran Google.

      They closely followed the Google research paper describing BigTable — the sweeping database that underpinned many of the Google’s online services, running across tens of thousands of computer servers — but they also went a little further. In rebuilding this massive database, they beefed up the security. After all, this was the NSA.

      Like Google, the agency needed a way of storing and retrieving massive amounts of data across an army of servers, but it also needed extra tools for protecting all that data from prying eyes. They added “cell level” software controls that could separate various classifications of data, ensuring that each user could only access the information they were authorized to access. It was a key part of the NSA’s effort to improve the security of its own networks.

07.17.12

Links 17/7/2012: Linux 3.5 RC7, Fedora 18 Plans Laid Out

Posted in News Roundup at 6:19 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • The Linux Setup – Tom Chandler, Writer

    I’m an Ubuntu guy, though the advent of Unity has pushed me to try the other Ubuntu flavors like Xubuntu and Lubuntu (both of which are running on my netbook and laptop). Xfce might just become my standard desktop; I launch everything using Synapse anyway, and Unity’s universal menus and lack of document identification don’t work for me.

  • 2 new mini Linux boxes

    After the success of Raspberry Pi, it seems mini PCs that run Linux has become a technology trend. Recently, 2 new mini Linux-enabled PCs have joined the party.

  • Desktop

    • My new test box – and how it wasn’t

      Let me tell you a secret: Although I often claim I have no friends, I do! A few, but still, they are present and accounted for. One of these friends happened to give me his T61 for extensive, long-term operating system testing, which you’ve been enjoyed recently, with all the latest-gen SSD benchmarking and quadruple boot setup and whatnot. And now, that same friend has loaned me another one of his machines, for an indefinite period of abuse. This means more fun.

      [...]

      The laptop is going back to its owner. I’m sorry to say, but with its crappy graphics and Wireless, it’s simply unusable. I could blame Linux of course, but then, that same Linux works fine everywhere else. Moreover, my other machines with N-capable cards are running just fine, since they happen to have other devices. And let’s not even mention the graphics card. You know what I think about non-Nvidia cards, or non-Nvidia drivers. You’ve seen what happens with Nouveau.

    • Why the Linux desktop doesn’t shine in business: A perspective

      I’ve been keeping track lately of what it is I do most during a full day of remote support. The three top things I deal with are:

    • Perfect Storm Brewing: The Linux Desktop – Part One

      From time to time I get the question of “Why has Linux failed on the Desktop?” Recently Linus was also asked this question, and he considered it a personal failure, since his first desire was to have Linux as a desktop machine. He attributed this to the fact that end user customers just do not like installing operating systems on their machines that they purchased.

    • Project Sputnik Versus Microsoft

      Dell is toying with the idea of loading up Ubuntu onto an XPS 13 laptop to create a developer environment in which people can create Web and mobile apps. It’s called Project Sputnik. Should Microsoft be worried? My thinking is no.

    • Dell ‘Project Sputnik’ Ubuntu laptop programme enters beta phase
  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • An old KDE user finds his way back…

        I left KDE back in the early KDE4 days. It wasn’t a matter of the fact I didn’t like the changes made, it was a matter of the plasma desktop simply being too unstable (for me) to get anything done.

        I had always been a KDE user since first using Linux. When I first installed Red Hat 7.1, the friend who gave me the disk gave me this simple instruction “When it asks you GNOME or KDE, choose KDE.” – and I was off.

        Oddly enough, I’ve made my way back to Fedora after leaving Fedora at FC2 for better KDE support, or I should say a more ‘upstream’ KDE (I grew to not like the Bluecurve thing that attempted to make KDE and GNOME look alike). I initially went to Mandrake (for maybe a week), tried out a little distro called Yoper (is it still around?), and finally settled in with Slackware for a while (and learned a *lot* in the process). After that I flopped around mostly between Kubuntu and Debian (usually Sid) with KDE.

      • [GSoC] Amarok gets more social
    • GNOME Desktop

      • Gnome Web 353 and beyond!

        Gnome Web (Epiphany) is a misjudged and underestimated project when web-browsers are the most popular and significant software in any OS. The reasons? The two powerful open source alternatives, Chromium and Firefox, but also the bad quality and poor in features Web.

  • Distributions

    • Mint and openSUSE: My take on four Linux release candidates

      I spent the weekend looking at the release candidates for four — or two, depending on how you count them — upcoming Linux distributions. Perhaps it is a good commentary on the state of Linux distributions that the most important thing to say about all four is that they just work.

      From installation to hardware detection and driver support, and the full range of packages and applications included, everything just works with no huge drama.

    • First Impressions of Netrunner 4.2

      The Netrunner distribution is one I’ve been asked to review recently. It’s a project based on Kubuntu and the latest release of Netrunner, version 4.2, is based on Kubuntu 12.04, making it a long term support release. According the to the project’s website, Netrunner aims to be a complete desktop OS that will feel comfortable to new users while remaining flexible. The latest release is offered in both 32-bit and 64-bit builds and the ISO download is approximately 1.6GB in size.

    • 4 less-known Linux distros for beginners

      If you are a long time user of Windows or Mac and want to try Linux, there is a high chance that your first distro will be either Ubuntu, Linux Mint or Fedora since these distros are very popular. However, there are some other distros that are more suitable for beginners in my opinion. All of these distros work out of the box, come with a very friendly, easy-to-use desktop and are super easy to install and very well-supported.

    • Happy Birthday to Slackware Linux

      Today, Slackware celebrate it’s 19th birthday and i think it would be a perfect timing if we could have Slackware 14 on this wonderful moment, but unfortunately it’s not possible. Even though -Current is now stabilizing, there are still some things to do before we can have Slackware 14 ready for public.

    • 31 Flavors of Linux

      What do Bill Reynolds, Fabio Erculiani, and Clement Lefebvre have in common? They spearheaded new distributions that have become staples in Linux desktop computing. Beginning new projects is particularly difficult and not all who try succeed. So, that’s why Todd Robinson might sound a little nuts with his newest experiment. He’s going to attempt to create and release a complete Linux operating system each and every day for a whole month.

    • Todd Robinson and the 31 flavors project

      There is a joke that there are more Linux distros than the total amount of Linux users. When this saying is obviously exaggerating, it is true that we have a lot of Linux distros already out there. But there will be more. At least there will be 31 more Linux distros after August this year.

    • Open Ballot: What’s your ideal distribution look like?

      Package managers, desktops, installers, multimedia codecs, proprietary driver support, start up and shutdown, and release models. All these things, and many more, separate the different distributions from one another. In this week’s open ballot, we want to know if you were king for a day, what combination of components would you pluck out of which distributions to recombine into your perfect operating system?

    • New Releases

      • Pear Linux 5 – Sunsprite released
      • Arch 2012.07.15
      • Uploaded early alpha of SimplyMEPIS 12: version 11.9.60 Will hit public download sites within 48 hours. Subscribers can get it now.
      • Sophos UTM 9
      • Finnix 105 has been released
      • VectorLinux 7.0 SOHO Edition

        The final release of VectorLinux 7.0 SOHO is now available. This release is built on the 7.0 GOLD release featuring the recently released KDE4.8.3 desktop experience. VectorLinux is the fastest Linux desktop in it’s class bar none. We have spared no expense to bring the KDE4 desktop to the Linux community in a unique fashion that is best tried to see KDE4 at its most awesome potential. With the custom artwork, visual tweaks and a little Vector magic, behold SOHO as you have never seen it before.

      • First 64-bit edition of VectorLinux 7.0 now available

        Nearly eight months after the 32-bit edition arrived, a 64-bit edition of version 7.0 of the Slackware-based operating system has been announced by the VectorLinux developers. Like the project’s Standard edition, the 64-bit release of VectorLinux 7.0 – referred to as “VLocity Linux 64-7.0″ – includes support for DVD playback, audio and video codecs, and plugins for multimedia and Java support out of the box.

      • Linux Deepin 12.06 Final Release Out !

        Linux Deepin is one of the most active Linux distributions in China. The developers of LD endeavour to provide its users with an operating system of high stability and efficiency, in order to fulfil our goal to “Keep newbies free from pain and save time for the experts”. With the efforts from both the community and the company that work behind the project, LD is becoming easier to use every day. We would like to say thanks to all of you who join us and support us. Please follow our blog ( http://planet.linuxdeepin.com ). Linux Deepin is released twice a year. Last major release was Linux Deepin 11.12.

    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

      • DebConf 12: Linux Gaming, Mobile, 64-bit ARMv8 Planning

        The DebConf 12 developer summit ended on Saturday in Managua. Here is a recap of the prominent Debian Linux and open-source discussions that took place in Nicaragua’s capitol for the past week.

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Valve ports Steam and L4D2 to Ubuntu

            Valve has a working version of Steam and Left for Dead 2 on Ubuntu. The software company revealed this on a new blog about its efforts to bring its popular online game distribution platform to Linux.

            This official announcement confirms months of speculation about Valve’s Linux development plans. In fact, Phoronix first broke the news in 2010, but it seems that it’s only recently that there was enough reason to believe that Valve was serious.

          • Second-Class Citizens?

            Jonathan Riddell, who has been working on the Kubuntu for the last 7 years as its sole paid developer, announced back in February that Canonical would no longer provide financial support for Kubuntu after the release of Kubuntu 12.04.

            And article on OMGUbuntu! explains further that the decision boils down to business. Riddell in the Kubuntu article above did say, “it has not taken over the world commercially and shows no immediate signs of doing so…”

            While this shake up does not spell the end of Kubuntu it does shift the way it is supported. Canonical will, from Kubuntu 12.10 onwards, provide backing for the KDE flavour in the same way as it does Xubuntu, Edbuntu, and Lubuntu – with infrastructure and resources rather than money.

          • How to Undo Unity

            Like Ubuntu’s Unity interface? Great. If not, you can easily change it to look and act like Ubuntu used to. This tutorial shows how.

            I won’t debate whether Unity is an improvement. This article is simply a “How To” for those who want to alter it.

            We’ll start by customizing Unity. We’ll add and delete icons from the applications Launcher on the left-hand side of the screen, then we’ll add icons and folders to the desktop. I’ll introduce some Unity tweaking tools.

          • Ubuntu For Beginners: A Series Of Ubuntu Articles

            These articles are first and foremost meant for beginners in Ubuntu world and open source in general. That doesn’t mean that others, who are already very well involved in both the worlds, are forbidden to read. All of you are very welcome with your suggestions/ideas what could be better.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Thinking About Fuduntu

              Funduntu 2012.3 is somewhat unique among Linux distributions. While you find many Debian and Ubuntu spins and forks you do not find as many Red Hat spins and forks that are user friendly, and more, optimized for laptops and netbooks.

              It seems not only optimized for netbooks and laptops, it is also very “Google friendly” having the Chromium browser, the Gmail application on the dock, and only having Google Docs for a word processor. I get this as Fuduntu is a distribution aimed at being light weight, and I credit the developers for having updated versions of Firefox, Thunderbird, and LibreOffice in the repository.

            • Linux Mint 13 XFCE Screenshots
  • Devices/Embedded

    • Overclocked Raspberry Pi running Raspbian OS is lightning quick

      The goal of the Raspberry Pi Foundation in releasing limited quantities of the Raspberry Pi was to accelerate the development of software for the machine before targeting schools. It seems to be working, and anyone lucky enough to have received their Raspberry Pi will soon be enjoying a much faster operating system.

    • Small low cost linux pc’s, an overview from 07-2012

      You might have heard of the Raspberry Pi, or the Cotton Candy, or the Snowball. Those are, besides nice pi, candy and snow, also small Linux pc’s. Most of them have an ARM chip, a small amount of memory and run some for of Linux.

      This page will provide an overview of what is on the market, specs, an image, and links to the boards. It is probably not complete, and if I forgot one, please leave a comment. I think I’ll be doing another overview at the end of the year.

    • Raspberry Pi Sales Restrictions Are Lifted

      As we’ve noted recently, when it comes to the top open source stories of 2012, it’s clear that one of the biggest is the proliferation of tiny, inexpensive Linux-based computers at some of the smallest form factors ever seen. And, the diminutive, credit card-sized Raspberry Pi (shown at left), priced at $25 and $35, is one of the most widely followed of these miniature systems. Now, the folks behind Raspberry Pi have announced that strict sales restrictions on the devices have been lifted.

    • Raspberry Pi: Making DIY computing cool again

      When it comes to the types of products and stories I cover, I’m rarely the most popular guy in the office. When Apple released all its new MacBooks several weeks ago, we had marketing folks streaming into the lab to get a glimpse. The CEO reportedly came by to try out the Windows 8 touchscreen PC we had set up. And it probably goes without saying that the phone, tablet, and camera guys around here get a lot more love than I do. Sadly, video cards, solid-state drives, motherboards, CPUs, and the like are all seen as too geeky, too user-unfriendly for the masses of my colleagues, so they usually leave me alone until some rare news happening forces them to remember I exist for a few hours.

    • Raspberry Pi waiting list scrapped: Let the bulk buying begin
    • The Value of Pi

      The sudden popularity of mini-board systems like Raspberry Pi have brought back the pioneering spirit of Linux’ early days. But will it bring a much-needed resurgence in programming and development?

      I have yet to get a Raspberry Pi unit for myself, nor do I think I will get one anytime soon. For one, I already have a nice mobile Linux laptop, currently running Ubuntu 12.04, so my Linux needs are quite well handled by that.

    • Raspberry Pi rivalled by rival quad-core Linux board

      The success of the Raspberry Pi has inspired a Korean firm to publish details of a new and more powerful version of the same ARM-based Linux computer-on-a-board concept, the ODROID-X.

      Marketed as a US $129 ($162) development board, the higher price of Hardkernel’s ODROID-X offers a taste of what the Raspberry Pi itself might one day turn into.

      At its heart is Samsung’s powerful Exynos4412 Cortex-A9 Quad Core running at1.4Ghz (also used in the Samsung SIII smartphone), enough grunt to run Ubuntu 12.04 as well as Android 4.04 on the 1GB of onboard RAM.

    • Phones

      • Android

        • Android 4.1 Jelly Bean: Complete List of All New Features

          Google officially unveiled its next-generation Android mobile OS, v4.1 Jelly Bean, in June at its annual I/O developer conference. The brand new software is currently only officially available for two devices, the Samsung Galaxy Nexus smartphone and Google’s brand new Nexus 7 tablet—check out a Nexus 7 hands-on here—but Jelly Bean should make its way to the bulk of new Android devices in the coming months, starting with the Samsung Galaxy S III and Motorola XOOM tablet.

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Tablet price battle apparent in US market

        Tablet prices are dropping in the US with Samsung’s 7-inch Galaxy Tab now priced at US$219 from US$399 in various stores such as Wal-Mart and Best Buy along with white-brand tablets that are on sale for as low as US$59.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Open source offense could be our best defense against cyberattacks

    A core dilemma for IT today is how to properly protect the organizations’ information systems and assets given security tools often seem like a black hole sucking down both time and money. But a strong defense doesn’t have to be expensive, and a good place to start is assessing what information is publicly available and figuring out how to safeguard it from attack.

  • 5 Questions with David A. Wheeler

    Meet David A. Wheeler. He’s a Research Staff Member for the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) and a well-known speaker, author, and expert on open source software and security. He helped develop the Department of Defense’s open source software policy and FAQ and has written other guidance materials to help people understand how to use and collaboratively develop open source software in government. He has a Ph.D. in Information Technology, an M.S. in Computer Science, and a B.S. in Electronics Engineering. We hope you enjoy getting to know David.

  • Google Open Sources Turing Machine Doodle

    This past week, Google open sourced the code for the animated Turing Machine logic puzzle it posted to its homepage in celebration of the computing pioneer’s centenary. Turning would have been 100 on June 23rd, and one of his most famous creations was Turning Machine, which exhibited some of the fundamental concepts that underpin today’s computers.

  • Break free with Miro!

    Miro is a free and open source music player, video player, media converter, internet tv application, podcast organizer, downloader and generally a feature-rich multimedia playing, organizing and synchronizing application.

  • Events

    • Berlin in August: Free Software at Campus Party

      From August 21. to 26. there is Campus Party in Berlin. I was asked beforeif I can make suggestions for good speakers from the Free Software community.That is what I did. So beside the already announced keynote speakers like Jon “maddog” Hall, MarkSurman (Mozilla Foundation), and Rainey Reitman (EFF) to following talks will take place in the Free Software track…

  • Web Browsers

    • Chrome

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox 16 with new Address Bar Word Highlighting

        Sometimes it is the little things that are worth talking about. When you enter a phrase or word in Firefox’s address bar, you receive a listing with suggestions in a menu that opens up automatically. Depending on your configuration of the feature, you may see history items or bookmarks listed in the window. We have previously detailed how you can modify the Firefox address bar so that nothing, only bookmarks or history items, or both are displayed in it. Privacy is one reason why you may want to modify the settings but there are others, for instance to load bookmarks faster in the browser by only displaying bookmarks in the results.

      • The Grounding of Mozilla’s Thunderbird

        “Thunderbird does everything I want it to do right now,” said Google+ blogger Kevin O’Brien. “I grant that someone out there probably wants it to become a feed reader, a floor polish, and a dessert topping, but I’m fine with it just the way it is. If they just keep up the security patches (which they say they will do), I am fine with it.”

      • Ubuntu and Thunderbird: What the Future Might Hold

        For years, Ubuntu’s default email client was Evolution. Then, last year, Canonical switched to Mozilla Thunderbird. But now recent doubts over the future of Thunderbird — most of them pretty speculative — have spawned worries that Thunderbird might, in its turn, disappear from Ubuntu. Will it? And more importantly, would it really matter to many people? Here are some thoughts.

  • SaaS

  • Databases

    • 5 Interesting Things You Can Do With PostgreSQL

      One could write thousands of pages about all the features PostgreSQL offers. Instead, let’s take a look at five features that are particularly interesting and find out where PostgreSQL sits in relation to other open source and proprietary database systems. PostgreSQL has a lot more to offer than might be immediately obvious.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

  • BSD

    • BSD For Human Beings?

      As the founder of PC-BSD, what can you tell us about your decision to start this project? How did you get involved with BSD systems, and what drove you into creating one?

  • Project Releases

    • Firebug 1.10 released with new cookie manager

      Version 1.10.0 of the Firebug web development tool has been released with several new features, such as a cookie manager and support for syntax highlighting. The major update to the open source web debugger is now compatible with the current stable Firefox 13 release as well as the Beta (14), Aurora (15) and Nightly (16) branches. It no longer requires the browser to be restarted upon installation; however, users upgrading from version1.9 will need to restart.

    • GParted update brings refresh of live CD partitioning tools

      Following the recent release of GParted 0.13.0, there has been a new release of the project’s own GParted Live distribution, as well as one from the Parted Magic developer. GParted Live 0.13.0-1 includes several important, and in one case long-awaited, bug fixes and Parted Magic 2012_07_13 has been updated with new packages and an improved icon theme.

    • Parted Magic 2012_07_13 Incorporates GParted 0.13.0
  • Public Services/Government

    • Italian Local Government Warms to Open Source

      There is a natural tendency to concentrate on what is happening locally, and so most of the stories here on Open Enterprise are about what’s happening in the UK, or developments that affect it directly. But it’s important to remember that open source is a global development, and that things are bubbling away everywhere, all the time.

  • Openness/Sharing

  • Programming

    • What Exactly Is GitHub Anyway?

      Andreessen Horowitz announced a whopping $100 million investment in GitHub this week. You can read commentary and speculation all over the web about what GitHub will do with the money, whether this was a good investment for Andreessen Horowitz and whether taking such a large investment is a good thing for GitHub.

      But what the heck is GitHub and why are developers so excited about it? You may have heard that GitHub is a code sharing and publishing service, or that it’s a social networking site for programmers. Both statements are true, but neither explain exactly why GitHub is special.

Leftovers

  • Security

    • Apple losing battle with hacker

      While the fruity cargo cult Apple advertises that its systems are totally secure, it is fighting a losing a battle with a Russian hacker who appears to be having a laugh.
      Alexey Borodin published a video on YouTube showing users how they could avoid paying for in-app purchases without even having to gain root access to the system.
      The method is actually simple. All you need to do is install two security certificates and change the DNS settings on their device.
      Borodin claimed that more than 30,000 illegal in-app purchases have taken place since he told the world+dog about the hack.
      The Russian seems to have a beef with the business model which offers you free software but insists you pay out for new features.

      Read more: http://news.techeye.net/security/apple-losing-battle-with-hacker#ixzz20t3bbriH

  • Finance

    • Goldman Sachs and the $580 Million Black Hole

      THE business deal from hell began to crumble even before the Champagne corks were popped.

      The deal, the $580 million sale of a highflying technology company, Dragon Systems, had just been approved by its board and congratulations were being exchanged. But even then, at that moment of celebration, there was a sense that something was amiss.

      The chief executive of Dragon had received a congratulatory bottle from the investment bankers representing the acquiring company, a Belgian competitor called Lernout & Hauspie. But he hadn’t heard from Dragon’s own bankers at Goldman Sachs.

      “I still have not received anything from Goldman,” the executive wrote in an e-mail to the other bank. “Do they know something I should know?”

    • Former Goldman Sachs director convicted

      Former Goldman Sachs board member Rajat Gupta lived the American Dream before being led astray by a wealthy friend who was a master at insider trading.

      That was the view of two jurors who on Friday voted with 10 others to convict Gupta of three counts of securities fraud and one count of conspiracy for sharing corporate secrets with hedge fund manager Raj Rajaratnam.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • Tar Heel Lawmakers Put Global Warming on Hold! (or, a Rising Tide Lifts No Votes)

      In a backward leap of anti-Copernican proportions, North Carolina’s state legislature recently passed what may be the nation’s first state-wide global warming denial legislation.

      The legislature on July 2 effectively nullified the state’s own science panel’s report predicting a 20 to 55-inch rise in sea level. The statehouse also commanded scientists to wait until July 1, 2016, to make their next report (and only after it is approved/scrubbed by the powers that be).

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • Censored by Copyright

        This week, I made a parody music video criticising Lord Finesse for being a copyright draconian. Guess what. He had my video pulled down, claiming it infringed his copyright. Which proves my point more than anything I could have said myself. Techdirt has written an article on the issue here.

        Anyway, in response to that, I got my Michael Moore on and have made this video. Ridiculously, I have had to avoid showing you any segment of the censored video, or of the song which I am discussing, for fear that Finesse will try to have THIS video removed too. With that in mind, please mirror and share as much as possible in case this one gets hit with a take-down as well.

07.15.12

Links 15/7/2012: Chromebooks, Linux Devices, and PCs for Senior Citizens

Posted in News Roundup at 6:03 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • Why People Seem to Love Closed Systems

    Patrick Gray, writing in TechRepublic, has some theories about why open source computing has yet to live up to some expectations. In the abstract, people may love the idea of the openness and freedom in technology. In practice, however, “vendors and consumers alike voted with their wallets for closed systems.” He cites the appeal of Microsoft, Apple and Amazon.

  • A French open source software specialist woos U.S. e-retailers

    France-based e-commerce platform provider PrestaShop seeks to expand in the U.S. Having opened a Miami office in 2011, it provides software for about 6,000 U.S. e-commerce stores—roughly six times as many as last year.

  • Best Ruby on Rails Hosting 2012

    The web hosting review site Top-Cheap-Web-Hosting.com announced the best Ruby on Rails hosting provider for 2012, based on ruby on rails hosting features, loading speed, reliability, technical support and price.

  • Workshop in Free Open Source Software (FOSS)

    The first 30 minutes of the workshop will present an overall of goals of the foundation, the philosophy and advantages of open source software and how it hall be implemented in Fiji.

    “Linux has the same features of operating systems such as Microsoft Windows and Apple Macintosh,” said SFF President, Mr Kush Singh.

  • Open Source Web Development Provides Custom Web Development Services at Reasonable Rates
  • Samsung Open Source Code for Epic and Skyrocket Models

    Samsung, in an apparent attempt to encourage hackers and developers and trying to give them a head start with the ongoing roll out of the OTA updates, have released the source codes of the Sprint Epic and AT&T’s Skyrocket on their download pages. The updates are available currently on their download pages for anyone interested.

  • 25 free open source projects IT pros will love

    Although it’s popular these days to pooh-pooh the advertising-supported, for-profit SourceForge in favor of GitHub, the SourceForge folks want to remind you that the forge still hosts more than 300,000 projects and serves up a good 4 million downloads a day.

  • Digsby becomes Open Source project

    There are a number of reasons why a closed-source project is turned into an Open Source project by its parent company or developer. Among them lack of interest by the parent company or developer, a drop in popularity, not enough resources to continue development, having been bought by another company, or a change of hearts. It is not really clear from the announcement why Digsby is going down the Open Source route but judging from the frequency of blog posts on the official site, it could be a bit of everything sans the being bought by another company part.

  • Digsby becomes Open Source project
  • Major Open-Source ARM Announcement Coming

    There’s a very exciting open-source announcement coming soon that will please an increasing number of ARM Linux users and fans of open-source graphics drivers.

    This forthcoming announcement, which isn’t being detailed yet but will be yet another Linux graphics exclusive for Phoronix the near future, is something entirely different from the other recent open-source ARM Linux graphics advancements. As something until then. let’s recap the existing open-source ARM graphics activities:

    - The Lima driver project that’s sponsored by Codethink and led by Luc Verhaegen as a reverse-engineered open-source ARM Mali graphics driver. Here’s the latest update on Lima from LinuxTag Berlin back in May.

  • Events

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Mozilla Introduces Persona, A Better And Secure Login System

        A normal web user may login and use to tens to hundreds of sites everyday. This is a hectic task and also one may remain in doubt as how his/her data is being used in each of these networks. To simplify this login system and to give users better control over their data, Mozilla has introduced a new product in the market, Persona.

      • Is Firefox’s Rapid Release Cycle Causing Too Many Problems?

        In early February of last year, we noted that for the very first time, Mozilla had pledged to move to a rapid release cycle for the popular Firefox browser. “Can’t wait,” responded one reader. It was clear at the time that Mozilla was making the move to better respond to competition from Google Chrome, which was already on its own rapid release cycle.

        Fast-forward to today, and Chrome’s market share is about equal to or possiby greater than Firefox’s, depending on whose numbers you believe. And, Mozilla has had to wrestle with problems related to its rapid release cycle. Now, one former Firefox developer is saying that Firefox’s woes can be blamed on the cycle itself.

      • Mozilla’s Rust language version 0.3 released

        With the announcement that version 0.3 of Mozilla’s Rust has been released, the alternate procedural, concurrent, OO and functional style is continuing its rapid evolution. Designed as a safe alternative to C or C++, as it is being developed, Rust is being used to create an experimental parallel browser called Servo. Version 0.1 of Rust was introduced in January 2012 after being created as a side project by Graydon Hoare in 2006 and revealed to the world in 2010. Version 0.3 includes over 1,900 changes from April’s version 0.2, as the developers work through the roadmap that will lead to a 1.0 release of the language.

  • SaaS

    • How a Looming Talent Gap Will Crush Enterprise Hopes for Big Data

      Large enterprises are putting a lot of money and effort into making sure they have the latest and greatest in Hadoop and other big data infrastructure tools, but it turns out their IT teams are far from prepared to actually use those tools once they are in place.

      That’s one observation from Jeremy Howard, president and chief scientist of Kaggle, which uses crowdsourcing techniques to provide statistical and data analytic services for clients.

  • Databases

    • The stealth success of PostgreSQL

      Other open source databases may have more name recognition, but PostgreSQL is seeing strong growth — as is the company EnterpriseDB, which helped develop it

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

  • CMS

    • Drupal Experiences Exceptional Growth

      Drupal is possibly one of the most popular open-source CMS in the world, and probably one of the largest free software community with over 800,000 members. During the last year, the Drupal business has experienced exceptional growth, both financially and socially.

    • Joomla! 3.0 Alpha 1 Released
  • Healthcare

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • A GCC Proposal To Build It Better, Faster

      There’s a proposal within the GCC development camp to change the CFLAGS under which the GNU Compiler Collection is built when in a release mode.

      Dimitrios Apostolou proposed on Wednesday to the GCC development list Change default BOOT_CFLAGS for release builds.

  • Public Services/Government

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Filmmaker Pledges to Live Open Source for a Year

      It’s one thing to like open source, but it’s another thing to live open source. Sam Muirhead, a 28-year old filmmaker who lives in Berlin, is making headlines for an unusual pledge he has made: He has sworn that beginning August 1st, he will spend one year living totally open source. And he doesn’t just mean he will use open source technology. He means that his beer, the paper he uses–everything he uses–will be open source.

  • Standards/Consortia

    • Accounting for Vendor Lock-in

      I am not an accountant. However, as a Graham and Dodd value investor over the years, I’ve picked up some of the fundamental principles. A key one is the Matching Principle, that revenues and expenses should be booked in a way that clarifies the underlying business performance, rather than based purely on the timing of cash transactions. In some cases this requires the use of special accounts, for things like depreciation, where the lifetime of a fixed asset (say factory machinery) extends beyond a single revenue cycle.

      A similar technique is used when dealing with deferred expenses. For example take the case of a nuclear power plant. A plant has a useful lifetime, but when that end date arrives there is a clean up cost. The property is not immediately usable for other purposes, but must undergo an expensive remediation. From an accounting perspective there is an asset retirement obligation, a form of deferred expense. This deferred expense is recognized on the books as a liability based on the present value of the expected clean up cost, which is then depreciated.

Leftovers

  • Linus Torvalds Asks Google To Stop Google+ Event Spam

    If you are a Google plus use, there are two things you would be most annoyed about. One is there is no way to see the private messages sent to you if you plan to respond to them two days later. Second is the new Google+ Event. I was bombarded by the event invite the moment it was announced.

  • Oracle, HP face off in court over Itanium

    Oracle turned its attention away from its Android patent fight with Google on Monday to battle Hewlett-Packard over Oracle’s decision to stop making new versions of database software that works with HP’s Itanium-based servers.

  • Security

  • Finance

    • Andrew Williams, Ex-Treasury Spokesman, Headed To Goldman Sachs

      Andrew Williams, a former spokesman for Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, is headed to Goldman Sachs at the end of July, the Financial Times reports. That’s only increased the speculation that Geithner may head to Goldman next year.

      Williams, currently director of media relations at General Electric, is the second of Geithner’s top spokesmen to decamp to Goldman. Richard “Jake” Siewert, also a former spokesman for Geithner, left the Treasury Department a few months ago to lead Goldman Sachs’ public relations department.

    • Goldman’s fall from grace continues

      Starting tomorrow banks will begin to tell investors how they did in the second three months of 2012. Overall, the indications are that the quarter will be a disappointment. But, surprisingly, Goldman Sachs (GS) may emerge as the biggest loser. Expectations for the once-vaunted investment bank have fallen more than rivals.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • How a Right-Wing Group Is Infiltrating State News Coverage

      When Idaho state legislators proposed a seemingly uncontroversial bill to ban access to commercial tanning beds by minors earlier this year, IdahoReporter.com took up the issue with force.

      The state news website, an affiliate of the conservative Franklin Center for Government and Public Integrity and overseen by the free market Idaho Freedom Foundation, posted six stories on the proposal between Feb. 16 and March 22, when the bill was voted down in a state Senate Committee.

    • Malcolm Gladwell Unmasked: A Look Into the Life & Work of America’s Most Successful Propagandist

      In the vast ecosystem of corporate shills, which one is the most effective? Propaganda works best when it is not perceived as propaganda: nuance, obfuscation, distraction, suggestion, the subtle introduction of doubt—these are more effective in the long run than shotgun blasts of lies. The master of this approach is Malcolm Gladwell.

      Malcolm Gladwell is the New Yorker’s leading essayist and bestselling author. Time magazine named Gladwell one of the world’s 100 most influential people. His books sell copies in the millions, and he is in hot demand as one of the nation’s top public intellectual and pop gurus. Gladwell plays his role as a disinterested public intellectual like few others, right down to the frizzy hairdo and smock-y getups. His political aloofness, high-brow contrarianism and constant challenges to “popular wisdom” are all part of his shtick.

  • DRM

07.12.12

Links 13/7/2012: Android Grows Massive in Spain, City of Helsinki Hides Proprietary Dealings

Posted in News Roundup at 8:05 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • The Big Data and Cloud Computing Trends Depend on Open Source

    Reuven Cohen has an interesting post up on Forbes’ site, which asks, “Free Versus Open: Does Open Source Software Matter in the Cloud Era?” He writes: “I like open source as much as the next guy but, from a value proposition standpoint, just being ‘open source’ doesn’t sound all that compelling to me. This has become especially true in the emerging cloud computing landscape where APIs and Big Data have become some of the most valuable currencies.” In fact, though, as the transition to the cloud and Big Data continue, open source software is playing an absolutely critical role.

    Cohen notes that Big Data has become one of the “most valuable currencies,” but isn’t the open source Hadoop platform–used to sift insights from extremely large data sets–one of the flagship pieces of software driving the Big Data trend? Hadoop has given rise to promising startup companies such as Hortonworks, focused on training and services surrounding it.

  • Free Versus Open: Does Open Source Software Matter In The Cloud Era?

    There is an increasingly common refrain I keep hearing from startups. These young companies, with their generally un-original software products, claim that its solution is just like (insert the market leader) except open source. Don’t get me wrong. I like open source as much as the next guy but, from a value proposition standpoint, just being “open source” doesn’t sound all that compelling to me. This has become especially true in the emerging cloud computing landscape where APIs and Big Data have become some of the most valuable currencies.

  • Do Self-Service and Open Source Co-Exist?

    The business intelligence landscape is changing to accommodate broader interactivity and ease of use. This is nothing new; one of the key trends is the increase in data discovery though self-service BI models.

  • New Open Source Software Available for Download on AXTSoftware.com
  • Open Source Opens the Door to Women

    Get everyone who works on open-source software together and put them in a little room in your brain. Now take a look around at what you just created. They’re smart. They come from all different countries and educational backgrounds, but it’s a stag party in there. They’re almost all men.

    Now imagine arriving as a woman.

    “It’s like going to a party where you know no one. That’s not a party you want to be at,” says Maírín Duffy, a blogger and senior interaction designer at Red Hat in Boston. Duffy is one of the few women who have shrugged off intimidation and walked right into the open-source community. Not many others have followed.

  • Developer Break: Node.js, Apaches and Celery
  • Web Browsers

  • SaaS

  • Business

    • Semi-Open Source

      • Atlassian JIRA 5.1 lifts 200,000 issue limit

        The latest release of the commercial bug tracking system, JIRA 5.1, is the “fastest JIRA yet” according to its creators, Atlassian. The release notes explains that the previous “soft limit” of 200,000 issues has been removed thanks to a 40% improvement in performance; a new scaling guide provides more information.

  • Funding

  • Public Services/Government

    • City of Helsinki Wants To Keep Software Costs Secret

      The IT department of the city of Helsinki claimed in a report to the city board that migrating to OpenOffice would cost is over 21 million euros. On 10th of April 2012, FSFE filed a Freedom of Information request, asking the city how it had arrived at a surprisingly high cost estimates for running OpenOffice (now LibreOffice) on the city’s workstations. The city of Helsinki has now denied this request and has stated that it will not release any details about the calculations.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • How to survive in an open world

      According to Don Tapscott’s “Four Principles of an Open World” TED talk, we are experiencing one of the most significant times in human history. Through the Internet and other innovations, we are able to collaborate like never before, and that change is having a profound effect on society.

Leftovers

07.11.12

Links 12/7/2012: OS4 12.5 Released, LibreOffice 3.5.5 Released, CETA Worries

Posted in News Roundup at 7:57 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • Free photo editing apps reviewed
  • Free-software activists hope for detained engineer’s freedom
  • How To Recruit Open-Source Developers

    Wondering how you can recruit open-source contributors for your project? Here’s how.

    Donnie Berkholz, a council member and developer for Gentoo Linux as well as an analyst at RedMonk, has presented on the topic of recruiting open-source contributors.

  • Google Doodle Turing Machine Now Open Source

    Following on from the release of the Moog Synthesizer Doodle code, Google has now released the JavaScript of its Turing Machine puzzle.

  • Ecotrust releases open source tool for complex decision makers

    Ecotrust this week released an open source software platform that the nonprofit group hopes will be used to support collaborative processes for complex decision making.

    The software, called Madrona, builds on Ecotrust’s 20 years of experience using mapping, database and other software tools to tackle complex topics like marine reserves and forest management.

    “Madrona is essentially a packaging of features into a single platform,” said Tim Welch, senior developer for Ecotrust.

  • Events

  • Web Browsers

  • SaaS

    • Stealthy Big Switch plugs into OpenStack clouds

      Big Switch Networks is not even out of stealth mode and has not yet revealed its aspirations and products for software defined networks – SDNs, in modern parlance – and yet the company is nonetheless contributing to the open source efforts to build more flexible and virtual network infrastructure and hoping to build awareness ahead of its eventual launch.

    • OpenNebula 3.6 integrates virtual appliance marketplace

      The OpenNebula project has announced the release of OpenNebula 3.6, code named “Lagoon” after the Lagoon Nebula (Messier 8). The latest stable version of the open source cloud computing toolkit brings performance improvements and better virtualisation management.

  • Data

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

  • Healthcare

    • OSEHRA Open Source Community Celebrates 1,000th Member

      OSEHRA, (Open Source Electronic Health Record Agent) the nonprofit dedicated to advancing open source electronic health records and accelerating innovation in health care information technology, announced today it has surpassed 1,000 authenticated users.

  • Business

    • Semi-Open Source

      • Spring Creator Rod Johnson Leaves VMware

        Rod Johnson, who wrote the first version of the open-source, Java-based Spring framework, and later co-founded SpringSource, has left his position as SVP and GM of VMware’s SpringSource product division. Johnson joined the Palo Alto, Calif.-based virtualization company when it acquired SpringSource in 2009, where he then served as CEO.

      • VMware Revamps Its Zimbra Enterprise E-mail Server

        VMware plans to make a beta version of an upgrade to its Zimbra Collaboration Server available for download on Wednesday, with shipments in final form scheduled for later this quarter, the company said.

  • BSD

    • Debian: Squeeze vs. Wheezy On Linux And kFreeBSD

      With Debian Wheezy now frozen for its release sometime next year, here are some early benchmarks comparing the performance of Debian 6.0.5 “Squeeze” to the latest packages for the Debian 7.0 “Wheezy” release. For this Squeeze vs. Wheezy comparison, both Debian GNU/Linux and Debian GNU/kFreeBSD were benchmarked from an Intel 64-bit system.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Comparison of Diagnostics between GCC and Clang
    • GCC 4.8 To Improve Diagnostics Abilities

      One of the long-advertised features of LLVM’s Clang C/Objective-C/C++ compiler has been that it offers more user-friendly diagnostics than the GNU Compiler Collection. Historically this has been true, especially against GCC 4.2 — the last GPLv2 compiler release. However, GCC developers have been working to improve this situation. With GCC 4.8, it looks like more of this work will come to fruition.

  • Licensing

  • Openness/Sharing

    • TB or not TB: India crowdsources research

      Facing nearly 2 million new tuberculosis cases every year — more and more of them drug-resistant — India has a bigger stake in finding a better treatment for TB than any other country.

      Yet until recently, obstacles hindered Indian scientists’ efforts to conduct advanced research.

      The reason? India’s university professors are bogged down with teaching, and few have the laboratory facilities needed to do cutting edge work. And every year, more of the best minds are lured away by the pharmaceutical industry — which has little interest in TB, from which there is little money to be made.

    • Open Access/Content

      • Open education, open source, and the dilemma over e-textbooks

        Forty years ago, John Holt wondered whether an educational revolution as profound as open education could survive unless it became part of a wider and deeper movement of social change. Until open source and the concept of an open education began to take hold, John Holt’s vision of an open education seemed to be a pipe dream.

Leftovers

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • Bravery and drone pilots

      The Pentagon considers awarding war medals to those who operate America’s death-delivering video games

  • Finance

    • America the Beautiful: A Fire Sale for Foreign Corporations

      This may be one of the most important stories ever ignored by the so-called “lame-stream, liberal” media. It’s unlikely you’re losing sleep over US trade negotiations, but the unfolding business agreement among the US and eight Pacific nations -the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) – should cause every US citizen, from the Sierra Club to the Tea Party to get their pitch forks and torches out of the closet and prepare to “storm the Bastille.”
      The TPP negotiations have been going on for two years under extreme secrecy, no information has been made available to either the press or Congress about the US position. But on June 12, a document was leaked to the watchdog group, Public Citizen, revealing the current US position and the reason for the secrecy. The contents are surreal, shocking and prima facia evidence for how corporations have become the master puppeteers of our government.

    • City Of Oakland Taps Occupy Wall Street To Take On Goldman Sachs

      As the world’s most powerful investment bank Goldman Sachs is no stranger to fighting all sorts of battles, but the city of Oakland, Cailf. is challenging the firm like no one ever has before.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • Calling for an Open and International Dialogue for the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Negotiations

      The Internet Society welcomes the European Parliament’s rejection of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) as a strong message in favour of open and transparent processes in negotiations dealing with policy issues pertaining to the Internet. The vote followed widespread protests throughout Europe, with Internet campaigners claiming that it posed threats to online freedoms. ACTA was originally meant to address, among other things, the issue of online piracy and the sale or promotion of counterfeit goods via the Internet.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • Mega-victory: Kim Dotcom search warrants “invalid,” mansion raid “illegal”

        On January 20, New Zealand police showed up in style at the mansion of flamboyant Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom, swarming over the property and bringing along two police helicopters. They cut their way through locks and into the home’s “panic room,” where Dotcom was hiding in apparent fear of a kidnapping or robbery. They seized 18 luxury vehicles. They secured NZ$11 million in cash from bank accounts. And they grabbed a whopping 150TB of data from Dotcom’s many digital devices.

      • Reforming copyright for the digital age: the Commission takes an important step forward

        Last week’s vote on ACTA – although hardly a surprise for those who’ve been following – was a reminder about the big debate currently going on, about how to balance intellectual property rights with Internet freedoms

        For me it’s about making it easier for artists to promote their work widely, and make a living from it: without constraining the immense innovation of the online world. And, for me, the current copyright system achieves all of those objectives poorly.

      • ACTA

        • Karel De Gucht does it again: CETA

          The European Treaties, however, provide for this loophole which was created for the WTO TRIPs agreement. I agree with Ante Wessels that the Article 207 process should not be used for bypassing national and European legislators. While the European Parliament disagreed with the adoption of measures in ACTA, De Gucht’s administration has other bilateral agreements in the pipeline to the same ends. They deserve the watchful eyes of concerned parties.

        • ACTA Lives: How the EU & Canada Are Using CETA as Backdoor Mechanism To Revive ACTA

          Last week, the European Parliament voted overwhelmingly to reject ACTA, striking a major blow to the hopes of supporters who envisioned a landmark agreement that would set a new standard for intellectual property rights enforcement. The European Commission, which negotiates trade deals such as ACTA on behalf of the European Union, has vowed to revive the badly damaged agreement. Its most high-profile move has been to ask the European Court of Justice to rule on ACTA’s compatibility with fundamental European freedoms with the hope that a favourable ruling could allow the European Parliament to reconsider the issue.

        • The Inclusion of ACTA Within CETA: Why The Concern Is Warranted

          My post yesterday on how the EU plans to use the Canada – EU Trade Agreement (CETA) as a backdoor mechanism to implement the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) provisions has attracted considerable attention with coverage from European media and activists. The European Commission refused to comment, stating that it does not comment on leaks.

        • ACTA is back, completed with investment protections

          The EU – Canada trade agreement (CETA) contains the same draconian civil and criminal measures as ACTA, see Michael Geist. He recommends: “With anti-ACTA sentiment spreading across Europe, Canada should push to remove the intellectual property chapter from CETA altogether.”

Links 11/7/2012: digiKam 2.7.0, Jolla Rises

Posted in News Roundup at 7:44 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • Teaching the open source way: An interview with Sameer Verma

    Dr. Sameer Verma first learned about open source software when a college friend gave him a weekend crash course in Linux. Now a professor of information systems in the College of Business at San Francisco State University, Verma has taken those lessons to heart—and is teaching his own students the open source way.

    Recently, we talked with Verma about the challenge of open source pedagogy, about integrating open source technologies and values into the college classroom, about the benefits of learning open source project management, and about his work with One Laptop Per Child.

  • Apache Lucene/Solr making gains in enterprise search

    Open source hasn’t made huge inroads in web search but Apache’s Lucene/Solr platform is beginning to make gains in enterprise search, particularly in light of the acquisition binge of proprietary giants.

  • Cultivating A Culture of Free

    Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) is based on a principle: Software Freedom. It is given away under a license that allows you to do with the software as you please. You can modify it, redistribute it, and never pay a penny for it so long as you abide by the terms of the license. This model has worked very well for FOSS. But this model doesn’t work for everything.

  • Syoncloud Released Syoncloud Logs 0.3 Log Processing Software as an Open Source
  • The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache Nutch(tm) v2.0
  • Open source Java projects: TomEE

    Apache TomEE aims to provide application developers with a best-of-breed technology stack that can be deployed to a simple and lightweight Java EE container. In this return to the Open source Java projects series, author Steven Haines introduces TomEE, explains how it differs from Tomcat, and helps you set it up in your development environment. He then walks through the process of configuring TomEE to integrate resources such as database connection pools and JMS destinations — bread and butter for today’s enterprise apps.

  • Events

    • GUADEC 2012 Program Published

      The Gnome Foundation has announced the schedule for GUADEC to be held from July 26 to August 1st in Coruña, Spain this year. The event will consist of over 46 talks, with 4 keynotes and a number of lightning talk sessions.

  • Web Browsers

  • SaaS

    • Lew Moorman: Open Cloud Key to Modern Networking
    • Interview: Whamcloud Wins FastForward Contract for Exascale R&D

      Today Whamcloud announced that the company has been awarded the Storage and I/O Research & Development subcontract for the Department of Energy’s FastForward program. FastForward is set up to initiate partnerships with multiple companies to accelerate the R&D of critical technologies needed for extreme scale computing. To learn more, I caught up with Eric Barton, Whamcloud’s CTO.

    • Beyond MapReduce: Hadoop hangs on

      Hadoop is all the rage in enterprise computing, and has become the poster child for the big-data movement. But just as the enterprise consolidates around Hadoop, the web world, including Google – which originated the technology ideas behind Hadoop – is moving on to real-time, ad-hoc analytics that batch-oriented Hadoop can’t match.

    • Stealthy Big Switch plugs into OpenStack clouds

      Big Switch Networks is not even out of stealth mode and has not yet revealed its aspirations and products for software defined networks – SDNs, in modern parlance – and yet the company is nonetheless contributing to the open source efforts to build more flexible and virtual network infrastructure and hoping to build awareness ahead of its eventual launch.

  • AbiWord/LibreOffice

    • First Peek at LibreOffice Android port Prototype

      That LibreOffice continues to respond to requirements of end-users became truly evident when news of it being developed for Android OS arrived a few months ago. And now with screen shot of the progress made so far being released by its developers, LibreOffice’s progress is good to note.

      In the developers own words, the screen shot only “look like – well, that gives a fairly horrific, bolts and all, barely usable (even with keyboard and mouse) office suite on your tablet.”; However, despite the lackadaisical images of the screen shot, the host of features that will finally come through for an Android OS are evident.

    • AbiWord is ready to work with you
  • Semi-Open Source

    • Jaspersoft 4.7 Adds Interactivity to Open Source Business Intelligence

      New Big Data analysis lands in Jaspersoft’s open source business intelligence suite as data caching accelerates information delivery.

      The whole point of using business intelligence applications is to get better insight out of data, a task made easier by better engaging end users. Given this, the ability to visualize and interact with data is a key focus for open source business intelligence vendor Jaspersoft in its latest 4.7 release out today.

  • Funding

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Gnucash For Android Released

      If you use Gnucash on your PC to track your expenses and accounts, here is great news for you. Now you will be able to do the same from any Android powered device. This application has been ported to Android and should run on Android version 2.2 and above.

  • Project Releases

    • TeX Live 2012 released

      Over the weekend, the TeX Users Group (TUG) released a new 2012 edition of the TeX Live distribution. New features this year include many detailed improvements. For instance, the MetaPost program can now be called by default when compiling a file in the \write18 primitive’s restricted execution mode. Output files from the pdftex TeX extension and the dvips driver can now be larger than 2GB, and dvips automatically embeds the 35 default PostScript fonts in the output file to ensure that typesetting is consistent on all systems.

  • Public Services/Government

  • Licensing

    • Richard Fontana blows hot and cold on GPLv3 fork

      A lack of clarity on the part of Red Hat open source licensing and patent counsel Richard Fontana as to whether he has, or has not, created a fork of the GPLv3 free software licence has led to well-known free software advocate Bradley Kuhn dissociating himself from the project.

    • Copyleft.next and the Future of GNU General Public Licenses

      “I am puzzled as to why this might be thought a newsworthy story at all,” says Richard Fontana, talking about his new licensing project, Copyleft.next (formerly, GPL.next). “Copyleft.next is just a toy research project, motivated initially by a mere desire on my part to learn more about using Git.”

      Fontana is perhaps being mildly disingenuous. Although the importance of Copyleft.next has been greatly exaggerated, he is not ruling out the possibility that it might play a role in the development of future versions of copyleft licenses such as the GPL family of licenses.

      If nothing else, the project seems to reflect the critique of GPL licenses that Fontana has been quietly making for some months now, which deserves wider recognition and discussion.

Leftovers

  • Hardware

    • Introducing the ARM 64-bit Architecture

      ARM announced a few days ago, on July 6th, that they posted a set of Linux kernel patches, implementing support for the AArch64 architecture, also known as the ARM 64-bit architecture.

      The initial support for the ARMv8 64-bit architecture has been added by ARM in the Linux kernel via a set of 36 patches.

  • Finance

    • Satyajit Das: Mr. Smith Goes to Leaves Wall Street

      In his 1933 inauguration address, Franklin Delano Roosevelt attacked the “callow and selfish wrongdoing” in banking and business. Roosevelt told the crowd of over 100,000 that attended that the “rulers of the exchange of mankind’s goods have failed” and that “unscrupulous money changers stand indicted in the court of public opinion”. Some 80 years later, the money changers have not “fled their high seats in the temple of our civilisation”. “Ancient truths” have not been restored to that temple. Something corrupt and rotten continues to fester at the heart of high finance, economic life and, indirectly, modern society.

    • City of London Corporation: a lesson in lobbying

      For almost 1,000 years, the City of London Corporation has resisted virtually every attempt by monarchs, governments or the people to rein in its vast wealth and influence. From the murder of peasant revolt leader Wat Tyler by the lord mayor of London and his men in 1381, to the dispatching from the City to Northern Ireland of rural refugees forced off their land in 17th-century land reforms, the corporation has long been a guiding hand in British history.

  • Copyrights

    • ACTA

      • CETA, the Zombie ACTA, Must Face the Same Fate

        A leaked version of the Canada-EU trade agreement (CETA) contains the worst parts of ACTA. The EU Commission appears to be once again trying to bypass the democratic process in order to impose ruthless repression online. Commissioner De Gucht cannot ignore the decision of the EU Parliament on ACTA. CETA must be cancelled altogether (or its repressive ACTA parts must be scrapped), or face the same fate as ACTA in the Parliament.

07.10.12

Links 10/7/2012: Thunderbird Put to Rest, Catchup with Free/Open Source News

Posted in News Roundup at 9:03 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • The Higgs Boson: Another Feather in Linux’s Cap

    CERN has “played a major role in bringing together scientific technologies and know-how regarding Linux in their Scientific Linux project, which acts as a clone and extension of Red Hat Enterprise Linux,” noted Slashdot blogger Chris Travers. “This goes *way* beyond the normal high performance computing usage of Linux. CERN is in the forefront of bringing Linux to the scientific community.”

  • FixMeStick gets a virus-infected PC up and running again

    FixMeStick is a USB flash drive with a rudimentary version of Linux and a set of malware-removal tools. Insert it into a Windows-based PC infected with viruses or spyware and you’re able to boot from the basic OS on the drive. It will then scan your PC and attempt to remove the malicious code so your PC is functional again.

  • Linux Credit Where Due

    I read an article on ZDNET. You can read it for yourself here. The Author was raising the point about companies who release Linux based services but fail to even mention Linux or their services’ heritage and what provides the actual base for their service. The Author points the finger specifically at Google’s Android and Canonical’s Ubuntu. I just want to extend on the Authors’ thoughts a little more.

  • Desktop

    • Google’s launches new Chromebox and Chromebooks

      Google has announced the launch of new Chromebook laptops and a new Chromebox desktop running version 19 of Chrome OS, a major software update to the minimalist Linux-based operating system built around the Chrome web browser. Chrome OS, the proprietary version of the open source Chromium OS, is designed primarily for accessing the web and cloud applications such as the company’s Google Apps web-based productivity suite. According to Google, the new devices and version of the OS represent “the next step”.

    • WOW! Computer for Seniors

      In fact, the company is so proud of their product they sell it at a premium price. That is justifiable because of the huge touch-screen, the freedom from worry about software updated and viruses and the great ease of use. It’s still a small computer, though, an all-in-one. No big box at all, and with fewer cables.

  • Server

    • M$ Promotes GNU/Linux By Shipping Cripple-ware For Servers

      Isnt’t that a laugh? M$’s charges more money in relation to how much of your own IT you can use? Do we have parking meters in our garages? Do we have coin-slots on our refrigerators? Do we pay to use our tools? Those are silly concepts. So is that other OS in IT.

  • Audiocasts/Shows

    • Audio: Dan Risacher talks open source

      Dan Risacher, a self-styled “policy wonk” in the directorate for enterprise services and integration under the office of the Department of Defense Chief Information Officer and open source advocate, spoke May 24 before Mil-OSS LANT, a military open source adoption conference.

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

  • Distributions

    • Zorin OS 6
    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • PCLinuxOS KDE 2012.2: Pretty and solid distro

        I have heard a lot of good things of PCLinuxOS and yesterday, finally I decided to try it out. I downloaded the stable version 2012.2 (KDE) from the PCLinux FTP. The ISO is about 690 MB and I booted it up in my VirtualBox. The initial liveCD boot was easy, it asked a couple of questions on my keyboard and location and finally landed on the desktop.

      • Mandriva divides itself once again

        As Mandriva SA plans its future roadmap, the company will be taking a unique and bold step with its commercial offerings: using and participating in two separate upstreams for its product lines.

        According to CEO Jean-Manual Croset and Director of Community Charles Schulz, the Mandriva server products will be based on the Mageia distribution of Linux, while desktop and OEM products will be based on the historical Mandriva Linux distro.

      • Mandriva for Desktop, Mageia for Servers

        The heads of Mandriva SA have decided to base upcoming server versions of Mandriva on Mageia, the community run Mandriva fork

    • Gentoo Family

      • 2012 Gentoo Screenshot Contest is On

        Every year members of the Gentoo project hold their annual Gentoo screenshot contest, and it’s that time of year again right now. And just as the name implies, it is indeed a contest for the prettiest, coolest, or whatever-vague-criteria-is-used-but-isn’t-published-anywhere Gentoo desktop setup. All you need is a Gentoo install and an Internet connection to win.

    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Tails 0.12.1 Screenshots (07/08/2012)
        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • 64-bit ARM support for Linux AArch64

            ARM employee Catalin Marinas has released a set of 36 patches that will extend the Linux kernel to provide support for ARM’s AArch64 64-bit architecture. This 64-bit ARM support will be provided by the ARMv8 instruction set, which was announced in the autumn of 2011 and is expected to be first used in processors in 2014.

          • Must-Have Missing Features in Ubuntu

            I feel a certain kinship with newer Linux converts. Switching to Linux on the desktop is definitely a unique experience that many of us tend to forget. For instance, the need to stop and think about where a tool’s located can be challenging for newbies.

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

  • Open source’s unlikely enemy: Your procurement rules

    Your procurement rules have gradually built up as you’ve played the procurement game with your suppliers. At its rawest, the vendors’ game is a chase to obtain as large a share of your IT budget as possible, preferably locked-in so that it becomes recurring revenue, while exposing themselves to the least cost and risk possible. Your suppliers’ tools of choice are proprietary software, proprietary data formats, and as much complexity as can be slathered into the solution.

  • Intel says open source fundamental to its cloud growth
  • NYSE Relies on Open Source for Growth

    The announcement by NYSE Technologies, the commercial technology division of NYSE Euronext, that it is expanding the terms of its partnership with the Warsaw Stock Exchange, illustrates how the exchange company expects to significantly increase revenue by commercializing its own technology.

  • Puppet Partners with EMC on Open Source Razor

    The open source Puppet configuration management system is widely used to get software onto servers. Now the developers behind Puppet are going a step further, taking aim at bare metal provisioning in an open source effort with EMC called Razor.

  • Open-source attitude in the internet era

    The term ‘open source’ comes from computer programming. It refers to a computer program that isn’t owned by any company and is freely available to the general public. Microsoft Word, by contrast, is ‘closed source’ — the Microsoft Corporation owns the code for its software and will never make it available or give it away for free.

    A little-known program called Open Office is a freely available alternative to Microsoft Office with many of the same features. A loose group of programmers around the world created Open Office and constantly tinkers with it to make it better. They do this for free with no benefit besides the pleasure of providing a useful service for anonymous users.

  • Monetizing Open Source with Fairware: Interview with Virgil Dupras

    There has been a long standing belief (or perhaps more accurately, fear), that developers who chose to release the source code for their software under a free and open license can’t turn their project into a viable source of income.

    It’s not hard to see how this negative connotation has developed. Those who may not be well versed in the various free and open licenses may believe that they are literally prohibited from charging for their software. Others may fall victim to the failed logic that, if the source is freely available, people won’t pay for the convenience of a binary build.

  • Filmmaker to attempt year of Open Source Everything

    On August 1st, Berlin-based filmmaker Sam Muirhead is abandoning all copyrighted products and switching to Open Source software, hardware, and services for one year, as the subject of his own series of online documentary videos.

  • DHS Sponsorship Boosts Open-Source Security Engine

    Network security companies looking for an open-source-based intrusion detection and prevention engine have a next-generation tool that can be incorporated into their existing or new offerings: Check out the latest beta of the Open Information Security Foundation’s (OISF) Suricata Engine.

  • Google scraps — and shares — Web-based collab coding tool

    Collide, which lets multiple programmers tap into a software development project, is open-source software now that Google has cast it off. One project member hopes it’ll inspire related projects.

  • From accountancy, to e-accountancy, to lion taming

    Electronic business has many levels. No surprise then that e-business (or e-commerce if you prefer) is served by e-accounting, which itself comprises of e-payments and (before that) e-invoicing… and every other level of e-accounting if you have the stomach for an endless stream of new-age e- prefixes.

  • Open-Source Science: The New Norm

    The discovery of the Higgs boson is of course a monumental achievement. But also noteworthy is how the physics community has evolved to get things done – and what this trajectory suggests for other scientific fields and fast-changing industries.

  • Google Collide Dims Hope For Brightly IDE

    Google has been developing a Web-based editor for computer code–what’s known as an integrated development environment, or IDE–for several years now. Mark S. Miller, an engineer for the company, revealed the existence of the project, known as Brightly, in a post to a mailing list in November 2010 about Google’s Dart programming language.

  • Events

  • Mozilla

    • Thunderfork: Canonical’s Chance To Expand Its Ecosystem With Thunderbird

      With the recent news that Mozilla will no longer be innovating with new versions of Thunderbird, many Ubuntu users might be left wondering what this will mean for their favorite distribution’s default suite of software. In fact, it seems like Canonical has had it’s hands full over the last two years trying to find a winning combination. Canonical has thrown it’s hands up in the air before and changed default software on a whim, most famously switching from enterprise friendly Evolution to user-friendly and mainstream Thunderbird. Also, it chose to abandon the stellar Banshee player in favor of the more homely and less feature-rich Rhythmbox.

    • Mozilla is Wrong. There is Still Room for Open Source Thunderbird Innovation

      Mozilla’s current success is born out of a decision made over a decade ago to split up the Mozilla Browser Suite. The original Mozilla Browser (now continued in SeaMonkey) has both email and browser which was split out into separate projects: Thunderbird and Firefox.

    • Mozilla Puts the Brakes on Thunderbird
  • SaaS

  • Databases

    • Why MongoDB? It’s the developers, stupid

      Increasingly the third standard within enterprises for databases, MongoDB, has been claiming a lot of victories lately. In relative terms, it has become the second-hottest skill to have on one’s resume, right after HTML5, according to Indeed.com job trend data. And despite plenty of hating on its technology, with one person telling me recently that “it sets database technology back 25 years,” MongoDB continues to get deployed for numerous, large mission-critical applications.

    • MySQL’s growing NoSQL problem

      Just a few short years ago, MySQL was the undisputed king of the open-source database hill. But with the NoSQL market emerging at an 82 per cent compound annual growth rate (CAGR), it’s looking like MySQL may get bulldozed by its NoSQL peers.

      While this shift toward NoSQL provides an interesting commentary on where the industry is heading, it’s even more instructive about the frenetic pace of innovation that open source is driving.

  • CMS

  • Education

  • Business

    • PEPPOL now available through Open Source; installed in only a few hours

      We all know that PEPPOL focuses on e-procurement, but it is no secret that pan-European adoption of e-invoicing is also high on the project’s agenda. The technological PEPPOL developments have taken another step towards this goal. And this all thanks to Norwegian SendRegning.

    • Zurmo Releases Beta Open Source CRM Application

      Under development for the past 19 months, Zurmo is the brainchild of McKay, cofounder Ray Stoeckicht, and Jason Green, cofounder and lead architect, who are all part of the leadership team at Intelestream, an open source enterprise applications developer and professional services firm.

    • Zurmo open source CRM app pins its hopes on gamification

      Company hopes gamification principles in its CRM application, now in beta, will make it stand out and better engage users

    • Zurmo Gamified Open Source CRM Releases Beta Version
    • Open Source Open Days from Sirius

      Sirius is launching an Open Source Open Day programme to educate Government, Public Sector and business organisations on how to get the most benefit from using Open Source software within their technology infrastructure.

      With the UK in double-dip recession, no let-up in the Government drive for austerity, and the old-fashioned idea of economic growth making a comeback, Western economies have much to learn from the BRICS in utilising Open Source to combine public austerity with private growth. Extensive usage of Open Source is a signature of those economies which are thriving despite the global downturn and contrast markedly with the malaise throughout European economies.

  • Funding

  • Project Releases

    • Piwik web analytics now with Do Not Track by default

      The developers of the open source web analytics engine Piwik have released versions 1.8 and 1.8.1 of their software. Version 1.8 brings several key improvements to the user interface and introduces Do Not Track (DNT) support. The 1.8 release is also rated as a critical update after a security review identified a “limited” XSS vulnerability, a cookie denial of service vulnerability and a local file inclusion vulnerability. The Piwik developers recommend updating to the latest version as soon as possible, with the latest version being 1.8.1, released a few days after 1.8 after a number of regressions were found.

    • Transmission BitTorrent client supports Retina display

      In the latest major update to their open source BitTorrent client, the developers at the Transmission Project have mainly focused on enhancements that affect Mac users. The 2.60 release of the peer-to-peer file sharing client adds support for the new Retina display (HiDPI) in Apple’s latest MacBook Pro laptop and is, the developers say, now ready for the Gatekeeper security feature in Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, which is expected to arrive later this month.

    • FFmpeg adds Blu-ray and ProRes support

      The FFmpeg developers have announced the first major update to the open source audio and video codecs package since January. FFmpeg 0.11, code-named “Happiness”, includes several new encoders and decoders for additional video formats including Blu-ray and Apple’s ProRes. A significant number of bugs have also been fixed.

    • New Nmap probes IPv6 networks
    • Open source initiatives in Spain
  • Public Services/Government

    • Open-Source R software driving Big Data analytics in government

      As government agencies and departments expand their capabilities for collecting information, the volume and complexity of digital data stored for public purposes is far outstripping departments’ ability to make sense of it all. Even worse, with data siloed within individual departments and little cross-agency collaboration, untold hours and dollars are being spent on data collection and storage with return on investment in the form of information-based products and services for the public good.

    • Pentagon releases open-source health record software
    • DoD official: Open source memo doesn’t mandate a support vendor

      The October 2009 memo on Defense Department use of open source software may have inadvertently created an additional roadblock to it, said attendees of a conference on military use of open source.

      The October 2009 memo (.pdf), widely seen as a landmark for its assertion that open source software qualifies as a “commercial item” under federal and Defense acquisition policy definition of the term (and so removing a previous barrier to is wider use), also stipulated that program managers before using open source software must “ensure that the plan for software support…is adequate for mission need.”

    • R is ready for big data
    • Government open source foundation needs to happen

      Talk within the Defense Department of creating a government open source foundation hopefully will become reality despite the climate of budget austerity that might prevent its formation.

    • Metadata plan should ease EU open source projects

      The European Commission wants to improve its free and open-source software repository system using an enhanced metadata specification meant to help E.U. countries exchange more information about their free and open-source software projects.

    • Proposal Aims to Improve EU Software Repository System

      The European Commission wants to improve its free and open-source software repository system using an enhanced metadata specification meant to help E.U. countries exchange more information about their free and open-source software projects.

    • Why there’s no quick fix to get open source into government
  • Licensing

    • NHS Hack Day brings open source to UK Health Service

      The first NHS Hack Day has highlighted applications which could help the UK’s National Health Service provide better, more customisable services for people. The event was won by a group who developed an electronic patient task list for doctors.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Open source powers big data index

      Avination Virtual Limited announced today that it has released code for llCastRay to the open source OpenSimulator project, as promised at Linux Day in Berlin last month.

    • Open-source ski films?

      If you’ve ever watched ski or snowboard films and thought “I could do that”, Teton Gravity Research (TGR) have now given you the perfect excuse to prove it. They’ve put up a $100,000 cash prize for the best segment submitted to TetonGravity.com during the 2012/13 season.

    • Loughborough professor calls for ‘open-source banking’

      The future of the UK economy depends on the switch to ‘open-source banking’, according to Alistair Milne, Professor of Financial Economics at Loughborough University.

      Speaking at today’s launch of the Loughborough University Centre for Post-Crisis Finance, which is part of the School of Business and Economics, Professor Milne advocated radical change in the structure and process of banking, defining ‘open-source banking’ as having open access to banking information and systems.

    • Open Data

      • TomTom’s Not A Fan Of Open Source Street Maps

        TomTom makes its money from navigation solutions, so it’s not a huge surprise that it’s not terribly fond of open source maps on a general level. It has been accused, however, of overstating the error potential in competing open source map sources as part of a blog post discrediting them.

      • TomTom launches assault on open mapping data

        Satnav manufacturer TomTom has written an article strongly criticising cartographical open data projects like OpenStreetMap for their “accuracy and reliability”.

        “Open source mapping has really come into the limelight in the past few years, and many businesses have started to experiment with its use in industry,” says TomTom on its website. “The limelight, however, brings with it closer scrutiny, and recent reports on the accuracy and reliability of open source maps make for uncomfortable reading.”

    • Open Access/Content

      • Scientific Journal Offers Flat Fee to Authors for ‘All You Can Publish’
      • Journal offers flat fee for ‘all you can publish’

        Science-publishing ventures continually battle for market space, yet most operate on one of only two basic business models. Either subscribers pay for access, or authors pay for each publication — often thousands of dollars — with access being free. But in what publishing experts say is a radical experiment, an open-access venture called PeerJ, which formally announced its launch on 12 June, is carving out a fresh niche. It is asking its authors for only a one-off fee to secure a lifetime membership that will allow them to publish free, peer-reviewed research papers.

    • Open Hardware

  • Standards/Consortia

Leftovers

  • The Cloud of Lowered Expectations

    Alas, I’m not surprised that the customers of the various services will view this as “business as usual.” We’ve all become accustomed to the idea that web sites go down, emails go astray, computers fail, and in general Internet services are mostly available.

    Many years ago, I worked for a short while on telephone switching systems. Those were the days of Ma Bell, and Ma was very demanding. As I recall, switching systems were required to have a Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF) of ten years, and a Mean Time To Repair (MTTR) of thirty minutes. It wasn’t easy, but those specifications were met…and rare indeed was the occasion when you picked up a telephone and were met with total silence. (Telephone offices typically had 48 hours of backup power.)

  • Finance

    • Wall Street Employees Lose $2 Billion in 401(k) Bet on Own Firms

      Wall Street employees, who dispense financial advice to individuals and companies, aren’t following a basic investing tenet with their own money: diversification.

      Workers at the five largest Wall Street banks saw the value of company stock in their 401(k) accounts, sometimes the biggest holding of those plans, decline more than $2 billion last year, according to annual filings. Those losses don’t include shares received as bonuses.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • Criminal Tax Penalties for ALEC? CMD’s Investigation Provides Facts for Powerful New Complaint by Former IRS Official

      This month, a former leader of the Internal Revenue Service filed a complaint that the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) has violated the terms of its nonprofit status by operating primarily for the private benefit of its corporate members, based on documents and research from the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD), which manages PRWatch, ALECexposed, and SourceWatch. The complaint, which also alleges that ALEC misrepresented itself in tax filings, raises additional allegations beyond those in earlier IRS complaints filed by Common Cause.

  • Privacy

  • Civil Rights

  • DRM

    • The DRM graveyard part 2: A brief history of digital rights management in video and TV

      A few months ago, we outlined a few of the major moments in the history of digital rights management (DRM) in the music industry. This time, we’re talking about TV, video, and the events in the ongoing fight over copying. We’re still calling it the “DRM graveyard”–but as you’ll see, the failures that DRM has seen in the music world aren’t quite yet as plentiful when it comes to video.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Monsanto Guilty! France convicts big ag firm of chemical poisoning
    • The Java IP Story

      Every year, I teach the AMOS class, a lab course on “Agile Methods and Open Source” that combines lectures with a real software project that ideally turns into a startup (see the AMOS Project concept, in German). To explain open source, I have to introduce students to intellectual property rights, of which most have been blissfully unaware of until then. Nothing teaches concepts better than a colorful story, and so I have been using the IP strategies around Java to make this dry topic come alive. For fun, comments, and corrections, I’m providing the short version of my talk below, including commentary. (You can also download a PDF version of the talk, licensed as CC-BY 3.0. If you find this useful for teaching, please tell me.) Students at this point have a basic working understanding of intellectual property and exclusion rights. Please let me know what you think! Finally, IANAL.

    • Copyrights

      • EU does an 1812 on US software companies

        In a move that scares the pants off of online software distribution such as Steam, the Court Of Justice of the European Union has just ruled that people should be able to resell downloaded games.
        While this does not effect the Land of the Free, where its French-backed Junta wants its people to pay many times for software they own.
        However, the ruling means that what it might say in the EULAs you are allowed to sell your old software. Steam, Origin, and GamersGate will now have their work cut out trying to work out a way to restore some rights to those who buy software online.

07.09.12

Links 9/7/2012: Linux 3.5 RC 6, Ex-Nokia Staff Resurrects MeeGo

Posted in News Roundup at 5:42 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Softpedia Linux Weekly, Issue 207
  • How to move from Windows to Linux?

    Some background: I have 10+ years of programming experience on Windows (almost exclusively C/C++, but some .NET as well), I was a user of FreeBSD at home for about 3 years or so (then had to go back to Windows), and I’ve never had much luck with Linux. And now I have to develop software for Linux. I need a plan.

    On Windows, you can get away with just knowing a programming language, an API you’re coding against, your IDE (VisualStudio) and some very basic tools for troubleshooting (Depends, ProcessExplorer, DebugView, WinDbg). Everything else comes naturally.

    On Linux, it’s a very different story. How the hell would I know what DLL (sorry, Shared Object) would load, if I link to it from Firefox plugin? What’s the Linux equivalent of inserting __asm int 3/DebugBreak() in the source and running the program, and then letting the OS call a debugger? Why do release builds use something, called appLoader, while debug builds work somehow different? Worst of all: How to provision Linux development environment?

  • A Linux computer for grandpa and grandma

    Tired of playing tech support for your older, less computer savvy relatives? Then you may want to consider getting them a Linux-powered WOW! Computer.

  • Desktop

    • Dell seeks Linux fans to try cut-price Ubuntu Ultrabook

      Dell is tempting Linux developers with the promise of a cut-price XPS 13 Ultrabook running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.

    • How to Get One Of Dell’s Linux-Based Developer Laptops And Become A Sputnik Beta Cosmonaut

      Dell has a skunks works project underway to offer a Linux-based laptop made for developers. Dubbed “Project Sputnik,” the effort has started to gain some traction.

      As part of its development, Dell has launched a beta program called the Sputnik Beta Cosmonaut program. Selected participants will receive the Dell XPS 13 Ultrabook with Ubuntu 12.04LTS pre-loaded at a discounted price.

      Project Sputnik signals Dell’s changing focus to offer open-source technology that it can integrate into its servers, storage and networking offerings and solutions.

  • Kernel Space

    • ARM Delivers 64-bit ARMv8 Linux Kernel Support (AArch64)

      ARM has today posted their set of patches that implements core Linux kernel support for AArch64, the ARM 64-bit architecture.

    • Intel Implements CMS MSAA For Ivy Bridge Driver

      The latest noteworthy patch-set coming out of the Intel Open-Source Technology Center is Mesa support for CMS MSAA for Ivy Bridge hardware.

    • Valve Software Finds Bugs With Linux Kernel

      As Valve Software’s Linux efforts continue to advance, they uncover Linux bugs. Fortunately, at least one Valve-spotted Linux kernel bug has now been corrected by NVIDIA.

      As mentioned back in March, Valve’s encountered OpenGL Linux performance problems. Those problems haven’t been for the open-source Mesa/Gallium3D drivers that are riddled with issues and incomplete functionality, but with the proprietary AMD and NVIDIA Linux drivers. I haven’t checked recently but I hope those performance issues are now worked out with the latest upstream binary blobs. I would assume those OpenGL performance problems have been worked out with Valve Software showing their Linux client to partners. Aside from Linux OpenGL, Valve is now evidently uncovering non-graphics related problems.

    • Proposal: A DRM SoC Framework
    • Linux 3.5-rc6
    • Download Linux Kernel 3.5 Release Candidate 6

      Linus Torvalds announced yesterday, July 7th, that the sixth Release Candidate of the upcoming Linux 3.5 kernel is now available for download and testing.

    • Linux leap second issues being fixed: developer

      Fixes are being readied to fix the problem in Linux that caused problems when an extra second was added to clocks at the end of June, according to a senior kernel developer.

    • Graphics Stack

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • E17 heading towards a Stable Release – No Really!

      I’ve been pushing the Enlightenment desktop for some time now and for as long as I’ve been promoting it I’ve also been warning folks that it is under heavy development. Well folks – Duke Nuke’em Forever might have beat them to a release, but E team is prepping for a major (stable!) release themselves.

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • Akademy 2012 Impressions

        Almost all communication between KDE community members happens online, and includes people from all around the world. At Akademy, KDE people meet each other and work together in person. Virtual communication is necessary and valuable for day-to-day work; working face-to-face is much more effective. And Akademy provides much more than that.

      • Calling on the KDE Community to Celebrate: 4.9 Release Parties

        The date for the release of the next milestone in KDE’s 4.x series is quickly approaching. Developers, testers and bug chasers have been busy putting the final touches on the latest version of our software, so it is once again time to get together and celebrate our community’s accomplishment.

      • KDE: Rely on Qt, protect Qt’s freedom, contribute to it

        The KDE community is one of the largest and most influential Free Software communities world-wide with thousands of volunteer contributors and countless users. Most of the software written by KDE is based on the Qt toolkit. With the recent strategy changes within Nokia—the largest contributor to Qt, there is uncertainty about the future of Qt that concerns KDE. This is the position of the KDE community regarding the future of Qt…

      • Pandora: Managing Your Season of KDE Participation

        If, unfortunately, you did not get selected for GsoC, SoK offers a great opportunity to started and work on an open source project and win yourself a KDE t-shirt and certificate.

        What if there is a tool which makes it easier to manage and organize your participation on SoK? Sayak Banaerjee, a KDE developer, has created an app called “KDE Students Program”, code named Pandora, which does exactly that. The app will be soon available on season.kde.org.

      • Dolphin 2.1 and beyond

        You have probably heard last week that Peter stepped down as Dolphin maintainer. I would like to thank him for the good collaboration that we had during the last years. It was a great pleasure to work with him, and I think that his departure is a big loss for KDE.

        He entrusted the future maintenance of Dolphin to me, so I will do my best to keep it in good shape. I think that ease of use and stability are what users appreciate most about Dolphin, and I want to make sure that it stays that way.

    • GNOME Desktop

  • Distributions

    • Archbang 2012.07.02 Screenshots (07/05/2012)
    • Zorin 6 Review

      It’s been a long while since Linux distros have tried to emulate the look and feel of Windows. Most distributions thought it would be the best way to get Windows users who are fed up with the constant virus and malware threats to switch to Linux and it has not been a successful run back in the day with Linspire and Xandros closing up shop a long time ago.

    • Doudou 1.2: A Linux 4 Kids | Review

      Doudou is a French Debian based distro for kids 2-12 years old and a quite popular actually. Few days ago they released version 1.2 and I thought to have a quick look at it.

      I’ll be totally honest. Doudou looks very promising and is really useful distro, but.. but it suffers from old school Linux developing attitude. What’s that? It’s handy made.

      Developers just packed lots of software in a poor environment and the only modern thing here is the GCompris platform. They say that target up to 12 years old kids. Oh well, my opinion, do not gift this to a 12 years old kid, he will hate you. You better buy him a barbie ;)

    • Zorin OS 6 Multimedia Edition Released

      The Zorin Group has released the latest version of Zorin OS which is optimized for multimedia consumption, creation and editing. The team recently released Zorin OS for Home and Business users.

    • New Releases

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Gears up for 2013 Release

        RHEL 6 was officially released in November of 2010, and with Red Hat Enterprise Linux receiving a major update approximately every two years, RHEL 7 is due to be released sometime in 2013.

        Tim Burke, vice-president of Linux Engineering at Red Hat, noted that key themes for RHEL 7 will include data center operational efficiency, virtualization and cloud enhancements as well as advancements in the integrated developers’ tools.

      • Red Hat moves app development to the cloud

        Open-source software developer Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) has introduced its JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 6, a cloud-based platform-as-a-service (PaaS) offering designed to help enterprises and their developers decrease speed application delivery.

        Red Hat’s new platform lets enterprises move application development and deployment to the cloud without the need to diverge from open industry standards, according to the company. It can be deployed in on-premise, private and public clouds to suit the needs of enterprises in various stages of cloud migration.

      • 2012 Red Hat Summit: RHEL Roadmap, Intel, Etc

        2012 Red Hat Summit: RHEL Roadmap, Intel, Etc
        This news is a few days tardy, but the videos from the 2012 Red Hat Summit are now available.

      • Red Hat Introduces Comprehensive Open Hybrid Cloud Solutions Portfolio
      • Red Hat’s journey through the “land of the giants”

        Open source provider Red Hat claims it is gaining traction in the New Zealand market.
        Red Hat credits this in part to the establishment of a presence here with the opening of an office in Auckland in April, 2011.

        But with last month’s global rollouts of JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 6, and upgrades to its JBoss Data Grid and Enterprise Business Rules Management System, the company sees itself in a better position to compete for business with middleware ISVs, systems integrators and resellers.

        “Traditionally, organisations have looked to IBM and Oracle for this, and we’ve struggled to gain legitimacy because we lacked a presence and a track record,” says Max McLaren, Red Hat’s MD for Australia and New Zealand.

    • Debian Family

      • DebConf Managua 2012 Begins Tomorrow

        DebConf 2012, this year’s Debian event, will begin on Sunday and run through next week.

        DebConf 2012 is being hosted in Managua, Nicaragua at the Universidad Centroamericana.

      • Debian Working On Inclusion In FSF Recommended Distributions List

        Debian project leader, Stefano Zacchiroli, has announced his plans to get Debian added to the list of FSF approved free software distributions.

        Zacchiroli explains the reason Debian is not listed in the FSF approved list, “Historically, one of the main argument to exclude Debian from the free-distro list (argument we have share with essentially all other popular distros) has been non-free firmware in main. This argument has become moot since the early days of Squeeze development (early 2010).”

      • Derivatives

        • 3 Things You’ll Love in the New Knoppix Live Linux Distro

          Experienced Linux users would know that when a Linux system initializes, it starts a lot of services, some of which are either unnecessary or not needed immediately (printing, for instance). So unless you know how to turn them off, it can be very frustrating to wait for the Linux desktop to fully load and become usable.

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu Still Aims For Wayland System Compositor

            While there’s still more than one month until the Ubuntu 12.10 feature freeze, Canonical/Ubuntu developers continue to work towards their concept of having Wayland serve as a system compositor for this next Ubuntu Linux release due out in October, but will they make it?

          • The Good And Bad Lessons Ubuntu Taught Me About Linux And Windows

            A long-time Windows user and an avid gamer, I never felt the need to install Linux on any of my systems. That was until I required a server box to handle automated build compilation, source control and backups for my programming work. The idea of buying another copy of Windows for a machine I’d never be in front of seemed ludicrous and so a copy of Ubuntu was installed instead. Having used Windows and Linux side-by-side for almost a year has given me an entirely new perspective on both operating systems.

          • Ubuntu Cloud Mirrors Now Globally Available
          • Flavours and Variants

            • Scrappy doo. Lucid has puppy powers

              For those who have been following you will know that I have recently embarked on a three part review of Puppy Linux. For those who haven’t been following, I have recently embarked on a three part review of Puppy Linux.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Raspberry Pi Modded To Play Super Nintendo Games

      PetRockBlog founder Florian has found a cool way to play with his new credit-card-sized Raspberry Pi PC: turn it into a universal gaming console.

    • Phones

      • Ex-Nokia staff to build MeeGo-based smartphones

        A group of ex-Nokia staff and MeeGo enthusiasts has formed Jolla (Finnish for “dinghy”), a mobile startup with the aim of bringing new MeeGo devices to the market. According to its LinkedIn page, Jolla consists of “directors and core professionals from Nokia’s MeeGo N9 organization, together with some of the best minds working on MeeGo in the communities.”

      • Startup Brings Nokia MeeGo Back to Life

        Nokia’s MeeGo software, which was dropped by the company in favor of Microsoft’s Windows Phone, is to live again after a group of former Nokia employees have set up a company to use the Linux-based mobile operating system.

      • MeeGo Resurrected: Linux Mobile Makes Comeback

        Just last week, it was announced that Nokia’s MeeGo team—the same team responsible for the revered OS used on the N9—walked away from the company. Although everyone has stayed hush on the matter, it is believed Nokia’s 10,000 job cuts had something to do with it.

        But it’s not that easy walking away from a labour of love. Those unfamiliar with MeeGo should know it’s built upon Linux, a programming language that is free and can be used by anyone with the skillset, ultimately promoting innovation before financial gain. That’s why most of the Nokia team have gone into business for themselves, creating a company called Jolla to continue bringing MeeGo powered devices to the market.

      • Ex-Nokia guys start mystery company to build Linux-based phones

        A six-man group of open-source diehards from Nokia have teamed up to form Jolla Mobile, a company focused on building phones using the Linux-based MeeGo operating system.

      • Android

        • Amazon Said to Plan Smartphone to Vie With Apple IPhone

          Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN) is developing a smartphone that would vie with Apple Inc. (AAPL)’s iPhone and handheld devices that run Google Inc. (GOOG)’s Android operating system, two people with knowledge of the matter said.

        • Hooray! Google Now Gets Ported From Jelly Bean To Ice Cream Sandwich

          Good news, Android fans. A developer over on the forever awesome XDA Developers forums has figured out how to extract Google Now from Android Jelly Bean and port it over to devices running Ice Cream Sandwich. The process for doing so requires a slightly geeky skill set, of course. You have to have a rooted device and you’ll need to be comfortable navigating through the Android file system, for starters. But assuming that’s you, then you can be among the first to try Google Now in (nearly) all its glory.

          In case you’re wondering what the big fuss is about, Google Now is only the most innovative, futuristic, and even downright creepy updates to Google’s search service ever to come. Instead of presenting a blank box where you type in text and hit enter, Google Now flips the search paradigm on its head. It alerts you to things you’ll want to know about before you search for them. Yes, really. Billed as a smart personal assistant to rival Apple’s Siri, Google Now comes pre-loaded on Android 4.1 Jelly Bean devices (the most recent version of Android, introduced at Google I/O), and proactively alerts you to things like weather changes, flight times and delays, sports scores, interesting places near you where you might like to eat, shop or visit, and more.

        • Friday Poll: Will you buy Android now or wait for iPhone 5?
        • Samsung Releases Source Code For Sprint Galaxy S III
    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Archos Launches $250 9-Inch Elements Tablet

        Archos is creating some stiff competition for Amazon’s Kindle Fire. The company has announced its 9-inch tablet for US$250 to compete with Amazon’s Kindle Fire.

        If compared with Amazon Kindle Fire, Archos has an edge in almost every department:

        - It allows users to access the Google Play Store which has more than 600,000 apps compared to Amazon’s smaller profile. Amazon blocks access to Google Play Store.
        - Amazon Kindle Fire has only 8GB internal storage with only 6GB for content. On the contrary Archos Carbon has 16GB of internal memory with SD card support so you can keep all your music, movies and games without worry.
        - 9-inch (1280×786) display as compared to 7-inch screen of Kindle Fire.

      • Nexus 7 review
      • Multiple Kindle Fire successors due, including a 4G LTE model

Free Software/Open Source

  • Essential Open Source Tools for Web Developers
  • Beliefs and Misbeliefs about Open Source Software

    What does “open source” mean? With open source software being so prevalent in our lives (Android, WordPress, Mozilla Firefox are almost fixtures), you would think that it would be simple enough to find somebody who can explain the term around here. A quick survey around the office turned out dismal results, however. A fellow intern told me “open source software” simply meant that the source code is open for view; another insisted that it means the software is free to use. I personally had the impression that it meant the code was crowd sourced and created by volunteer developers–the idea was immediately shot down by the other two. So what, really, does “open source” mean?

  • Colectica Releases Open Source Blaise to DDI Metadata Converter
  • Rethinking the social network: 3 open-source alternatives to Facebook

    Despite being still in the testing stages, Diaspora* is arguably the most well-known distributed social network at the moment. The brainchild of four NYU students, Dan Grippi, Maxwell Salzberg, Raphael Sofaer and Ilya Zhitomirskiy, the project was able to fundraise over $200, 000 in 2010 through Kickstarter (Mark Zuckerberg was a donor). The code is open-source and hosted on Github, where it is worked on by volunteer developers. In Diaspora*, users set up a personalized server, termed “pods”, using the Diaspora* software. This server can then be used to port content from

  • NASA needs open source framework

    Despite some well-known open source projects undertaken by NASA, the space agency lacks a framework for understanding the use and production of open source software at the agency level, say a clutch of computer programmers and technologists.

    In an article published earlier this spring by IT Professional, information technology professionals led by Chris Mattmann, a senior computer scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, say that when they tried to open source a JPL project, they “entered uncharted territory.”

  • TEDGlobal 2012: ‘The more you give away the more you get back’

    First there was “open” – open source, open tech, open journalism. And now? Prepare yourself for “radical openness”.

  • Open Source Awards open for entries

    Sponsored by companies in the local open source community, the awards have been running since 2007. They “work to raise awareness of the free and open source advantage for New Zealand by telling powerful success stories based on real achievements that are already making a difference for our country,” say organisers on the awards website.

    Award categories recognise outstanding use of free open-source software in the public sector, the private sector, education, the arts and social services – including charities and community organisations.

  • In defence of open source

    he Internet world changes quickly. Open source, the practice of promoting free redistribution and access to an end product’s implementation, was little known and often unpopular.

  • Lockheed Upgrades Joint ISR System With Free Open-Source Software
  • How important is the source in Open Source

    The use of open source in trading systems is at an interesting stage. Financial markets participants are now starting to look at open technologies for financial markets, particularly those targeted at trading, to supplement the general open source systems they are already using, such as Linux, Apache and MQ systems.

  • Open source middleware protects and maintains CERN collider
  • Events

    • The Linux Foundation’s LinuxCon, CloudOpen Conferences are Approaching

      If you’re looking for a good way to close out the summer on a high note, keep in mind that the LinuxCon and CloudOpen conferences are taking place together in San Diego, Calif., August 29-31. And, The Linux Foundation has finalized the complete programs and keynote confirmations for the events. Here are the details on what looks like a good time if you’re into Linux and the cloud.

    • Open Source: OSS Leads new Software Innovation

      Open Source software continues to grow in terms of acceptance. In fact, it has become the leader in software segments like cloud computing, mobile applications and enterprise mobility. That’s based on a survey sponsored by North Bridge Venture partners and conducted by Black Duck Software and the 451 Group.

    • Linux.conf.au 2013 Extends Deadline For Papers

      The deadline for submitting paper proposals for Linux.conf.au 2013 in Canberra was originally supposed to be last Friday, but has now been extended by a fortnight. Am I bitter that I set aside time to make sure I submitted my proposal before the deadline? No. (Grinds teeth.)

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Essential Firefox Extensions
      • Extensions…? Here’s a few some missed.

        Recently, LXer carried a story that highlighted several Firefox extensions that are a “must have” for any browsing experience. While there were a few in that list that I find newly-useful, it was lacking in some basic extensions that make life ever-so-much-easier for computer commandos.

        There is a set of extensions we add to every Reglue computer we place and I have trouble understanding why they didn’t make this list. Here are a few of them that should have made the cut. I’m sure that you are aware of most of them but I put them here to be passed along to your less savvy friends,

      • Mozilla To Shaft Thunderbird Next Week

        Mozilla will be announcing Monday that they will be basically stripping away their resources towards the advancement of the Thunderbird e-mail client.

      • So, That’s It For Thunderbird

        Mozilla is not “stopping” Thunderbird development, it has just decided that: “continued innovation on Thunderbird is not the best use of our resources given our ambitious organizational goals.” And it’s pulling people off the project. But it’s not stopping? Right.

        This, according to a letter shared with “Mozillians” ahead of the official announcement to be revealed on Monday. Recipients were asked not to share the letter, blog or tweet about the news until then, but obviously someone out there didn’t agree with that plan.

      • Mozilla Foundation and EFF join hunt for Syrian open source developer

        The open source community and human rights organizations have joined forces to find a software developer who has been missing for months following the recent civil unrest in Syria.

        Bassel Khartabil, a 31-year-old computer engineer, was the project leader of Aiki Framework, an open source tool for building web applications. He also contributed to various community-based online projects, including Creative Commons, Fabricatorz, Mozilla Firefox, Open Clip Art Library, Sharism, and Wikipedia.

      • Mozilla To Stop Innovation On Thunderbird
      • Evolution of Thunderbird e-mail Client

        Mozilla has decided to freeze the features and concentrate on web/cloud stuff. That annoys some who have grown to depend on Thunderbird, particularly those with many e-mail accounts. Thunderbird makes sense for its ability to concentrate those accounts in one application.

      • Thunderbird development to be stalled by Mozilla

        An email leaked on Friday forced Mozilla to reveal its decision to reduce resources for the Thunderbird email client ahead of a planned announcement next Monday. The early announcement from Mozilla Foundation chair Mitchell Baker explained that the organisation felt that, as an open source, cross-platform email client, Thunderbird was unlikely to be a “source of innovation” and future leadership. Mozilla’s officials say they have concluded that what is important for Thunderbird is ongoing stability and that “continued innovation in Thunderbird is not a priority for Mozilla’s product efforts”.

      • Mozilla to halt further development of open-source email client Thunderbird
  • SaaS

    • Rackspace president: Cloud needs open alternative to Amazon
    • Open Source, the Fuel for Cloud Disruption
    • 5 Ways Cloud Computing Is Like Open Source

      You may not remember the angst of the early- to mid-2000s, when the open source debate raged hot and heavy. Many times I witnessed IT professionals vociferously denigrate open source in favor of established proprietary vendors. I heard endless arguments about the quality disadvantages of open source, the lack of “professional ability” among open-source developers, the absolute requirement that a large company stand behind a software component used in a corporate system, the dangers of lack of indemnification, and on and on. According to large numbers of IT organization staff, open source was a toy, fine for unimportant hobby systems, but woefully inadequate for “real” corporate IT applications.

    • Increasingly, Clouds Are Built the Open Source Way

      Today’s cloud computing landscape has no clear leading vendor; but rather is a mosaic of services. While the commercial opportunities are enormous, open source clouds are beginning to dominate the private cloud side of the market.

    • Open source powers big data index
  • Education

  • Semi-Open Source

  • Funding

  • BSD

    • Features Coming For FreeBSD 10

      Here’s a look at some of the planned features that are being worked on for the FreeBSD 10 release.

      The FreeBSD 10 features that have already been talked about on Phoronix include:

      - FreeBSD 10.0 will deprecate GCC and switch to the LLVM/Clang compiler by default. GCC will likely remain within FreeBSD ports, but LLVM/Clang is the future for FreeBSD rather than using the GPLv3-licensed GCC. Other BSD distributions are also working towards migrating from GCC to LLVM/Clang.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Game of the day: GNU Backgammon

      It’s almost a cliche in Western culture. For some reason, those swanky-looking leather-bound backgammon sets became either the mark of tasteful distinction or the default Christmas gift when you don’t know what else to get. I see them in households everywhere. Unopened. Unplayed. Checkers still in the little sealed plastic baggies. Unloved. I don’t know, I guess backgammon sets got advertised in the back pages of Playboy during the ’70s or something; it has that kind of aura.

  • Project Releases

    • Etherpad Lite 1.1.1 Released

      The Etherpad Foundation has released a new version of their collaborative web based editor, Etherpad Lite. This release features a lot of bug fixes along with support for node 0.8, new hooks and API endpoints, resolution of various security issues, Postgres support and better Microsoft Windows support out of box.

    • Transmission 2.60 Released

      The version 2.60 comes with all tickets closed, which means all the open bugs and requests have been resolved. Some of the key changes in this release include better support for magnet links, better scraping behavior for various trackers, notifications for seeding and downloading completion on the web client and various other small bug fixes.

    • Transmission 2.60 Has Been Officially Released

      Transmission 2.60, the open source cross-platform BitTorrent client that strives to be as simple as possible, has been released last evening, July 5th.

    • Pidgin 2.10.6 Released

      Pidgin, a popular cross-platform IM client, has got a new release. This version fixes a major bug that required users to triple click on the buddy list to open the messaging window.

    • PacketFence 3.4 supports up to 100 custom VLANs
  • Public Services/Government

    • VA awards $4.9M contract to support open source tech

      The Department of Veterans Affairs has awarded Ray Group International of Tampa, Fla., a $4.9 million contract to support the open source community that is contributing software code to the VA and Defense Department integrated electronic health record system.

    • France awards €2 million open source support tender

      The central IT department for the French government has granted a €2 million contract to support 350 different open source tools throughout fifteen different ministries. The three to four year contract, which was officially tendered last year, was awarded to consulting companies Alter Way, Capgemini and Java specialist Zenika.

    • Government departments snub open source storage
    • Vietnam considers drastic measures to encourage open source software use

      Forty three out of the 63 provinces and cities have installed and used open source software. It is estimated that 7300 officers have been trained in the plan to build up the labor force to support the open source software application.

      In many localities, open source solutions have been developed and utilized by the local budget. Quang Nam province, for example, has 90 percent of electronic information websites of the local state agencies developed onJoomla open source. Meanwhile, two districts and three departments in the province are using the one-stop-shop software based on Drupal open source.

      Tuyen said that Vietnam encourages organizations and agencies to use open source software because of its outstanding advantages. It is clearly more economical to use open source software than close sourced software which is always very expensive.

  • Licensing

    • Open source incest: GPL forked by its coauthor

      One of the principal authors of version 3 of the Gnu General Public License (GPL) has spun off his own version of the license without the participation of the Free Software Foundation (FSF), in a move that could ruffle feathers in the often-cantankerous free software community.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • From Tech to Toilet Paper, Berliner Tries to Live Completely Open Source for One Year

      Open source computer, open source mobile phone, open source toothbrush, open source jeans, open source video codec, open source camera, open source beer and even open source toilet paper: these are just a few things you need if you decide to make every aspect of your life open source for a year. A 28-year-old filmmaker from New Zealand living in Berlin is going to try just that.

Leftovers

  • Country Most in Love with M$ Gets the Most Machines Knocked off the Internet Monday

    USA has about 10% of the world’s infected machines. China which has about the same number of on-line users has 1/7 as many infected PCs as USA. India which has four times the population of USA has 1/3 as many infected PCs. To keep the problem at home in USA, the world should just stop using that other OS. It’s not needed and not worth the trouble it cause

  • Finance

    • Goldman Sachs Loses $20.6 Million Award Appeal

      On Tuesday, the Goldman Sachs group lost an appeal against a $20.6 million award won by creditors of Bayou Group, the now bankrupt hedge fund. Goldman’s argument was rejected by the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals which found Goldman’s assertion without merit in claiming that the arbitrators making the award had disregarded the law. The three-judge panel appeals court observed, “The manifest disregard standard is, by design, exceedingly difficult to satisfy, and Goldman has not satisfied it in this case.”

    • Goldman Sachs facing £250m lawsuit
    • Wall Street Confidence Trick: How Interest Rate Swaps Are Bankrupting Local Governments

      The “toxic culture of greed” on Wall Street was highlighted again last week, when Greg Smith went public with his resignation from Goldman Sachs in a scathing oped published in the New York Times. In other recent eyebrow-raisers, LIBOR rates—the benchmark interest rates involved in interest rate swaps—were shown to be manipulated by the banks that would have to pay up; and the objectivity of the ISDA (International Swaps and Derivatives Association) was called into question, when a 50% haircut for creditors was not declared a “default” requiring counterparties to pay on credit default swaps on Greek sovereign debt.

    • Full Show: How Big Banks Victimize Our Democracy

      PMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon’s appearances in the last two weeks before Congressional committees — many members of which received campaign contributions from the megabank — beg the question: For how long and how many ways are average Americans going to pay the price for big bank hubris, with our own government acting as accomplice?

      On this week’s Moyers & Company, Rolling Stone editor Matt Taibbi and Yves Smith, creator of the finance and economics blog Naked Capitalism, join Bill to discuss the folly and corruption of both banks and government, and how that tag-team leaves deep wounds in our democracy. Taibbi’s latest piece is “The Scam Wall Street Learned from the Mafia.” Smith is the author of ECONned: How Unenlightened Self Interest Undermined Democracy and Corrupted Capitalism.

  • Privacy

    • Maple Seed Drones Will Swarm The Future

      Imagine a cheap, tiny, hovering aerial drone capable of being launched with the flick of a person’s wrist and able to provide manipulable 360-degree surveillance views.

      It’s real, it’s inspired by maple seeds, and the company behind it, Lockheed Martin, envisions a future in which swarms of the new drones can be deployed at a fraction of the cost and with greater capabilities than drones being used today by the military and other agencies.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • U.N. Affirms Internet Freedom as a Basic Right

      Will Internet companies help or hinder government authorities that try to restrict their citizens from using the Web freely? And will their customers, investors or shareholders care enough to do something about it?

      That debate was freshly stirred on Thursday as the United Nations Human Rights Council passed a landmark resolution supporting freedom of expression on the Internet. Even China, which filters online content through a firewall, backed the resolution. It affirmed that “the same rights that people have offline must also be protected online, in particular freedom of expression, which is applicable regardless of frontiers and through any media of one’s choice.”

    • Civil liberties organisations advocating for a free internet

      Several international civil liberties organisations have put their weight behind a Declaration of Internet Freedom. The first signatories included the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the Center for Digital Democracy, and Mozilla. Both individuals and organisations can sign the declaration which reads, in full:

    • Verizon: net neutrality violates our free speech rights

      Verizon pressed its argument against the Federal Communications Commission’s new network neutrality rules on Monday; filing a legal brief with the United States Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit. The company argued the FCC’s rules not only exceeded the agency’s regulatory authority, but also violated network owners’ constitutional rights. Specifically, Verizon believes that the FCC is threatening its First Amendment right to freedom of speech and its property rights under the Fifth Amendment.

  • DRM

    • Recent iOS, Mac app crashes linked to botched FairPlay DRM

      iOS and OS X users are experiencing crashes due to corrupted binaries pushed out by Apple’s servers over the Fourth of July holiday, according to Instapaper developer Marco Arment. The problem appears to be linked to Apple’s FairPlay DRM scheme, which is added to apps downloaded via the iOS App Store or Mac App Store. While Apple appears to be working to correct the issue, the problem is ongoing as of Thursday.

      Arment discovered the problem late Tuesday night after pushing an update to his Instapaper app to the App Store. “I was deluged by support e-mail and Twitter messages from customers saying that it crashed immediately on launch, even with a clean install,” Arment wrote on his blog.

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