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08.05.11

Links 5/8/2011: KDE 4.7 Reviewed, News Catchup

Posted in News Roundup at 10:42 am by Guest Editorial Team

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Code 42 Software Reports New Data on Rapid Growth of Enterprise Linux Use

    Code 42 Software Inc., creators of CrashPlan, CrashPlan PRO, and CrashPlan PROe, continuous data backup for home and business, today reported new data about the rapid growth of Linux use in enterprise. Only halfway through 2011, Code 42’s CrashPlan PROe sales have grown 10 times 2010 levels. The company expects to end 2011 with a 14,000 percent growth in Linux revenue year-over-year. Since 2009, Code 42 has experienced substantial Linux growth. In 2010, the company recorded 400 percent year-over-year revenue growth of CrashPlan PROe for Linux.

  • How and Why Wall Street Programmers Earn Top Salaries

    There’s actually a pretty wide range of languages/tools used, but Linux is the ‘default’ OS…

  • Desktop

    • Linux Desktop Hits and Misses

      It seems like it wasn’t that long ago when Windows was an exclusive part of my computing life. Ever so slowly, I began to move away from Windows XP into some of the popular Linux distributions of the time.

      I found myself falling in love with a specific Linux distribution made popular by its ability to “just work” without a ton of configuration. At the time, this held a great appeal to me. After all, I had other things to do throughout my day besides having to configure everything on my desktop PC by hand.

    • Choosing the Right Linux Distro for Your Business

      In this article, I’ll look at the benefits of both corporate and community supported distributions and how they might best fit into the enterprise space. In addition, I’ll offer suggestions as to which option might make the most sense in each type of enterprise scenario. I’ll also take a look at specialized Linux distributions.

  • Kernel Space

    • Linux 3.0: More important than you think

      Ah vacation. It was a week of blissful lounging around a breezy beach side and playing in a water-filled world where I was no longer at the top of the food chain. There were no computers, no talk of networking this, security that, or anything in between. But then the hard reality of the world wormed its way back into my mind and I now find myself trying hard to get back into some sort of groove…an open source kind of groove (of course).

      And although it’s officially next month (the month of my forty-fourth birthday, thank you very much) Linux is about to turn 3.0. And although Linus Torvalds himself has said this is not a big deal, it is. Why? Because of the very fact it is not a big deal.

      [...]

      These assumptions occur whether they are true or not — even if it has been made clear there are no deal making/deal breaking changes in the kernel. After all, look at the major feature list in the 3.0 kernel:

      * Btrfs data scrubbing and automatic defragmentation
      * XEN Dom0 support.
      * Unprivileged ICMP_ECHO.
      * Wake on WLAN.
      * Berkeley Packet Filter JIT filtering.
      * A memcached-like system for the page cache.
      * A sendmmsg() syscall that batches sendmsg() calls.
      * The setns() a syscall that allows better handling of light virtualization systems such as containers.
      * New hardware support such as Microsoft Kinect and AMD Llano Fusion APUs.

  • Applications

    • Super Collision At Studio Dave: The New World of SuperCollider3, Part 1

      SuperCollider is composer/programmer James McCartney’s gift to the world of open-source audio synthesis/composition environments. In its current manifestation, SuperCollider3 includes capabilities for a wide variety of sound synthesis and signal processing methods, cross-platform integrated GUI components for designing interfaces for interactive performance, support for remote control by various external devices, and a rich set of tools for algorithmic music and sound composition. And yes, there’s more, much more.

    • LiVES 1.4.5 has been released! | Video editor

      LiVES 1.4.5 has been released! the new release comes with many news features and fixed many bugs, it add -tmpdir startup option, Stop PAL formats reverting to NTSC in x264 encoder., Fix bug to add fewer blank lines to ~/.lives file, Do not show “Loaded subtitles” message when subtitles are not loaded, Instant opening of some .flv files, Move correct pointer (start or end) when the timeline is clicked in longer files, Add video fade in/out effect, Fix frames being cut after applying effects in virtual clips. more info about this .

    • Instructionals/Technical

    • Games

      • REVIEW: BEEP – Linux platform fun!

        FPS games seem all the rage these days and after playing a few of them you would be forgiven for thinking there’s very little variety. Can you honestly remember vividly an FPS you played from a year ago on say the PS3, when all too often its the same generic gameplay albeit with different gfx and sound?

        As the Humble Indi Bundle, Minecraft et al showed, there’s a massive market for games which do not rely on the proven (and popular) FPS format. There are so many success stories that being an indi developer no longer means that you are resigned to selling only a few copies of your product – The Internet and word of mouth advertising mean that a decent product can be very lucrative.

      • First Person Shooter ‘Red Eclipse : Supernova Edition’ Released for Linux

        A new version for popular Linux FPS game Red Eclipse has been released. Codenamed ‘Supernova Edition’, this release sees many new features and changes.

  • Desktop Environments

  • Distributions

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Yes, I broke my computer with PCLinuxOS

        Let me put this straight: I’m not blaming PCLOS at all. The installer performed the actions I commanded, nothing less, nothing more. Granted, I might be a non-technical Linux user, but I’m also beyond that childish stage in which users blame Linux when something does not go as planned. I should have paid attention to the small voice telling me that it was not a good idea to use a free HD space BEFORE my Mandriva partition and that it was an even worse choice to install the PCLinuxOS GRUB to the main sector of the partition table, but I stubbornly ignored the still small voice of wisdom.

      • PCLinuxOS, the REAL deal!

        A couple of days ago, I described how I had an unfortunate experience while I attempted an install of PCLinuxOS. Because of lack of time, I had to remove the distro to recover my PC and finish my work, promising to get back at PCLOS later.

        Well, time has come: a kind reader of my post, to solve the problem of the multiple boot, recommended me to visit the PCLOS forums and find the wise sage, who goes through forum-land under the name of Old Pollack.

      • Not a Tug o’War, but Convergence
    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

      • Debian Project News – July 25th, 2011

        Welcome to this year’s eleventh issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.

      • Debian’s GNU/kFreeBSD

        I’ve heard two popular reasons for running a GNU environment on top of a FreeBSD kernel. One is script compatibility. The idea being that if a person needs a FreeBSD kernel (for whatever reason) they may still want to run GNU-specific scripts. I can see the reasoning behind this, though kFreeBSD does have a few quirks to it (such as the device names I mentioned above) which may introduce new incompatibilities. The other reason often cited is ZFS support. Though I didn’t find ZFS tools installed by default, ZFS utilities are available in the kFreeBSD repositories. This brings together great file system technology with an environment which will be familiar to GNU/Linux users. A third, and often overlooked, reason for running kFreeBSD is because we can. There is something compelling about running a mash-up of technologies from two different open source camps. For people who just like to tinker with computers kFreeBSD is right up there with trying MINIX or running NetBSD on a toaster.

        Given the problems I ran into with the installer and issues I ran into trying to login to a graphical environment, I have to say kFreeBSD isn’t a project I would recommend to many people, certainly not novice users. Given the defaults it appears as though the project is aimed mostly at people running servers who have an interest in both GNU/Linux and FreeBSD. And, though certainly not without rough edges, it is an interesting operating system. It has got warts and it can be a pain to get up and running, but the fact that it can exist — does exist — is, well, is pretty cool when you think about it.

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu Contributor Harmony

            I have made no bones about my opposition to unpaid copyright assignment in any quarter. Least understandable was the old Canonical contributors agreement, Mark wrote another of his personal defences in his blog on Friday; of what I consider to be unreasonable and assumptive. But this isn’t about that blog post.

          • Contributor License Agreement corner cases

            I’m looking at the Canonical Individual Contributor License Agreement (pdf here). In contrast to the previous copyright assignment, it merely grants a broad set of rights to Canonical, including the right to relicense the work under any license they choose. Notably, it does not transfer copyright to Canonical. The contributor retains copyright.

          • Flavours and Variants

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Raspberry Pi $25 PC goes into alpha production

      Game developer David Braben caused geeks to get excited back in May when he announced plans to develop and release a $25 PC. It is called the Raspberry Pi, and takes the form of a USB stick that can be plugged into the HDMI port of a display ready to act as afully-functional PC.

      The thinking behind the super-cheap PC is to get it into the hands of school kids and let them start experimenting and programming. The planend hardware included a 700MHz ARM11 processor, 128MB RAM, OpenGL ES 2.0, and 1080p output. It will run Linux in some form, but importantly it’s only $25 and will allow access to the wealth of free tools Linux has access to.

      Two months on and the spec of the PCB layout has been finalized and an alpha release has been sent to manufacture. Any doubts this PC wasn’t going to happen should now disappear as this alpha board is expected to be almost the same as the final production unit.

    • Google TV box price drops to $99

      We learned in May that Amazon.com had dropped the price of Logitech’s Google TV system (aka the Logitech Revue) 33 percent, to $199. Now, Logitech says it’s dropping the Revue’s price to $99.

    • Phones

      • Android

        • Canalys: Android has almost half of global smartphone market, Microsoft has one percent

          Canalys tracks smartphone sales in 56 countries around the world, and released a summary of its data for Q2 2011 on August 1. According to the firm, Google’s Android operating system led in 35 countries and achieved a global market share of 48 percent.

          Android, “the number one platform by shipments since Q4 2010,” was shipped on 51.9 million phones during the quarter, a year-over-year increase of 379 percent, Canalys says. It put in a particularly strong performance in the APAC (Asia Pacific) region, garnering a 85 percent share in South Korea and a 71 percent share in Taiwan, the firm adds.

        • Huawei launches a 3D smartphone

          THE 3D TREND is once again being foisted upon punters as Huawei has announced the launch of its first 3D smartphone.

          Aptly called Vision, the handset features a 3D user interface and a “carousel display”, by which we think Huawei means a revolving set of home page icons, or images, or something. With it Huawei will join the Korean handset maker LG in the 3D smartphone market, which – to be honest – hasn’t exactly taken off yet.

        • HTC Salsa Android smartphone

          HTC has released two ‘Facebook phones’ of late – the Qwerty-packing ChaCha and the Salsa, the latter being a compact bundle of fun, which wears its dedicated Facebook button just beneath its screen.

        • Study: Android is least open of open source mobile platforms
    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Tablets will overtake consumer PCs, says Fujitsu CTO

        Content consumption rules for consumers and tablet sales will overtake consumer PC and notebook sales. That’s the view of Dr Joseph Reger, Fujitsu’s chief technology officer.

      • Asus spins three low-priced netbooks

        Asus is taking the netbook back to its roots, with two devices intended to sell for as little as $200. The low-cost EeePC R011PX and EeePC X101 come with the Ubuntu and MeeGo operating systems, respectively — but will also run Windows if you insist.

      • Binatone Homesurf 705 tablet video demo

        MAKER OF GADGETS Binatone gave The INQUIRER a look at its budget 7in tablet, the Homesurf 705.

        Binatone has jumped into the tablet party with its Homesurf 705. It has a 7in resistive touchscreen with 480×800 resolution, 2GB of internal storage, WiFi, microUSB and a microSD card slot.

      • Android will turn the tablet market on its head

        SCATTER CUSHION HARDWARE, the tablet computer, will make its way into most homes with the Android operating system in place, according to a report.

        Informa Telecoms and Media said that despite its considerable hold on the market Apple’s IOS based machines will start to fall out of favour with users over the next four years before being completely swept aside by Android devices.

      • Galaxy Tab vs Playbook vs Flyer video review

        BITTER RIVALS Khidr Suleman and Chris Martin fight to the metaphorical death over the best 7in tablet currently on the market. This video face-off features three 7in tablets that are assessed on their various merits, and a winner is crowned.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Mozilla

    • Mozilla eyes mobile OS landscape with new Boot to Gecko project

      Mozilla has announced a new experimental project called Boot to Gecko (B2G) with the aim of developing an operating system that emphasizes standards-based Web technologies. The initial focus will be on delivering a software environment for handheld devices such as smartphones.

    • Boot to Gecko – Mozilla’s Project To Build A Web Based Operating System For Smartphones

      When Mozilla announced the Webian Shell last month, many wondered if Mozilla too is planning to launch its own version of a web-based operating system. There was no definite answer then, but there is now.

      Mozilla has launched a new project called “Boot to Gecko”. The aim of this project is to develop a complete operating system for the open web. Unlike Google’s version of a web-based OS – the Chrome OS – Mozilla’s version is not aimed at netbooks. With Boot to Gecko, Mozilla is aiming for smartphones – and Android forms a part of their plan.

    • Mozilla aims to play the OS game

      Mozilla is plotting to join the operating system fray with an “open Web” twist.

  • Databases

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • A Word of Thanks

      Yesterday Michael Brauer posted on the OASIS ODF TC mailing list his farewell post. Michael, like a very large number of the other employees of the “Oracle’s Hamburg Business Unit”, if not all of them, will be let go by the end of the month. If you wonder what the “Oracle’s Hamburg Business Unit” is, it’s the people who have been developing a large part of what was OpenOffice.org and before that, StarOffice. I remember the company when it was a privately owned entity called StarDivision. I have contributed and interacted with these people for over 10 years. I guess I will see some of them working for different employers; sometimes as competitors, sometimes as partners. But we will see us again one day or another, and I look forward that day. I have made a few friends there; these are bright people, and they have played an instrumental in the expansion of Free and Open Source Software, and dare I remind it? ODF and Open Standards as well. I sincerely wish them the best for the future, whatever road they choose to take. This “business unit” has been known under many names during all these years, and I understand very well that the present days must be sad and sorrowful days.

  • CMS

    • Open source wars: WordPress vs Drupal vs Joomla

      Every IT person, developer, and programmer has an opinion when it comes to the various open source content management systems out there. It often comes down to functionality and ease of use, but even then the lines are often blurred and there is rarely a clear-cut victor. WordPress vs Drupal vs Joomla – which is really the king of open source CMS?

  • Programming

Reader’s Picks

  • United Nations University trains practitioners in GNU Health (formerly GNU Medical) and other free software.
  • Gmail wins Harvard

    Gmail will serve as the email interface for most Harvard undergraduate accounts by the middle of next month, replacing the webmail client currently designated for those addresses but used by a fraction of those students.

  • Trey Ratcliff likes Google+

    The interface of the streams and the hangouts enable me to get to know new people in a more human manner. Comparing it to Twitter, there is a not this matrix-like stream of symbols and bit.ly codes flying by my eyes. Here, I see photos, visual thoughts, videos, and the sorts of retinal stimulation that humans expect.

  • The value of open virtualization

    Over a 3-year period, an open virtualization solution can cost less than half of a proprietary alternative. Also, open virtualization efficiently supports a wide range of guest operating systems, including Windows as well as Linux. In fact, we think that one of the major uses of KVM is going to be by customers who want to virtualize mixed Linux / Windows environments, and have a common hypervisor.

  • Oracle throws Schwartz blog into the memory hole to hide his endorsement of Google’s use of Java. [2]

    Robert Pogson’s trolls taunt that use of free software caused the demise of Sun. Wikipedia’s explanation is that the Dot Com bubble burst ruined the hardware market, by flooding it with cheap Sun hardware from bankrupt companies. Anti-trust authorities should revisit this episode to be sure Microsoft did not engage in a classic second hand equipment anti-trust violation as well as Microsoft and telco retardation of the internet in the late 90s which ruined so many businesses.

  • Judge Blasts Oracle in Android Software Fight

    PJ adds a link to the ruling and adds, ” I don’t think the judge altogether grasps the tech yet, but he definitely ruled that Oracle’s expert wasn’t fit for the jury to hear, and that the $6 figure proposed as damages was not defensible.” In other news, she summarizes the history of the case,

    some keep pushing every step of this litigation as doom for Google, what has happened so far? Well, for starters, Oracle has had most of its patents found invalid in the reexaminations. And the judge has told it to reduce the number of its claims. So right there, Google has won a great deal. If there are any damages at all, they won’t therefore be in the stratosphere. And the judge yesterday told Oracle its $6B-expert was all wet in how he came up with that ridiculous figure. … In other words, this case is now a lot smaller than when it started, and if there is a settlement, it could only be on terms Google doesn’t mind. … at the beginning, almost the whole world was saying that Android was doomed, that Google was going to be found liable, that this was a slam dunk for Oracle, blah blah blah. Was any of that true? Obviously not. And may I point out that there are no patent counterclaims in this case, and yet Google is winning? Duh. Time for the media to notice that they got spun.

  • Praise for Web OS.

    If the tiny but powerful Veer and the absolutely rabid yet organised fan community is any indication of the direction WebOS is heading, the OS could make a rapid recovery under HP’s stewardship.

  • Security

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

  • Anti-Trust

    • Nokia shows the Microsoft touch – faltering sales and losses.

      Nokia, struggling to hold onto its place as the world’s number one mobile phone maker, slumped Thursday to only its second quarterly loss since 1998 as sales continued to fall. Having pinned its hopes for recovery on a tie-up with US giant Microsoft, Nokia reported a three months to June a net loss of 368 million euros ($520.5 million), compared to a profit of 227 million euros in second quarter 2010. Analysts had expected a net loss of 104 million euros

      I’d buy one of their MeGo phones if I could be sure it was not a jail.

  • Civil Rights

    • Ralph Nater calls for US Supreme Court impeachments.

      Five Supreme Court Justices–Scalia, Thomas, Roberts, Alito and Kennedy are entrenching, in a whirlwind of judicial dictates, judicial legislating and sheer ideological judgments, a mega-corporate supremacy over the rights and remedies of individuals. … the decisions are brazenly over-riding sensible precedents, tearing apart the state common law of torts and blocking class actions, shoving aside jury verdicts, limiting people’s ‘standing to sue,’ pre-empting state jurisdictions–anything that serves to centralize power and hand it over to the corporate conquistadores.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Apple discusses patent threats in their SEC filings.

      PJ laughs at the ambiguity and asks, “Time to fix the US patent system, then, don’t you think, if one of the most successful tech companies in the country can’t predict its own survival with certainty, due to the threat of invalid patents?”

    • Microsoft sued for Kinect patent infringement

      Impulse Technology filed the suit in federal court in Delaware, accusing Microsoft and several game makers–including Electronic Arts, Ubisoft, and THQ–of violating patents related to, among other things, tracking and assessing movement skills in multidimensional space

      This does not seem related to the HiE-D case.

    • Did Microsoft Steal the Kinect?

      [Carlos Anzola], an inventor, tinkerer, and self-ascribed geek from Bogotá, Colombia, had been working for years on a nearly identical gesture interface for the PC. His creation, the Human interface Electronic Device, or HiE-D – pronounced ‘Heidi’ – was capable of gesture recognition years before Microsoft would release the Kinect.

      This seems to be a typical wine, dine, steal by Microsoft of a not entirely obvious piece of hardware.

More Reader’s Picks

  • Linus not happy with Gnome 3

    I’m using Xfce. I think it’s a step down from gnome2, but it’s a huge step up from gnome3. Really.

  • A study showing that IE users tended to be stupid was a hoax.

    I still think this PR flim flam was sponsored by Microsoft in the first place.

  • Security

    • McAffee admits complete and universal security failure.

      I am convinced that every company in every conceivable industry with significant size and valuable intellectual property and trade secrets has been compromised (or will be shortly), with the great majority of the victims rarely discovering the intrusion or its impact. In fact, I divide the entire set of Fortune Global 2000 firms into two categories: those that know they’ve been compromised and those that don’t yet know.

      Last year, another study showed that 88% of Fortune 500 networks had a particular botnet and Google has shown that Windows itself is spyware, so only people who don’t mind Microsoft and criminals looking over their work should use Windows. All non free software carries the risk of backdoors.

    • Glen Moody calls out Windows for “Operation Shady Rat”

      This massive breach of security, and loss of possibly highly-sensitive information, was all down to two things: the abiding thoughtlessness of people opening attachments, and a range of flaws in Microsoft’s software. So the statement that “the only organizations that are exempt from this threat are those that don’t have anything valuable or interesting worth stealing” is not true; another class would be those wise enough not to allow any of their personnel to use Microsoft products.

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • Feds Say They Can Search Bradley Manning’s Friend’s Laptop Because They Can

      This border search had nothing to do with the border and everything to do with the feds using a questionable opportunity to seize data that it could not otherwise get access to via legal means. If House’s laptop were really crucial to the case, then the Justice Department should have gotten a warrant to view it. … the reason given for having to keep House’s laptop for so long … the laptop ran both Linux and Windows and the tech geniuses at Homeland Security had trouble understanding how to deal with that.

      If you must travel to, from or within the US, bring a clean laptop you don’t mind giving away, sftp via rsync your files to yourself when you get here and scrub the drive before you leave. If you must run Windows, do it in a VirtualBox.

    • Man arrested and beaten for taking pictures of police in Los Vegas

      Crooks can be heard yelling in pain while Colling can be heard telling him to “shut up” and telling him his decision not to turn off the camera put him in “a world of hurt.”

      Bullies often blame their victims.

  • Cablegate

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

  • Finance

    • Who’s Grabbing Africa’s Land? U.S. Speculators, Including Universities

      China and Arab countries have generally been scrutinized in the media for their land deals, but much of the cash flow comes through U.S. and European investors, according to Oakland Institute—through established pension funds, agribusiness behemoths and even educational institutions. … “We see really vertical integration and control of the markets [by investors] who will be able to both influence prices and also decide on what the production will be,” warns Oakland Institute Policy Director Frederic Mousseau. “We have the food chain, which is pervasively and quite rapidly in recent years being under the control of financial groups.

  • Anti-Trust

    • Former Microsoft Exec Steven VanRoekel Named US Federal CIO

      VanRoekel previously served 15 years at Microsoft where his final position was as Microsoft’s Windows Server and Tools Division, followed by a year+ stint at the FCC starting in 2009, ending at this newest appointment.

      Techrights has a lot of articles about the stint at the FCC.

  • Censorship

    • EFF – Vague Anti-Stalking Law Threatens Protected Speech Online

      In this case, the government has presented the novel and dangerous theory that the use of a public communication service like Twitter to criticize a well-known individual can result in criminal liability based on the personal sensibilities of the person being criticized. … “While true threats can and should be opposed, public speech about prominent people must be vigorously protected.”

      The rich and powerful would use anti-trolling laws and as a censorship tool which has no effect on corporate controlled media.

  • Privacy

    • EFF: Randi Zuckerberg Runs in the Wrong Direction on Pseudonymity Online

      Randi Zuckerberg [of Facebook] doesn’t just think that you should be using your real name on Facebook or Google+ or LinkedIn — she thinks pseudonyms have no place on the Internet at all … Not only is uncivil discourse alive and well in venues with real name policies (such as Facebook), the argument willfully ignores the many voices that are silenced in the name of shutting up trolls: activists living under authoritarian regimes, whistleblowers, victims of violence, abuse, and harassment, and anyone with an unpopular or dissenting point of view that can legitimately expect to be imprisoned, beat-up, or harassed for speaking out. … An Internet in which everyone has to use their real name is not necessarily going to be any more polite, but it is guaranteed to be a disaster for freedom of expression.

      Not mentioned is the fact that rules against nyms might be violated by the enforcers themselves, which simply gives authorities power that others lack. Put more concisely, Facebook and other ISPs would be the greatest fuckwads of all, a situation that mirrors the world of broadcast and physical media.

  • Civil Rights

    • Biofuels from food crops and rampant speculation lead to starvation and people eating less.

      The surprising conclusion from all this is that, leaving out the impact of the biofuel boom of the 2000s, global consumption of both cereals and edible oils is actually slowing down. All the more tragic, then, that speculative forces are still allowed to run amok in global commodity markets and global food prices are kept so high as to increase the deprivation of the millions of hungry people in the world.

    • US insurance companies have raised premiums and reduced health care.
    • Alabama’s immigrant hate law rehtoric finds a target.

      Newlywed shoppers claim Wal-Mart’s false accusation that they tried to steal $2.90 worth of chicken neck bones caused the wife to be falsely arrested and lose her job, her husband to be deported, and both to lose their car, all their possessions and their house – though Wal-Mart’s security video showed they had paid for the damn chicken bones.

      So much for “The customer is always right.” This is what happens when political leaders turn on minorities. RMS notes, “That false accusation would only have caused a brief annoyance if it had not been followed by repeated violations of the couple’s rights.” The annoyance might be brief, but the bad attitude is pervasive here in Alabama and officially encouraged by the state.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Huffington Post notices US patent problems, Huffington Post Notices

      It’s possible that one consequence of first-to-file is that you’ll have a rush of more patents … The bill’s new review process inside the PTO does provide a cheaper way to challenge silly patents than the current court process, but tech firms aren’t likely to take advantage of it. Monitoring patent applications is nearly impossible, and challenging a patent alerts its holder to a potential lawsuit target if the challenge fails.

    • Google: When patents attack Android

      Android’s success has yielded something else: a hostile, organized campaign against Android by Microsoft, Oracle, Apple and other companies, waged through bogus patents. … A smartphone might involve as many as 250,000 (largely questionable) patent claims, and our competitors want to impose a “tax” for these dubious patents that makes Android devices more expensive for consumers. … the law frowns on the accumulation of dubious patents for anti-competitive means – which means these deals are likely to draw regulatory scrutiny, and this patent bubble will pop. … We’re also looking at other ways to reduce the anti-competitive threats against Android by strengthening our own patent portfolio.

      It is sad to see Google buying into a corrupt system which Microsoft has long used to extort gnu/linux users. Money wasted on worthless patents won’t fend off lawsuits from IV and other shell companies. Software patents should not exist.

    • Microsoft nonsense about Nortel Patents

      PJ notes, “Google publicly announced they wanted the patents for defense only. But counterclaims by a defendant are defense. It’s how you defend, meaning if no one sues you for patent infringement, you never use the patents at all in litigation. For Shaw to pretend he doesn’t know that, assuming the media won’t, is cynical. And you thought “Get the Facts” was bad.” Google put it more clearly

      it’s obvious why we turned down Microsoft’s offer. Microsoft’s objective has been to keep from Google and Android device-makers any patents that might be used to defend against their attacks. A joint acquisition of the Novell patents that gave all parties a license would have eliminated any protection these patents could offer to Android against attacks from Microsoft and its bidding partners. Making sure that we would be unable to assert these patents to defend Android — and having us pay for the privilege — must have seemed like an ingenious strategy to them. We didn’t fall for it.

    • Patents against prosperity

      This recent episode of Planet Money, “When Patents Attack”, is an informative and entertaining primer on the way America’s patent system squelches competition, slows innovation, and enables egregious predation through the legal system. Please listen to this. And then tell me that Nathan Myhrvold of Intellectual Ventures is not our age’s authentic villainous robber baron, making a fortune gaming America’s dysfunctional patent-law system to shake down would-be innovators.

    • Copyrights

      • Two solicitors fined and suspended for file-sharer letters

        The Solicitors Regulation Authority has suspended two lawyers and fined them £20,000 each for sending out thousands of letters accusing people of illegally sharing files…. Davenport Lyons passed the work onto ACS:Law and Andrew Crossley in 2009 when it got sick of the bad publicity. Crossley was declared bankrupt in June

      • Righthaven, still angering judges, finally pays cash for its mistakes

        Now, it is finally paying defense lawyers, even if it can’t quite manage to send a check to the proper location.

        Fraud from start to finish.

      • The UK Musicians Union wants to tax every device that can play music.

        [Their argument] reveals the abiding and ingrained sense of entitlement that pervades all the creative industries. They are not content to be paid once like most people, but want to be paid again and again.

        It is difficult to imagine individual musicians that blockheaded, so the union must represent someone else.

07.25.11

Links 25/7/2011: Calculate Linux 11.6.1, CentOS 6.0 LiveCD

Posted in News Roundup at 3:19 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Softpedia Linux Weekly, Issue 157
  • Kernel Space

    • Compiling Linux kernel 3.0 with Emdebian ARM toolchain

      The Emdebian project works to bring Debian on embedded platforms, with repositories of custom distributions and toolchains to cross-compile software. I wanted to try their ARM toolchains, and coincidentally the Linux kernel 3.0 has been released in these days, so I tried to cross-compile it and emulate it on QEMU. These tests have been done on my Debian “wheezy” desktop.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • Moved to Fluxbox

      After giving Unity a try on Ubuntu 11.04 and hearing that GNOME2 will be dropped in Ubuntu 11.10, I’ve decided to find a new work environment. I tested a few desktop environments and window managers and decided on Fluxbox.

    • Change Isn’t Always Bad for Linux

      Mac users who don’t like the Lion changes don’t have that same kind of latitude. There aren’t really any alternative Mac distributions they can turn to.

      Linux users are better positioned to embrace change, since it’s usually not too hard to walk away from changes we don’t agree with. So why not be a little open to changes? Why not give more UI changes an extended look before we walk away in anger or disgust?

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • Top Ten of the most viewed KDE Websites

        Some readers might remember, some time back we talked about setting up stats for most of our KDE Websites. Yes, we did. And i thought it is time to share something of that with you, my highly interested readers ;)

        Let’s compile a chart of our most viewed sites.
        It’s no surprise, our highly dynamics sites are ranking very high. But which and how?

    • GNOME Desktop

  • Distributions

    • New Releases

      • Calculate Linux 11.6.1 released

        First update for distribution Calculate Linux 11.6 has been released.
        Major Changes¶

        * Fixed KDE-applet knetworkmanager.
        * Fixed installation with the first version of Grub.
        * Fixed permissions for samba server share distfiles.
        * Fixed auto-install the video driver on to the USB-HDD.
        * Fixed saving settings.
        * To display the disk size using the binary prefix instead of decimal.
        * Improved localization of the Bulgarian language.
        * KDE updated to version 4.6.5.

      • Zorin OS 5 Lite is now available

        The Zorin OS Team are proud to release the Zorin OS 5 Lite, the lightweight version of our operating system designed for Windows users using old and low-spec computers. We have released this version ahead of schedule. This new version of Zorin OS Lite is based on Lubuntu 11.04 and uses the LXDE desktop environment, which brings new and updated packages. Many program changes were also made for this release to increase size efficiency and to improve the overall experience. Most notable in this release is that in can now fit on a CD. We have removed WINE, VLC, a few games and other programs to save space and included them into our new and exclusive program, the “Zorin OS Lite Extra Software” which allows you to install these programs easily if you wish to do so. We have also included our other exclusive programs such as our Zorin Look Changer and Internet Browser Manager in Zorin OS 5 Lite.

    • Gentoo Family

      • Sabayon 6 GNOME review

        Chromium is the only Web browser installed, but Firefox 5 and Opera 11.50 are available for installation. Adobe Flash plugin and Java JRE are installed, and with libdvdcss installed, Totem, the installed video player, has no problem playing encrypted video DVDs, Essentially, the system comes loaded with all the applications that most users will need. Need some application that is not installed? Use the package management system to search the repository and install it.

    • Red Hat Family

      • 6 wonders of CentOS 6.0

        Do you know what CentOS is?
        No, this is a not a OS which costs you only one cent to buy. Although, I bought a DVD with Linux OS for 0.01 GBP once, it was not CentOS.
        CentOS is actually free Operating System based on RedHat Enterprise Linux. In other words, group of enthusiasts took out source code of RHEL, which they have to publish as part of Linux license, re-branded it as CentOS and published for open and free usage.

      • [CentOS 6.0 (LiveCD) is out]
      • Fedora

        • Ask Fedora – 24-7

          Enter the world of Ask Fedora. Of course this is just a test instance for feedback. So test it out, ask questions, provide answers and let me know how everything is working out for you. I am primarily looking at how well it scales and whether open id and your Fedora id is working as intended but any other feedback is welcome too. If you know Django and Python and want to help out, drop me a line. We are looking to add several features, fix some issues and provide excellent integration with Fedora including but not limited to auto linking to Red Hat bugzilla, theming it and providing its own logo!

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • CrunchBang worth more than just a test run

          However, I’m on my fourth day of using CrunchBang — also known in shorthand as #! — and, for once, the temptation to use it for longer that the simple “test drive” is overwhelming, to the point where it’s completely feasible that I may be using this for quite awhile.

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Trying Kubuntu 11.04

              On a second thought, I am back into Kubuntu just to see how much I can endure it, I should say it is wow with all the effects as after rebooting it is with nvidia proprietary drivers and the effects are brilliant

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Linux thin client taps new Marvell ARM SoC

      Wyse Technology announced a Linux thin client based on Marvell’s new 1GHz PXA510 system-on-chip (SoC), with support for Citrix Receiver, VMware View Open Client, Wyse TCX and VDA, and Microsoft’s RDP (remote desktop protocol) 7. The Wyse T50 offers 1GB RAM, 1GB flash, DVI-I with a dual-display option, gigabit Ethernet, four USB ports, and support for 720p video within a browser.

    • Phones

      • Android

        • Apple iOS versus Android

          As Android’s popularity grows its competitors look for ways to slow it down.

          Things are looking a little rough for Android right now. Its increased popularity is not only attracting millions of new fans but is also attracting unwanted patent attention from competitors unhappy with its success.

Leftovers

  • Cablegate

  • Finance

    • Goldman Sachs fights bias lawsuit, cites Wal-Mart

      Goldman Sachs Group Inc (GS.N) said a recent landmark decision throwing out a class-action lawsuit against Wal-Mart (WMT.N) means it should not face a wide-ranging case accusing it of systematic bias against women.

    • The Fed Audit

      The first top-to-bottom audit of the Federal Reserve uncovered eye-popping new details about how the U.S. provided a whopping $16 trillion in secret loans to bail out American and foreign banks and businesses during the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. An amendment by Sen. Bernie Sanders to the Wall Street reform law passed one year ago this week directed the Government Accountability Office to conduct the study. “As a result of this audit, we now know that the Federal Reserve provided more than $16 trillion in total financial assistance to some of the largest financial institutions and corporations in the United States and throughout the world,” said Sanders. “This is a clear case of socialism for the rich and rugged, you’re-on-your-own individualism for everyone else.”

07.24.11

Links 24/7/2011: News Leftovers

Posted in News Roundup at 8:00 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • 19 ways to do your bit for open source

    It’s undoubtedly good to give back to a community you take so much from.

    And in doing so, you can also help improve the software that you use every day, both for your benefit and for everyone else.

    Here are 19 ways you can help open source projects.

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Mozilla jumps to deal with Google Toolbar demise

        The toolbar offers a variety of services, including a search box, a way to use bookmarks stored on a server, and a measurement of a Web site’s PageRank–a score Google gives that measures its influence in Google search results. But Google has chosen to do in the Firefox version.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • OpenOffice Gets IBM Boost

      It’s curious how the recent OpenOffice saga has been downplayed by much of the media covering technology, but it seems pretty important to me. OpenOffice and LibreOffice are the two primary office suites available today that are both free and complete. There are others, too, but OpenOffice is the dominant suite, and LibreOffice is a fork of the OpenOffice code.

      The fork, which is a common phenomenon in open-source projects, was expected by many to supersede OpenOffice, but two things happened. First Oracle, who owned OpenOffice as part of the Sun takeover, wasn’t interested in maintaining what is essentially a labor of love, so it gave the whole thing to the Apache Foundation. Then this week IBM decided it wanted OpenOffice to stick around, so it handed over its entire Lotus Symphony Suite to the group and told them to use whatever they wanted.

    • Contest winner Ksplice wins big with Oracle buy

      Barely three years old, Cambridge startup Ksplice Inc. was bought by database giant Oracle Corp. for an undisclosed amount.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Fellowship interview with Bernhard Reiter

      Bernhard is founder and Executive Director of Intevation GmbH, a company with exclusively Free Software products and services since 1999. He played a crucial role in the establishment of FSFE as one of its founders, and architect of the original German team. Beside that he participated in setting up three important Free Software organisations: FreeGIS.org, FFII, and FossGIS.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • The Free Technology Academy needs your help!

      Since the first pilot in 2009, the FTA programme [5] has expanded from 3 to 13 course modules, including subjects such as “The concepts of Free Software and Open Standards”, “GNU/Linux systems”, “Economic Aspects of Free Software”, “Software Architecture” and many others. According to the spirit of the Free Software movement, all FTA learning materials [6] are released under copyleft licenses.

  • Standards/Consortia

    • FTC chairman backs national data security standard

      Federal Trade Commission Chairman Jon Leibowitz said there should be a national data breach notification standard Thursday but declined to take a position on the SAFE Data Act that passed a House subcommittee Wednesday.

      Currently, 47 states have laws that require companies to notify consumers if their private data is breached, but there is no national standard.

      “You don’t want a crazy quilt patchwork of statutes even if most of them, or the vast majority of them, are reasonable,” Leibowitz said at a forum on privacy at the Brookings Institution on Thursday.

Leftovers

  • Civil Rights

    • Eric S Raymond: Thoughts On No-Anonymity Policy Of Google+

      Google is clearly making some execution mistakes in implementing this policy, such as deleting the accounts of people with single-word legal names that merely look like handles. I agree these mistakes need correction and that Google needs to have a more responsive appeals process, but I think over-focusing on mistakes and edge cases obscures the most interesting question: is Google right? Will a no-handles policy produce a social network with higher value to more users than a network with handles?

  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • The Usage Based Billing Hearing Concludes: Has the CRTC Come to Competition Too Late?

      The CRTC’s usage based billing oral hearing concluded yesterday with a final decision expected some time in the fall. This long post focuses on the shift in CRTC thinking on the state of broadband competition in Canada but wonders whether it comes too late to make a difference. For many years, the CRTC has steadfastly maintained that the Canadian ISP market is competitive. For example, in the net neutrality decision from October 2009 it stated:

      Consistent with the current regulatory approach, under which the Commission has granted forbearance for retail Internet services, primary ISPs may continue to apply ITMPs to retail Internet services as they consider appropriate, with no requirement for prior Commission approval. This approach remains valid due in part to the large number of existing ISPs. A change in the approach would amount to interference with market forces and would result in inefficient regulation, which is contrary to the Policy Direction.

  • Copyrights

    • Access Copyright: It’s “Virtually Impossible” to Opt-Out Of Tariff

      Over the past few weeks, a growing number of Canadian universities have announced plans to opt-out of the Access Copyright interim tariff effective September 1, 2011 (the University of Calgary’s Gauntlet has an excellent article on the issue). Those universities join many others that opted-out from the start of the year. While many universities are moving on to alternative licensing approaches, the universities and Access Copyright continue to battle over the prospect of transactional (or pay-per-use) licensing which the universities want and Access Copyright refuses to grant. The AUCC filed its response on the issue earlier this week, which included some notable correspondence between Access Copyright and academic publishers.

    • ACTA

      • European Parliament ACTA study

        Act on ACTA refers to a European Parliament Trade Committee commissioned study on ACTA (pdf). The study highlights problematic aspects of ACTA and makes recommendations (see below). According to the study, “unconditional consent would be an inappropriate response”, and “There does not therefore appear to be any immediate benefit from ACTA for EU citizens”. The study confirms ACTA goes beyond current EU legislation. It recommends asking the European Court of Justice an opinion on ACTA.

Links 24/7/2011: Acer Puts Linux on ARM Notebook, Apple Copies Linux-based OS

Posted in News Roundup at 5:25 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • The open internet and its enemies

    I believe that if we want an open society based around principles of equality of opportunity, social justice and free expression, we need to build it on technologies which are themselves ‘open’, and that this is the only way to encourage a diverse online culture that allows all voices to be heard.

    But even if you agree with me, deciding what we mean by ‘open’ is far from straightforward:

    Does it mean an internet built around the end-to-end principle, where any connected computer can exchange data with any other computer and the network itself is unaware of the ‘meaning’ of the bits exchanged?

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

  • Licensing

Leftovers

Reader’s Picks

07.23.11

Links 23/7/2011: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7 is Out; Linux Distribution From DoD

Posted in News Roundup at 5:32 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Pinoy IT activist Manny Amador found dead

    Passionate Linux advocate and local IT pioneer Manny Amador was found dead by authorities on Friday in his rented house in Cebu where he had relocated to work for open-source firm InfoWeapons.

  • Software Wars are updated now in git
  • Stats for browsers and operating systems accessing sutor.com

    Linux 12.82%

  • Google’s Problems with Android Apps, Webmaster Tools and Oracle – RMS Says Don’t Go There
  • Desktop

  • Audiocasts/Shows

  • Kernel Space

    • Linux by the numbers

      The latest version of the Linux kernel, Linux 3.0, was pushed out last night, marking the end of the 2.6 kernel series.

      As most people in the know understand, this does not represent a big sea change, since the new version numbering was really just a way to discontinue the 2.6 numbering, which would have been 2.6.40 for the kernel today, had not Linus Torvalds announced in late May that the time had come for a new numbering scheme.

    • Don’t Panic! It’s only Linux 3.0

      There have also been improvements with how the kernel works with the still experimental Btrfs (B-tree file system) and the now standard ext4 file system. This, in turn, should lead to faster and, in the case of Btrfs, more reliable, file systems.

    • Graphics Stack

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • Desktop Summit Announcements

      In case you missed them, there have been a couple of exciting announcements around the Desktop Summit in Berlin, Germany.

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • public transport plasmoid looking for your input

        I really like the ability to quickly see route information with times and associated alerts for my home station, and with multiple instances of the Plasmoid I can keep track of several stations quite easily at a glance. The journey features are also indispensible.

        Using it with Contour, which is getting support for random Plasmoids in addition to the Nepomuk-derived resources that are associated with an activity, is going to be very, very nice for someone like me who travels a fair amount: I’ll end up with one Activity on my tablet per trip with all my files, contacts and even transit information agregated in one place that I can switch to with a simple thumb swipe. Oh, yeah!

      • ++performance

        Plasma uses a lot of files from disk, particularly when using QML and scripted Plasmoids, but also whenever something requests an image from the theme. The Package class is responsible for the former functionality and the Theme class for the latter. We already cache the results of the Theme rendering, but not the results of looking around on disk for the requested image. There is essentially no caching at all for Package: every request for a file sends it looking on disk for it.

      • KDE Plasma Desktop Introduction
      • KDE Commit-Digest for 17th July 2011
      • Improving KDE’s Plasma Performance

        Due to KDE’s Plasma extensive use of the hard disk for Plasmoids and other activities, and thinking about KDE’s performance on mobile device, Aaron Seigo has been working to make the library consume less memory. He has achieved at least partial success in this effort.

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Setting up GNOME 3 on Arch Linux

        It must have been my curiosity that drove me to exploring Arch Linux a few weeks ago. Its coming on a Linux Format DVD and a few kind words about its being a cutting edge distribution were enough to set me installing it into a VirtualBox virtual machine for a spot of investigation. In spite of warnings to the contrary, I took the path of least resistance with the installation even though I did look among the packages to see if I could select a desktop environment to be added as well. Not finding anything like GNOME in there, I left everything as defaulted and ended up with a command line interface as I suspected. The next job was to use the pacman command to add the extras that were needed to set in place a fully functioning desktop.

  • Distributions

    • A Linux Distro From the US Department of Defense
    • Lightweight Portable Security (LPS)-A Linux disto from the US Department of Defense
    • Preview: What’s Coming Up In VectorLinux 7?

      A while ago I received an invitation to view a video presentation giving 10 good reasons to review VectorLinux, and it’s true that I cannot recall to have read a review of it in years. This venerable distribution has been around for a long time but has also garnered some controversy around offering a paid for Deluxe version, introducing a paid for members club, and has been accused of not making source code freely available and thereby infringing on the GPL. It seems the club did not take off as I cannot find any mention of it anymore on the web site.

      All that aside, VectorLinux 5.0.1 was my distribution of choice when returning to Linux in 2005, and a nice experience it was. Basically what I had been looking for was something like Mandrake Linux back in the late 90′s but based on Slackware, and Vector did just fit the bill.

      It had and probably still has a very enthusiastic, helpful and polite community, and the forums were a great resource. I still remember the names and the fact that all these people are still actively involved as you can see in the credits during installation speaks volumes.

    • Not Your Average Linux Distribution: DOD’s Flavor

      The Department of Defense (DOD) has released a unique Linux distribution designed to be a secure option for people, such as telecommuters, who need remote access to internal government and corporate networks from potentially insecure desktops.

      Created by a collaboration between the DOD and the Air Force Research Laboratory, Lightweight Portable Security (LPS) can be booted from a CD or flash drive onto nearly any Intel-based PC or Mac, according to information posted on the project’s website.

    • Arch Linux: I stand corrected

      In my last article, ArchBang: A small review I was a bit unfair to the distro. I did not want to see these distros (ArchBang and Arch Linux) for what they really are and I consider that to be very wrong. Therefore, I bring you a few thoughts on Arch Linux after playing around with it for about 2-3 days.

      Arch is not your average, over-dressed, underpowered and over-popular Linux… as I so wrongly tried to see at as. Arch has the ability… no, gives you the power…

    • New Releases

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

    • Red Hat Family

      • Apple Lion? No – Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7 instead

        In a week peppered with massive exposure for Apple’s new OS X release Lion, open source converts will hopefully be more interested to read that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7 is now here.

        Key “extra toppings” in this iteration centre on features that enhance the flexibility, security and stability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 environments.

      • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7 Updates Linux Security
      • Red Hat updates Enterprise Linux 5.7

        Red Hat has updated Enterprise Linux 5.7, which now includes several features from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.

        The operating system processors supports deployments on Intel, AMD, POWER and IBM System z architectures.

        Red Hat also offers a security framework based on the OpenSCAP Security Content Automation Protocol, including a library and set of utilities, giving a standardised approach to validating Red Hat Enterprise Linux security.

      • Ouch! Oracle Drops Support For Red Hat, Suse Linux

        Oracle is dropping support for the leading open source operating systems — Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Suse Linux. The company made this announcement post its acquisition of Ksplice, the creator of innovative zero downtime update technology for Linux.

      • The changes in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7

        The main improvements to the latest release of RHEL series 5 are optimised virtualisation with KVM and Xen, as well as new and revised drivers. Slowly but surely, the series is nearing the end of the first and most active phase its lifecycle.

      • Fedora

        • Font Rendering in Fedora

          Shortly said, it’s not very impressive. But what are the options we have? Can we improve it? Well, there are some font settings that are available. See e.g. this blogpost about making fedora fonts look Ubuntu-like. Although I personally see that as making things worse, there are people who think otherwise. What I decided to do was to skim through most of the hinting options we have and decide for myself what looks best. And of course, provide my readers with some images so that they could decide for themselves.

        • Fedora 15 Shutdown
    • Debian Family

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Phones

      • Android

        • Android Market adds multiple-APK support to battle fragmentation

          Android Market now lets developers mount multiple Android Package (APK) files optimized for different devices and releases, instead of selling the optimized versions separately, says Google. Meanwhile, security firm Dasient reports that eight percent of Android apps are transmitting personal user data to unauthorized computers, and some Android malware is specializing in “drive-by downloads,” leaving users unaware of what’s being installed.

        • Toshiba tablet’s loaded with ports, but too hefty for eWEEK reviewer

          Toshiba’s Thrive is a decent, if unspectacular, entry to the trundling Android “Honeycomb” tablet market, according to this eWEEK review. However, the availability of multiple ports will please enterprise users, who might also like the removable battery better than did author Clint Boulton.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Open source Vs proprietary: the war goes on!

    Torry Harris Business Solutions (P) Ltd., (THBS) is one among them who are actively embracing open source solutions and contributing to open source community.

    “Being a player in the software services space, Torry Harris considers the open source software as a key enabler to cost-effective software solutions,” says Karthik T S, head of CoE SOA, Cloud and OSS, Torry Harris Business Solutions (P) Ltd. in an interaction with CIOL.

  • Indian open source community, biggest in the World

    The technology industry in India has developed significantly in the last few years and India has evolved relatively well to the idea of open source software and adoption rates are remarkably good.

    With many companies embracing for open-source technologies, the role of open source in IT has been changed in many companies.

  • Before you get locked into Lync, consider open source options
  • Events

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Thunderbird 6.0 arrives in Beta Channel

        Mozilla has announced the release of version 6.0 of Thunderbird – its open source news and email client – into the Beta Channel. While a final release date for Thunderbird 6.0 has yet to be confirmed, a production version will likely follow shortly after Firefox 6.0, which is scheduled for 16 August.

      • Google Toolbar drops support for Firefox. Why now?

        Google has decided to drop support for Firefox for the Google Toolbar.

        No, that’s not a bad thing at all. The toolbar is a relic of any older era. An era when Firefox Sync didn’t exist, an era when the awesomebar wasn’t truly aweseome.

        Apparently however, Mozilla is seeing the Google Toolbar issue as being a potential barrier to adoption for Firefox 5.

  • SaaS

    • Is open source in the cloud still open source?

      Open source platform as a service (PaaS) platforms are one of the most exciting topics in the software industry nowadays. Following the $212M acquisition of Heroku by Salesforce.com, we’ve seen how in a matter of months, platforms like dotCloud of VMWare’s Cloud Foundry have emerged with complete PaaS suites based on popular open source technologies.

      The value proposition behind this type of PaaS offer is very simple. These platforms will enable the foundation to host, manage, provision and scale solutions based on some of the most renowned open source technologies such as Ruby on Rails, Hadoop, MySQL among dozens of others.

    • Open source and the IT company, a lucrative proposition

      As my colleague Derrick Harris suggests, the open-source cloud-computing project OpenStack has come a long way in just a year. But it’s only one of a growing number of open-source projects challenging expensive and proprietary incumbents across the IT industry. From storage to networking, open-source projects are emerging that offer viable alternatives.

    • Rackspace’s cloud going all OpenStack
    • WS02 Brings Middleware to the Cloud

      Middleware servers used to be locked down to on-premise deployments, but that has now changed in the modern world of the cloud and Platform-as-a-Service.

      Middleware servers used to be locked down to on-premise deployments, but that has now changed in the modern world of the cloud and Platform-as-a-Service.

  • Databases

    • EnterpriseDB Announces the Postgres Enterprise Manager BETA!

      EnterpriseDB is proud to introduce Postgres Enterprise Manager, the first enterprise-wide architected management tool for database professionals who are looking to efficiently manage and monitor Postgres servers throughout their organizations.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • Test-Driving VirtualBox 4.1 on Linux: Bumpy but Pretty Good

      Oracle released VirtualBox 4.1 on July 19 with a slew of improvements ranging from usability improvements to rasing the ceiling for RAM to 1TB for 64-bit hosts. With 4.1, we decided to take VirtualBox out for a spin and see how it handles.

      I’ve been using desktop virtualization since the early days, when VMware was a scrappy little company shipping a nearly unheard-of product — a desktop virtualization tool that would let you run Windows in VM in Linux. No more dual-booting for those folks who had to have access to Microsoft Word or QuickBooks but wanted to enjoy Linux as their desktop of choice.

  • CMS

  • Semi-Open Source

    • Zenoss Community Alliance (ZCA)

      The community has created the Zenoss Community Alliance (ZCA) which is a group of senior community members who are working to evolve Zenoss core and the community to better serve the needs of the community and the entire Zenoss ecosystem. To this end, the board of ZCA has provided the following agenda…

    • Jaspersoft may be looking to acquire with its $11M funding

      Business intelligence software maker, Jaspersoft, announced yesterday that it raised $11 million dollars in funding. The round was lead by existing investors Red Hat and SAP Ventures in addition to including newcomer Quest Software.

      Jaspersoft caters to the enterprise with business intelligence products. It aims to centralize the way data is secured, delivered and analyzed.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

  • Project Releases

    • nginx-1.0.5

      2011-07-19

      nginx-1.0.5 stable version, nginx-0.8.55 and nginx-0.7.69 legacy stable versions have been released.

    • Imixs open source BPM, workflow engine reaches 3.0

      And in May, BonitaSoft upgraded its open source BPM suite which is also developed in Java and available under the GPL.

    • The Evolution of Asterisk (or: How We Arrived at Asterisk 10)

      We are fast approaching the seven-year anniversary of the release of Asterisk 1.0.0, which occurred at the first AstriCon in September, 2004. If you look back a little further, there were various “0.x” releases made as early as December of 1999… my, how time has flown!

      We’ve had quite a few ‘major’ releases of Asterisk since then, including 1.2, 1.4, and most recently, 1.8. Each of these releases has included significant changes, and sometimes architecture-improving changes. Each of them has also included substantial new functionality for Asterisk users. Along the way, we’ve been asked by many people in the community when we are going to start working on (or release) “Asterisk 2.0.” Typically, we’ve responded by saying that will not happen until we can really justify such a significant change in the version number. Many open source projects have gone through similar progressions, and quite a number of them have in fact undergone complete (or nearly complete) rewrites resulting in new ‘major’ versions.

  • Licensing

  • Openness/Sharing

  • Programming

    • ActiveState Advances New Cloud Platform, Stackato, to Beta With New Features

      PostgreSQL, Python 3 and Additional Core Services Added, Opens Testing Group Further

    • Google Summer of Code 2011: midterms and statistics

      Google has published “a few more interesting statistics” from this year’s Google Summer of Code (GSoC) event; in May, a statistical breakdown of accepted students was published. According to a post by Stephanie Taylor on the Google Open Source Blog, 202 (18.1%) of this year’s 1,115 student participants took part in last year’s programme. Of those students, 35 were also part of the 2009 programme, meaning that 3.1% are three year students.

    • Gearing up for Java 7

      The last four Java Specification Requests (JSRs) required for Java 7 have received the blessing of the Java Community Process (JCP). JSR 292, support for dynamically typed languages, JSR 334, small enhancements to Java language and JSR 203, more new I/O APIs (NIO.2), all passed with unanimous support in the final approval ballot. The only note of dissent was from Google in the final approval vote for JSR 336, the umbrella JSR which incorporates all the JSRs required for Java 7.

    • European Space Agency Summer of Code
  • Standards/Consortia

    • DOJ Delays Web Accessibility Regulations

      Earlier this month the United States Department of Justice admitted what many of us have suspected: we will not be seeing web accessibility regulations in the United States for commercial and public entities any time soon. Some time in 2013 at the earliest.

      In July, 2010, the Department issued what is called an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rule Making indicating that it was planning to issue regulations about web accessibility. The step after an “Advanced Notice” is a “Notice of Proposed Rule Making” (NPRM). After that is the rule itself. In its semi-annual regulatory agenda for Spring 2011, however, the DOJ called the NPRM for Web Accessibility a “Long Term Item” not expected until December, 2012. That’s well over a year from now. And it is close to two years after the public comment period on the Advanced Notice closed, and almost two and one half years after the DOJ announced the possible regulations in July, 2010.

    • TinyOgg finally comes to an end

      But now, it seems that what we are doing is obsolete. In May 2010, Google set free the WebM format which was quickly adopted by major web browsers in addition to the largest online video provider, YouTube. 99% of what people watch on YouTube is now available in WebM and thus playable without Flash or any other unfree technologies. (Well, in addition to the fact that I have not posted any entry in many months, which meant that there was no itch anymore!)

      Now is the time to move on to other projects (or to college life, who knows? :) ). By July 15th, TinyOgg entries URLs will be automatically redirected to the original video page and I will run the service for at least eighteen months more.

Leftovers

  • Government shutting down hundreds of data centers

    The U.S. government is aiming to pull the plug on hundreds of unneeded data centers over the next few years in an attempt to save taxpayers some hard-earned cash.

  • No apologies for Microsoft Windows

    Recently I’ve had some discussion with colleagues about Mac OS X, Windows, and Linux in comparison to each other. Generally, I’ve found that most people agree that Mac OS X is more stable than Windows, and those that are familiar with Linux feel that it too is more stable than Windows. But after that being said, they come back with an apology for Microsoft stating that they (Microsoft) have to get Windows to run on fragmented hardware, whereas Apple standardizes the hardware and can therefore provide a more stable operating system for it, because there aren’t nearly as many variations in hardware configurations.

  • Cablegate

    • Petition defends David Hicks from censorship attempt

      Julian Assange, John Pilger and Noam Chomsky have added their names to a new online petition in support of former Guantanamo Bay prisoner David Hicks.

      They join scores of other signatories, including Greens MP Adam Bandt, human rights lawyer Julian Burnside, Liberty Victoria President Spencer Zifcak and Overland Journal editor Jeff Sparrow. Overland released the online petition on July 21.

    • Framing The Narrative: Murdoch v. Assange

      In Murdoch’s empire, talking points from above dictate the news delivered to the masses. Yet Rupert’s writers need only scan the front pages to discern how best to please their boss and get prominently featured. It’s a culture of corruption, as countless recent articles have documented, designed to maximise profits and political power.

      But the media landscape is changing. Why should we ordinary citizens of the world keep paying for news, when we can get it online for free? But then, if media organisations are not making a profit, how can they afford to keep supplying news for free? This remains the great unresolved Catch-22 of the C21st Fourth Estate.

      News Corporation is planning more firewalls to protect media content, despite the previous failure of such models at organisations like the New York Times. The UK Independent newspaper is now running an online survey asking readers to tell them how the paper can deal with the shifting media paradigm. The Economist prominently features an on-going debate on the subject.

      Meanwhile, I suspect The Guardian’s apparent anti-WikiLeaks crusade may be motivated by a desire to “own the space” that WikiLeaks has staked out (namely, the safest place to publish leaks in this new globalized, digital world). Yes, all the big media organisations are scared, even Murdoch’s dreaded nemeses at The Guardian.

    • Wikileaks report reveals corruption in Lithuanian newspapers
    • Library of Congress: We didn’t call WikiLeaks ‘extremist’

      The Library of Congress says it was not responsible for categorizing a WikiLeaks-related book as “extremist” and that it has decided to removed that label.

  • Finance

    • Consumer Bureau Launches in Shark-Infested Waters

      According to the Center for Responsive Politics, Wall Street and the financial services lobby spent an eye-popping $1,400,000,000 between 2008 and 2010 to kill financial reform. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has a whole unit dedicated to killing it. This year, the those same forces spent $156 million on lobbying in the first quarter. The big banks are fighting the implementation of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform bill with a stable of willing Congressmen and an army of lobbyists fanned out across a dozen federal agencies where Dodd-Frank rulemaking is underway.

    • Debt debate reverberates in state governments

      Virginia’s governor is livid that his famously tight-fisted state could face higher borrowing costs to build roads and schools. Maryland has put off a $718 million bond sale for three days because of the current financial uncertainty. And California plans to borrow about $5 billion from private investors next week to ensure it can cover day-to-day operating expenses should the federal government default on its debt.

    • House votes to check new consumer agency

      The House greeted the official opening Thursday of the new agency to protect consumers from financial abuse by voting to change its structure and reach.

      Republican sponsors said they were trying to make the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau more transparent and accountable. Democrats said Republicans wanted to cripple the agency before it gets on its feet.

    • Morgan Stanley Posts Loss That Hints at Recovery

      At Morgan Stanley, even a loss can be a win.

      Although the financial firm reported a second-quarter loss of $558 million on Thursday, three crucial divisions posted significant gains, a promising sign that the turnaround plan Morgan Stanley embarked on after the financial crisis was taking hold.

    • On Its First Day, Consumer Bureau Finds Support

      The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau formally opened for business on Thursday, much to the consternation of Congressional Republicans.

      But as conservative lawmakers step up their attacks on the new regulator, aiming to undermine its structure and authority, champions of the bureau are pushing back.

    • 4 more Credit Suisse bankers charged in tax case

      Federal prosecutors in Virginia have charged four more bankers with Zurich-based Credit Suisse Group with conspiracy in what they say was a long-running scheme to help U.S. taxpayers hide as much as $4 billion in assets.

      Prosecutors originally charged four people in the scheme in February, so the charges announced Thursday bring the total number of people charged up to eight. Charging documents filed in the case do not specify what bank the group worked for, but The Associated Press previously reported its identity.

    • Why aren’t Obama’s numbers lower?
    • Harry Reid: Cut, cap may be among ‘worst legislation’ in history

      Majority Leader Harry Reid said the Senate will vote Friday on the Cut, Cap and Balance Act, a bill backed by conservatives that he called “weak and senseless” and “perhaps some of the worst legislation in the history of this country.”

      The Senate had been expected to vote Saturday on the House-passed bill, which has little chance of passing the Democratic-controlled upper chamber. But Reid expedited the vote so the Senate can quickly move to a backup plan he and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) are hatching to raise the debt ceiling and avert a financial default by the Aug. 2 deadline, a Democratic aide said.

    • Economy’s spring slump could last through summer

      The economy could lapse even further if Congress and the Obama administration fail to reach an agreement on raising the nation’s borrowing limit in the coming week.

    • Goldman wins dismissal of Timberwolf CDO lawsuit

      NEW YORK (Reuters) – Goldman Sachs Group Inc won the dismissal of a lawsuit accusing it of causing an investor to become insolvent by fraudulently misleading it about risky debt it expected would tumble in value.

      In a decision made public on Thursday, U.S. District Judge Barbara Jones in Manhattan said the plaintiff, Basis Yield Alpha Fund, failed to sufficiently show that its investment in the Timberwolf 2007-1 collateralized debt obligation was a “domestic” transaction, entitling it to sue in a U.S. court.

    • Goldman Model Championed by Blankfein Planted Seeds of Distress

      The window shades were lowered to block out the sunlight soaking lower Manhattan on a Friday afternoon in June as 14 students in Eric H. Kessler’s executive MBA class gathered in a conference room to present their analyses of Goldman Sachs Group Inc.’s leadership.

      The firm’s management shows “resistance to change” and is “doing business in a bubble,” one of the three student teams explained in a PowerPoint presentation. Another recommended creating an “ethics role” within Goldman Sachs’s securities division. Kessler, who teaches management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, peppered the students with questions. Could cohesive culture be a weakness as well as a strength?

    • 15 Reasons You Don’t Want To Work At Goldman Sachs

      There are plenty of good reasons to work at Goldman Sachs; we’ve written about them before.

      But inspired the bank’s miserable earnings report this morning, we realized that the negatives are piling up considerably.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • ALEC Exposed: The Koch Connection

      Hundreds of ALEC’s model bills and resolutions bear traces of Koch DNA: raw ideas that were once at the fringes but that have been carved into “mainstream” policy through the wealth and will of Charles and David Koch. Of all the Kochs’ investments in right-wing organizations, ALEC provides some of the best returns: it gives the Kochs a way to make their brand of free-market fundamentalism legally binding.

    • The Murdochs must stop spinning and resign

      In 2004, I created Outfoxed to expose Rupert Murdoch’s war on journalism. Focusing on Fox News, we examined how NewsCorp has long blurred the line between corporate interests and journalistic integrity. The film presented an in-depth look at the dangers of ever-enlarging corporations taking control of the public’s right to know. Those dangers were shown to include ethic-less journalism, as well as the role of public relations spin in replacing the honest presentation of facts.

      On Tuesday, as Rupert and James Murdoch appeared before parliament, this theme was repeated. Their testimony was less about true and honest answers and more about the script of a public relations firm, and an attempt to spin the public debate on issues of corporate disgrace.

      If their testimonies presented any information at all, it would be how much the Murdochs want to promote the spin of willful ignorance. For two incredibly involved businessmen, their testimonies would lead you to believe that they have long had absolutely no idea about what happens within their company.

    • Rupert Murdoch’s Fox News ran ‘black ops’ department, former executive claims

      Rupert Murdoch’s Fox News television channel had a “black ops” department that may have illegally hacked private telephone records, a former executive for the station has alleged.

  • Censorship

    • Website blocking minutes released under FOI

      109 MPs have now signed Julian Huppert MP’s EDM 1913, which called for the Government to reconsider policies such as website blocking, in light of the recent UN Special Rapporteur Report that was expressly critical of blocking on freedom of expression grounds. More recently, the Organisation for Security an Cooperation in Europe released a report that reached similar conclusions about disconnection and website blocking jeopardising rights to freedom of expression. Over 8,600 people have written to their MPs about this issue.

  • Civil Rights

    • The Government still wants to hack your phone

      While politicians are convinced that Murdoch’s press has over-stepped the mark by routine hacking of citizen’s phones, let’s remember that plans for mass, pervasive hacking of our phones and emails is still sat waiting for revival by the Home Office.

07.22.11

Links 22/7/2011: Linux Kernel 3.0 is Out, New Ubuntu LTS, Oracle Buys Ksplice

Posted in News Roundup at 6:03 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Linux Australia to tweak constitution

    Linux Australia, the umbrella group for Linux user groups in the country, plans to make some changes to its constitution, according to its president, John Ferlito.

    The major change will be moving the organisation’s financial year from one that is the same as the calendar year to one that begins on October 1.

    “We need to change our financial year so we have time to put an audit together as we are now required to by NSW Fair Trading,” Ferlito told iTWire.

    [...]

    Last year, the organisation conducted an online survey of members to find out what functions they expected the body to perform.

  • TLWIR 9: Microsoft’s Kernel Contribution, The Hurd, and Open Hardware from CERN

    Summary: In the last edition of TLWIR, I discussed Toyota’s recent embrace of the GNU/Linux operating system. In this week’s edition, I will expand on this theme of organizations embracing the concepts of openness and freedom.

  • What’s new in Linux 3.0

    The transition to the Linux kernel’s ‘third decade’ sees numerous changes to the Btrfs filesystem. The kernel now includes all the major components needed to host guest systems under Xen and includes many new and revised drivers.

    Linus Torvalds and his collaborators have taken just two months to complete the latest kernel. The most notable change, however, is cosmetic rather than technical – the transition from version 2.6.39 to 3.0. This not been taken as a cue to insert major changes, however, and the new kernel is in fact a perfectly normal version increment, following the pattern set for the 2.6 series.

  • Server

  • Audiocasts/Shows

  • Kernel Space

    • Oracle Buys Ksplice

      Oracle announced that it has acquired Ksplice, Inc., the creator of innovative zero downtime update technology for Linux. The transaction has closed. Ksplice’s management and its highly-regarded team of engineers bring significant domain expertise to Oracle.

    • Oracle Fires Another Shot Over Red Hat’s Bow

      Oracle announced today that it had bought Ksplice Inc., the company behind the software that allows a rebootless kernel change. This exciting technology was welcomed by the Linux community and was even provided free of cost to Fedora users. Knowing Oracle’s track record, this will undoubtedly cause worry throughout the community.

      Oracle isn’t planning on shutting this one down, although the ksplice.com blogs are currently down, but is planning on using it to offer zero downtime guarantees. In fact, the very wording of their press release almost comes out and states that this technology willl no longer be available to other distribution makers.

    • Oracle Buys Ksplice for Rapid Linux Updates

      Make no mistake about it, Oracle is serious about its Linux business. Today Oracle announced what I consider to be a significant addition to that business with the acquisition of Ksplice.

      Ksplice is this really neat tech that lets Linux admins ‘hot patch’ that is patch an in-use system without the need for a reboot. For a mission critical system, that’s a big deal.

    • Note on Linux 3.0 and the 3.1 merge window

      As everybody knows by now, not only did I do an -rc7 last week instead of releasing 3.0 (due to some worries about the RCU code), but I ended up also not doing the 3.0 on Monday because of a pathname lookup bug and then some _more_ RCU issues.

    • Preparing For The Linux 3.1 Kernel

      Linus Torvalds is expected to release the Linux 3.0 kernel today. He has announced that the last-minute bugs that held up the Monday release should be addressed and he’s preparing for the Linux 3.1 kernel merge window to be opened.

    • Linux kernel 3.0 released
  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

  • Distributions

    • Gallery: My top five Linux desktop distributions

      SystemRescueCD isn’t a Linux desktop you’d use every day, but it’s essential to anyone who’s ever had to fix a misbehaving desktop of any sort.

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • PCLinuxOS In The Classroom

        The following comes from Jim, a member on the PCLinuxOS forums.

        I thought I’d share it with my blog readers. It points out how new users immediately see Linux as being attractive, powerful , and easy to set up and use. Once you see Linux is action, your curiosity level spikes!

      • Review: PCLinuxOS 2011.6 KDE

        The last time I tried out PCLinuxOS was at version 2010.07, and I tried the KDE version then too. I didn’t particularly it then because I felt it dropped a lot of useful applications from the 2009.2 release (which I tried out before I started this blog), and because it was pretty slow on my computer. Then again, my perspectives and desires have changed a little bit since then, so don’t read too much into that.

        [...]

        So what’s the deal? I really liked the applications, and other applications installed and worked well. After much struggle with getting PCLinuxOS to start X/11 properly, my laptop’s hardware was detected fine. Another strong point is PCLinuxOS’s reputation as being stable, yet having access to the latest software through its rolling-release nature. Finally, it’s configuration tools are still really good and really handy. But as with SimplyMEPIS 11.0, because I had to type GRUB commands to get it to work correctly in the live session, I can’t recommend this to total newbies to Linux, at least based on my own experiences. Plus, even the positive part of the experience was marred by that lone KDE Plasma crash, which I am not used to seeing much anymore. I would recommend this more to slightly more experienced Linux users who aren’t afraid to tinker and troubleshoot.

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) EVP, CFO Charles E Jr Peters sells 5,532 Shares
      • Insurance Technology – NTT Com Honored By Red Hat for Its Biz Hosting Basic Solution
      • Fedora

        • Fedora Community (the app) Update
        • Kororaa 15 (Squirt) Beta 2 released

          The second beta release of Kororaa 15 (codename “Squirt”) has been released and is available for download, in 32 and 64 bit with KDE 4.6 and GNOME 3.

          This release fixes the black screen issue that some users were reporting, as well as having the desktop theme customisations for KDE (as well as GNOME) correctly applied. The usual Kororaa goodies apply.

        • Fedora 16 to have Grub2, GNOME 3.2 and KDE 4.7

          The range of features in Fedora 16, which is scheduled to be released at the end of October, is becoming clearer now that the deadline for submitting new features has passed. Late submissions are accepted on rare occasions, but the “feature freeze” is planned for next Tuesday – by then, all major advancements on the Linux distribution’s feature list are planned to be largely complete and ready for testing. The first and only alpha version is to be released three weeks later – on 16 August.

        • Living with Fedora – A Debian/Ubuntu User’s Take on Fedora 15

          I’ve been a die-hard Debian fan for about 10 years, and I’ve written several articles on the subject. That said, most of our Linux-savvy readers are Ubuntu users, so that’s been my main desktop OS for as long as I’ve been a MakeTechEasier writer. Ubuntu has always been fine, and generally got the job done without hassle, however this past release (11.04, Natty Narwhal) has been the cause of a rift among many Ubuntu users. This release pushed Unity, their homegrown desktop environment, front and center. Like many others, I’ve never managed to get a feel for Unity. After weighing my options, I decided to jump ship and try out Fedora 15. It’s the first Fedora I’ve tried since Core 1, and things certainly have changed.

    • Debian Family

      • People behind Debian: Martin Michlmayr, former Debian Project Leader

        Martin Michlmayr is a Debian developer since 2000 and I share quite a few things with him, starting with his age and involvement in the quality assurance team. He managed to be elected Debian Project Leader in 2003 and 2004.

        He’s no longer as active as he used to be but his input is always very valuable and he continues to do very interesting things in particular concerning the support of NAS devices. Read on for the details.

      • Derivatives

        • Elementary OS: A True User-Friendly Linux

          A Linux desktop that’s easy to use for people who don’t have a Ph.D. in computer science has been a holy grail. But a new release, Elementary OS, comes pretty close.

          While the Linux/Apache/MySQL/PHP stack powers many of the Web servers bringing you your pages, as a quick check of Netcraft shows (yes, even Walyou!) it’s success on the desktops of non-techies has been more limited. Some Linux partisans entertain Microsoft conspiracy theories, but the simple fact is that Linux has traditionally been rather difficult to set up. A few distributions, notably Ubuntu, have come fairly close to making Linux mainstream for ordinary computer users.

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • New Look Ubuntu Software Centre Delayed Until 12.04?

            The design overhaul of the Ubuntu Software Centre many had hoped would land in Ubuntu 11.10 is seeming unlikely.

          • Ubuntu 10.04.3 (Lucid Lynx) LTS released!

            The Ubuntu team is proud to announce the release of Ubuntu 10.04.3 LTS, the third maintenance update to Ubuntu’s 10.04 LTS release. This release includes updated server, desktop, alternate installation CDs and DVDs for the i386 and amd64 architectures.

            The Kubuntu team is proud to announce the release of Kubuntu 10.04.3. This release includes updated images for the desktop and alternate installation CDs for the i386 and amd64 architectures.

          • Ubuntu Development Update
          • Ubuntu 11.10: Fast And Friendly

            Ubuntu 11.10, which also goes by the somewhat ridiculous code name of Oneiric Ocelot, is anything but ridiculous if you’re a power desktop user — judging by its early “alpha” version. It has the fastest boot-time we’ve seen on an HDD-based PC, shows snappy performance between applications and just may be the easiest PC operating system in the world to navigate.

            A change under the hood seems to have made all the difference in the world.

            When Ubuntu 11.04 met the world earlier this year, it provided a new “Unity” interface that looked cleaner and friendlier but many complained that it acted clunky and slow at times. Developers of the Linux distro then jumped into action like the pit crew on a NASCAR team; they swapped out the Gnome Desktop Manager (GDM) with a newer, lighter LightDM. From what we’ve seen, what that did was, essentially, remove legacy code with code that was built to be less complex and faster.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Phones

      • Android

        • Vodafone Smart Android smartphone

          You can argue all you want about the merits of the various mobile operating systems but it’s undoubtedly Android that has put smartphones into the hands of the impecunious masses and in numbers that would have been inconceivable just eighteen months ago.

        • My favourite Android applications

          It’s been a year now that I’ve replaced my old Sony Ericsson with a brand new HTC Desire! I have to admit that I am amazed by this excellent Android mobile phone. 1GHz Snapdragon processor, 576MB RAM, 5 Megapixel camera with 720P video recording and Android 2.2 Froyo along with HTC Sense UI. For those who hear the word Android for the first time I will say that Android is Google’s operating system for mobile devices such as mobile phones and tablets. And of course it is based on Linux!

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Android tablets take 30 percent global share, but struggle in enterprise

        Android tablets took a 30 percent share of global tablet shipments in the second quarter, compared to 61 percent for Apple, as part of a 331 percent growth in total sales since Q2 2010, says Strategy Analytics. According to a Good Technology study, however, Android tablets still trail the iPad significantly in the enterprise — where Apple represented 95 percent of second-quarter sales.

Free Software/Open Source

  • The future of free software – are we on rocky ground?

    And what if other things become more sexy? Exactly. If a free software project is not seen as innovative, as ‘doing cool things’, it loses momentum. Which, due to the high turnover in free software, quickly leads to a project’s end. This might indeed be the effect of being able to write software for mobile phones which everyone can get their hands on. It is far more cool if you can do that, get your ‘app’ out there, even make a buck.

    The obvious answer to the question you don’t even have to ask is then obvious: yes, to make free software grow, it needs to be more interesting. We need to talk about technology. Not talk down new initiatives, but be excited about them! This is why I applaud GNOME for the work on GNOME Shell. This is why I think what KDE is doing with Plasma Active is awesome. Such projects bring energy, excitement and, most importantly, new contributors! New people in free software!

  • Copyright, copyleft, and culture

    Nina Paley has certainly stirred things up with her recent “rantifesto” on free culture and free software. It has spawned numerous responses on various blogs, both from supporters and those who disagree with her contention that the Free Software Foundation (FSF) is being hypocritical in its licensing of its web pages and other non-software works. For some people it is a bit galling to see an organization that is set up to ensure the right to create and distribute derivative works (subject to some conditions, of course) of software, be so steadfast in its refusal to apply those same freedoms to text and other works.

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox and Thunderbird Stable, Beta, Aurora and Nightly Channel PPAs

        Here is a list of all PPAs for different Firefox and Thunderbird Channels which you can add to your sources list and always have up to date packages. We have covered PPA instructions all for all these channels in different articles but now you can find them all at one place.

        PPA instructions for Stable, Beta and Aurora channels will upgrade your existing Firefox/Thunderbird installation while instructions for Nightly channel will install a new daily build trunk version side by side to your existing Firefox/Thunderbird installation. Please note that other than Stable channel, all other channels have beta/development builds not suitable for production purposes so use them at your own risk.

      • Firefox 8 is 20% Faster than Firefox 5, Install Firefox 8 in Ubuntu via PPA

        Firefox 8 recently found its way into the nightly build channel. According to a recent study by extremetech.com, Firefox 8 is already 20% faster than Firefox 5 in almost every metric and has got a drastically reduced memory footprint as well.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • Developer Interview: Tor Lillqvist

      I am Tor Lillqvist. On LibreOffice IRC I am known as tml_ . I live in Helsinki, Finland, with my wife and our 10-year daughter. My son has already grown up and moved out. Some of my passions are trains (modern and recent electric and diesel technology, I am not that much into steam nostalgia), reading good books, listening to challenging and/or good music, the visual arts, architecture, and travels.

      Most recently I have read “The Evolution of Bruno Littlemore” by Benjamin Hale, “Hitch-22″ by Christopher Hitchens and “Homage to Catalonia” by George Orwell. Among art museums that have impressed me are the Guggenheim Bilbao and ICA Boston. I love the music of for instance David Sylvian, Nico, Steve Reich, Sigur Rós, Erik Satie, rechenzentrum, Emilie Simon, Carnatic and Gamelan music.

  • Project Releases

    • Breakin Version 3.20 Released

      Advanced Clustering Technologies announces the latest version of its open source stress test and diagnostics tool, breakin. The new release offers UI improvements and bug fixes, and new utilities in the rescue environment, including: blockdev, numastat, and bonnie++. SSH and SCP clients are now included in the boot image environment, and the 3.20 release easily builds under Red Hat/CentOS 6. Upgrades to testing procedures also provide improved processor stress testing.

  • Openness/Sharing

  • Programming

    • Eclipse illustrates open source development diversity

      As we have highlighted on numerous occasions, we are seeing growing focus on corporate-led open source communities. A prime example would be the Eclipse Foundation, which is clearly dominated by corporate interests but encourages a community effort to work together to with a joint purpose – to deliver the Indigo release for example.

  • Standards/Consortia

Leftovers

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • I’ll be away for a week next week.

      Relations between Washington and Islamabad deteriorated further when the US justice department charged two men alleged to have been in the pay of the Pakistani intelligence service.

    • New film tackles military justice system in the West Bank

      A new film by Israeli director Ra’anan Alexandrowicz tackles the issue of military courts in the West Bank like it has never been investigated on film. Israel’s military legal justice system in the West Bank has been treated on +972 in relatively great detail especially in reference to the unarmed demonstrations which have spread through border villages for the past eight years. According to the press release for the film,

  • Finance

    • New film tackles military justice system in the West Bank

      In 2009, stock owners, bankers, brokers, hedge-fund wizards, highly paid corporate executives, corporations, and mid-ranking managers pocketed—as either income, benefits, or perks such as corporate jets—an estimated $1.91 trillion that 40 years ago would have collectively gone to non-supervisory and production workers in the form of higher wages and benefits. These are the 88 million workers in the private sector who are closely tied to production processes and/or are not responsible for the supervision, planning, or direction of other workers.

    • Advice Hillary Clinton Should, But Won’t, Give to Economically-Strapped Greece

      When U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton visited Greece, she praised the Greek government’s austerity measures to reduce deficits and cut spending. The U.S. and Greece face a common challenge of dealing with soaring deficits, but they also face something else in common: a refusal to deal with out-of-control military spending. And given that the United States is a major arms seller to Greece, Hillary Clinton will encourage the Greeks to slash workers’ wages and pensions, but not its enormous military appetite.

  • ACTA

    • European Parliament Study Confirms ACTA Must Be Rejected

      The EU Parliament just published a study assessing ACTA in view of its upcoming ratification vote. Most of the report includes the typical copyright extremism nonsense, especially when it comes to the digital environment. However, this scholarly study cannot but recognize that ACTA contains serious legal flaws and brings nothing to EU citizens. Despite trying hard to help the Commission, it is forced to conclude by suggesting that the EU Parliament should reject ACTA.

Reader’s Picks

07.21.11

Links 21/7/2011: Linux is Gradually Beating Apple in Europe

Posted in News Roundup at 5:51 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Developer gets Chromium OS up and running on a MacBook Air

    A UK-based developer who finally scraped together enough money for a MacBook Air managed to hack Google’s Chromium OS onto it a short time later, according to a blog post published on Tuesday. Chromium’s startup time is slower than OS X and the need for BIOS emulation bogs the entire thing down, but the author managed to force the OS and the hardware to put aside most of their differences. For science.

  • Server

  • Kernel Space

    • Linus is on Google+ will Linux users follow?

      Where Linus goes, I (for better or for worse) will now follow. If he’s on Google +, the so am I. For journalist that cover Linux, I suppose they’ll all come to the same conclusion too. But what about users?

      Following the LKML can be a tedious and painful process. If Linus is not giving out vital human-readable kernel information over Google + won’t that be interesting to potentially millions of people? (or at least tens of thousands?)

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • Good Bye, Kubuntu! Hello, Linux Mint XFCE!!!

      If you look at systems, you see that I have GNOME (Debian) and KDE (Mageia). Would it be nice to have something else installed? Yes, and this something else is XFCE.

    • Black day for green jobs: Feds prepare to cut environmental agency

      The federal government will slash funding to the environmental agency that evaluates potentially harmful policies and projects before they get the green light.

      And if the trend in declining funds and employees continues, Canada could experience a series of environmental disasters, as government loses access to valuable information about proposed resource projects — whether it’s shale gas extraction, offshore drilling or big hydroelectric projects, critics say.

  • Distributions

    • New Releases

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Mageia: the return of the Girl Next Door

        Like many acolytes in the Temple of the Mighty Penguin, I had my first successful Linux experience with Ubuntu. (It was 7.04. I still have the disk.) I was generally satisfied with Ubuntu, but had some trouble with WiFi, looked for alternatives, enjoyed the exploratory nature of distrohopping, and sometime in 2009 I made my way over to Arch Linux. I liked Arch Linux. I liked commencing a hardworking, creative day with startx. I liked trying to keep up with the new stuff that populated the repos daily, almost hourly. But one day, I ran the pacman -Syu command, which is something like the conary updateall command I waxed hysterical about in a previous post. After that, my Work Computer didn’t work.

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Latest Roku boxes shrink, get their game on

      Roku announced three new versions of its Linux-based, Netflix-ready streaming IP media player, all running on less than two Watts and adding support for casual gaming. The Roku 2 HD ($60) supports 720p playback; the Roku 2 XD($80) moves up to 1080p; and the Roku 2 XS ($100) adds USB and Ethernet ports, as well as a motion-control remote and Angry Birds.

    • Roku officially unveils new game-enabled video players
    • Linux-Based Wireless Device Server

      Lantronix, a leading global provider of smart connectivity solutions that enable cloud-based access to virtually any device, anywhere, anytime, today announced the commercial availability of its next generation Linux-based wireless device server, PremierWave EN™. Also available with this release of PremierWave EN is an embedded Linux development offering from Timesys Corp., provider of the industry’s most-easy-to-use and affordable embedded Linux development products and professional services.

    • Phones

      • Android

        • Dual-core Droid 3 slider is Motorola’s best yet, review says

          Motorola’s Droid 3 is a nice addition to the Android smartphone family Verizon Wireless began selling in October 2009, according to this eWEEK review. With a new keyboard, an eight megapixel camera, and Android 2.3 (“Gingerbread”), this device is “the best of the Droids yet.”

        • Apple suffers stunning iPhone market share slide

          Android drowns out iPhone sales in Europe

        • Apple gets a kicking in Europe

          It seems that the heathens in Europe are abandoning the fruity cargo-cult Apple almost as fast as the Anglican church is losing its members.

          According to Computerworld, Jobs’ Mob has lost more than a third of its UK iPhone market share since June 2010.

          Apparently Apple’s moderate majority have had a gutsful of the Walled Garden of Delights and are converting to Android.

          Apple fanboys are insisting that the reason for the conversions is because the world is waiting for the new iPhone 4, which are slightly cheaper.

          The figures come from Kantar and are mostly being seen as a sign that Symbian is dying more than anything else. For example in the UK Symbian’s share fell from 32.7 percent to 10.7 percent. However what is strange is that while RIM in most countries in the UK its share rose from 19.4 percent to 22.3 percent.

        • Android Phones Help Poor Farmers in Uganda

          About 400 so-called “community knowledge workers” in Uganda are using Android phones loaded with an open-source data-collection application that feeds data into Salesforce. The phones are powered by batteries that can be recharged in a variety of ways, including solar and bicycle.

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Lenovo’s Honeycomb tablets feature Netflix

        Lenovo announced two Android 3.1 tablets: a consumer-oriented IdeaPad Tablet K1 claimed to be the first tablet to offer Netflix, and a business-focused ThinkPad Tablet. Each tablet follows the Honeycomb script by offering an Nvidia Tegra 2 processor, a 10.1-inch WXGA display, and dual cameras, but the ThinkPad also features pen support and a standard-size USB port and SD reader.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Top general says Defense Department IT in ‘Stone Age’

    Cartwright, who was speaking at the FOSE information technology conference here, said the DOD is sending increasing amounts of data, such as video, to soldiers on the battlefield, and it’s beginning to build an architecture “that starts to take us where we need to be.” But Cartwright quickly tempered that.

    “Quite frankly, my feeling is — at least being a never-satisfied person — the department is pretty much in the Stone Age as far as IT is concerned,” Cartwright said.

    Cartwright cited problems with proprietary systems that aren’t connected to anything else and are unable to quickly adapt to changing needs. “We have huge numbers of data links that move data between proprietary platforms — one point to another point,” he said.

    The most striking example of an IT failure came during the second Gulf War, where the Marines and the Army were dispatched in southern Iraq.

  • New hardware-based open source tool to measure broadband performance

    BISMark, a project led by Georgia Tech and the University of Napoli, measures Internet performance via router

    Researchers have released a new open source tool that could be downloaded by anyone to measure their broadband speed and identify speed issues if any.

  • Mozilla

  • SaaS

    • OpenStack Turns 1

      It was 1 year ago today that openstack was officially announced.

      I remember the day well, because it was the first time I’ve spoken with Chris Kemp, NASA’s chief technology officer for IT. NASA was one of the key founding members of OpenStack alongside Rackspace.

      It is NASA’s Nebula engine that started off as the core compute cloud technology, while Rackspace’s tech is on the storage side.

  • CMS

  • BSD

    • What to expect in OpenBSD 5.0 onwards

      That does not mean that there is nothing to be excited about this time around, only that the OpenBSD approach is about guided and well planned evolution rather than revolutionary changes where large chunks of code are thrown away and replaced with new, untested code with bugs to be explored and exploited until a future dot-something-else release is finally considered stable.

      [...]

      In about six months’ time, you will see blog posts and other news items announcing the change to OpenBSD 5.1-beta, and we will be gearing up for yet another OpenBSD release. In any case, the best way to support the project (that produces, among other widely used software, OpenSSH, more likely than not by a wide margin, your remote login system) in addition to contributing code, testing and direct donations is to go to the OpenBSD Orders page and order one or more items.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Free software isn’t a single school of thought

      However, even a brief investigation shows that the term “free software” covers a wide variety of positions. To start with, there are degrees of support for the general beliefs. Some free software supporters never use proprietary software. Others will use proprietary software, but only if no practical free software alternative exists. A few will even use proprietary software if it is the best-quality alternative.

      Then there are the points of emphasis. While most free software advocates focus — naturally enough — on software, there are those like Peter Brown, the former executive director of the Free Software Foundation, who consider free software something that should be part of the general progressive philosophy, like recycling or environmentalism. You can also find people still who use the term “open source” as it was originally intended as a less intimidating term and who champion free software values. Increasingly, too, I’m encountering people who view free and open source software alike as part of a general movement towards free culture and technology that includes other interests such as the Open Access and Maker movements.

  • Licensing

    • Project Harmony: Red Hat and Others are Early Critics

      Recently, one of the biggest topics in the open source arena has been whether businesses and organizations are giving back to the projects and communities that they benefit from. In this post, we discussed how many organizations that now use open source aren’t giving back at all. While this debate is ongoing, though, there is a coordinated effort to establish rules and guidelines for making contributions to open source. It’s called Project Harmony, is heavily backed by Canonical, and is stirring up quite a bit of controversy.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Backblaze open sources 135TB storage architecture
    • Open Hardware

      • Robots for Humanity, Powered by Open Source

        A new collaborative robotics project is ripping the idea of autonomous assistance for the disabled out from the land of science-fiction and planting it firmly in the real world – and all using the power of Open Source.

        ‘Robots for Humanity’ is the result of a team up between Willow Garage, developers of personal robotics hardware and software, ‘Healthcare Robotics Lab’ at Georgia Tech and disabled user Henry Evans and his wife Jane.

Leftovers

  • Security

  • Cablegate

    • WikiLeaks show US calling shots in Haiti

      A month before a newly elected Haitian President René Préval was to assume office in 2006, frustrated U.S. officials found themselves in a diplomatic tussle with Haiti’s interim government over returning criminals to the country.

      Nine months earlier, the U.S. had unofficially halted deportations amid concerns that deportees were behind a wave of kidnappings and violence. With presidential elections over, and the security situation somewhat improved, U.S. officials wanted the program resumed.

    • Harvard internet hero arrested on hacking charges

      A respected Harvard researcher has been arrested in Boston on charges related to computer hacking, based on allegations that he downloaded articles that he was entitled to get for free.

      A US federal indictment was unsealed on Tuesday on charges that Aaron Swartz broke into the computer networks at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to gain access to JSTOR, a non-profit online service for distributing scholarly articles, and downloaded 4.8 million articles and other documents – nearly the entire library.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

  • Civil Rights

  • Copyrights

    • Movie industry buries report proving pirates are great consumers

      The movie and music industry seem hell bent on portraying pirates as criminals and parasites who cost both industries billions of dollars in lost sales. In order to prove this fact a number of studies are commissioned to help demonstrate the effect a pirate has on sales of entertainment.

      The problem with this approach is that it has been found to be biased towards portraying pirates as the movie industry wants them to be seen, rather than presenting the facts. A great example of this has been discovered by the German-language politics and media website Telepolis.

    • Frustrated judge pushes Google digital book deal

      A Manhattan federal judge set a Sept. 15 deadline for Google, authors and publishers to come up with a legal plan to create the world’s largest digital library, expressing frustration that the six-year-old dispute has not been resolved.

      At a hearing on Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Denny Chin said if the dispute is not “resolved or close to resolved in principle” by mid-September, he will set a “relatively tight schedule” for the parties to prepare for a possible trial.

07.20.11

Links 20/7/2011: Linux Vitality, Tablets With Linux Grows Fast

Posted in News Roundup at 6:28 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • 12 Things You See Every Day That Wouldn’t Exist Without Linux

    We checked around, and it’s true. Linux is all over the place. We rounded up some of the less obvious and more offbeat things that depend upon Linux to function.

  • Kernel Space

    • Real-time patches for the Linux kernel take a major step forward

      Thomas Gleixner has released the first test version of a real-time (RT) Linux kernel based on a current release candidate of Linux kernel version 3.0; having been slightly delayed, version 3.0 is due to be released any day now. With version 3.0-rc7-rt0, the developers have taken the biggest step towards a modern basis for the RT kernel, a kernel that is chiefly maintained by Gleixner and several other developers – the current stable kernel with real-time capabilities is still based on the Linux 2.6.33 series, which Greg Kroah-Hartman has continued to maintain specifically for the RT developers.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • GNOME Desktop

      • The Grand Review of three new desktops, pt. 3: the Glorious GNOME Upgrade

        In a very short while, I have had the opportunity to try three new desktops. KDE 4 (not new but completely unknown to me previously), Unity on Ubuntu Natty (not a new desktop, but a novel shell nevertheless), and GNOME 3. I have previously documented my experiences on KDE 4 and Unity, and in this third and final installation it is GNOME 3′s turn.

  • Distributions

    • The A.Typical RPG Released

      A KDE-based distro powered by Arch Linux? Sounds like a perfect combo. We put Chakra through its paces to find out whether it would bring us closer to Linux computing nirvana…

      Pros: Fast and sleek distro with several innovative tools and features backed up by excellent documentation
      Cons: The lack of persistent storage capability in the Live CD mode
      Chakra Homepage

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

  • Funding

    • Open Source Developers Can Make Money From In-App Payments

      Google’s open source Android and ChromeOS have created a viable shop for open source developers to monitize on their apps. Unlike Apple’s restricted AppStore, which may take weeks to get an app approved, and you are always at the mercy of Apple for the survival of your app, Google’s Chrome WebStore and Android Market offer a more ‘democratic’ and innovative approch.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Resist the Temptations of the Cloud!

      There is a systematic marketing campaign to drive users to entrusting their computing and their data to companies they have absolutely no reason to trust. Its buzzword is “cloud computing,” a term used for so many different computing structures that its only real meaning is: “Do it without thinking about what you’re doing.

Leftovers

  • Finance

    • You Want to Fix the U.S. Economy? Here’s a Start

      A simple 8-point plan would restore both the banking and the real estate sectors, and end the political dominance of the parasitic “too big to fail” banks.

      Craven politicos and clueless Federal Reserve economists are always bleating about how they want to fix the U.S. economy and restore “aggregate demand.” OK, here’s how to start:

      1. Force all banks to mark all their assets to market at the end of each trading day, including all derivatives of all types, including over-the-counter instruments.

      2. Allow citizens to discharge all mortgage and student loan debt in bankruptcy court, just like any other debt.

      3. Banks must mark all their real estate to market weekly as defined by “last sales of nearby properties” adjusted for square footage and other quantifiable measures (i.e. like Zillow.com).

    • Goldman Sachs Plans Job Cuts as Debt Trading Misses Estimates

      Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (GS), the U.S. bank that makes most of its money from trading, said it will cut about 1,000 jobs after a plunge in fixed-income revenue that was bigger than analysts estimated.

      Second-quarter fees from trading debt, currencies and commodities tumbled 63 percent from the previous quarter, more than twice the drop at other major U.S. banks. Net income was $1.09 billion, or $1.85 per share, the New York-based company said today in a statement, falling short of the $2.30 per-share average estimate of 23 analysts surveyed by Bloomberg.

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