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04.14.12

Links 14/4/2012: Mandriva Speaks Out, Firefox Demotes Flash

Posted in News Roundup at 11:02 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • Machine Learning with WEKA: An Interview with Mark Hall
  • Syllable chalks up new release

    Syllable, an attempt to write a desktop-focused operating system from scratch using best practices, has notched up a new milestone, with its developers releasing 0.6.7 today.

  • Friday Favorite: Audacity 2.0

    Audacity, the venerable and much loved open source audio editor, has a 2.0 release today in versions for OS X, Windows and GNU/Linux.

  • Eaton touts open-source SDK as a boon to power management

    UPS supplier Eaton has released a new open-source software development kit aimed at providing better accessibility and flexibility to users of its power management products.

    RELATED: Cisco, EMC, VMware unite behind big data, cloud training initiative

    Hervé Tardy, the company’s vice president and general manager of distributed power quality, says the ability to substantially modify the management software based on the specific needs of each client is a powerful upside to the firm’s technology.

  • Eaton Offers Customized Open-Source Software to Address IT Manager Power Challenges
  • Open Source Analytics News Service Debuts
  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Flash and Java to be click-to-play in future Firefox

        After more than two years on the back burner, Firefox has finally introduced click-to-play (or “opt-in activation” in Mozilla terms) for all plug-ins, including Flash, Java, and Silverlight. Plug-ins are the single biggest cause of browser slow-downs and security vulnerabilities — and Chrome has had a similar feature for more than a year — so really, it’s about time Mozilla added this to Firefox.

      • Firefox To Require Permission For Plug-Ins

        Mozilla engineers are in the process of improving the security and speed of Firefox by implementing a permission switch for browser plug-ins.

      • Firefox gets click-to-play option for plugins
  • SaaS

    • HP’s Converged Cloud Services: A Very Big Bet on OpenStack
    • Why Open Source Is the Key to Cloud Innovation

      In the 25 years since Richard Stallman wrote the GNU General Public License, free and open source software (FOSS) have become pervasive in computing: Linux, Apache HTTP Server, MySQL and more can be found in large numbers of enterprises across the globe. And open source is now increasingly undergirding cloud computing as well.

      “Open source is certainly at the foundation in terms of building out cloud technologies,” says Byran Che, senior director of product management at Red Hat and responsible for its cloud operations offerings, management software and Red Hat Enterprise MRG, (Red Hat’s Messaging, Real-time and Grid platform). “If you take a look at market share in the server space, as you look at traditional data centers, about 70 percent are running on the Windows platform and about 30 percent are running Linux. As you take a look at what operating systems people are choosing to build applications on in the cloud, the ratio flips completely.”

    • Red Hat and IBM sign on to OpenStack Foundation
    • IT Consultants Build OpenStack Cloud Business Practices
    • OpenStack Wins the Open Source Cloud

      Over the last two weeks there has been a whole lot of news about ‘open’ clouds. From my perspective though there is now one clear winner – OpenStack.

      As opposed to say Eucalyptus or CloudStack, OpenStack has one key item that those other two ‘open’ cloud efforts do not – THE SUPPORT OF EVERY MAJOR LINUX DISTRIBUTION.

    • Open Source ownCloud Debuts Enterprise File Sync and Sharing
  • Databases

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

  • CMS

    • 13 Tips for Better Joomla CMS Security

      With the surging popularity of Joomla, it’s no surprise hackers are drawn to it as well. Don’t panic, however. There are a number of things you can do to strengthen your security and turn your Joomla website into a fortress. Read along as we show you how to guard against the most common exploits and hacks that this open source CMS faces.

  • Healthcare

    • If the Other Shoe Drops, I Want Medicare

      More than five weeks ago, when some of my cancer markers were elevated, I began the process of bartering with the insurance company, doing the tests they said would be covered, and then coming all the way back to the start to finally getting the tests my doctors originally ordered. My full diagnosis and treatment considerations have been pending ever since, and that has given me time to think and to remember. Waiting, worrying, and wondering.

      It’s not that I believe every cancer is a death sentence. I certainly know that isn’t the case. I am a uterine cancer survivor. My mom is a two time breast cancer survivor. But I am 57 years old now — old enough to be an expensive liability in our society, especially if I get sick and need care, but too young to be covered by Medicare. If I face a serious illness like cancer again that costs me an awful lot in out-of-pocket expenses not covered by insurance and lost time from making the money we need for survival, I will doom my husband to struggles he doesn’t need and that are not his fault. Bad enough that one of us should be sick, there is certainly no need for me to take him down with the ship.

  • Business

  • Finance

  • Public Services/Government

    • European public services must follow Iceland’s open-source lead

      The global economic crisis has triggered a series of unprecedented social and political upheavals that have left many governments on the brink of bankruptcy. The high volume of debts have engulfed even the most well-managed economies, triggering a chain reaction in which cuts to public sector spending have become inevitable.

      A high profile casualty of these consequences was Iceland, where a collapse in the banking system led to long-running financial and diplomatic crisis. Significantly, it has recently been announced that Iceland is set to swap its high-cost public sector proprietary software solutions in favour of open source alternatives. Strategists behind the move cited cost savings as a prime reason for the shift in solution and, to their credit, this is a perfectly logical reason for engaging with open source alternatives.

    • Digital Native Government Agency Embraces The Power Of Open Source
    • U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Gets Open Source, Publishes on GitHub
    • Open Government is Go for Launch at NASA

      The new Open Government Plan, “Flagship Initiative,” is the creation of an “accessible, participatory and transparent web environment,” a goal reflected in the new site. Users are welcomed to a colorful, easy-to-read and easy-to-browse database of NASA projects and information — and they’re encouraged to comment on everything.

    • NASA’s Open-Source Open Government Future

      NASA chose its website as flagship for a revamp of its open government plan rolled out yesterday, and — as if to show the agency meant business — did so with a brand-new, brightly colored buzzword-catcher of a website.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Agencies lay out plans for Open Gov 2.0
    • Big Pharmas back open source drug discovery with money and molecules

      Call it crowdsourcing for cures. Fed up with outdated models for finding new treatments that have missed the mark, drugmakers and other public health stakeholders have ignited open source efforts that involve networks of companies and scientists joining forces to discover drugs. And one of the pioneering efforts of this ilk in India is moving ahead with a mid-stage trial for a drug against tuberculosis.

      India’s Open Source Drug Discovery unit, which uses an online infrastructure to connect more than 5,500 scientists and others, revealed late last month with the Global Alliance on TB that the anti-tuberculosis molecule will be investigated in a Phase IIb trial in India, Forbes reported. And the open source group has two more TB molecules in advanced preclinical testing that could eventually enter trials and combat the infectious disease, which kills about 400,000 people annually in India.

    • Linux for Your Electric Car: Techies Create Open Source EVs

      Zero is the Apple of electric motorcycles. The Santa Cruz, Calif.,-based company’s bikes coast out of the factory in gleaming perfection with control software that has been optimized for safety and performance. And, as with iPhones, the source code remains a company secret. Gearheads who like to know every detail of how their machines work or want to modify them either have to jailbreak their devices or start from scratch. They can turn to outside sources but, again, the only option is to buy a motor controller kit from a company that has made all of the configuration decisions in advance.

    • The Tumanako project looks to make electric vehicles open source
    • Better EVs Through Open Source Collaboration

      “People who are into electric vehicles like to be able to tweak them to make them faster and to be able to fix them themselves,” says Philip Court, the director of Greenstage, an electric racecar developer in New Zealand.

    • Boom in Nordic crowdsourcing takes in film, lawmaking
    • How Open Source Drug Discovery Is Helping India Develop New Drugs

      Crowdsourcing can boast of many success stories today, but in 2008, when the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) launched such an effort for drug discovery, there weren’t many. Four years on, its Open Source Drug Discovery (OSDD) network is emerging as a cyber platform to garner resources for developing drugs that pharmaceutical companies don’t find attractive enough.

    • The H Half Hour: Open source and evil genius

      A typical evil genius will attempt to conquer the world and keep his or her plans secret. As any reader of The H knows, that’s no way to build a culture of innovation within the evil genius community. The H was pleased, therefore, to talk to Simon Monk who has been using open source technology, like the Arduino, as the basis for a series of Evil Genius books for aspirant evil geniuses and other people who want to get building open source based gadgetry.

    • Open Data

    • Open Hardware

  • Programming

    • Legit introduces alternate Git workflow
    • Reasons Behind Popularity of Open Source Language for PHP Web Application Development

      PHP as an open source language has gained more popularity from PHP developers and PHP programmers because of its more interactive approach than HTML. Not only it is very fast, secure, economical, and efficiently manages the data but PHP codes can also be incorporated very easily. Moreover, another reason behind its popularity is that a web developer can download it free of cost and customize it according to the project requirements. Several business owners and big corporate are attracted towards PHP custom web application development due to its easy availability and flexible terms and conditions.

  • Standards/Consortia

Leftovers

  • Is Lobbying Closer To Bribery… Or Extortion?

    We’ve certainly talked quite a bit about the institutional-level corruption of the way Congress and lobbying works, but a recent This American Life episode, done in partnership with the Planet Money team takes a much deeper dive into how lobbying works. You absolutely should listen to it. It’s really fascinating, even for folks who follow a lot of this stuff. There is also a full transcript, but hearing the whole thing is quite fascinating. Among the elements that are most interesting are the details of just how much time and effort goes into politicians raising money, and how the various fundraisers work.

  • Whatever happened to Unix?

    Open Source Initiative cofounder Bruce Perens said that, thanks to Apple, Unix is more popular than ever. “We now have more Unix systems than we’ve ever had before. They are in our phones and our access points. I think if you actually set out to count, you could make a graph and show that Unix—if you define Unix as something that serves a POSIX I/O—that Unix is at its peak today,” he said.

    “What’s the difference? We don’t care about the stuff the user doesn’t see. The user doesn’t see Unix. This is something I often have a hard time explaining to companies.”

    And while one of the world’s largest companies—Apple—is based entirely on Unix kernels, that doesn’t mean Unix is on the cusp of a massive comeback. In fact, it would seem that the formal Unix market has essentially stood still in recent years.

  • Security

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • Global Oil Production Update: EIA Revises Two Decades of Oil Data

      With the most recent release of international oil production data, EIA Washington has revised figures back to 1985. This is one of the most comprehensive revisions I have seen in several years. Generally, the totals were revised slightly lower, and this was especially true for the past decade. Data for the full year of 2011 has now completed. | see: Global Average Annual Crude Oil Production mbpd 2001 – 2011.

  • Finance

  • Censorship

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Trademarks

      • Shut your kale-hole

        CHICK-FIL-A sells an average of nine sandwiches per second at its roughly 1,600 restaurants. Bo Muller-Moore paints T-shirts in the garage next to his house in Montpelier, Vermont. In 2011 Chick-fil-A’s sales were more than $4 billion; Mr Muller-Moore (pictured) estimates that his were $40,000.

        [...]

        They warned Mr Muller-Moore that they had successfully pressured other miscreants into dropping some 30 slogans, from “Eat More Dog” to “Eat More Music”. Their letter also alleged that Mr Muller-Moore’s “misappropriation of Chick-fil-A’s EAT MOR CHIKIN intellectual property…is likely to cause confusion.”

04.13.12

Links 13/4/2012: Android on the Wrist, $35 Android ICS Tablet

Posted in News Roundup at 1:14 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • ‘Flashback’ Mac Malware: One More Reason to Switch to Linux

    Given the vast numbers of Macs that are apparently infected with the Flashback Trojan malware, it’s not at all surprising to see that sales of Mac security software are now skyrocketing.

  • Desktop

    • Malaysia Educates the Public About GNU/Linux

      The Government of Malaysia has long used GNU/Linux internally. In their country, many consumers are unaware of GNU/Linux and replace FreeDOS on PCs with illegal copies of that other OS. A program is under way to persuade OEMs and retailers to use GNU/Linux on PCs instead.

    • Google Chrome OS Review: Heading Towards Microsoft Market?

      With an eye on an unseen, distant future the ‘pseudo-modern’ desktops are adopting the single windowed approach. Whether it be Microsoft’s Metro, Ubuntu’s Unity or Gnome’s new shell, they all think PC is nothing more than a smartphone with a touch screen.

      I am one of those who are not big fans of this approach. The ‘pseudo-modern’ desktop Uis are focused on smartphone/tablet like devices where you use one window (one app) at a time. What’s the point of buying expensive CPUs and GPUs (minimum system requirements for modern operating systems) and 27″ multiple monitors when all I can do is run one app at a time?

    • If OSs were Cars

      You are not your car. You can be a hacker and ride a sedan, you can ride a muscle car being a writer and you can go to school in a BMW. For some, the car is important or even has philosophical signifant but for most, the goal is ‘what I’m going with my car’.

  • Server

    • SAP Unveils Ambitious Plans for Database Market

      While HANA and its in-memory capabilities is a key platform for SAP’s database strategy, so too is the Sybase database. SAP acquired Sybase in 2010 for $5.8 billion. Sikka said that Sybase is now able to run the entire SAP business suite.

  • Kernel Space

    • Graphics Stack

      • Open-Source ARM Mali Graphics Driver Achieves…

        The open-source ARM Mali graphics driver, known as the the Lima project, has achieved a major milestone.

        Since delivering the exclusive news of the Lima project as an open-source reverse-engineered ARM Mali graphics driver for Linux back in January, there hasn’t been too much else to report on about this driver that’s still early in its development life. This driver is called Lima since it doesn’t have the official blessing of ARM Holdings and right now has been only running simple demos with Limare. The code is available and is running on the KDE Plasma Active Tablet as was talked about and shown at FOSDEM 2012.

        Fortunately this morning I’ve heard some news from the Lima developers about hitting a major milestone. Joining Luc Verhaegen, the lead developer of the Lima project, have been Ben Brewer (another employee of Codethink) and Connor Abbot have been the latest developers joining the Belgian on this open-source driver project.

      • Open-Source NVIDIA Driver Approaches Stable State
      • Improving Linux DRM For Embedded Systems

        A set of Direct Rendering Manager patches have appeared to ease the development of targeting DRM drivers for embedded systems. There’s also two new DRM drivers using this SDRM layer.

        These patches for DRM on embedded systems provide “helpers” to take care of the DRM device and introduce an “SDRM” layer. The helpers can setup the CRTCs, encoders, connectors, and other components as separate devices rather than having the current monolithic design to a DRM driver. This work is based upon some of the Exynos driver patches by Samsung but was written by Sascha Hauer of the German-based Pengutronix.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • Is Ubuntu Unity Faster Than Gnome Panel?

      One of the most active Ubuntu developers Jo-Erlend Schinstad is also a pro-active defender of Ubuntu Unity and HUD. He tries his best to clarify doubts of users and educate them about the features of Ubuntu Unity. Muktware has published quite a lot of his articles on various topics related to Ubuntu. We recently interviewed him to understand his approach towards Ubuntu and its users. He has now posted a video to compare Ubuntu Unity with Gnome Panel, as people seem to keep saying that they are more efficient with Gnome Panel than with Ubuntu Unity.

    • More details emerge about MyUnity 4.0
    • Report: Aura Window Manager, I’m confused.
    • LMDE MATE/Cinnamon 201204 RC Screenshot Tour

      The Release Candidate of the upcoming Linux Mint Debian Edition 201204 operating system has been announced by Clement Lefebvre on April 11th, 2012.

      Linux Mint Debian Edition 201204 RC comes in two editions: the first one features the MATE 1.2 and Cinnamon 1.4 desktop environments, and the second one features the Xfce 4.8 desktop environment.

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • Calligra 2.4.0 released

        After a long developmental period, Calligra 2.4.0, the first stable version of Calligra, has been released. Calligra is a Qt-based graphic and office suite forked from KOffice in 2010. Note: In some quarters, Calligra is said to be a continuation of KOffice, rather than a fork.

      • The First Version of Calligra Released
      • The Impact Of KDE On 3D Gaming

        Being discussed following the Ubuntu 12.04 Desktops Impact Performance, Power Consumption was the impact that KDE’s KWin compositing window manager (and others that don’t redirect fullscreen windows by default) has on the OpenGL gaming performance.

        Depending upon the driver it can potentially cause a hit as shown in Wednesday’s comparison of Unity, Unity 2D, GNOME Shell, KDE, Xfce, LXDE, and Openbox. All of the desktop environments were tested in their “out of the box” / stock configurations on Ubuntu 12.04. The KDE aspect is being discussed in this forum thread where the usual items are brought up.

  • Distributions

    • ROSA Desktop 2012 beta review
    • Student stiffs penetration tool BackTrack Linux with 0-day

      A student has discovered a critical vulnerability in BackTrack, a flavour of Linux that’s a favourite among security pros.

      The previously undiscovered (hence zero-day) privilege escalation bug in the network penetration-testing distro was discovered during an ethical hacking class organised by the InfoSec Institute.

      Jack Koziol, security programme manager at the institute, explained that the bug in Backtrack 5 R2 (the latest version) allowed the student to overwrite settings to gain a root shell. The flaw was found in wicd (the Wireless Interface Connection Daemon), which has not been tested for “potential remote exploitation vectors” according to Koziol.

    • New Releases

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Mageia 2 Default Wallpapers Chosen

        Last fall Mageia put out the call for artists to participate in their Mageia 2 artwork contest. It’s been eight long months, but the choices have now been made. The new Mageia 2 default and alternative backgrounds have been chosen.

        Submitted by Luiz Fernando, the winning image is a lovely deep blue base with wisps of royal blue cutting across the primary focal lines.

    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

  • Expert witness says most popular Hotfile downloads are open source apps

    Hotfile is determined to outlast Hollywood’s ongoing crusade against file locker services. The company is defending itself against an aggressive litigation campaign that movie studios first brought against it over a year ago. Hotfile’s case may be bolstered by a recent report which shows that the two most widely-downloaded files distributed through the popular file locker service are open source software applications.

    Charges against Hotfile that alleged direct copyright infringement were thrown out last year by a federal court judge. The remaining charges allege that the company is liable for inducing its users to infringe copyright. The answer to that question will hinge on whether the courts find that Hotfile has substantial non-infringing uses.

  • The Benefits of an Open Market, Revisited

    Overall as I developer, I find the ability to instantly push out updates highly desirable. As a consumer I appreciate the fact that submissions are tested and verified to at least technically work and not crash. Is there a perfect system? Not that I know of. What is the perfect system? I don’t know. If there was a way for developers to be able to reach their users quickly with bugfixes and even new features that allow for consumers to not have to wade through extremely low quality and exact duplicate apps, then I would be one happy developer.

  • Open Source Technologies: Saving and Improving Lives

    The thought of ‘open source’ need not always conjure up images of socially removed geeks slamming away at their keyboards.

    There have been instances of the open source ideology saving and improving lives, and this article explores a couple of examples on that aspect.

  • PhoneGap 1.6 Released!

    We are happy to announce the release of PhoneGap 1.6! The PhoneGap/Apache Cordova Community has worked hard to fix many bugs (including the nasty local storage bug caused by the iOS 5.1 update) and added some new features.

  • Events

  • Web Browsers

  • SaaS

  • Databases

    • Oracle previews MySQL 5.6

      Offering a glimpse of the new features some database administrators will be working with before too long, Oracle has posted a preview version of the next MySQL relational database management system.

      The Development Milestone Release (DMR) for MySQL 5.6 comes with a number of new and still experimental features for the open source database system, including improved replication and the ability to bypass the SQL framework for faster data access.

    • Firebird SQL Project Newsletter, Issue 3
    • 10gen announces MongoDB Hadoop Connector

      10gen, the company behind MongoDB, has announced the general availability of a connector for its open source NoSQL database and Apache Hadoop, the MapReduce framework and distributed computing platform. According to its developers, version 1.0 of the connector is the “culmination of over a year of work to bring our users a solid integration layer between their MongoDB deployments and Hadoop clusters for data processing”.

    • MariaDB 5.5.23 arrives with performance improvements

      Version 5.5.23 of MariaDB, a drop-in replacement for MySQL, has been published by the developers at Monty Program. The first stable release in the 5.5 series of the open source database includes performance improvements and “a few added features” over MySQL 5.5.23, which it is based upon.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • How LibreOffice Writer Tops MS Word: 12 Features

      When reviewers look at LibreOffice and its ancestor OpenOffice.org, they inevitably assume that it’s inferior to Microsoft Office. At the very most, they may grudgingly find it acceptable for undemanding users.

      However, when you examine LibreOffice and MS Office without assumptions, the comparison changes dramatically. That’s especially true when looking at the word processors, LibreOffice’s Writer and MS Office’s Word.

      For one thing, features frequently have different names in Writer and Word. Although LibreOffice and OpenOffice.org have a history of conforming to MS Office’s name-choices — for example, in the spreadsheets, data pilots were recently renamed pivot tables to match Excel’s usage — holdouts remain. For example, the equivalent of Word’s AutoSummary in Writer remains AutoAbstract.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Who Cares About Software Freedom?

      Well it’s been a disconcerting kind of week here in the Linux blogosphere, not least because of all the darn construction going on down at the Google+ Grill.

      First it was the hammering giving Linux Girl a headache. Then, on Wednesday, she walked in after lunch and could barely recognize the place. What is this interface sorcery, she wants to know?

      Then, of course, there was the retirement of Linux Girl’s old friend, Maverick Meerkat, in the past few days as well. Alas, dear distro — we hardly knew ye!

  • Openness/Sharing

  • Programming

Leftovers

  • Security

    • New ZeuS-based Trojan leeches cash from cloud-based payrolls
    • End of Windows XP support era signals beginning of security nightmare

      Microsoft’s recent announcement that it will end support for the Windows XP operating system in two years signals the end of an era for the company, and potentially the beginning of a nightmare for everyone else.

      When Microsoft cuts the chord on XP in two years it will effectively leave millions of existing Windows-based computers vulnerable to continued and undeterred cyberattacks, many of which hold the potential to find their way into consumer, enterprise and even industrial systems running the latest software.

  • Finance

  • Copyrights

    • Illegal Copying is not Theft

      Under US law, violation of copyright is not a crime unless commercial use is made of the copy or the value is more than $1K. Even when it is a crime, illegal copying is limited to 1, 5 or 10 years for different levels of severity and this guy was likely in the 1 year category.

04.12.12

Links 12/4/2012: PCLinuxOS 2012.02 Reviews, GNU/Linux in the Punjab Government

Posted in News Roundup at 8:07 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Linux. Do it your way!

    I like to think that Linux is about a flexible an operating system as you can find. But it can be easy to forget just how flexible it is. We can get ourselves stuck in our computing habits and stick with the old and familiar. And sometimes, just trying something new can sometimes seem daunting and just not worth the effort.

  • Server

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • What Inspired Google+ New Design: Gnome 3 Shell Or Ubuntu Unity?

      Humor: Google yesterday rolled out a new layout for Google+, it’s social network. The new UI has impressed a majority of users. If Facebook’s infamous TimeLine was inspired by the horror movies “I Know What You Did Last Summer” to help stalkers and governments,”, Google has gone geek. The new design of Google+ is inspired by Gnome 3 Shell.

      “A critical piece of this social layer is a design that grows alongside our aspirations. So today we’re introducing a more functional and flexible version of Google+. We think you’ll find it easier to use and nicer to look at, but most importantly, it accelerates our efforts to create a simpler, more beautiful Google.” wrote Vic Gundotra on a Google blog.

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • Calligra 2.4 To Be Released Today
      • Akademy Keynote: Dr. Will Schroeder, KitWare CEO

        Dr. Will Schroeder is one of the keynote speakers for Akademy 2012 in Tallinn, Estonia. Will is the CEO of Kitware Inc., a proven leader in the creation and support of open-source software.

      • Simon Listens speech recognition project migrates to KDE

        The KDE Community has announced that the Simon Listens speech recognition project has successfully completed its migration from the SourceForge source code repository to KDE’s Git infrastructure. Often referred to simply as Simon, the program, which is included with some Linux distributions such as Knoppix 7.0, allows users with physical difficulties to control their systems using only their voice.

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Wayland Running Various GTK Applications

        There’s some more progress to report on with Wayland and Weston beyond the Wayland talks at last week’s LF collab summit, including a video showing various GTK applications running within Wayland on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.

        One of the independent developers that has been involved with the ongoing Wayland/Weston work for some time has posted a video and information about running various GTK applications under Wayland with an Ubuntu 12.04 LTS host. Additionally, he’s written an unofficial “State of Wayland” report as of early April.

  • Distributions

    • Slitaz 4.0 Arrives with New TazPanel Goodness

      Slitaz seems to be growing up and playing with the big boys. In the latest release, new original tools highlight the maturing nature of this tiny distro. It’s been two years in the making, but it’s been worth the wait.

    • DoudouLinux: A Starter Distro Where Baby Linux Gurus are Born

      Where do Linux gurus come from? From baby newbies. How do baby newbies become gurus? One good way is with the help of the best child- and beginner-oriented distribution, DoudouLinux.

    • New Releases

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • PCLinuxOS 2012.02 review – Hope?

        Once upon a time, PCLinuxOS used to be one of my favorite candidates for permanent desktop use, but it was back in 2009, with a truly magnificent Gnome release. Such is the trouble with great success, sequels cannot match the original. In the three years since, my experience with the distro has steadily declined. But now, there’s a fresh new release, and this means fresh new hope.

      • PCLinuxOS 2012.2 review

        One of the distributions I used in the years before starting this blog was PCLinuxOS. After I discovered that PCLinuxOS was a spinoff of Mandrake (the first Linux distro I ever used), I gave it a try, and used it for at least a year. It served me quite well but that was many years ago. What is it like these days? Here’s my review of their latest release.

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat Legal Delays F18 Codenaming

        Hopefully you’re not too anxious to know the codename for the future Fedora 18 Linux release, which will serve as the successor to Fedora 17′s Beefy Miracle. Red Hat’s legal department has caused a delay in coming up with the codename for this Fedora release due out in H2’2012.

        Coming up with the Fedora codenames via contributor suggestions has generally been an interesting but odd event with a colorful selection of possible codenames each cycle. With Fedora 17 it’s been arguably the oddest codename with the “Beefy Miracle” title; heck, even Ubuntu developers like it. While many see the Fedora codenames as just good fun, some Fedora users have grown concerned about the names.

      • Red Hat’s Billion Dollars And the Power of Free

        Recently, there was some justified excitement that Red Hat had finally done it, and turned in annual sales of over $1 billion. A couple of years ago, I wrote a post here on Computerworld UK wondering why there were no companies based around open source that had managed to achieve such billion-dollar turnovers, and suggested that the key reason was one put forward by Red Hat’s CEO, Jim Whitehurst:

      • Red Hat clustered storage goes beta

        The first iteration of the Gluster clustered file system that is going through the Red Hat annealing process is coming closer to market with the launch of a the first beta of the tool since Shadowman acquired Gluster last October.

    • Debian Family

      • Debian kFreeBSD vs. Debian Linux vs. FreeBSD 9

        Here are some benchmarks comparing Debian GNU/kFreeBSD with the new 9.0 kernel, Debian GNU/Linux with the Linux 3.2 kernel, and FreeBSD/PC-BSD 9.0.

      • Debian’s diversity statement
      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Further Ubuntu Accomplishments Progress
          • How Canonical’s next moves could repaint the Linux landscape
          • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 260
          • Limpag: New Ubuntu release on its way
          • Interview with lovinglinux
          • Ubuntu Linux Comes Preloaded on Two New Laptops

            As a fan of Ubuntu in particular and Linux in general, I’m always interested when new devices come out with my favorite operating system already installed.

          • Radeon, Nouveau Power Usage On Ubuntu 12.04
          • Gallium3D LLVMpipe Driver On LLVM 3.1
          • Ubuntu 12.04 LTS KVM Virtualization Battles 8.04.4, 10.04.4 LTS
          • Ubuntu 12.04 Desktops Impact Performance, Power Consumption

            How does the choice of desktop environments you make for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS impact your system’s performance and power consumption? Here’s the latest round of benchmarking from the various Ubuntu 12.04 desktop environment choices — Unity, Unity 2D, GNOME Shell, KDE, Xfce, LXDE, and Openbox — when running them on three different laptops.

          • Flippant salvos at a worthy initiative

            It also speaks about the good battery life and the “good value” delivered by Intel Pentium Dual Core B950 based products. In so far as the operating system is concerned, the laptops are being distributed come equipped with the Linux based operating system. Ubuntu 10.10 is distributed as free and open source software. The decision of the government to avail the open source option is important for several important reasons. Firstly, it reduces dependence on proprietary software vendors and secondly it drastically cuts down on the overall cost of the machines. Since they are not bundled with expensive licensed software such as Microsoft Office they are cost-effective and provide value for money, an important factor for the government to consider which has an inherent responsibility and fiduciary duty to the taxpayers.

            Open source is also a catalyst for development as it allows users to adapt the software to their own needs. This can improve IT and programming skills that in turn promote innovation. The Ubuntu OS comes installed with Libre Office and the internet browser Firefox. Additional software that is not installed by default can be downloaded and installed using the Ubuntu Software Center without paying any additional charges – an added bonus, since this would be illegal with proprietary software. Also, Ubuntu does not need an antivirus as its kernel is designed in such a way that no spam or virus can affect it.

            UBUNTU is getting popular globally due to its open source and freeware feature. It is not only being used by students but the LINUX enterprise OS offerings are being used by world renowned education institutes for their enterprise deployments and universities in Pakistan are also using it. The primary purpose to bundle the UBUNTU OS in the machines was to save cost and promote students to take advantage of this free OS which has some great features, is easy to use and comes with a UBUNTU Liber Office (just like MS office) and also has the world renowned Fire Fox Internet Browser (similar to MS Internet explorer).

            The Punjab Government has also saved cost on bundling MS Office which is even more expensive that Windows OS. Ubuntu also has another advantage; it does not need an Antivirus as its Kernel is designed is such a way that no Spam or Virus can affect it which in turn saves cost. The selection of bundling the UBUNTU was done in order to take advantage of all the features free of cost to the government. In this regard, it is further advised to instruct all educational institutions to discourage any ads that are placed on their notice boards with regard to installation of the Windows OS as the people who are offering the students to install a Windows OS for Rupees 500/- are also using pirated versions and thus misguiding the students. Furthermore, a DVD has been provided with every laptop which contains drivers for not only UBUNTU but Windows OS as well.

          • Say Goodbye to Ubuntu Linux 10.10 ‘Maverick Meerkat’
          • Flavours and Variants

            • Kubuntu Linux Gets New Sugar Daddy

              Kubuntu — the version of Ubuntu Linux that uses the KDE desktop interface rather than the standard Unity desktop — has a new sponsor.

            • Farewell, Apple. Hello Linux Mint!

              That’s right, I packed it in. My MacBook Pro is now on the shelf. In a while, it goes on Craigslist — not because it’s been obsoleted by the latest version of Mac OS — Mountain Lion as mine will work okay (some MacBook Pros will not). Instead, there’s a cushy comfort zone that’s dangerous for a product reviewer to fall into.

            • Deepin: An Elegant Ubuntu-based Distro For The Chinese

              The beauty of Linux lies in the fact that there is a distro for everyone. It doesn’t matter whether you are a geek, beginner, Apple fan, Windows fan, gamer or developer, there’s surely one distro for you. And yes, if you are a Chinese, there is this distro just for you, and it is elegant and well-polished.

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • Security

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • North American Natural Gas Breaks Below Two Dollars, for a Million BTU

      Natural gas in North America broke below the $2.00 barrier today, for the first time in ten years. It’s important to remember that, unlike oil, natural gas does not trade at a converged, global price. Accordingly, a million BTU in LNG form currently trades for over $9.00 in the UK, and over $15.00 in Japan. Such low prices for natural gas unquestionably give the US a competitive advantage. But, it will take a resurgence in manufacturing and related industrialism to fully capture the price disparity. After all, the US is still very much an oil-based economy.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • A Silver Bullet That Would End Secret Tax-Exempt Money In Elections

      No doubt about it, large unlimited donations are flowing into SuperPACs from rich individuals and corporations aimed at influencing who is elected at all levels of government in 2012. With the SuperPACs and other forms of political committees regulated by the federal and state election agencies, or by the IRS under section 527, at least we know who the donors are.

      But when political campaign expenditures are made by various forms of nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations, such as 501(c)(4) social welfare groups (like Crossroads GPS) or 501(c)(6) business associations (like the US Chamber of Commerce), there is no general law requiring their donors to be identified. So secret money in the millions, once again, flows in.

04.11.12

Links 11/4/2012: Linux 3.4 RC2, Red Hat Storage 2.0 Beta, Kubuntu Finds New Sponsor

Posted in News Roundup at 5:26 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • U.S. Government Files Antitrust Suit Against Apple and Five Publishers

    The U.S. took legal aim at Apple Inc. and five of America’s largest publishing firms on Wednesday, hitting them with an antitrust lawsuit for allegedly setting pricing patterns for eBooks that limit competition. The suit contends that Apple and the group of publishing companies cost consumers millions of dollars through an arrangement where publishers set the pricing of eBooks, eliminating variable costs for them that could have been set by retailers and distributors.

  • U.S. Suit Says Apple, Publishers Colluded on E-Book Prices
  • Security

    • Microsoft seals up Windows zero-day flaw in April Patch Tuesday

      Microsoft released six bulletins on Tuesday to fix a total of 11 vulnerabilities, one of which has become the target of active attacks against unpatched applications.

      One of the four critical patches in the batch – MS12-027 – addresses an Active X issue that impacts numerous application and creates a mechanism to drop malware onto vulnerable Windows systems.

      Microsoft warned of attacks in the wild against the zero-day flaw, which affects an unusually wide range of Microsoft products and Microsoft users. Applications affected include Office 2003 through 2010 on Windows; SQL Server 2000 through 2008 R2; BizTalk Server 2002; Commerce Server 2002 through 2009 R2; Visual FoxPro 8; and Visual Basic 6 Runtime.

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • US Coal Exports at Highest Level in Twenty Years

      For the full year of 2011, the US exported 107,259 thousand short tons of coal. This was the highest level of coal exports since 1991. More impressive: exports recorded a more than 25% leap compared to the previous year, 2010. (see data here, opens to PDF). Additionally, this was also a dramatic breakout in volume from the previous decade, which ranged from 40,000 – 80,000 thousand short tons per annum. The below chart, from EIA Washington, does not capture the full year, though it certainly portrays the trend. Nota bene: this chart tracks the quarterly volumes of coal exports:

  • Finance

  • Censorship

    • Net Filtering Violates the Rule of Law

      Last year, in their decision regarding the controversial LOPPSI bill, French constitutional judges held that Article 4 of the bill, which allows the French government to censor the Internet under the pretext of fighting child pornography, is not contrary to the Constitution. In doing so, the French constitutional court failed to protect fundamental freedoms on the Internet, and in particular freedom of expression. Hope now lies with European institutions, the only ones with the power to prohibit such administrative website blocking and its inherent risks of abuse.

  • Privacy

    • When the cops subpoena your Facebook information, here’s what Facebook sends the cops

      This week’s Boston Phoenix cover story — Hunting the Craigslist Killer: An Untold Detective Story from the Digital Frontier — would not have been possible without access to a huge trove of case files released by the Boston Police Department. Many of those documents have never been made public — until now. As a kind of online appendix to the article, we’re publishing over a dozen documents from the file, ranging from transcripts of interviews to the subpoenas that investigators obtained from the tech companies that helped them track the killer’s digital fingerprints. We’ve also published the crime scene photos and uploaded recordings made by investigators as they interviewed the killer, Philip Markoff, and others involved in the case.

      One of the most fascinating documents we came across was the BPD’s subpoena of Philip Markoff’s Facebook information. It’s interesting for a number of reasons — for one thing, Facebook has been pretty tight-lipped about the subpoena process, even refusing to acknowledge how many subpoenas they’ve served. Social-networking data is a contested part of a complicated legal ecosystem — in some cases, courts have found that such data is protected by the Stored Communications Act.

  • Civil Rights

    • Uncivil Liberties: The Coalition’s Surveillance Chaos

      It has been a of week of chaos for Britain’s government on civil liberties. Theresa May signaling the intention to bring in legislation to allow law enforcement agencies to check email, web, social media and gaming forum traffic unleashed a wave of protest. It also unleashed contradiction in the government parties. The Conservatives were quick to exploit the “being tough on crime” angle in the Sun. LibDem president Tim Farron was fielded to promise to shoot down the proposals Nick Clegg was set up to defend just a few short days before.

      We have had leaks, briefings, interviews, spin and letters. Lots of letters. The whole debacle has been capped with Home Office and the Prime Minister’s websites being DDoSed by Anonymous.

    • The “99% Spring” to Train 100,000 Activists
  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • ACTA

        • EU Parliament Must Stand Firm On Its Political Assessment of ACTA

          Paris, April 10th 2012 – The European Parliament has decided not to refer ACTA to the EU Court of Justice, and will normally hold its final vote this summer, as originally planned. This coming week marks a new opportunity for EU citizens to engage with their elected representatives in Brussels, calling on them to move swiftly toward a thorough political assessment of ACTA.

04.08.12

Links 8/4/2012: LF Collab 2012, OpenStack Essex

Posted in News Roundup at 10:12 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • 7 Mobile Operating Systems You Might Never Use
  • Finance

    • Big Repairs Still Needed To Fix the American Jobs Picture

      No doubt, a few economists and some business leaders will be inclined to argue that the trend is not entirely negative. Fair enough. Perhaps it indicates flexibility in US labor markets, especially as the economy tries to recover through the formation of small business. Also, it makes sense that an economy trying to recover would first add back part-time work in equal amounts to full time work, before stepping up to the array of benefits extended to the full time worker. But therein lies the problem: American workers desperately need health-care coverage, which is not typically offered to part-time workers. Meanwhile, deleveraging of household balance sheets since the high debt levels of 2007 has been mild. The result is yet another way to see how deeply consumer demand is restrained: there’s not enough work to both pay down debt, and restart consumption.

    • Fed may fine firms not part of foreclosure deal
    • Kaplan, community members discuss city’s bond debt deal with Goldman Sachs

      Rebecca Kaplan was once a rabbinical student, and the Oakland City Councilmember still knows her scripture well. On Wednesday afternoon, Kaplan quoted the books of Isaiah, Leviticus and Exodus while speaking during a teach-in about the city’s bond debt with Goldman Sachs at Allen Temple Baptist Church in East Oakland.

      In 1997, Oakland and the investment bank Goldman Sachs agreed to a rate-swap deal relating to $187 million in city debt. The deal allowed the city to convert floating interest rates on the debt into a fixed rate of 5.6 percent. But what appeared to be a good deal at the time has proved costly in the long run, after the market collapsed in 2008 and interest rates dropped to below 2 percent. The city has come out on the short end of the deal, and has already paid out $26 million more than it owed and is currently paying $5 million annually.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

  • Privacy

04.06.12

Links 6/4/2012: KDE 5.0 Wishlist, Fedora 17 Delays

Posted in News Roundup at 2:16 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • Linuxaria: I really fell in love with the idea of Open Source and GPL even before I actually installed my first Linux
  • Our Culture of Exclusion

    Bubs thinks you should just go out with the bingers and act like a crazy person right along with them – they won’t know the difference! Fair enough, but I’m not interested in ‘partying hard’, I want to talk with like-minded people about subjects I don’t necessarily get to talk about at the office. For example, we don’t use Node.js at work – so I go to JSConf to chat and learn about it in a casual atmosphere. Except I don’t get to do that. It’s always the same: talks, then binge time.

  • The Future of Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Is Open

    The roboticist on the panel argued that AI is an intellectually challenging field where the problems are difficult, and therefore can be solved only by highly intelligent people working on obscure mathematics and algorithms. The future, he argued, will look much like the past: a series of incremental, hard-won improvements in very narrow fields.

  • SaaS

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

  • BSD

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • GCC 4.7 Compiler Performance On AMD FX-8150 Bulldozer

      While we have seen that Intel’s Sandy Bridge is doing well on the new GCC 4.7 compiler (along with LLVM/Clang 3.1), has AMD’s Bulldozer CPU architecture advanced at all for this leading multi-platform compiler? Up today are benchmarks of GCC 4.7.0 — with comparative benchmarks going back to GCC 4.4 — from an AMD FX-8150 Eight-Core Bulldozer setup.

    • A turning point for GNU libc

      The kernel may be the core of a Linux system, but neither users nor applications deal with the kernel directly. Instead, almost all interactions with the kernel are moderated through the C library, which is charged with providing a standards-compliant interface to the kernel’s functionality. There are a number of C library implementations available, but, outside of the embedded sphere, most Linux systems use the GNU C library, often just called “glibc.” The development project behind glibc has a long and interesting history which took a new turn with the dissolution of its steering committee on March 26.

      In its early days, the GNU project was forced to focus on a small number of absolutely crucial projects; that is why the first program released under the GNU umbrella was Emacs. Once the core was in place, though, the developers realized they would need a few other components to build their new system; a C library featured prominently on that list. So, back in 1987, Roland McGrath started development on the GNU C library; by 1988, it was seen as being sufficiently far along that systems could be built on top of it.

  • Open Access/Content

    • Tufts U Sciences Knowledgebase Goes Open Source

      Tufts University is taking its enterprise content, course, learning, knowledge, and curriculum management system for health sciences, known as Tufts University Sciences Knowledgebase (TUSK), open source. Medical schools around the world now have the opportunity to install TUSK at their own institution, customize it to suit their own needs, and optionally contribute their customizations back to the TUSK source code.

  • Programming

Leftovers

  • Copyrights

    • Tell Obama And Dodd: No Backroom Dealing, No New SOPA

      Hollywood and Obama should’ve learned: No form of censorship will be acceptable to Internet users, and we’re fed up with corrupt, back-room deals that are driven by the rich and well-connected. Any major Internet policy changes should be negotiated in the light of day, so the millions of people who’d be affected can have their say too.

04.05.12

Links 5/4/2012: Early Look at GNOME 3.4, Mageia 2 Postponed

Posted in News Roundup at 6:38 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • Security

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

  • Finance

    • The Race for BTU

      The world’s major central banks — including the Bank of Japan (BOJ), the European Central Bank (ECB), and the Federal Reserve — appear to have finally won a major battle in the deflationary war that broke out five years ago in 2007. While the ultimate victor is yet to be determined, it now seems likely that a period of nominal growth could ensue for another two years, perhaps even longer.

      This will not be high-quality growth. And little of the growth will be real.

      Commodity prices will surely eat away at most, if not all, of any gains that may occur in global GDP. Additionally, while non-OECD growth actually has a chance of achieving some GDP gains in real terms, the prospects for the OECD are not as encouraging.

    • MF Global: JPMorgan Produces Smoking Gun

      When New York-based MF Global collapsed on October 31, 2011, its $41 billion in assets made it the eighth largest bankruptcy in U.S. history and the biggest financial firm to implode since Lehman in September 2008. Then Chairman and CEO Jon Corzine is connected to the head of one of his key regulators, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), through his former protégé at Goldman Sachs, Gary Gensler. He also knows the Fed’s William Dudley, a key member of the Fed’s Open Market Committee, from their days at Goldman Sachs. The Fed approved MF Global’s status as a primary dealer, a participant in the Fed’s Open Market Operations, less than one year after Jon Corzine took its helm. Corzine is also a former New Jersey governor, a former New Jersey U.S. senator and was a major campaign contribution bundler for President Obama.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • Breaking News: Coca-Cola Dumps ALEC

      According to a statement Coke made to the Washington Examiner, “Our involvement with ALEC was focused on efforts to oppose discriminatory food and beverage taxes, not on issues that have no direct bearing on our business. We have a long-standing policy of only taking positions on issues that impact our Company and industry.”

  • Censorship

  • Copyrights

    • ACTA

      • De Gucht: Please wait, Europarl!

        What he doesn’t consider is that the IPR lobby is willing to surrender ACTA but not the entire Article 207 TFEU process which is challenged by the ECJ ruling invoked by De Gucht. And finally, the upcoming IPRED+ is more interesting than the dossier which allegedly does not change anything.

      • EU Commission Shamelessly Persists In Trying to Delay ACTA Vote

        The EU Commission has made public the text of its own referral of ACTA to the EU Court of Justice. This initiative comes a week after the EU Parliament voted not to refer ACTA to the Court, which would have suspended the parliamentarian procedure for at least 18 months. The Parliament is expected to vote on ACTA this summer, and must continue to resist the Commission’s shameless technocratic tricks to save ACTA.

      • ACTA referral, here you are

04.04.12

Links 4/4/2012: GNOME 3.4 Live CD, GIMP 2.8.0-RC1

Posted in News Roundup at 5:20 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Desktop

    • Little Drive, Big Deal

      You’ve heard of Linux, but haven’t had a chance to see what all the fuss is about. After all, your computer runs Windows. But what if you could plug in your USB drive and temporarily turn your PC into a Linux system? Even better, when you’re done, your machine will go back to its regular Windows-powered self, with no trace of Linux left behind?

      You can work this bit of OS prestidigitation with UNetbootin, a free Windows utility that downloads and installs any version of Linux to your flash drive, then makes that drive bootable. It’s an easy, hassle-free way to test-drive the OS, which runs entirely from the drive, making no changes whatsoever to your

  • Server

    • Dell-Clerity: Shifting IBM Mainframe Apps to Linux, Windows
    • Can An ARM-Based Supercomputer Become the World’s Fastest?

      Ramirez, a manager with the center, is in the midst of building a new supercomputer, called Mont-Blanc, that will use the same kind of low-power chips that you can find in tablets and smartphones today. Starting next month, his team will start assembling the first Mont-Blanc prototype using Nvidia’s Tegra 3 processors instead of the RISC or Intel x86-compatible processors that are used on virtually all of today’s supercomputers. The Tegra 3 will handle communications between different parts of the system while the actual number crunching will be done by yet-to-be-determined low-power multicore Nvidia graphics processors similar to the GeForce 520MX.

  • Kernel Space

    • Android As A First Class Citizen To Linux Kernel

      Greg Kroah-Hartman was asked today during a panel he was moderating at the 6th annual Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit about Google’s Android on the mainline Linux kernel.

      For those that haven’t been paying attention, since last year there’s been a concerted effort to mainline more of Google’s Android changes into the mainline Linux kernel. Android patches that went into the mainline Linux kernel previous suffered some rot, but this latest effort has the backing of several companies and is finally coming to fruition within stable kernel releases.

    • Who Are the ‘Unkown’ Linux Kernel Developers?

      There are a lot of different people that contribute code to the Linux kernel. In fact, according to the 2012 Linux Kernel Development report from the Linux Foundation, more than 7,800 developers from nearly 800 different companies have participated in Linux kernel development.

      Not all of those companies and developers participate in every kernel release. According to the report, for the recent Linux 3.2 kernel release, some 1,316 developers contributed, representing 226 different companies. While there is lots of participation, over the last five years the top 30 developers have contributed 20 percent of the total code.

    • The Linux Foundation Releases Annual Linux Development Report
    • How is Linux Built? Our new report and video.

      When you work for the Linux Foundation you get a lot of questions on just how Linux is built. Given the massive scale of the development and ubiquity of Linux today, some of us in the community might think everyone understands how the largest collaborative project in computing works. How you submit a patch. How maintainers work with Linux creator Linus Torvalds. But because of Linux’s unprecedented growth in mobile, embedded and cloud computing, among other areas, new companies and developers are looking to participate. More than ever before, actually.

    • How Linux is Built
    • Linux boss: We’re number one where it counts

      “We want to continue our trajectory in every corner of the industry,” Zemlin told The Register. “We’re seeing Linux as the primary platform for greenfield sites in large enterprises, the primary operating system for cloud computing build outs, and we’re seeing tremendous growth in mobile and the embedded markets.”

      While some in Redmond might point to the fact that Linux is still not king of the corporate desktop, Zemlin said that that battle isn’t particularly relevant anymore. People use a wider variety of computing devices to use computers, and the browser is the becoming the most common interface for most users.

    • Linux Kernel 3.3.1 Is Available for Download

      Greg Kroah-Hartman announced on April 2nd the immediate available for download of the first maintenance release for the stable Linux 3.3 kernel series.

      Linux kernel 3.3.1 incorporates ARM fixes, updated drivers (wireless, Radeon), USB updates, as well as some improvements to various filesystem, such as CIFS, EXT4, XFS and NFS.

    • Slideshow: Live from Collaboration Summit
    • How Linux Talks to the Internet of Things: A Look at IEEE 802.15.4

      If you pay much attention to the futurists on the Web these days, no doubt you’re familiar with the term “Internet Of Things.” It may be yet-another-buzzword, but the central concept is quite real: the spread of low power, Internet-connected devices that use wireless networks to communicate with our PCs and servers. After all, you don’t need a computer in your water heater or electric meter: you just need a sensor, and way to read it remotely. Linux will be a major player in this space, but most developers still aren’t familiar with the network standards that make it work, like IEEE 802.15.4.

    • What is tmpfs ?
    • Graphics Stack

      • Non-Linux OSes Still Playing In An Intel UMS World

        While Intel has a lot of interesting work going on right now within their Linux kernel DRM driver and elsewhere within their open-source graphics stack, operating systems like OpenIndiana/Illumos and FreeBSD are still catching up, but they’re still a ways off.

        Pushed out yesterday was an updated Intel graphics driver for the OpenSolaris-derived OpenIndiana. This new Intel X.Org driver is derived from xf86-video-intel 2.9.1… Yes, what was released as upstream in October 2009 while the latest Linux users are now running xf86-video-intel 2.18.0 with many, many features and changes since that point.

      • Intel outlines open source development projects

        The director of Intel’s Open Source Technology Center Imad Sousou outlined the chip giant’s plans to invest in the open source community and provided an update on two key projects, speaking at the Linux Foundation’s Collaboration Summit in San Francisco.

      • Kernel Log: Intel hibernate bug fixed

        New versions of the Linux kernel fix a bug in Intel graphics drivers which could cause memory corruption. AMD has released X.Org drivers for its new Trinity processors. In September there will be a conference for X developers in Nuremberg. Progress has been made on GPGPU support in Mesa 3D.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

  • Distributions

    • What DEFT brings to the table
    • New Releases

    • Red Hat Family

      • CentOS Desktop

        I may be (half) joking sometime, but it happens to be serious too: encountered an old laptop (in bad shape, lot of dead pixels and such, it was a workhorse back in its time) which refuses to play along with Windows: bluescreen at startup, bluescreen at fresh install, hardware problems. The first thought: memory problems but memtest96 running from a Fedora live CD disagrees… but if I booted the device from that CD, just for the kicks I booted the distro (F14): works correctly, no lock-up, even WiFi is supported OOTB (so I suspect the hardware problem lies with the video card and is triggered by real use, not by the VESA driver).

      • Red Hat’s $1B milestone notable but chump change vis-a-vis overall Linux industry

        The Linux Foundation’s exec director saluted Linux distribution leader Red Hat for reaching $1 billion in revenues but pointed out that the overall Linux industry is worth many, many billions today.

      • Red Hat Turns More Into More

        Margins matter. The more Red Hat (NYS: RHT) keeps of each buck it earns in revenue, the more money it has to invest in growth, fund new strategic plans, or (gasp!) distribute to shareholders. Healthy margins often separate pretenders from the best stocks in the market. That’s why we check up on margins at least once a quarter in this series. I’m looking for the absolute numbers, so I can compare them to current and potential competitors, and any trend that may tell me how strong Red Hat’s competitive position could be.

      • Porticor Joins Red Hat Innovate Initiative

        Porticor®, the leading cloud data security company delivering the only cloud-based data encryption solution that infuses trust into the cloud by ensuring customer keys are never exposed, today announced it has joined the Red Hat Innovate™ program, enabling Porticor to leverage the power, openness and collaborative nature of open source communities, including enhanced access to Red Hat collaboration initiatives and software programs.

    • Debian Family

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Mentor Embedded Linux supports open source Yocto Project

      Mentor Graphics Corporation has released its next generation Mentor Embedded Linux platform that includes support for the Yocto Project, an open source collaborative project established by The Linux Foundation. The Mentor Embedded Linux platform helps developers build Linux-based embedded systems, independent of hardware architecture. With the new Mentor Embedded Linux platform, developers also gain the ability to easily select the best Linux kernel for their needs, irrespective of the kernel developed by Mentor Graphics or by a semiconductor company or by any third party.

    • Phones

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • Security

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • The Fracking Frenzy’s Impact on Women

      Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” has generated widespread media attention this year. The process, which injects water and chemicals into the ground to release “natural” gas and oil from shale bedrock, has been shown to contribute significantly to air and water pollution and has even been linked to earthquakes. But little has been reported on the ways in which fracking may have unique impacts on women. Chemicals used in fracking have been linked to breast cancer and reproductive health problems and there have been reports of rises in crimes against women in some fracking “boom” towns, which have attracted itinerant workers with few ties to the community.

  • Finance

    • Exclusive: The $1.3 billion bond deal haunting Goldman

      The Securities and Exchange Commission is likely to bring charges soon against Goldman Sachs (GS) for a 2006 mortgage investment deal. The agency hasn’t said which one yet, but Fortune has learned there’s a good chance the SEC’s case will focus on Fremont Home Loan Trust 2006-E, a bundle of more than 5,000 mortgages that has cost investors, including mortgage guarantor Freddie Mac and by extension U.S. taxpayers, an estimated $545 million.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • Copyright paradigm shift in visegrad countries

        The field of copyright is associated with important cultural, social, and technological aspects, all of which have to be taken into account when formulating policy in this field. In the last 20 years, copyright and patent holders in different fields of industry and art have entered into a period of redefinition. Today, the copyright that served to protect the interest of creators in the last centuries is a barrier of invention and knowledge-sharing.

      • US government: We hear there’s child porn on those Megaupload servers, judge!

        Megaupload wants the servers back to help with its defense, but with most of its assets seized by the federal government, it can’t pay for them. Carpathia would normally wipe the servers and lease them to new clients, but the Electronic Frontier Foundation is demanding that legitimate users of the site be allowed to retrieve their personal data first. The Motion Picture Association of America doesn’t want this to happen without assurances that its copyrighted content won’t be retrieved and distributed again; besides, it might want the servers for a future lawsuit of its own. And the federal government yesterday announced that the servers “may contain child pornography,” which would render them “contraband” and limit Carpathia’s options for dealing with them.

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