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04.13.11

Links 13/4/2011: Nginx 1.0.0 is Out, Catchup With Some Older Non-Linux News

Posted in News Roundup at 9:39 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Ballnux

    • HTC Sensation smartphone runs on latest dual-core Snapdragon

      HTC announced a 4.3-inch, dual-core 1.2GHz Android phone — initially heading for T-Mobile and Vodafone before going global. The HTC Sensation features a unique, contoured display, 768MB RAM, a full range of wireless features, a new HTC Watch video service, and an updated version of the HTC Sense featuring a “active lockscreen.”

  • Applications

    • Viewnior Image Viewer
    • 10 of the Best Free Linux Earth Science Software

      Earth science (also known as geoscience) is the focus of understanding the sciences related to the planet Earth. It includes a wide range of fields such as geology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, oceanography, and glaciology. Some people are surprised to learn that astronomy is also regarded to be an earth science. Geology is generally considered to be the primary earth science.

      Earth scientists plays an important role in helping nations minimise risks that are posed by climate change and natural disasters (such as floods, tornados, hurricanes, and earthquakes).

    • Music Production in Linux 2
    • Proprietary

      • Professional Quality CAD on Linux with DraftSight

        DraftSight builds are available in both Debian and RPM packages on the product’s home page. The beta weighs in at a beefy 68.8 MB, with a prodigious list of dependencies, but it is a real, native Linux application and not a WINE port. The dependencies are standard GUI fare — Freetype, Cairo, GTK+, D-Bus, and so forth, so any up-to-date system should have no trouble installing it. Still, it might have been nice to have the dependencies listed on the web site, although that is par for the course — Dassault’s DraftSight site has an annoying habit of providing the majority of its content (including the FAQ and Getting Started Guide) as downloadable PDFs rather than simple HTML.

    • Instructionals/Technical

  • Desktop Environments

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Have Some Cheese with that Webcam

        Since the launch of Linux Magazine TV (LMTV) in February of this year, my interest in video has increased beyond any reasonable limits. I’m obsessed with video and our efforts in this new area for us. For weeks I’ve tried to find a way to use my new Panasonic HM-TA1 pocket video camera for new LMTV entries and my own projects. Last week I discovered Cheese Webcam Booth (Cheese), which is the topic of this week’s article. Using Cheese is intuitive and closely resembles the Apple iPad2 Photo Booth app. The difference in price between Cheese (free) and Photo Booth ($499+ for the iPad2) is significant, which definitely gives you something to smile about.

  • Distributions

  • Devices/Embedded

    • A 300ms BeagleBoard boot?

      Make Linux Software posted a video showing the “fastest ever embedded Linux boot.” The video shows a BeagleBoard equipped with a 720MHz TI OMAP3530 processor booting Linux 2.6.32 in an impressive 300 milliseconds from boot loader to shell — although the jury is out on just how useful the stripped-down 1.5MB image might be.

    • TI launches open source project supporting its wireless chips

      Texas Instruments (TI) announced an “OpenLink” project, which has released a battery-optimized, open source Linux wireless driver stack for mobile devices. The initial release will support Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and FM communications on TI’s WiLink WL1271/3 and WL1281/3 chips, running on the ARM Cortex-based BeagleBoard and PandaBoard boards under Ubuntu, MeeGo, and Android, says the company.

    • Phones

      • Android

        • Best Alternative Web Browsers for Android

          The web browser portion of the Android market is one of the most fiercely competitive markets since all users at one point or another need to browse the Internet on their devices. Although Android ships with a default web browser, the increasing demands users place on surfing the Internet has lead to the launch of more advanced browsers that offer added features and usability.

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • Newspapers and Social Media: Still Not Really Getting It

    Many traditional media entities have embraced social-media services like Twitter and Facebook and blogs — at least to some extent — as tools for reporting and journalism, using them to publish and curate news reports. But newspapers in particular seem to have a hard time accepting the “social” part of these tools, at least when it comes to letting their journalists engage with readers as human beings. A case in point is the new social-media policy introduced at a major newspaper in Canada, which tells its staff not to express personal opinions — even on their personal accounts or pages — and not to engage with readers in the comments.

  • What is legitimate “newsgathering” and what is “piracy”?

    Zunguzungu’s got an excellent, nuanced piece on the creation and attribution of value in newsgathering and reporting. Zz reminds us that the current arrangement is perfect arbitrary and contingent: no underlying universal principle reifies certain news-related activities (writing the story), ascribes no ownership stake to other activities (sources quoted and unquoted, tipoffs, references); and damns yet another set of activities (curating, aggregating and commenting upon the news).

  • Why Paying Bribes Should Be Legal

    You head down to the local government office to pick up your check. But when you get there, the clerk says you can’t have the refund — unless you pay him a bribe. So you pay the bribe, and the clerk gives you your refund.

    Both you and the clerk have just committed a crime, according to Indian law.

    Kaushik Basu, chief economic adviser to India’s Ministry of Finance, wants to change that.

  • Trust Obama?

    Last week, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) tried to get the Senate to adopt candidate Barack Obama’s core principle of presidential warmaking powers.

    Paul added an amendment to a bill that would adopt as the “sense of the Senate” the following quote from candidate Obama: “The president does not have power under the Constitution to unilaterally authorize a military attack in a situation that does not involve stopping an actual or imminent threat to the nation.”

  • AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile Hit With Dumbest Antitrust Lawsuit Ever

    We just wrote about how Max Davis, who’s trying to create a silly and totally pointless compulsory licensing system for MMS content was more or less laughed out of court in the lawsuit he filed against the mobile operators, claiming that they were running illegal P2P file sharing programs in the form of their MMS capabilities. It apparently took him all of a few days to come up with a new, perhaps even more ridiculous strategy: he’s suing AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile and TracFone for supposed antitrust violations over the same basic issues. Once again, it seems clear that this is an incredibly weak (and almost certainly unproductive) attempt at getting these companies to agree to his pointless licensing scheme.

  • Science

    • Space Junk Threat Will Grow for Astronauts and Satellites

      Fast-moving chunks of space debris zipped uncomfortably close to the International Space Station twice in the past week — cosmic close calls that will likely become more common over the next several years, experts predict.

      For one thing, after 50 years of spaceflight there is just more junk up there than there used to be, sharing space with vehicles and their human crews. And this debris can snowball — as when satellites collide, spawning thousands of new pieces of orbiting junk.

    • SpaceX Unveils Plan for World’s Most Powerful Private Rocket

      Private spaceship maker SpaceX announced plans Tuesday (April 5) for a new heavy-lift rocket, a vehicle that would be the most powerful commercial rocket ever built and haul much heavier loads than the company’s previous boosters.

  • Health/Nutrition

    • What’s Worse Than ‘Ruinous’?

      In 2003 Paul Ryan was one of 207 Republicans in the House of Representatives who voted for the Medicare prescription drug benefit championed by President George W. Bush—a reckless expansion of a huge program that was already heading for bankruptcy. Yesterday Ryan, who now chairs the House Budget Committee, did partial penance for that budget-busting blunder with a plan that includes ambitious Medicare reforms as well as $5.8 trillion in spending cuts during the next decade.

      At a time when Democrats and Republicans are squabbling over whether to cut $33 billion or $61 billion in spending this year—neither of which would make much of a dent in a deficit that is expected to hit $1.6 trillion—Ryan’s plan may seem breathtakingly bold. But while it is admirably forthright in some respects, it dodges several important questions. It’s too bad there is no opposing party to keep the Republicans fiscally honest.

    • CTIA cites First Amendment protection of radiation levels

      The CTIA is arguing that a San Francisco ordinance demanding radiation levels be displayed on phone packaging breaches the First Amendment of the US constitution, and is thus illegal.

      Speaking to CNET, the wireless telecommunications organisation claimed that forcing shops to reveal the specific absorption rate (SAR) of phone handsets infringes on the retailers right to free speech by compelling them to mention it. The ordinance requires all San Francisco retailers to provide the information at the point of sale, though it hasn’t yet come in to force.

    • CTIA argues SF cell phone law violates First Amendment

      San Francisco’s board of supervisors has agreed to put its Right-to-Know Ordinance under further review after the wireless industry’s lobbying arm claimed the legislation infringes on the First Amendment rights of cell phone retailers.

      In an interview with CNET, CTIA spokesman John Walls said the city cannot force retailers to distribute materials that warn consumers about the possible negative effects of cell phone radiation. “You can’t compel speech,” he said. “Telling retailers to give out that information violates the First Amendment.”

  • Security

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • TSA chief defends body scanners

      Transportation Security Administration administrator John Pistole defended controversial full-body scanning techniques that have endured withering criticism from Republican leaders in Congress.

      Speaking at a Department of Homeland Security conference in Washington Friday, Pistole said the body scanners that have attracted attention in recent months were TSA’s best option for preventing non-metallic explosive devices.

    • Appeals Court Strengthens Warrantless Searches at Border

      The authorities may seize laptops, cameras and other digital devices at the U.S. border without a warrant, and scour through them for days hundreds of miles away, a federal appeals court ruled.

      The 2-1 decision (.pdf) Wednesday by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals comes as the government is increasingly invoking its broad, warrantless search-and-seizure powers at the U.S. border to probe the digital lives of travelers.

      Under the “border search exception” of United States law, international travelers, including U.S. citizens, can be searched without a warrant as they enter the country. Under the Obama administration, law enforcement agents have aggressively used this power to search travelers’ laptops, sometimes copying the hard drive before returning the computer to its owner.

  • Cablegate

    • In The End, Secret Hold On Whistleblower Protection Narrowed Down To Two Senators

      Back in January, we noted the somewhat ironic fact that a US Senator had put a “secret hold” on a bill to protect government whistleblowers. We wondered if someone would blow the whistle and out that Senator. Thankfully, the folks from On the Media stepped up, and set up a project to find out who put that secret hold on the bill. Last we had checked in, they had narrowed it down to three possible Senators: Jon Kyl, Jeff Sessions and James Risch.

  • Finance

    • Man who made coins found guilty

      In September 2008, Bernard von NotHaus donned prison stripes at the Silver Summit at the Best Western Coeur d’Alene Inn.

      Von NotHaus, 67, was at the summit pitching his own “Liberty Dollar” coins, but dressed the part of a convict to stick a symbolic finger in the eye of the federal authorities. They had seized records, dies for casting coins, and Liberty Dollars from three Coeur d’Alene businesses linked to his currency. Sunshine Minting Inc. in Coeur d’Alene made coins for von NotHaus.

    • Oh What a Lovely Budget Item

      When Bill Kristol endorsed America’s intervention in Libya, the Weekly Standard editor was being completely consistent with everything else he has said about American foreign policy. He just wasn’t being consistent with his pose as a proponent of fiscal restraint. It’s bracing to watch Kristol twirl so easily from denouncing “the Democrats’ orgy of spending” and complaining about Republicans who “don’t have a credible plan to deal with the debt or the deficit” to jubilating that the president “didn’t shrink from defending the use of force.” But the pundit’s gyrations can’t obscure a basic reality: You can pay your bills or you can be a global policeman, but you can’t do both. Not in 2011.

      According to ABC, the cost of Obama’s kinetic spending reached $600 million in its first week. The Pentagon estimates that the total could reach $800 million by the end of September, and the Pentagon just might be lowballing. Todd Harrison, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, has told The National Journal that the price tag could “easily pass the $1 billion mark on this operation, regardless of how well things go.” And if things don’t go well…

  • Censorship

    • Google Found Liable For Autocomplete Suggestions In Italy

      Here’s yet another ridiculously bad ruling for search engines in Italy. Glyn Moody points us to the news of a blog post by a lawyer involved in the case (against Google) who is happy that his side prevailed and that Google is liable for search autocomplete suggestions. The case involved someone who was upset that doing a Google search on his name popped up “con man” (“truffatore”) and “fraud” (“truffa”) as autocomplete Google search suggestions. We’ve seen similar cases elsewhere, and France has (most of the time) also ruled against Google.

      Of course, this is ridiculous for a variety of reasons. Google is not “creating” this content. It’s accurately suggesting results based on what users are searching. Clearly, people are searching on this particular individual along with the two terms. That’s not Google’s fault. Yet Google is liable for it?

  • Civil Rights

    • Is The FBI Lying To Congress About Its Abuses Of The Patriot Act?

      As we go through this brief extension in three of the more controversial provisions of the Patriot Act, which give law enforcement tremendous leeway in spying on people with very little oversight, there have been some hearings about those provisions. At a recent Senate Judiciary Hearing about this, FBI director Robert Mueller was asked if any of the three provisions had been found to be abused. Mueller responded, “I’m not aware of any.” However, as the EFF notes, it has clear evidence of the roving wiretap being abused, which it found via some FOIA documents. Tellingly, when it requested info about Patriot Act violations, it received heavily redacted info. However, via a different FOIA request, it received other information that, when combined with the first FOIA request, reveals a clear abuse by the FBI.

      [...]

      This raises some pretty serious questions.

  • DRM

    • The Terror of Customer Expectations

      That particular war has already been lost, pretty much. Conventional wisdom among the tech savvy is that DRM is bad, and few of the indies use it. Nontechnical ebook buyers will figure it out when they decide to move to another reader system and can’t take their purchases with them. (The ebook business is so new that most people are still on their first reader and their first forty or fifty ebooks.) The day will come in the next few years when Big Print will be a lot less big, and competing against a lot more ebook publishers who have long understood that DRM does no one any good.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • “Big Content” Is Strangling American Innovation

      Innovation has emerged as a key means by which the US can pull itself out of this lackluster economy. In the State of the Union, President Obama referred to China and India as new threats to America’s position as the world’s leading innovator. But the threats are not just external. One of the greatest threats to the US’s ability to innovate lies within: specifically, with the music and movie business. These Big Content businesses are attempting to protect themselves from change so aggressively that they risk damaging America’s position as a world leader in innovation.

    • Lawmakers tell Google to do more on antipiracy

      WASHINGTON–The tone of a congressional hearing held today on antipiracy was set early when Rep. Bob Goodlatte suggested that Google was falling short in its antipiracy efforts.

    • Senator Leahy Ignores Serious First Amendment Concerns With COICA

      Seeing as he’s a Senator, it would help if he were familiar with the law. As such, he would know that (1) copyright infringement is not “theft,” and (2) yes, the First Amendment protects all kinds of speech, even speech made by criminals and (3) the Free Speech issues that many of us are concerned with are the takedowns of legitimate non-infringing content, which we’ve seen happen repeatedly by Homeland Security — which is the type of program Leahy is looking to expand with COICA.

    • Geist: Canadian-backed report says music, movie, and software piracy is a market failure, not a legal one

      Trademark and copyright holders frequently characterize piracy as a legal failure, arguing that tougher laws and increased enforcement are needed to stem infringing activity. But a new global study on piracy, backed by Canada’s International Development Research Centre, comes to a different conclusion. Following several years of independent investigation in six emerging economies, the report concludes that piracy is chiefly a product of a market failure, not a legal one.

      The Social Science Research Council launched the study in 2006, identifying partner institutions in South Africa, Russia, Brazil, Mexico, Bolivia, and India to better understand the market for media piracy such as music, movies, and software. The result is the most comprehensive analysis of piracy to date.

    • FDA, KV Pharma Bend A Bit To Public Pressure; Lower Makena Costs, Allow Competing Drugs To Remain… For Now

      We’ve been discussing how the FDA has been systematically banning drugs that have been on the market for years, and retroactively granting monopolies to particular pharmaceutical firms. The case that’s drawn the most attention is that of Makena, a drug to prevent early childbirth which is provided on the market by a bunch of different firms, and was competitively priced around $10/dose. Yet, after the FDA stepped in and gave a monopoly to KV Pharmaceutical under the economically-clueless belief that this would help make the drug “more available,” there was a massive public backlash when people discovered KV would increase the price of the drug from $10 to $1,500.

    • Copyrights

      • Why Chris Dodd Is Doing Everything Wrong With The MPAA

        We’ve certainly suggested that Chris Dodd was making a big mistake by focusing on the MPAA’s old talking points in his new role as chief of that lobbying organization. Rather than leading Hollywood to a future of new business models and smarter embrace of what consumers want, he’s kicked things off by being anti-consumer, anti-technology and a supporter of previous policies that have failed massively. It’s not exactly a recipe for success.

      • Parade Of Strawmen Dominate House Hearing About Online Infringement

        We’ve already mentioned how the House’s Hearing on: “Promoting Investment and Protecting Commerce Online: Legitimate Sites v. Parasites” turned into something of a bitchfest at Google for not waving a magic wand and stopping infringement. However, I also wanted to look at the prepared statements of the four participants, which seemed to overflow with ridiculous strawmen.

        First up, we have esteemed and respected First Amendment lawyer Floyd Abrams, who (it is always said) defended the NY Times in the Pentagon Papers case many years ago. While Abrams is widely respected, it feels like lately he’s been getting quite sloppy in his thinking. Late last year, he published a piece trying to differentiate Wikileaks from the NY Times/Pentagon Papers situation, and was widely criticized for getting many of his facts wrong — undermining his entire argument.

      • Tenenbaum Appeal Heard: Is It Okay To Make Someone Pay $675,000 For Downloading 30 Songs?

        The latest in the ongoing trial of Joel Tenenbaum, the student who was found guilty of sharing 30 songs online, and told to pay $675,000 for it, until the judge unilaterraly reduced the amount to $67,500. As we noted at the time, it really seemed like Tenenbaum had horrifically bad legal counsel, in the form of Harvard law professor Charlie Nesson, who still seems more focused on making the case a circus, rather than focusing in on the key issues. That does not, however, mean there aren’t key issues here, with the big one being the appropriate standards for determining how much one should have to pay if found guilty of file sharing.

        The appeal was just heard on Monday, and you can listen to the oral arguments (mp3) from the court’s website. It’s definitely an interesting hearing and worth listening to. As with most appeals court situations, the bulk of the work is done in the briefs that were filed prior to the hearing, and which everyone is familiar with. The oral hearings get right to the point and drill down on where the panel of judges has questions.

      • Rick James Estate Files Class Action Lawsuit Against Universal Music Over Digital Revenue

        The estate of Rick James, best known for his song “Super Freak,” filed a proposed class action lawsuit on Friday against Universal Music Group over money owed from digital downloads and ringtones.

        The new class action lawsuit comes in wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision not to review a case initiated by Eminem’s former Detroit-based producing partners, F.B.T. Productions, which won a lower 9th Circuit ruling last September deeming digital music to be more akin to a license than a physical sale of music. The distinction is important: Copyright owners get a 50% share on royalties from licenses but only about a 12-20% royalty rate from sales.

      • Groups slam online piracy efforts

        A coalition of progressive activists and conservative bloggers slammed the bipartisan push to crack down on online piracy backed by organized labor and the entertainment industry on Monday, calling it an encroachment on freedom of speech.

        Lawmakers from both parties are scheduled to hold a press conference at the Capitol Monday, where they are expected to renew their push for new online piracy laws that give feds greater authority to shut down sites that host or link to pirated content.

        The effort will likely resemble the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA), which was introduced by Senate Judiciary Chairman Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and passed the committee last year. The White House has backed the effort and recommended stiffer penalties for online piracy convictions.

      • TV Site Sued For Linking To Completely Legal Videos

        There are thousands of sites that link to video on the Internet and it’s becoming increasingly common for them to be threatened by rightsholders when they link to unauthorized content. However, things have gone a stage further as a site is now being sued by a copyright group for linking to completely legal content provided by official sources.

      • Forwarding a Sentence-Long Message from a Listserv = Copyright Infringement?

        So argued Kenneth M. Stern, a California lawyer; no dice, said the district court in Stern v. Does (C.D. Cal., decided Feb. 10, 2011 but just now made available on Westlaw). No dice, said the court, concluding that the message lacked the modicum of creativity required for copyright protection — because it was so short and dictated by functional considerations — and that the copying was a fair use. Both conclusions seem right to me, though the fair use conclusion is especially clear, given the utter lack of any likely effect on the value of plaintiff’s work.

      • CRIA Watches Massive Music Piracy Crisis Devastate Unknown Band

        During the last couple of weeks a heated debate has sprung up around the claimed massive music piracy of a relatively unknown band. One Soul Thrust currently have just 176 followers on Twitter yet according to their manager the group is being destroyed by the pirating masses who have, to date, downloaded their debut album 100,000 times. With the CRIA apparently supporting the band’s position, it’s time to investigate.

      • As Expected, MPAA Sues Movie Streaming Site That Uses Connected DVD Players

        When Zediva launched, we already knew it was going to face a legal fight from the MPAA and the movie studios. The company lets people stream movies they want to see, but tries to get around the legal licensing issues by only streaming directly from internet connected DVD players, playing legitimately acquired DVDs. Their argument is that it’s really no different than renting a movie and bringing it to your own DVD player. And, perhaps, the Cablevision ruling in the US on remote DVRs gives them some support for their position. But, there was no way the industry was going to just let this go by without any sort of fight. And, so, the MPAA has now sued the company claiming that it’s a “sham,” and that Zediva is running an illegal video-on-demand service without the proper licenses. In some ways, this case could also impact the attempts by cloud music players to stream legitimate content without a license as well.

      • Movie studios sue DVD streaming site Zediva

        The movie studios have seen the online movie rental service Zediva and filed their thumbs-down review of the site in federal court Monday, asking for monetary damages and an immediate shutdown.

        Zediva.com, which officially launched in mid-March, rents new release movies without permission from the studios by letting its customers rent a DVD player and disc from afar. Only one person can rent a given disc at a time. That, the company argues, puts it in the same legal bucket as a traditional video rental store.

      • Exploit Turns Anti-Piracy Agency Site Into The Pirate Bay

        Hadopi, the French agency charged with handling file-sharers’ copyright digressions, has once again been shamed by a copyright-related blunder. The agency which mandates that all citizens secure their networks to keep out freeloading pirates, has a surprisingly unsecure site itself. Ironically enough, the vulnerability allowed outsiders to change the search engine of the Hadopi site into that of The Pirate Bay.

      • The IP Maximalist’s Guide To Making It Big
      • Techdirt talks a lot about how to make money in the music biz without actually selling music. Consider this an improvement. With these instructions, you’ll hardly have to produce any music at all, and if you do, you won’t have to go through all that time-intensive and “extremely expensive” production/promotion stuff.

      • Google Books, Fair Uses, and “Copyright” as Misnomer
      • US Government’s ‘Pirate’ Domain Seizures Failed Miserably

        Over the past several months a series of domain name seizures by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) made headlines across the Internet.

        Under the flag of “Operation In Our Sites” the authorities shut down a dozen file-sharing and streaming sites, as well as close to 80 sites selling counterfeit goods. After two months of silence on the domain seizure front, the MPAA has now applauded the US authorities for their “successful” enforcement efforts.

      • Music Industry Will Force Licenses on Amazon Cloud Player — or Else

        Amazon’s decision to launch its new Cloud Player without securing additional music licenses has been described as a “bold move” by many observers. It takes serious guts for Amazon to simply declare that it doesn’t need licenses — especially when even casual observers know the music industry thinks otherwise.

      • Porn Company Says You Owe $25k If Content In Your Account Ends Up Pirated… Even If You Prove You Were Hacked [Updated]

        Liberty Media/Corbin Fisher continues its somewhat aggressive attempts to blame everyone but itself for failing to put in place a better business model. Remember, we just noted the bizarre claim that it made in the mass infringement lawsuit it filed that anyone who did not secure their internet routers to block all infringing material was negligent. In the comments to that post, someone pointed out that the company also had recently changed its terms of service to say that if anyone with an account had content from that account end up pirated, the user owed $25,000 even if they could prove that the account was hacked…

      • Filmmakers’ unfair argument against ‘fair use’
      • ACTA

Clip of the Day

Code is Law: Does Anyone Get This Yet?


Credit: TinyOgg

Links 13/4/2011: Linux 2.6.39 RC3, Fedora 16 is Verne

Posted in News Roundup at 2:55 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Kernel Space

    • ITechLaw to Hold 40th Anniversary Celebration in San Francisco

      Accepting the award on Torvalds’ behalf will be conference keynote speaker Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation. Zemlin works with the world’s largest technology companies, including Google, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Intel, Nokia and others, to help define the future of computing on the server, in the cloud and on a variety of new mobile computing devices. His work at the vendor-neutral Linux Foundation gives him a unique and aggregate perspective on the global technology industry.

    • Linux 2.6.39-rc3
    • Graphics Stack

  • Applications

    • Linphone- An Open source SIP phone for desktop & mobile
    • Seven Free Security Tools for Linux

      One of the big advantages of using Linux is that its security tends to be so much better than that of the competing alternatives. That’s due in large part to the way Linux assigns permissions, but it’s also certainly true that the open source operating system is targeted by malware writers far less frequently than Windows is, in particular, simply because it’s less widely used and so much more diverse.

      [...]

      There are, of course, countless other security tools for Linux out there, many of them excellent as well.

    • Proprietary

      • Make your Speed Dial look great with Opera Barracuda

        Opera 11.10 aka Barracuda has been released today. With the new, more flexible Speed Dial your favorite sites are better looking than ever. Speed Dial automatically uses website logos and lets Web developers make content tailored for speed dial. And in Opera 11.10 you can add as many sites to Speed Dial as you like.

      • Opera 11.10 Goes Gold, Now Ready for Download

        Opera Software today announced the final release of Opera 11.10, an incremental update with a barrel full of subtle changes. Perhaps the biggest one is a revamped and faster Turbo that’s up to four times as fast as before, the Norwegian browser maker claims. Part of the secret sauce in the recipe for faster Turbo is the added support for Google’s WebP image format, which provides lossy compression for photographic images.

    • Instructionals/Technical

    • Games

      • An Open-Source MMORPG Using The Unigine Engine

        Project Bossanova has high hopes to develop “the first 3D game built especially with Linux as the first priority. It will set the standard in gameplay, graphics, compatibility, community integration and more.” In addition, they plan to have the game, now announced as RunServer’s MMT, to be open-source. This is an MMOPRG game and it’s being built using the Unigine Engine.

      • Humble Frozenbyte Bundle: Don’t be left out in the cold

        For the next 14 days, you can get Wolfire Games’ freshly-released Humble Frozenbyte Bundle! Like the first two bundles, you pay what you want to download five independent, DRM-free, cross-platform computer games, and choose to divide your money between the game developers, Child’s Play, and EFF. The Frozenbyte Bundle includes Trine, Shadowgrounds Survivor, the unpublished game Splot, and gaming prototype Jackclaw, in which you get to rampage through a city, throw cars, and generally cause mayhem.

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • KDE Spain announces Akademy-es 2011

        KDE Spain is organizing Akademy-es 2011, the annual meeting of KDE users and contributors in Barcelona, Spain from May 20th through May 22nd. Akademy-es is an important event in the KDE calendar. Attendance and the technical quality of papers have increased significantly during each of the previous events.

        New this year, Akademy-es will take place in two different locations. The events of each day are designed to fit ideally with the surroundings. On Friday, Akademy-es will be held at the North Campus of the Polytechnic University of Catalunya, and weekend activities will be at The School of Sant Marc de Sarrià.

      • Testing Plasma Active

        The default desktop opens with a shaded cover that is actually a desktop lock. You can drag that away to unlock and reveal these “plasma strips” that are for KDE widgets. One is an RSS feeds list and another is a weather widget. Clicking on a feed title opens the article or post in Firefox – one might expect Konqueror. You can drag the strips with your mouse cursor as a whole to reveal any additional strips that didn’t fit on the display. You can add more widget strips by clicking the “plus sign” at the end of widget strips. On each strip is a configuration icon that can be clicked on to reveal another configuration icon and a quit icons. If you drag the original configuration icon to the newly spawned configuration icon that opens the configuration dialog for that particular widget. Using the handle at the bottom of the screen will drag the whole strip containment out of sight to reveal an almost normal appearing desktop.

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Ubuntu Unity vs. GNOME 3: Which is Better?

        GNOME 3 and Ubuntu’s soon-to-be released Unity are the first GNOME desktops designed from the start with usability principles in mind. Not that releases in the GNOME 2 series ignored usability, but in GNOME 2, usability was an addition to the desktop, comparable to adding the foundation after the house was built.

        Whether you use GNOME 3 or Unity will probably depend on your distribution’s choice. But assuming you have a choice, which should you use? Suggesting an answer is hard, because in many ways the two are distinctly similar in design, with the differences largely in the details.

      • GNOME3 on Ubuntu Natty: the first impressions
      • Gnome3 from a XFCE user’s perspective.
  • Distributions

    • Red Hat Family

      • NYSE and Deutsche Borse merger chiefs size up single Red Hat Linux trading platform

        The New York Stock Exchange and Deutsche Borse are planning a move to a single cash equities trading platform, understood to be based on Red Hat Linux, in a crucial step towards saving €79 million (£64 million) in annual IT costs and delivering robust, fast messaging.

        If the merger goes ahead, the exchanges will also integrate “complementary” derivatives businesses, and combine their US options platforms. The savings represent 26 percent of the €300 million total planned cost cuts, which also include more efficient clearing and market operations.

      • Fedora

        • Results of Fedora 16 Release Name Voting

          Votes :: Name
          ——————————-
          2204 :: Verne
          1662 :: Beefy Miracle
          1522 :: Omoto
          1241 :: Nepia
          1207 :: Bonnet
          1157 :: Barona
          908 :: Llullaillaco
          845 :: Legation
          607 :: Mt. Orne

        • Fedora 16 will not be a Beefy Miracle

          The Fedora community has voted on the name for the next major release of this Linux distribution.

          There were some 2,204 votes cast for the winner…

          Verne

          Yes, Verne.

    • Debian Family

      • Knoppix 2011 6.4 Review

        Generally because Knoppix is meant to be used as a live CD too much customization will not always be necessary.

      • Canonical/Ubuntu

        • Goodbye Ubuntu 8.04 LTS
        • So long 8.04 Hardy Heron – You have a special place in my computing history.
        • Ubuntu 11.04 ‘Natty Narwhal’ Awesome New Plymouth Theme!
        • Ubuntu Becomes First OS To Get Automatic Epson Printer Drivers
        • Canonical To Drop Support For Ubuntu 9.10

          With an announcement on the security mailing list, Canonical has confirmed that support for Ubuntu 9.10 will cease on April 29 2011. This came as no surprise as it adheres to the expected support cycle of a .10 Ubuntu release, and 9.10 is now 18 months old.

          The recommended upgrade path from 9.10 is to Ubuntu 10.4. 10.04 is a long term support (LTS) release, and support will end on April 2013. Note that, according to official Ubuntu documentation, it’s not possible to skip a release version when upgrading. So, it’s not possible to go straight from 9.10 to 10.10. It is possible to upgrade from 9.10 to 10.04 and then to 10.10. That’s quite a lot to go through, and personally, I’d be tempted to make a fresh install and migrate the user data.

        • Look what we built together, a retrospective on Unity bitesize bugs.

          This cycle we started off determined to make it easy for anyone who wanted to contribute to Ubuntu Unity to have no roadblocks in their way. We concentrated on making our work processes as smooth and easy as possible. We had Q+A sessions in IRC, Ask Me Anythings on Reddit, and regular status reports so that anyone who wanted to dive in this cycle could grab Unity and fix a bug.

        • Flavours and Variants

          • Moonstruck with…
            MoonOS

            Should Linux users try Moon? Since it is more of a creative spin-off of Ubuntu, and not a completely self-made distro, it really is more a matter of taste, computing style, and personal preference than functionality or utility. Former and current Mac users looking for an easy to use, friendly distro with a familiar interface can find refuge in MoonOS to ease any transition pains they might experience in swapping to Linux. Of course, like Ubuntu, MoonOS is an excellent beginner’s distro, and it will provide most of the tools a former Windows user may be looking for in Linux. Even those who are tired with Ubuntu and wish to try a different approach will discover Moon to be just as easy as – if not easier than – Ubuntu with its Docky alternative. MoonOS’ default theme is arguably more attractive, although whether Moon’s green is more likable than Ubuntu’s brown is a purely subjective matter. Also, all Ubuntu users have to do is change their default appearance, and the argument ceases to exist.
            Finally, more experienced users could decide that Moon does not meet their advanced needs, and Ubuntu fans and Linux veterans may be annoyed by Docky and unimpressed with the original artwork. Nevertheless, with its alternative take on Ubuntu and its colorful, customizable Docky, MoonOS remains easy enough for anyone to use and interesting enough for even a dedicated Linux user to try.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Renesas Electronics Joins Linux Foundation

      The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, today announced that Renesas Electronics Corporation is its newest member.

      Renesas is a premier supplier of advanced semiconductor solutions, including microcontrollers (MCUs), systems-on-chip (SoC) solutions and a broad range of analog and power devices. The Japan-based company is aggressively investing in the areas of next-generation automotives, mobile phones, set-top boxes and other increasingly sophisticated electronics that are running Linux. For example, Renesas recently announced new SoCs for next-generation mobile phones and for dashboard-mounted car navigation systems, respectively, that support advanced human machine interfaces (HMI).

    • Phones

Free Software/Open Source

  • Events

  • Web Browsers

    • Flock browser fails to fly at Zynga

      I’ve never been a fan of Flock, the ‘social’ web browser. Personally, I’ve long argued that Flock is little more than an overlay.

      At first Flock was an overlay of social add-ons to Firefox, then it moved to Chrome.

    • Mozilla

      • Even As Firefox 4 Performance Problems Loom, Firefox 5 is Coming

        Mozilla is doing an admirable job of helping users get the most out of Firefox 4, including posting lists of add-ons that can lead to performance problems. But its rapid release cycle is new, and it remains to be seen–especially since previous Firefox development proceeded much more slowly–if Mozilla is ready to follow the cycle that it has announced.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • Desktop Publishing Software With OpenOffice

      Recently I was asked by a family member to set them up with a copy of Publisher. Apparently, they weren’t aware of the cost involved in purchasing this software, so I suggested we look into some free alternatives that might better meet their needs. After some thought, I remembered that Microsoft Publisher is just Word with a few additional bells and whistles at the user’s disposal. And remembering that most desktop publishing software is a bit overwhelming for most folks, I instead chose to make due with OpenOffice Writer. Why not simply choose Serif PagePlus Starter Edition? Honestly, as great as the software is, there is just too much going on. At this point, I might as well have suggested Scribus. No, keeping things limited to drawing tables and inserting images was where it’s at. But this leaves us with the need to get some decent clip art inserted into Writer so that it’s ready to go.

  • Business

    • Semi-Open Source

      • The H Half Hour: Talend, Open Core and Community

        Ross Turk is the new director of community at Talend , a company that’s not afraid to say they use an open core model. In this H Half Hour, The H asks Turk about how the open core model works at Talend and how the company is building a community around its data transformation and management tools.

  • Funding

    • VC funding for OSS-related vendors in Q1

      Venture capital funding for open source software-related vendors declined 14% in the first quarter. According to our preliminary figures, OSS-related vendors raised $79.8m in Q1, compared to $92.5m a year ago.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Stallman weighs pros and cons of digital inclusion

      Richard Stallman, founder of the free software movement and the GNU Project, spoke Monday on the benefits and threats of digital inclusion in society.

      Stallman defines digital inclusion as the creation of an inclusive information society in which all people have access to information and communication technology.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Sage Bionetworks is the Latest Open Biotechnology Effort

      Slowly but surely, biology and biotechnology efforts that follow open source principles are improving, and as they mature, they could have a profound effect on healthcare, longevity, disease control, and much more. Biotechnology reporter Luke Zimmerman’s latest dispatch on the work of Sage Bionetworks founder Stephen Friend offers a case in point. With gene sequencing efforts going on all around the world–but mostly going on in silos, where information is not shared in optimal ways–Friend is convinced that shared data could bring on huge advances in biotechnology. His is only one of several promising efforts in this area.

    • Open Data

      • Got Data?

        What platform versions are being downloaded? What geographies is your service popular in? Which APIs are being consumed? What progamming languages are most popular? From web analytics of your documentation to user activation data, you can answer these questions. But this isn’t happening at present.

  • Programming

  • Standards/Consortia

    • Press Releases: Open Standards law approved in Portugal

      The Portuguese Parliament approved on the 6th of April 2011 a Law for the adoption of Open Standards on public IT systems. This law represents the consensus reached by the represented parties following two proposals submitted by PCP and BE, that were discussed and merged on the Working Group that produced the final text.

    • Standardization Roadmap for Electric Drive Vehicles Called for at ANSI Workshop

      Nearly 120 stakeholders and another 34 webinar attendees gathered for the April 5-6 ANSI Workshop: Standards and Codes for Electric Drive Vehicles in Bethesda, MD, to examine the standards and conformance activities needed to drive the safe, effective, and large-scale deployment of electric drive vehicles (EDV).

    • Europarl in Strassbourg pushes for interoperability

      Here I extracted a few quotes from the European Parliament resolution of 6 April 2011 on a Single Market for Enterprises and Growth which show its special emphasis on improving interoperability conditions for the single market. Strassbourg sents a clear message.

    • Has the Battle for the Digital Car Been Won?

      This week a new consortium was launched that may signal who will finally own the last great, unclaimed consumer computing platform – the automobile. The new organization is the Car Connectivity Consortium, and the winner is . . . well, we’ll come back to that a little later. Suffice it to say for now that the fifteen year battle to control the digital future of the automobile could be at an end, and that its resolution may tell us something about the future of the digital desktop as well.

Leftovers

  • Dumbest Lawsuit Ever? HuffPo Sued By Bloggers Who Agreed To Work For Free… But Now Claim They Were Slaves

    We may have set a new low for idiotic lawsuits. Jonathan Tasini, a freelance reporter who was famously involved in a lawsuit with the NY Times, concerning copyrights on a database of freelancer articles, is now suing the Huffington Post for not paying him while he wrote for it by choice. The basis of the lawsuit is the already discussed fact that a bunch of folks who blogged for the Huffington Post are stupidly upset that Arianna Huffington sold her site to AOL for $315 million, and that they didn’t get any of the money. Of course, they didn’t invest their money in the site. They held no equity and, most importantly, they wrote for the site for free by choice. If they didn’t like the “deal”, they shouldn’t have done it.

  • AOL, Arianna Huffington Hit with Class Action Suit

    Huffington Post bloggers who think they ought to get paid for their volunteer writing have been litigating their case in the court of public opinion. Now they’re taking it to a real one.

    Today, a group of bloggers led by union organizer and journalist Jonathan Tasini filed a class-action suit against the Huffington Post, founder Arianna Huffington, and AOL, which acquired the news-and-blogs site in February.

  • Health/Nutrition

    • The Debate Over Privatizing Medicare: Can Anyone Say $20.5 Trillion?

      The NYT has a front page story on the debate over Representative Ryan’s plan to privatize Medicare. The article is an entirely in the form of he said/she said, providing readers with absolutely no information that would allow them to assess the arguments over the plan. This is especially important since the article reports that changes like those in the Ryan plan are necessary to control costs.

    • Pay Attention to the Insurers Behind Paul Ryan’s Curtain

      Democrats who think Paul Ryan and his Republican colleagues have foolishly wrapped their arms around the third rail of American politics by proposing to hand the Medicare program to private insurers will themselves look foolish if they take for granted that the public will always be on their side.

    • “Revere America”: Another Conduit for a Super-Wealthy Family to Influence Elections

      Miles C. CollierOn March 23, 2011 a group called Revere America issued a dire-sounding PRNewswire press release titled, “Americans Fear Loss of Freedom on Anniversary of Health Care Reform Law.” It warned that “a majority” of Americans view health care reform as “a threat to their freedom” and cited a poll by Bill McInturff of Public Opinion Strategies to prove it. The release came well after Revere America had spent $2.5 million on attack ads in the 2010 mid-term elections to defeat Democratic candidates in two states — New York and New Hampshire — who had voted in favor of health care reform. Just prior to the mid-term elections, in the autumn of 2010, Revere America ran a a slew of false and misleading attack ads against the health care reform bill that erroneously called health reform “government-run healthcare” (a Republican and insurance industry buzz-phrase). The ads said that the new law will result in higher costs and longer waits in doctors’ offices. In another false claim aimed at inducing fear, the ads told viewers that “your right to keep your own doctor may be taken away.”

    • The Front Group Hall of Shame Gets a New Inductee

      Today will go down in the public relations history books as the day health insurers and their allies began a coordinated campaign to ensure that the health care reform law is implemented in ways that will benefit them way more than the rest of us. Today is the day they plan to launch their brand new front group — drum roll, please — the Choice and Competition Coalition (CCC). But first, a bit of context.

  • Cablegate

    • WikiLeaks is the method we use towards our goal of a more just society: Assange

      In India, after the initial stunned reaction, the tone of the official response to our publication of the India Cables was set by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh questioning or disputing in Parliament the authenticity of the cables and what the U.S. Embassy and consulates were reporting back to the State Department. Here’s what he actually said in the Lok Sabha, our House of Commons, on March 18. He said the government “cannot confirm the veracity, contents or even the existence of such communication.” This seems to have set the Indian government apart from the rest of the governments, the rest of the world, at the receiving end, doesn’t it?

      Yes, it does.

      Have you come across this reaction anywhere else?

      We have not come across this reaction and that reaction disturbed me. Because Hillary Clinton had been involved in informing the Indian government, in December [2010], as well as many other governments, that this was coming. There has been no question as to the credibility of any document we have ever published in the last four years, let alone the [U.S. Embassy] cables — which have been authenticated by the very aggressive action of the State Department towards us and by hundreds of journalists from the most reputable institutions across the world.

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • Calif. sets nation’s highest renewable power goals

      Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday signed legislation requiring California utilities to get one-third of their power from renewable sources, giving the state the most aggressive alternative energy mandate in the U.S.

    • Studies Say Natural Gas Has Its Own Environmental Problems

      Natural gas, with its reputation as a linchpin in the effort to wean the nation off dirtier fossil fuels and reduce global warming, may not be as clean over all as its proponents say.

    • Gas Prices Rise, and Economists Seek Tipping Point

      Gas prices are approaching record highs, but so far most Americans do not appear to be drastically cutting back their driving or even their spending as they did in 2008.

    • Fracking Insiders Score Big in New Gas Bill, But Americans Not Told the True Costs of Massive Drilling Plan

      Corporate insiders peddling the claim that drilling for methane gas will solve America’s energy needs just scored big in Washington — and for these insiders fracking for gas is very lucrative business. House Resolution 1380, given the feel-good moniker of the “New Alternative Transportation to Give Americans Solutions Act ” or “NAT GAS Act,” was announced on Wednesday, April 6, in the U. S. House of Representatives. The bill is 24-pages long and rewards the fracking industry with tax credits and products to help “drive” consumption. The bigger the vehicle, the more tax credits given.

  • Finance

    • Soros Says Moral Hazard Looms; Volcker Says Banks Can Fail

      Moral hazard in the financial system “looms larger than ever before,” even after the Dodd- Frank law gave U.S. federal agencies tools to regulate institutions that may be deemed too big to fail, said billionaire investor George Soros.

      “The evidence is overwhelming that the first priority of the authorities is to prevent a market collapse, and everything else has to take second place,” Soros, chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC, said yesterday at a conference in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire.

    • David Harvey’s Crisis of Capitalism, Animated
    • Who Wants a Voucher?

      In yesterday’s post, I compared two ways of solving the long-term Medicare deficit: (a) increasing payroll taxes and keeping Medicare’s current structure or (b) keeping payroll taxes where they are and converting Medicare into a voucher program. As a person who will need health insurance in retirement, I prefer (a), but others could differ.

    • Oil price tumbles on supplies and Goldman pullback

      Oil dropped to the lowest level this month on Tuesday as energy experts said the world will remain flush with surplus oil this year despite the loss of Libya’s exports and increased demand from Japan.

      Oil was also pushed down after Goldman Sachs warned investors that the price had already topped its second-quarter forecast and is due for a “substantial pullback” in the near term. Traders took special notice of Goldman’s warning because the investment bank is considered a big player in oil markets, and it’s known for bullish price forecasts.

    • Paul Ryan’s slasher novel

      The fiscal savior of this country will be the person who persuades us to bite the bullet: Accept some pain now to remain prosperous later. That person will not be Rep. Paul Ryan.

      The reviewers agree: The Path to Prosperity, aka the Republican budget proposal for 2012 that was released a week ago by the House Budget Committee — which Ryan chairs — is one helluva read. To liberals, it’s the nightmare of a madman with an ax chasing you down a long hallway. To conservatives, it’s a sweet dream of wonderland, where angels dine on Heritage Foundation press releases. Right or wrong, it is said, Ryan has at last set the stage for an honest debate about government spending and the federal deficit.

    • Obama first to put tax increases on budget table

      Higher taxes have been missing from the fierce budget battle that nearly shut down the federal government. But President Barack Obama is about to put them on the table – at least a modest version that he had pushed before and then rested on the shelf.

    • Wonkbook: Obama to back Simpson-Bowles

      It’s been a little unclear what, exactly, President Obama could say on Wednesday that would count as a new plan for long-term deficit reduction. His pledge to avoid raising taxes on people making less than $250,000 means most taxes are off the table. The Affordable Care Act means most of his health-care reform ideas have already passed into law. The five-year non-security discretionary spending freeze got announced in his 2012 budget proposal, and though you could imagine defense cuts entering the picture, the White House hasn’t seemed eager to go down that road. That leaves tax reform and Social Security, neither of which the administration would be interested in attempting alone.

    • California Dings MERS

      California bankruptcy court Denies US Bank as trustee relief from stay; Court says recording is required BEFORE foreclosure, not after.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • Fake “Handwriting” Boosts Junk Mail Open Rate

      Fool junk mail recipients once, and then Fake penkeep fooling them over and over again. That’s the hope of a Virginia-based direct mail marketing company that has developed a specialized machine that makes junk mail envelopes look like they have been hand-written.

    • FOX “News” Bids Glenn Beck Adieu

      On April 6, 2011, FOX News announced it would help Beck “transition” into other ventures, which include for-air projects and FOX News’ websites. What the press release did not mention was the successful campaign against Beck initiated by Color of Change, an organization rooted in equal political access for people of color.

    • Railroad CEO Charged With Giving $50,000 in Illegal Contributions to Scott Walker

      The Wisconsin state elections board and Milwaukee County District Attorney’s office have revealed a money laundering scheme involving illegal contributions to Scott Walker’s campaign committee by the head of Wisconsin & Southern Railroad Company.

      The months-long investigation found that William Gardner, the CEO and president of Wisconsin & Southern Railroad (WSOR), instructed employees to make political campaign contributions for the 2010 elections and then reimbursed those donations from WSOR’s corporate account. Through this money-laundering scheme WSOR spent a total of $53,800 on political contributions in the 2010 election cycle, vastly exceeding the $10,000 per person (or per corporation) limit required by Wisconsin law; Gardner used corporate funds to reimburse 11 contributions from himself, his girlfriend, his daughter, and several employees. The majority of that spending, nearly $50,000, went towards the Friends of Scott Walker campaign committee.

  • Censorship

    • Silence from the website blocking Working Group

      Yesterday Ed Vaizey’s website blocking ‘Working Group’ met to discuss a plans for a voluntary scheme to block access to websites accused of infringing copyright. It’s an idea that has caused quite a stir; 2,000 people have so far written to their MPs and the terms ‘The Great Firewall of Britain’ and ‘Hadrian’s Firewall’ were coined on Twitter

    • Nominet talks about domain suspensions

      Nominet’s discussions about domain suspensions started yesterday. Over 3,000 sites have so far been ‘suspended’ at the request of the Police. This has been taking place without any formal procedure, although an appeals mechanism has handled 12 complaints, of which 9 were upheld.

    • On Google and censorship

      Hugo Roy asked my thoughts about the recent case of Google’s employees being convicted in Italy for a video that has been online a few months on Google Video (now YouTube).

      I have already said so by and large, microblogged extensively on that. My opinion is that the decision is a shame for my Country.

      [...]

      Google, as soon as it was informed of the problem, took the content down and possibly thought it was over.

      Not quite, as the Prosecutor in Milan, where Google is based in Italy and where the content was allegedly put online, decided to indict four Google executives. Recently the Court of Milan decided that the executives have violated Italian Data Protection Law and convicted them.

      This is what I have learned from public sources, I hope I have not reported them inaccurately. I have no direct knowledge of the facts.

      [...]

      Filtering == censorship

      It is impossible to put enough people in line to watch, inspect, report of each and any video that is uploaded. Too much information is put online per second, period.

      So the solution for the Prosecutor seems to be “you are doing this in China, you can do this here”. What Google is doing there is censorship. So we want censorship here too.

  • Privacy

    • Why internet privacy matters

      Over the last couple of days, I’ve blogged a bit about the proposed legislation that came to be known as Bill C-52 in the last session of Parliament. (See: Canadian police state legislation needs closer examination, and Conservative majority would pass lawful access within 100 days. Also check out Michael Geist’s excellent post: The Conservatives Commitment to Internet Surveillance.) Bill C-52 fell off the order paper when the 40th Parliament was dissolved for the current election, but I think it really needs to be extensively discussed in the current election. (I should note that this is not necessarily a partisan issue, since it was originally proposed by the Liberals many elections ago.)

    • Is Facebook More Dangerous Than Microsoft Windows?

      The company which has Microsoft, the creator of the world most insecure software products, as a partial owner [Microsoft has $250 million invested in Facebook and holds stakes in the company] can’t stay safer. Facebook, the social brokering site, continues to put users data and critical information at risk.

      The company which harvested Gmail users data but refused to give them access to their own Facebook data to sync it with their Google account continues to put that sensitive data at risk.

  • Civil Rights

    • China accuses US of human rights double standards

      Beijing has a doctrine of non-interference in other countries’ internal affairs, but the State Council Information Office releases an annual report on the US human rights record as a riposte to Washington’s criticisms. The document says it underlines the hypocrisy of the US and “its malicious design to pursue hegemony under the pretext of human rights”.

      Last week the secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, criticised China’s “worsening” record – citing the detention of artist Ai Weiwei and others – as she released the annual state department survey of the human rights situation around the world. An introduction to the Chinese document, by the state news agency Xinhua, said the report was “full of distortions” and the US “turned a blind eye to its own terrible human rights situation”.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality/UBB

    • Voting For a Free and Open Wireless Internet

      Next Tuesday, April 12th, the EU Parliament Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) will hold a major vote for the future of wireless communications in the European Union. By amending the radio spectrum policy programme proposed by the European Commission, Members of the Parliament have an opportunity to boost wireless Internet access. By encouraging shared and unlicensed uses of the spectrum, they can create the next generation of WiFi networks that will improve access to the Internet in urban as well as rural communities, and launch the next wave of innovation in mobile communications. But the risk is for Europe to give in to media or telecoms corporations who would like to control the airwaves – a public resource. La Quadrature calls on EU citizens and NGOs to step into this important debate on the future of our communications system, which forms the structure of our democratic societies.

    • Voting For a Free and Open Wireless Internet

      The Industry Committee of the European Parliament has adopted amendments to the EU Spectrum Policy Programme allowing for a free use of airwaves for citizens, which will lead to the development of the next generations of free wireless Internet communications (“next generation WiFi”). This vote is encouraging and must be confirmed in plenary, despite the pressure that broadcasters and telecoms industries will inevitably put on the European Parliament to keep airwaves under control.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • A Challenge To Chris Castle – Chris – Who Do You Really Serve?

        Chris Castle is a Lawyer who specializes in the Music Industry. Of the many lawyers who weigh in on copyright issues, Chris is the one I have the most respect for. Chris admits up front that he has a strong economic interest in the issue, unlike Barry Sookman, James Gannon, or Richard Owens, who pretend that they do all of their writing out of the goodness of their hearts.

      • A Comment Addressed to Chris Castle

        Chris Castle is a Music Industry Lawyer. I classify Chris as an honest lawyer, he has his opinions, and he’s quite willing to admit that his opinions are biased by his employment.

      • iPod Tax Fight Conceals Another Consumer Copyright Fee Hike

        The Conservatives have launched another campaign over the iPod Tax today complete with website, video and Twitter account. I posted a lengthy account of the claims last December (short version – the Liberals on record now as opposing, the earlier record is open to debate), but the issue keeps returning. Given the attention to the issue, it is worth noting that Bill C-32, the Conservatives own copyright bill, would likely have led to a doubling of the fees that Canadians pay on blank CDs. Alternatively, it would have led to a dramatic reduction in revenues for Canadian artists. The reason stems from the government’s commitment to ratify the World Intellectual Property Organization’s Internet treaties and the legal requirements found in those treaties.

      • European Copyright Law: Collusion for the Control of the Net

        In the coming days, a college meeting of the European Commissioners will take place to decide the future of European copyright policy. This revision takes place in conditions that raise severe concerns from a democratic perspective and put fundamental rights at risk, especially when it comes to the Internet.

      • Colorado Judge Is Seething At Righthaven—And He’s Handling All Their Cases

        Controversial copyright-enforcement company Righthaven was already catching a lot of flak for its lawsuit against Brian Hill. Denver alt-weekly Westword was eagerly reporting that its biggest competitor, The Denver Post, was trying to make extra cash off its photos and articles—by working with Righthaven to sue a 20-year-old, chronically ill, mildly autistic hobby blogger. Now Righthaven has dropped that case. But the same Colorado judge who showed little patience for Righthaven’s tactics in the Hill case is overseeing dozens of other Righthaven cases.

Clip of the Day

The Internet World Wide Web 1994 – 1998


Credit: TinyOgg

04.12.11

Links 12/4/2011: KDE Targets Mobile Devices, OLPC Growth in Peru

Posted in News Roundup at 12:56 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • The War With Microsoft Is Over and Linux Won?

    When laptop sales overtook desktops, “Microsoft didn’t care,” Hudson pointed out. “Either one meant the sale of a Windows OS, and often other software.”

    The switch to “mobile-everything,” on the other hand, “is already having a huge impact, because in most cases it marks the loss of another customer to Apple or Linux.

    “Maybe it’s not the year of linux on the desktop, but it’s also not the year of Windows on mobile devices, and it never will be,” Hudson concluded. “Mobile is where the growth is, for both business and the consumer, and that market is being divvied up between Apple and Linux, with Linux dominating.”

  • Server

  • Kernel Space

    • Carrier Grade Linux 5 Finalized

      The Linux Foundation this week officially released the Carrier Grade Linux 5.0 specification (CGL).

      CGL provides a set of specifications which helps to define the requirements of carrier and network equipment vendors. The CGL 5 specification is the first major revision since CGL 4.0 was released in February of 2007.

      The new CGL 5.0 specifications have been available in draft form for months, and vendors including MontaVisa and Wind River have already released products that will support the new specification.

    • The Major Open-Source ATI Improvements Over Two Years
    • systemd for Administrators, Part VII
  • Applications

    • 25 things you can do with VLC!

      VLC is beyond doubts the most popular open source, cross-platform media player and multi-media framework written by VideoLAN projects. VLC player is small in size,vlc-logo
      just about 17 Mb and immensely powerful! In this post we will explore the player and list 20+ things you can do with VLC player.

    • Best Browsers for Linux

      With each passing day, I find myself more amazed at the level of innovation shown from within the browser community. Both open source and closed source browsers on the Linux desktop manage to extend browser functionality far beyond the usual. This has proven both exciting and problematic. Exciting in the sense that we can now do more than ever thought previously with our browsers, yet problematic in that we have more moving parts that malfunction us.

      In this article, I’ll highlight the best browsers for the Linux platform and offer some additional thoughts on how they have made an impact on our lives.

    • The Top 5 Portable Apps For Linux

      Most of us know about portable apps for Windows, and how useful they can be sometimes. It’s great to simply have your favorite programs and add-ons with you, especially in the case of browsers. However, portable Linux apps have been nonexistent, at least until now. Lately a decent collection of Linux portable apps have showed up, and are now worth mentioning for those who want to try them out.

      [...]

      Whenever you’re on the go, it’s very important that you can take notes and keep track of them. Gnote is a great choice because it’s lightweight and doesn’t have Mono as a dependency. It’s easy to use, has lots of formatting and organizational features, and doesn’t take up much space. It’s your best bet to jot down those sudden ideas.

    • Introducing Mixbus And The Ardour3 Alpha

      Mixbus (Figure 1) is a version of Ardour2 for Linux and OSX that replaces Ardour’s native mixer with one designed by the Harrison company, a manufacturer of professional audio mixing boards. Harrison consoles have been used to mix the soundtracks for many popular movies – see the advertisements on the site – and their products can be found in major broadcast, film, and audio post-production studios, as well as in live performance venues. Mixbus has been designed to emulate the best features of an analog mixer with the added value of Ardour’s audio capabilities and Harrison’s unique DSP core. Indeed, current Ardour users will find familiar territory in the Mixbus recorder/editor and a whole new world in the mixer section.

    • UMPlayer – Another Feature Packed Cross-Platform Media Player

      There’s no shortage of quality free media players to entertain your eyes and ears, regardless of your computer or operating system. With cracking cost-free solutions like VLC (often considered the king of media players) and iTunes alternative JetAudio, you really shouldn’t be paying for this sort of software.

      Universal Media Player, or UMPlayer for short, is yet another addition to the media player category which uses the MPlayer backend to chew through any media you give it. The app promises to play everything and integrates various web services into one desktop solution.

    • Proprietary

      • Opera 11.10 Near Release Final As RCs Come At A Furious Pace

        The bugs are dying at an incredible pace in Norway today, as the Opera Desktop Team has put forth another release candidate, these last few coming with point numbers! The latest, and 2nd for this very long spring day, is RC 4.1, which brings lots of presentation bugs to an end.

    • Instructionals/Technical

    • Games

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • plasma active quick

        The Plasma Quick initiative aims to take libplasma, which is the underlying infrastructure for Plasma based applications, and make it an even better solution for devices that it already is.

      • KDE’s New Project for Portable Devices

        Key KDE developers have been blogging about new projects aimed towards portable devices. As Aaron Seigo says, “In a nutshell, Plasma Active is about getting the KDE Platform with Plasma providing a compelling user interface ready for and available on hardware devices outside the usual laptop and desktop form factors.” For us mortals, that means an interface for smartphones, tablets, and handhelds.

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Pidgin and GNOME3
      • Journey of a new GNOME 3 Debian packager

        With all the buzz around GNOME 3, I really wanted to try it out for real on my main laptop. It usually runs Debian Unstable but that’s not enough in this case, GNOME 3 is not fully packaged yet and it’s only in experimental for now.

      • GNOME 3: Shocking changes for Linux lovers

        For those that prefer a “dock” approach to launching apps, the GNOME Shell has that option covered as well, just add your favorites to the dock and click to launch. The dock is also an easy way to switch between open apps.

      • Review: GNOME 3

        GNOME 3 Shell seems a lot more mature and usable than it did two months ago, while GNOME 3 fallback mode presents a compelling traditional alternative to GNOME 3 Shell.

  • Distributions

    • CTKArch – The Other Arch-based Distribution Using Openbox

      CTKArch is a distribution, or perhaps more a spin, based on Arch Linux that is using Openbox as default window manager. It’s minimal in size, if you believe that anything under CD size is minimal these days, and seems to be designed first and foremost to run from CD or USB as a live system, so it has a lot in common with ArchBang. Only a few days ago, 7th April, v. 0.7 was released into the wilderness of the Linux distribution jungle. I had toyed with 0.6 on and off for a few weeks and thus am in the position to make a few observations.

    • Reviews

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat’s Future Linux Desktop

        That will be changing in 2012 with the reintroduction of a Simple Protocol for Independent Computing Environments (SPICE)-based virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI).

      • CentOS 5.6: A Free Powerhouse for Web Servers

        Last summer, in fact, it was named the most popular Linux distribution in that area, with almost 30 percent of the Linux server market.

      • CentOS 5.6 brings the Ext4 filesystem mainstream

        LINUX DISTRIBUTION CentOS has released a major update following in the footsteps of Red Hat’s Enterprise Linux, which has been updated to version 5.6.

        CentOS is a community version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and follows the same versioning scheme as RHEL, with both distributions now on version 5.6. CentOS is essentially a free version of RHEL built with the same packages as Red Hat’s commercially supported version but without the Red Hat branding.

        While Red Hat released RHEL 5.6 in January, it has taken a few months for the CentOS lads to get around to removing all the necessary branding to avoid infringing Red Hat’s licences. However the delay has been made worse by having to split effort between CentOS 5.6 and CentOS 6.

    • Debian Family

      • Reviews: First look at CrunchBang Linux 10

        . My conclusion is CrunchBang appears to be a good tool, I just haven’t found any task for it.

      • Canonical/Ubuntu

        • Ubuntu 11.04: Small issues, big win

          For the last few months, on nearly every site I blog for, I have been saying that Ubuntu 11.04 was going to be a big setback for Ubuntu. This “setback” was mostly due to Canonical’s decision to use Unity as the default desktop. This decision sidestepped GNOME and GNOME 3 all together. Well, after using Ubuntu 11.04 beta 1 for a few weeks now, I have to say I was wrong. Although there are a few weak spots in the release, this beta release has gone a long way to showing me that Ubuntu hasn’t fallen off the tracks, jumped the shark, or is about to lose it’s way. In fact, Ubuntu 11.04 will remain king of Linux for new users as far as I can see.

        • Ubuntu 11.04 beta testers divided over Unity

          In the short time since the release of Ubuntu 11.04 beta, the OS has received mixed reviews. Some testers say it is the worst Ubuntu beta release ever, while others say they are impressed by its new features.

        • Ubuntu 11.04 beta review – Natty Narwhal’s naughty but nice…

          The new Unity interface is surprisingly usable. Of course, it does have some rough edges and power users may find it limiting in many ways. Still, we think that the new interface has great potential and is already good enough for day-to-day computing. Naturally, Ubuntu 11.04 is more than just a fresh interface, and the new version brings a slew of other updates and improvements that make it a solid release indeed.

        • Natty Not-quite

          Not to say i hate everything about it. I like the speed, and it looks great. The new app launcher is excellent so far despite one or two crashes. The idea of a dock isn’t horrible, but i’d like more control over it, not some hidden options in the Compiz settings.
          And a final note for anyone who’s going to troll… get used to articles like this as Linux becomes more popular… it’s called constructive criticism, and i noticed the Linux community often doesn’t take it very well. This is just an opinion, you’re free to po

        • Ubuntu 8.04 reaches end-of-life on May 12 2011

          Ubuntu announced its 8.04 Desktop release almost 36 months ago, on April 24, 2008. For the LTS Desktop releases, Ubuntu committed to ongoing security and critical fixes for a period of 36 months. The support period is now nearing its end and Ubuntu 8.04 Desktop will reach end of life on Thursday, May 12, 2011. At that time, Ubuntu Security Notices will no longer include information or updated packages for Ubuntu 8.04 Desktop.

        • Demystifying Unity’s Graphics Hardware Requirements

          As I read the reviews of Unity that have started to appear around the web, I see there is a concern regarding the graphics hardware support for Unity. Some users are concerned that Unity will not run on their hardware, and so they will have to use Unity 2D instead. Let me tell you about the choices we made.

          As time goes, hardware becomes old and obsolete. This is very much true for GPUs. The rate of graphics advance over the last 10 years has been impressive. What was great 5 years ago isn’t enough to run all types of real-time 3D graphics programs anymore. For Unity we looked at the visual effects we wanted to do and the level of performance we wanted to achieve. To minimize the number of draw calls per frame in Unity, we needed GPUs to have support for frame buffer objects. With frame buffer objects support, we render only the parts of the interface that need to be updated and leave the rest untouched. For rendering, we wanted to have flexibility and the best visual results possible. So we decided to require ARB vertex and fragment support.

        • Ubuntu 11.04 Changes – New Unity Update Brings Options for Adjusting Launcher Behavior
        • Natty Narwhal T Shirts now available in Canonical store
  • Devices/Embedded

    • Yocto 1.0 integrates OpenEmbedded and Linaro code

      The Linux Foundation announced the availability of the Yocto Project Release 1.0, which includes a version of OpenEmbedded’s bitbake build system, major improvements to its developer interface, and Linaro technology for improved ARM support. The Linux Foundation also announced new Yocto Steering Group members Dell and Mentor Graphics to help oversee the embedded Linux standardization project.

    • Phones

      • Nokia/MeeGo/Maemo

        • Nokia: What’s Missing from this Picture?

          But what strikes me is that these do not address what is, for me, the central question: why does Nokia need Qt in the long term – that is, beyond the short-term requirement to “harvest additional value” from the platform, as Nokia put it so charmingly? Until that question is answered, I remain pessimistic about the long-term effects of Nokia’s moves on Qt and open source in general – however many refutations the company issues on other points.

        • Nokia’s Not-so-cute Qt Move

          And if Qt has no future, why on earth would Nokia continue to invest money and people in producing the open source version that would be commercialised by someone else? Surely it is bound to pass the open source side across to Digia at some point, or maybe to some other party, although it’s hard to see who would want to pick up the non-commercial part of Qt when the money-making aspect resides elsewhere.

        • HTC Climbs Past Nokia in Market Cap
      • Android

        • Google confirms Chrome OS tablet code

          Google is baking specifications for a tablet based on its Chrome OS into its open source Linux code, the company confirmed. Meanwhile Google flattened its executive structure, promoting Android creator Andy Rubin and others to senior vice president roles, and has also acquired Pushlife, makers of an iTunes-like music app for Android.

        • Google confirms Chrome OS tablet code
        • LinkedIn for Android ships as Google updates Apps for security

          LinkedIn released the final LinkedIn for Android 1.0 app to help professionals view and manage LinkedIn connections. In other enterprise-related Android news, Google upgraded its security and device management programs for Android with three Google Apps updates, including a Device Policy update, a Google Apps Lookup app, and a Honeycomb tablet encryption feature.

        • Entry level Android numbers to increase tenfold in 2011

          A report today from Taiwanese Digitimes shows some explosive estimates for $150 and cheaper, contract free Android phones. Specifically, the paper says it expects to see 20-25 million entry level Android devices ship in 2011, up from 2.5-3 million in 2010.

    • OLPC

      • Peru to Open OLPC Factories, Will Distribute 1 Millionth XO Laptop by End of 2011

        Alan Garcia, the President of Peru, just announced that the country will be handing out their one millionth XO laptop by the end of this year and will soon be building manufacturing facilities to build the laptops locally. The One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) program created the XO laptop as an inexpensive tool for children around the world to learn with. The OLPC program in Peru has a goal to have laptops in 100% of the country’s public primary schools by the end of 2011.

    • Tablets

Free Software/Open Source

  • Bitcoin gains an open source client

    A Google engineer has released an open source Java client for Bitcoin, the peer-to-peer currency that may eventually revolutionize online transactions.

  • Open Source Biology Deserves a Shot

    Gene sequencing has gotten incredibly fast and cheap, and researchers around the world are pouring huge volumes of genomic data onto their private servers, in the hope they will sift through it all to make groundbreaking discoveries. Should so much genomic data be so closely guarded, or should it be poured into a free and open database that all scientists share?

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Why Firefox Rapid Release Schedule Is a Bad Idea

        Mozilla has committed to a more aggressive release schedule for the Firefox Web browser. There were nearly three years between the launch of Firefox 3 and Firefox 4, but Firefox 5 is expected to be introduced in a matter of months at the end of June. There are some benefits to the rapid release schedule, but also some potential pitfalls.

      • First Firefox 4 update coming on April 26

        Mozilla has announced that it will release the first update for Firefox 4 on April 26, about a month after the original release, back in March 22.

        New with this release is that Mozilla will start using code names (somehow related to the main branch codename, in this case Tumucumaque) for udpates as well, as a way to help developers that follow Firefox development closely, more clearly understand what is coming when.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

  • Healthcare

    • VA Electronic Health Record Open Source Custodial Agent

      The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is seeking to establish a Custodial Agent (CA) that will facilitate the establishment and operations of an Electronic Health Records (EHR) Open Source software development ecosystem and define the relationship between and interactions among developers, users, vendors and service providers.

    • Open Source in Good Health and Vice Versa
      Good

      Last week I wrote about the UK government’s “new” IT strategy, which is designed in part to avoid some of the costly mistakes of the past. And as far as the latter go, there aren’t many bigger or costlier than the NHS National Programme for Information Technology (NpfIT).

      Now, some of us might say that one of the reasons this was such a disaster was that it did just about everything wrong: it was imposed unilaterally from the top, and built around huge slabs of proprietary code – but you’d expect me to say that. So here’s someone else opining much the same, slightly more politely:

  • Business

    • Tasting the Delights of OrangeHRM

      Since free software was originally created by hackers for hackers, it’s no wonder that the first programs they created were tools – things like Emacs – and something to run them on – GNU/Linux. The second generation applications were key infrastructural elements – Web servers, databases etc., while more recently, we’ve seen the rise of applications like enterprise content management and CRM, as open source moves closer to the end users.

      But one class of software that seemed totally absent was that for managing human resources – HRM apps. I thought this was something of a lack, but that would be filled in due course. It turns out that it was filled quite some time ago – 2006, to be precise – and that I somehow overlooked the open source OrangeHRM product completely since then. To remedy this, I met up with Sujee Saparamadu, the CEO and cofounder of the company, to catch up on the subject.

  • Programming

    • OSS is about access to the code

      I have a kind of a fetish – the idea that source code, even old or extremely specific for a single use, may be useful for a long time. Not only for porting to some other, strange platform, but for issues like prior art in software patents, for getting inspiration for techniques or simply because you don’t know when it may be of use. For this reason, I try to create public access archives of source code I manage to get my hands on, especially when such codes may require a written license to acquire, but may then later be redistributed.

  • Standards/Consortia

    • An alert to governments about Open Standards

      There are two undeniable facts in the information technology industry today, which often end up being forgotten in our day by day activities:

      Corporations are monopolistic by nature and technological dependence is at the base of the information technology industry economic model.

Leftovers

  • Google speeds up the Web with SPDY

    Network engineers and hard-core Web architects know that HTTP (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol), the data transfer method used by the Web, isn’t the most efficient data transfer protocol around. So, back in November 2009, Google started working on a faster replacement: SPDY, pronounced “speedy.” And, now, if you’re using the Chrome Web browser, and visiting Google Web sites, you can see SPDY in action according to Conceivably Tech.

  • Autocompletion brings liability

    I would be falsely modest if I said that I am not proud that our pleadings have been entirely endorsed by a panel of three highly authoritative judges. The facts are simple and very well described in the order. Basically, typing in the Google search field “Name Surname” of my client, the autocompletion and the “suggested searches” (now “related searches”) offered to complete it with “con man” (“truffatore”) and “fraud” (“truffa”), which caused a lot of trouble to the client, who has a pulic image both as an entrepeneur and provider of educational services in the field of personal finance. Google argued that it could not be held liable because it is a hosting provider, but we showed that this is content produced by them (and by the way, they do filter out certain content, including terms that are know to be used to distribute copyright infringing material), although through automated means. Therefore in this case the search engine cannot avail itself of the safe harbour provision of the Ecommerce Directive.

  • Google loses autocomplete defamation case in Italy
  • Cablegate

    • Julian Assange extended interview

      JULIAN ASSANGE: We have increased our publishing since late last year when my present difficulties began to include over 63 media organisations from around the world. We have now published over 7,000 US Embassy cables relating to Cablegate, so, yes, we’re continuing on. Even when I was in prison for 10 days we continued publishing.

  • Finance

    • DC. lawyer charged in multimillion-dollar insider trading scheme

      By mid-March, as the government tells it, Matthew H. Kluger knew the FBI was closing in.

      As a lawyer for three of the nation’s premier corporate law firms, most recently in the Washington office of Wilson Sonsini, he had allegedly stolen secrets that yielded tens of millions of dollars of insider trading profits. Now he was trying to eliminate the evidence.

  • Privacy

    • Pandora, other app makers subpoenaed over user data collection

      A federal grand jury has opened an investigation into mobile apps and what kind of personal data they might transmit about users, Pandora has revealed. The streaming music company recently amended its S-1 filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to note that it had been subpoenaed to produce documents about its user data collection on Android and iOS devices, which the company believes is related to an industry-wide probe into how mobile apps capitalize on user information.

    • Net giants challenge French data law

      Google and Facebook are among a group of net heavyweights taking the French government to court this week.

      The legal challenge has been brought by The French Association of Internet Community Services (ASIC) and relates to government plans to keep web users’ personal data for a year.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality/UBB

    • Court rejects suit over Net-neutrality rules

      A federal appeals court on Monday rejected as “premature” a lawsuit by Verizon and MetroPCS challenging the Federal Communications Commission’s pending rules aimed at keeping Internet service providers from blocking access to certain websites or applications. The decision, by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia circuit, is a first-round victory for the FCC and its chairman, Julius Genachowski. But the real battle over the agency’s attempt to regulate broadband providers has barely begun. Several broadband companies, and some consumer advocacy and public interest groups, are likely to return to court this year to challenge aspects of the rules. Edward McFadden, a Verizon spokesman, said Monday that the company intended to refile its lawsuit this year. The House will take up a joint resolution condemning the new Internet access rules this week.

  • DRM

    • SCEA and George Hotz Reach Settlement!

      Here’s the joint statement. There is a permanent injunction, but no admission of wrongdoing by Hotz, who, as he said from day one, was never trying to enable piracy. I commend SCEA for taking this step, and I mean that sincerely.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Ethics of Intellectual Monopolies: the Video
    • Legality of Human Gene Patents Questioned

      WASHINGTON—A U.S. federal appeals panel, hearing a case over Myriad Genetics Inc. patents for identifying breast- and ovarian-cancer risk, Monday probed whether it makes sense to continue allowing the patenting of human gene sequencing.

    • Under the U.S. Supreme Court: Can you patent the building blocks of life?

      A relatively quiet but intense struggle in the federal courts will decide under what conditions a company can patent the building blocks of life — or in some cases the building blocks of death — for profit.

      The struggle almost certainly will reach the U.S. Supreme Court.

      For now, those fighting the case are waiting for a decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington, which decides intellectual property issues.

    • ORGANIC FARMERS AND SEED SELLERS SUE MONSANTO TO PROTECT THEMSELVES FROM PATENTS ON GENETICALLY MODIFIED SEED: Preemptive Action Seeks Ruling That Would Prohibit Monsanto From Suing Organic Farmers and Seed Growers If Contaminated By Roundup Ready Seed

      On behalf of 60 family farmers, seed businesses and organic agricultural organizations, the Public Patent Foundation (PUBPAT) filed suit today against Monsanto Company to challenge the chemical giant’s patents on genetically modified seed. The organic plaintiffs were forced to sue preemptively to protect themselves from being accused of patent infringement should they ever become contaminated by Monsanto’s genetically modified seed, something Monsanto has done to others in the past.

    • OSS is about access to the code

      And Sheen is also getting into the intellectual-property game. According to a variety of news reports, Sheen has filed trademark applications on 22 of his catchphrases, including the expressions “Duh, Winning,” “Vatican Assassin,” and “Tiger Blood.” Click here for the NY Post story.

    • Newspapers

      • Finally Calling Time on Piracy FUD

        Last week I got in a bit of an argument with Adam Thierer, Randy Picker, and others about the New York Times paywall. I think a paywall is a bad business strategy, but my opposition to paywalls is mostly a matter of (as I tweeted to Adam) “personal principle rather than business advice.” Adam seemed confused by that statement, so let me see if I can elaborate.

      • UK Newspapers Confirm Digital Death-Wish

        I thought I had plumbed the depths of the UK newspaper industry’s stupidity when it came to digital. The idea that putting up paywalls in any way strengthens the readership, reputation and brand of a publication was so far off the mark that I thought it was not possible to go beyond it in sheer wrong-headedness.

    • Copyrights

      • How Rigorous Will the RAND Report Be?

        So, how can we little people – the ones that are actually paying for all this work, but that are never allowed to provide any input – head off this danger of a biased, misleading report emerging from RAND Corporation?

        I think the only way is to starting making noises about the fact that it *might* be biased and misleading, so that those preparing it at RAND Corporation know that we are watching them like proverbial hawks, and that we will assuredly tear their methodology to pieces when it comes out, and will thus be certain to find – and brandish – the slightest lack of rigour or bias therein.

        Got that, RAND Corporation people? Excellent.

      • Piracy is not Counterfeiting: Updating IPRED

        As the Report from the European Commission to the European Parliament rightly says: “this initial evaluation of the effectiveness of the Directive comes at the right time.” The world of digital content is evolving so quickly that the current form of IPRED is sadly out of date, and urgently needs to be re-thought in the light of new evidence in this field.

        The Report goes on to make the following comment: “Several studies carried out by international organisations and industry have shown that infringements of intellectual property rights have reached a significant level, with certain of these goods posing a danger to consumers’ health and safety.” This statement requires closer analysis.

      • Finally Calling Time on Piracy FUD

        One of the striking features of reports purporting to estimate the “damage” caused by piracy – both of software and content – is that without exception, as far as I can tell, their numbers and methodology simply do not withstand close scrutiny.

        The trouble is, when it’s a question of lone voices like mine or even that of Techdirt’s Mike Masnick, probably the most dogged debunker of piracy FUD, the content industries can ignore such posts, presumably in the belief that our quick analyses somehow don’t count.

      • Judge to copyright troll: your “business model” isn’t my problem

        Ars Technica freelancer Eriq Gardner was recently sued over a photo that appeared in a piece he wrote for us last year. The flimsy lawsuit was quickly dismissed, but the company behind it lives on—and has sued 50+ people in Colorado for their use of the same photo. Now, the federal judge overseeing all these cases has made it clear that he sees through the company’s “lawsuit as revenue generation” strategy, and that he’s not interested in enabling it. Righthaven is already backing down.

      • Viacom Appeal: YouTube Hits Back, Says It’s A Good Net Citizen

        Last year, Viacom (NYSE: VIA) appealed its loss in its copyright lawsuit against YouTube (NSDQ: GOOG), and the video-sharing site has now filed a reply (embedded below) to Viacom’s arguments. Many of the arguments in the 107-page brief repeat what was argued in the courts below, but it’s interesting to observe the tone set in the opening pages of the brief. YouTube takes its time before getting to the legal points, showing that it’s really a good corporate citizen of the internet.

      • Lawsuit Against YouTube Threatens Global Growth of Political Speech

        San Francisco – The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and a coalition of advocacy groups have asked a federal appeals court to reject attempts to thwart federal copyright law and saddle online communities with new litigation fears in the appeal of Viacom v. YouTube.

Clip of the Day

Sintel Lite – Tour 1


Credit: TinyOgg

04.11.11

Links 11/4/2011: CentOS 5.6, Fedora 15 Beta RC1

Posted in News Roundup at 12:10 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Audiocasts/Shows

  • Kernel Space

    • Before Somebody Else Mentions It – “Story of Linux” Video For Linux’s 20th Anniversary

      The actual anniversary isn’t until August of this year, but heck, making noise about Linux throughout spring and summer doesn’t sound like a bad idea. So the Linux Foundation made this nifty little dry-erase animation…

    • Happy anniversary, Linux

      The Linux Foundation is kicking off a year long celebration of the 20th anniversary of Linux and they want all community members to participate. Here’s how: submit a video that demonstrates the impact of the operating system on computing, business and/or culture over the last 20 years, today or into the future. The videos will be judged by community rankings as well as celebrity judge, Linus Torvalds.

    • The Birth of Linux: How Linux Got Started

      In a way, Linux got its start before Linus ever sat down to start work on the kernel. Specifically, the foundation that made the kernel possible was kicked off in September of 1983 when Richard M. Stallman announced the GNU Project with the words “Free Unix!” to a Unix “wizards” newsgroup. The announcement may also have included the first recursive acronym (GNU’s Not Unix) and set off a bunch of confusion about what Stallman meant by free.

    • Isolating Your Linux Systems – How Sharing Operating Systems Can Put Holes in Your PCI Compliance

      PCI compliance is all about protecting your core servers, and you can’t be careful enough when you go about this. Protecting your servers is all about guarding key components from the rest of your online systems, and most important of all, perhaps, is isolating the server that you use for crucial credit card data from the rest of the systems on your network. This is really the heart and soul of PCI compliance. Now I’m sure that the team you have in charge of security and PCI compliance has set up a Linux based system for your core servers. However, it’s very unlikely that every system on your network uses Linux. Under such circumstances, every system that does not use Linux is a potential threat to the security of your network and to integrity of your PCI compliance.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • active routes

        Both Sebastian and Marco have now blogged about Plasma Active, and we’re working on getting more presentable information on what we’re working towards put together.

        In a nutshell, Plasma Active is about getting the KDE Platform with Plasma providing a compelling user interface ready for and available on hardware devices outside the usual laptop and desktop form factors. While we continue to do a pretty good job on our traditional turf, we have work ahead of us if we wish to realize the dream of covering as much of the device spectrum as possible.

      • KDE SC 4.6.2 Is Available for Ubuntu and Fedora Users

        The KDE team has just announced on April 6th the second maintenance release for KDE Software Compilation 4.6. This is a minor update, focusing on bug fixing and translation updates.

        KDE Software Compilation 4.6.2 is the second in a series of monthly bug fixing releases to the KDE Software Compilation 4.6 series and it brings various translation updates and improvements. Everyone should update their existing KDE SC machines running version 4.6.1 or earlier (see a short tutorial below).

      • Clementine Steadily Improving – PPA for Ubuntu Maverick, Natty Updated
      • New Features in digiKam 2.0: Face Recognition

        Face recognition has been one of the most requested digiKam features, and the latest version of the photo management application provides this functionality.

        As the name suggests, the face recognition functionality can be used to find photos containing faces and attach face tags to persons in photos. This lets you quickly locate all photos of a specific person using digiKam filtering capabilities.

      • KDE Commit Digest for 3 April 2011
    • GNOME Desktop

      • GNOME 3: From an end-user’s perspective

        Released just a few days ago, GNOME 3 is the latest major version of the GNOME desktop environment. If you are currently running a GNOME-based Linux or BSD distribution, you are probably using version 2.30 or 2.32, but that should change in the upcoming release cycle when many of the distributions will be shipping with GNOME 3 as the default. So while we wait, this article will attempt to give you an idea of what to expect. Rather than discuss the difference between old and new GNOME from the development angle, the article presents information from a lay user’s perspective. Can I find my away around the new desktop without consulting a manual or documentation?

      • GNOME 3 rocks!

        Following the release of GNOME 3.0, the world has been celebrating GNOME 3 here and there starting from April 6th: 141 registered GNOME 3 release parties spreading over 47 countries according to this wiki page. Being on the GNOME.Asia committee for 4 years already, I am happy to see that 43% (61 parties) of the release parties are from Asia (in 15 countries), India actually organizing the most (20% i.e. 29 parties in total), followed by Greater China (9% i.e. 12 parties in total). That makes me feel that all those efforts and time spent on GNOME.Asia are starting to bear fruit.

  • Distributions

    • Slackware 13.37

      slackToday we have a guest article By: Guillermo Garron from Go2linux, i really like his site so if you don’t know it i really suggest you to go and ckeck it.

    • 3 Linux Distros That You Might Never Want to Try

      Linux-based distributions like Fedora, Ubuntu, and openSUSE have completely revolutionized the traditional desktop. However, there are some distributions that don’t quite match the standards that these Distrowatch-toppers have set. Here’s a look at 3 such Linux distributions, that you’ll never want to try.

    • New Releases

    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

      • Do I Have Bad Karma for Debian?

        Do I have bad karma to run Debian? I have 6 posts about Debian so far, and only one of them relates to full success, where I was able to run a full-power Debian on my laptop. Maybe I myself and Debian are just creatures of different worlds and we cannot live together?

      • Do I Have Bad Karma for Debian?

        Do I have bad karma to run Debian? I have 6 posts about Debian so far, and only one of them relates to full success, where I was able to run a full-power Debian on my laptop. Maybe I myself and Debian are just creatures of different worlds and we cannot live together?

      • Canonical/Ubuntu

        • Meet the ubuntu (or rather unity) menu; will you call this an innovation?

          The ubuntu desktop never stops to amuse and never stops to innovate. The ubuntu unity packs in with load full of features and one never stops to wonder how much thought have been gone into come up with all those ideas, if only some efforts was also put into the planning and implementation of those nice ideas. Many times I felt that the developers are are so immersed with developing features that they fail to step back and think how to go about the implementation and thus fail to attain the best possible implementation of those features. Instead of as a feature many of these innovations appear to be as an annoyance or a bug.

        • How I use the Unity Dash
        • To be Unity or not to be Unity. That is the question.

          Finally one Canonical employee and community member ‘Jorge Castro’ replied well to the above Unity usability myth. He also made a screencast of his desktop running Natty to demo how Unity will do multitasking well.

          Meanwhile Ubuntu fans have created another Ubuntu derivative. Unlike other Ubuntu based distros which are painted with some other theme flavor, this one sports the DE most of the community wants. It is an unofficial Ubuntu derivative which is going to ship with the stock Gnome 3.0. So, users now have the choice to use the official Unity Ubuntu or unofficial Gnome 3 Ubuntu.

        • Knowledge-Sharing on Agenda During Ubuntu App Developer Week

          Have an idea for a great Linux application that’s missing from the 30,000+ downloads in the Ubuntu repositories? Or just interested in learning some programming pointers? If you answered yes, the latest and greatest Ubuntu App Developer Week, which starts Monday, April 11, 2011, is for you. Keep reading for details…

        • Ubuntu App Developer Week Enabling and Inspiring Developers

          Ubuntu App Developer Week, will take place in online in the #ubuntu-classroom and #ubuntu-classroom-chat IRC channels on April 11-15, 2011 from 16:00 to 21:00 UTC each day.

          David Planella of the Ubuntu Community Team at Canonical says “Our goal is to give all attendees a taste of the wide variety of tools on the Ubuntu platform that can be used to create awesome applications, and to showcase some applications that have been created and explain how they were put together.”

        • Flavours and Variants

          • Elementary OS – Distro Review

            It’s been awhile since I had the time to install another distribution and really put it through it’s paces enough to write a full review of it. After crying wolf about a lack of information on the Elementary OS website, I felt I owed it to their team to give the disc a (free) download and put their OS through it’s paces.

          • Linux Mint XFCE Released and Linux Mint F.A.Q.!
          • Review: Linux Mint Xfce 201104

            Just over 2 weeks ago, I wrote about how Linux Mint is moving the Xfce edition to a Debian base. Well, a few days ago, they released the official Linux Mint Xfce 201104.
            For those of you who didn’t read that post, in short, Linux Mint Xfce is now Debian-based instead of Ubuntu-based. The developers had a few things to say about this: (1) the desktop will be faster and lighter on resources (114 MB of RAM at idle, 177 MB of RAM with Mozilla Firefox, LibreOffice Writer, and LibreOffice Calc open all at the same time), (2) the Xfce edition will now include more mainstream applications like Rhythmbox instead of Exaile, and (3) the Xfce edition, being based on Debian Testing, will be a rolling-release branch. All these things sounded very exciting to me, so I decided to try it out.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • In praise of the D-Link Boxee Box

      Following several months of use, and one major firmware update, DeviceGuru is now ready to relate our experience with using the D-Link Boxee Box. Despite seeming a bit more like a late-stage beta than a fully-released product, the device has gradually taken over command and control of our non-DVD TV watching experience.

    • Phones

      • Android

        • AMD Jumping on the Android Bandwagon

          It was only a matter of time before AMD followed Nvidia’s lead and finally jumped onto the Android bandwagon, as the company is now recruiting engineers to create chipset drivers for Android. According to unnamed sources, the nation’s second largest CPU manufacturer is now looking to offer notebook and tablet partners chipset solutions supporting Google’s popular mobile platform.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Events

    • I left my Linux in San Francisco (for this week)

      The 5th annual Linux Collaboration Summit is happening this week in San Francisco. This summit gathers core kernel developers, distribution maintainers, ISVs, end users, system vendors and other community organizations for plenary sessions and workgroup meetings to meet face-to-face to tackle and solve the most pressing issues facing Linux today.

    • Announcements from the 5th Annual Linux Collaboration Summit

      The Linux Foundation kicked off the 5th Annual Linux Collaboration Summit with four announcements: the formation of the new High Availability working group, the release of the Carrier Grade Linux 5.0 specification, Yocto Project Release 1.0 availability, and the 20th Anniversary Video Contest.

  • Databases

    • The Drizzle tale: a fork that’s growing

      Nearly three years ago, when open source hacker Brian Aker created a fork of MySQL it did not look like anything that was much needed – at the time Sun owned MySQL and the popular database software looked to have a bright future.

  • CMS

  • Project Releases

    • Open source Horde groupware reaches version 4

      After nearly three years of development the fourth generation of the Horde open source e-mail and groupware suite was released this week bringing with it a more modern code base and social networking features.

      The core of Horde includes the Horde Application Framework, and PHP Web application framework that is used to develop the family of groupware applications for messaging, time keeping and contact management, among others.

      Horde 4 makes more use of the PHP Extension and Application Repository and installing and updating Horde apps has been simplified with its own PEAR server.

  • Openness/Sharing

  • Programming

Leftovers

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • Why Are Visa Applicants Forced To Travel To Mexico’s Most Dangerous City?

      Almost anyone who wants to come to the U.S. — either as a visitor or a resident — has to physically visit a U.S. consulate in their country of origin to apply for a visa and undergo an interview by an Embassy officer. In Mexico, those applying for U.S residency can only do so at one location: the U.S. consulate in Ciudad Juárez — where over 3,000 people were killed in 2010 alone.

  • Finance

    • Annals of C-suite dysfunction, Goldman Sachs edition

      Ian McGugan has a good review of Bill Cohan’s huge new book on Goldman Sachs which includes an intriguing quote about how Bob Rubin “encouraged a culture of undisciplined risk taking” — something which goes directly against the reputation he’s spent many years cultivating. It comes from Chapter 15, which starts in the dangerous year of 1994 and which is full of juicy gossip about the very human frailties of the people running Goldman.

    • Still Standing

      There’s something endearing about Lloyd Blankfein. Born in the Bronx in 1954 and reared in a Brooklyn public-housing project, he hawked hot dogs at ­Yankee Stadium, dodged gangs, studied hard and didn’t know much about how the other half lived. “I always thought that a prep school was what some people went to after high school to prepare themselves for ­college,” he later said. At Harvard, he was “shunned” by the social clubs, worked in the cafeteria, watched “Star Trek” and hit the books. He went on to Harvard Law School, smoked too much, got fat, got married and got a job.

      More than three decades later, through dint of hard work and shrewd judgment, Mr. Blankfein is at the helm of Goldman Sachs, the most powerful bank on what’s left of Wall Street—a position that has made him a wealthy man. In any normal ­estimation, his story would be something to ­emulate, even ­celebrate.

    • Book Review: Money and Power: How Goldman Sachs Came to Rule the World by William D. Cohan

      The Good: Wide access to associates and ex-employees; Cohan offers the most human portrayal of the firm yet.

      The Bad: For all Cohan’s research, no surprise explanation of how Goldman makes so much money year after year

      The Bottom Line: Goldman Sachs may be only slightly smarter and faster than rivals, but that may be all that matters.

    • The next housing shock

      As more and more Americans face mortgage foreclosure, banks’ crucial ownership documents for the properties are often unclear and are sometimes even bogus, a condition that’s causing lawsuits and hampering an already weak housing market. Scott Pelley reports.

    • Goldman Sachs chief Blankfein was ‘stunned’ by SEC lawsuit: extract from Money and Power

      Wall Street has always been a dangerous place. Firms have been going in and out of business ever since speculators first gathered under a buttonwood tree near the southern tip of Manhattan in the late 18th century.

      Despite the ongoing risks, during great swaths of its mostly charmed 142 years, Goldman Sachs has been both envied and feared for having the best talent, the best clients and the best political connections, and for its ability to alchemise them into extreme profitability and market prowess.

  • Privacy

    • Social Networking and Geeks

      The latest craze in hiring an IT person is by a prospective employer looking at an applicants Facebook or LinkedIn page. Lovely idea to get the feel of how a person is socially but for the most part is a failure when you’re in search of a specialist for your network. The same is true for an Audio Technician, or any other “geek” type job.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • ACTA

        • India will not accept any intellectual property talks outside WTO: Anand Sharma

          India will not accept any attempt made by groups of countries to discuss intellectual property rights outside the multilateral forum of the world trade organisation, commerce and industry minister Anand Sharma has said.

          Responding to questions on India’s position on the proposed Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), a new intellectual property treaty being framed by a group of developed nations, the minister said a few countries cannot get together and try to change what is and will always be a multilateral regime called the TRIPS agreement.

Clip of the Day

HTC Flyer – unboxing (rozpakowanie)


Credit: TinyOgg

04.10.11

Links 10/4/2011: GNOME 3 Still Dominates the News

Posted in News Roundup at 4:40 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Using GNU/Linux is cooler than using Windows: Laura Lucas Alday

    This is the last interview of the trinity series and in this interview we spoke with Laura Lucas Alday the woman power behind the latest release of Cheese. She was responsible for enhancing cheese to support svg overlays. Laura finds GNU/Linux better than Windows.

  • Where’s the Parallel Beef?

    Years ago there was this ad campaign by the Wendy’s hamburger chain that asked the question Where’s the Beef?. The commercials were rather funny and “Where’s the beef?” has become a way to ask “where is the substance?” or to call attention to the lack thereof. Before GP-GPU, multi-core, and clusters, I have been asking a similar question about HPC development tools. In particular, “Where are the parallel programming tools?” This question has become fundamentally important to the future of computing and the answer is not quite clear.

  • Top five new things in Linux

    This past week, the cognoscenti of the Linux community gathered in San Francisco to discuss the state of the platform as a whole. During the week, a number of projects also managed to release new versions. Here are five you should know about.

  • Cloud Appliance Solutions for the Enterprises (CAFÉ) Taiwan

    The Institute for Information Industry (III) Taiwan and Ulteo announces a joint agreement to develop Cloud Appliance solutions for the Enterprises (CAFÉ).

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • Plasma Active – A Desirable User Experience Encompassing the Device Spectrum

        Today, I’d like to announce to a wider audience a project we have been working on in and beyond the Plasma team. Its goal is to “Create a desirable user experience encompassing a spectrum of devices“, and it is called Plasma Active. A couple of things make Plasma Active special. First, the driver is the desirable user experience. That means that we want to create something, people want, and people want to use. It means we are less technology-focused, but are taken a user-centered approach. Second, we are not targeting a single device, or a narrowly-defined class of devices. Plasma Active is made to run on a spectrum of devices that make up the user experience together. Devices change, and so does the way the user interacts with them. By strongly separating data and visualisation / interaction, we do not re-invent the wheel but adapt to the requirements and expectations of a device, and about how devices work together for the user.

      • Plasma/Active/Installation
    • GNOME Desktop

      • How To Create A Screencast In GNOME 3

        GNOME 3 has an inbuilt software that allows you to record your desktop. This makes it very easy to create a screencast in GNOME 3. Here is how you do it …

        You can start/stop recording your GNOME 3 Desktop by pressing the Ctrl+Shift+Alt+R key combination.

      • Welcome GNOME 3! We have a present for you…

        So, you’re born, and we here at openSUSE Project are very excited to welcome you into the world. We’ve been watching with anticipation and excitement as the many thousands of developers and contributors mobilized around the world to make your first steps into this world a reality. The videos and plethora of information shown on gnome3.org make clear that you’re very welcome!

      • Sam and me

        It’s not a particularly ringing endorsement. But neither is it particularly precise in its criticisms. It seems Sam has two or three gripes about the beta, and lumped them all together in one muddy package.

      • Making awesome even better; gnome back to work with gnome 3.2

        Just in case you didn’t notice, the much delayed, much awaited, much criticized and, why of course, much enhanced gnome desktop version 3.0 with its brand new shell released last week. (If you not yet tried it yourself, head on to the gnome3 page and grab a copy of the live cd .iso of the next generation desktop.)

      • Drag Me to Shell, p2.

        I said last time I would go into the file maangement side of GNOME 3 a bit more, and I think I would be right in saying that there are a number of people who think this is probably one of the weakest aspects of the release.

        The first thing to say is, I vaguely surprised myself by the lack of problem in this area. If you read various reviews, the changes in accessibility to file management and the lack of desktop icons are quite often brought up as serious issues, and as a relatively heavy user of the desktop file space I imagined that this would be the thing which would hurt the most.

      • Great one, Gnome! Would you like to reload and try for your other foot?

        I was rather appalled to see the direction Gnome is going. Even though I’ve complained about Gnome before, I’ve still been using it thus far since going Ubuntu. But this is really going to sever my relationship with Gnome for good.

        This review shows Gnome 3 completely botching up the whole multi-virtual-desktop metaphor. Once again, we see something that Linux got right, which is being bludgeoned out of it.

      • GNOME 3: configuration wish granted

        Almost two and a half year ago GNOME 3 was in a very early state and most plans still had to be drawn up. At that time there was an interesting meme going on at Planet GNOME in which people blogged about their wishes for the large changes that would come to GNOME.

      • Wishlist for gnome (and shell) 3.2

        I know gnome 3.0 is just released and people are more or less still getting used to it. As such this may not be a right time to discuss what should be in gnome 3.2.

      • GNOME 3 and Its Fallback Desktop

        I like the GNOME 3 fallback desktop better than GNOME 3 itself.

  • Distributions

    • Slackware 13.37 RC 4.6692

      Another call for Slackware 13.37 Release Candidate. This time, Pat took the suggestion from Nicola to take Feigenbaum constant of 4.6692 to be the codename for (hopefully) the last RC before Slackware 13.37.

    • 3-in-1: How 3 Old Friends Can Be Found In Same Place

      Can you ever expect that three of your oldest friends which belong to different companies can be found in the same place? Difficult to imagine, isn’t is? It’s like accidentally finding your best school friend and your best colleague in your favorite pub just across the road from your home. Dream!

    • Reviews

      • Distro Hoppin`: Saline OS 1.3

        Iiiii’ve been working at the saaaline aaaall the live looong daaaay. Actually, that’s a lie, as this Debian-based operating system is quite easy to install, setup and, once that is done, it lets you run about your daily computing routine.

        [...]

        Yep, yep, I really loved spending some time with Saline OS and I think this could be a keeper.

      • Salix Xfce 13.37-beta2 – first impressions and screenshots

        Salix 13.37-beta2 was installed into a virtual machine with 512 MB RAM and it’s faaast.

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Mandriva 2010.2 KDE Review

        Way back in ancient times when Mandriva was still Mandrake this was actually the first distribution of Linux I recall ever using. Things have come a long way since then but unfortunately I have neglected using Mandriva in recent years. So I decided it was time for some nostalgia. These days Mandriva is an excellent distribution, definitely up to par with all of the rest. Mandriva offers extensive consumer services and business solutions, but for the everyday Linux user there is also the Mandriva free download DVD ISO. This DVD comes with optional KDE or Gnome desktops, and wide selection of popular free software.

      • PCLinuxOS 2010 Gnome Zen Mini Review

        Another similarity to KDE is the single panel on the bottom of the desktop, in your panel you can store launchers, see open windows, or store useful applets to display information. The panel also holds a workspace switcher to switch between virtual desktops. You can customize the look and feel of your panels simply by right clicking on the main panel. In the right click menu you can add new panels, view panel properties, or add applets to your panel. You can try many of the usual Gnome applets like a system monitor, note pad, or local weather monitor. For even more style try floating, or transparent panels.

    • Red Hat Family

      • Moving on from Red Hat to Google

        Last month, I moved from Red Hat to Google. After spending six-and-half years at Red Hat, it was a tough decision to make because I got to work on issues like open standards and open source that have such long-term implications for India. To tell the truth, I had also gotten into a warm comfort zone in my previous job and was wondering what to do next, after we won the open standards fight in India.

    • Debian Family

      • DebConf11 call for contributions

        We invite submissions of proposals for papers, presentations, discussion sessions and tutorials for Debconf11. Submissions don’t have to be limited to traditional talks, you could propose a performance, art installation, debate, or anything else. Official submissions will be accepted until May 8th 2011, 23.59 UTC.

      • Canonical/Ubuntu

        • Ubuntu 11.04 Gets Much Needed Launcher Customization

          One of the major criticisms of Natty’s Unity launcher was a user’s inability to control or customize it. The good news is Ubuntu team is working at war-footing to iron out the wrinkles pointed out in the Beta 1. John Lea reported a bug to offer increased customization of the launcher.

        • New hardware, Sandybridge, and Ubuntu.

          My fiancée and I have decided that we should invest in a new tower computer for various reasons. One primary reason is to use it for multimedia (music streaming to the stereo/home theater, movies, videos, etc), as well as a data server around the house.

        • Unity and Me

          I’ll admit when Mark announced that Unity would be the new desktop for Ubuntu, I was skeptical. I always liked the indicators work, but had used an otherwise pretty standard Gnome desktop for years, and liked it. I upgraded to Natty very early in the cycle and have been using Unity for months. Things were quite rocky at first, with instability issues and features either gone or partially implemented. Of course that is to be expected since massive amounts of development work was being done on it. Today, the features are there and Unity is quite stable for me. It is getting very close to release, but AIUI the Unity developers are working very hard to squish the remaining stability bugs. You can read more about the decision to stick with Unity, but that is not what I am writing about today. I’m writing about why as an Ubuntu user I like Unity. Keep in mind, I am not a Unity developer and have just picked things up along the way and this isn’t meant to be an exhaustive list of features or bugs. Just what I like and and dislike.

        • Ubuntu Natty release countdown banners chosen
        • Ubuntu, Unity, Linux Mint and other stuff

          The truth must be said, I’ve not tested Linux Mint yet, I’m somehow too comfortable with my two main OSs Slackware Linux and Arch Linux, using Debian from time to time.

          But I’m reading good reviews about it all time, just like this one, what caught my attention on that reading was not only how good the author consider Linux Mint, but also how bad he consider Ubuntu.

          It is also a long time since I do not try Ubuntu, but I’m looking forward to test ‘11.04’ with unity, I’ve run it in a Netbook some time ago, and I must said I liked it.

        • How I multitask in Unity
        • Fast Two Way Sync in Ubuntu!

          I love the portability of a laptop. I have a 45 min train ride twice a day and I fly a little too, so having my work with me on my laptop is very important. But I hate doing long running analytics on my laptop when I’m in the office because it bogs down my laptop and all those videos on The Superficial get all jerky and stuff.

          I get around this conundrum by running much of my analytics on either my work server or on an EC2 machine (I’m going to call these collectively “my servers” for the rest of this post). The nagging problem with this has been keeping files in sync. RStudio Server has been a great help to my workflow because it lets me edit files in my browser and they run on my servers. But when a long running R job blows out files I want those IMMEDIATELY synced with my laptop. That way I know when I undock my laptop to run to the train station that all my files will be there for me to spill Old Style beer on as I ride the Metra

        • Clementine Steadily Improving – PPA for Ubuntu Maverick, Natty Updated

          Clementine Music Player version 0.7.1 was released few days back and the venerable Amarok 1.4 fork continues its steady improvement it received during the last year. Clementine 0.7.1 is largely a bug fix release for Clementine 0.7 which came out with a number of major new features. Clementine PPA for Ubuntu Natty and Maverick is updated as well.

        • Falling In Love With ‘Sexy’ Ubuntu 11.04 aka Natty Narwhal
        • Ubuntu 11.04 Gets Much Needed Launcher Customization

          After long discussion and weighing the pros and cons the bug has got a fix. Once the patch is in the repositories, user will see an applet in the Gnome Control Center called ‘Unity Launcher’. It doesn’t have any super cow powers at the moment other than offering users the option to control the visibility of the launcher — users will be able to select whether they want to trigger the launcher when they take the mouse to the left of the screen or to the top left corner. At the moment the launcher pops out only when you take the mouse to the top left corner.

        • Flavours and Variants

          • Review: Linux Mint Xfce 201104

            Just over 2 weeks ago, I wrote about how Linux Mint is moving the Xfce edition to a Debian base. Well, a few days ago, they released the official Linux Mint Xfce 201104.
            For those of you who didn’t read that post, in short, Linux Mint Xfce is now Debian-based instead of Ubuntu-based. The developers had a few things to say about this: (1) the desktop will be faster and lighter on resources (114 MB of RAM at idle, 177 MB of RAM with Mozilla Firefox, LibreOffice Writer, and LibreOffice Calc open all at the same time), (2) the Xfce edition will now include more mainstream applications like Rhythmbox instead of Exaile, and (3) the Xfce edition, being based on Debian Testing, will be a rolling-release branch. All these things sounded very excitin

          • Spotlight On Linux: wattOS
  • Devices/Embedded

    • Care robot runs on Windows and Ubuntu, uses Kinect for vision

      GeckoSystems will show off its fourth-generation “CareBot” service robot at its “Mobile Robots in Motion” conference on April 13-14. Based on two dual-core Intel Atom-based Mini-ITX boards, with one running Ubuntu Linux and the other Windows XP, the latest CareBot features an updated GeckoMotorController 7.0 and a new GeckoImager 3.1 vision system based on Microsoft Kinect technology.

    • In praise of the D-Link Boxee Box

      Following several months of use, and one major firmware update, DeviceGuru is now ready to relate our experience with using the D-Link Boxee Box. Despite seeming a bit more like a late-stage beta than a fully-released product, the device has gradually taken over command and control of our non-DVD TV watching experience.

    • linux: pwning computers and devices after 20 years

      2011 is the 20th anniversary of the first release of the Linux kernel by Linus Torvalds. Since that time, the linux kernel, together with the GNU tools and a whole host of software has been developed by enthusiasts and professional programmers into an operating system that runs on tiny embedded systems right up to the world’s fastest supercomputers.

    • Phones

      • Nokia/MeeGo/Maemo

      • Android

        • Putting Text to Speech to Work

          In a prior article we explored using the Text To Speech (TTS) capabilities native to Android.

          In this article we begin to apply the TTS capabilities into an application that has (slightly) more utility.

          The reasons for using Text To Speech range from the practical, safety-minded applications to the “just for fun”. The application we build in this article is arguably a little bit of both.

          While our prior look at Text To Speech was geared around the mechanics of using the TTS features, this application spends a bit more time with the context of the application and leverages what we have previously learned.

        • Android Honeycomb Code Will Be Released Soon: Google

          I never doubted that Google will close Android. But, then it took Andy Rubin to come forth and further clarify. In a nutshell, we all agree that Android has been fragmented. Whose fault is it? Google’s? No. Its the fault of those hardware vendors who picked up wrong OS to run tablets or are now planning to use a wrong OS to run smartphones. Using 2.x series on tablets was a big a mistake as is using 3x on phones.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Understanding Project Harmony

    I’ve been highly critical1 of corporate copyright assignment policies, especially those that effect me personally. Canonical, one of those I’ve complained about, has been working to try and standardise the wording and formation of the contracts that you have to sign in order to assign copyright over.

  • Events

  • Web Browsers

    • Why is Microsoft pushing IE 9 out now? Firefox.
    • Internet Explorer 6 is Holding Back the Linux Desktop

      There is no reason, other than fear of change, to be using a browser or operating system in 2011 that was created over a decade ago (unless of course it is on a server that has over a decade’s worth of uptime). It amazes me how many times I’ve setup Firefox or Google Chrome on a friend’s computer only to return later to find out they have foobared something because they fell back into using Internet Explorer after I left (most often times simply because they liked the blue E). Once most people are set in their ways it is hard to get them to change – no matter how subtle that change may be.

    • Chrome

      • Chrome to block downloads of hazardous .exe files

        As well as sounding the alarm when navigating to a nefarious web site, in the future the Windows version of Google’s Chrome browser will block downloads of infected .exe files. Users will, however, still be able to override this feature and download them anyway.

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox 4 Is Faster, Cleaner, More Secure

        With all other major browsers having recently released new versions, this also means that the current generation of browsers all represent the latest in cutting edge Web technologies, including support for the emerging HTML 5 standard.

  • Databases

  • Project Releases

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Open Data

      • Announcing the Open Data Challenge – a pan-European open data competition

        For a long while our Working Group on EU Open Data has been very keen to run a pan-European open data competition. Hence we’re very pleased to announced the opening of the Open Data Challenge, which is precisely such a competition.

        The competition is open for the next 60 days and there are €20,000 in prizes up for grabs! As seems fitting for a pan-European initiative, the winners will be announced by EC Vice President Neelie Kroes in Brussels this coming June.

  • Programming

Leftovers

  • Cablegate

    • Bradley Manning: top US legal scholars voice outrage at ‘torture’

      More than 250 of America’s most eminent legal scholars have signed a letter protesting against the treatment in military prison of the alleged WikiLeaks source Bradley Manning, contesting that his “degrading and inhumane conditions” are illegal, unconstitutional and could even amount to torture.

      The list of signatories includes Laurence Tribe, a Harvard professor who is considered to be America’s foremost liberal authority on constitutional law. He taught constitutional law to Barack Obama and was a key backer of his 2008 presidential campaign.

  • Finance

    • What We’ve Learned About Wall Street From Watching the Raj Rajaratnam Trial

      Depending on whom you talk to, the allegations of $63.8 million in securities fraud against the Galleon hedge-fund owner Raj Rajaratnam amount to either the biggest insider-trading case since Michael Milken or the largest insider-trading case, ever, period, the end. Twenty-seven people were charged, and nineteen have pleaded guilty. Authorities investigated Rajaratnam’s alleged network of co-conspirators like they were the Sopranos, with 2,400 wiretaps producing 90 hours of tape. Thanks to those recordings and testimony from power brokers at Goldman Sachs, Intel, and McKinsey, the first few weeks of the trial have offered a rare glimpse into the Brioni-collared, Ferragamo-slippered tribe normally hidden behind closed doors. The defense has yet to present its arguments. But as the prosecution prepares to rest its case today, here’s what we learned so far.

    • Now Facebook Might Not IPO Until 2013 Or Later

      The SEC has said it is considering raising the shareholder limit for private companies in a letter to Rep. Darrell Issa obtained by the WSJ.

      The SEC has a rule that says that once a private company reaches 500 individual shareholders, it has to report publicly the way a public company does, so this rule is an incentive for companies to go public: if they’re going to have the drawbacks of being public (disclosure) they might as well have the advantages (access to public markets).

  • Privacy

    • CPS Rule on Phorm intrusion – A two tier charging threshold?

      There are very few tech cases that hit the news in the UK, so its always interesting to look at decisions made by the CPS when the digital world is thrust into the British legal system. The Phorm case is facinating for a number of reasons, but before we look at those, lets remind ourselves of the BBC Click and its Botnet incident.

      Apparently if you are the BBC and run a botnet, then there is no crime since no charges were ever placed.

      That decision disappointed me since it seemed you can get away with “research” and “public interest” defences if you happen to be a larger entity than the average Joe and that, has not gone unnoticed, with comments in tech forums remarking on a disproportionate balance between size of entity and chance of prosecution.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality/UBB

    • How to cut off the Internet the easy way? A Shovel

      According to the Guardian, one little old lady in Georgia managed to cut off an entire country, Armenia, from the Internet for five hours Her weapon? A shovel.

      No, I’m not kidding.

      The story goes that the woman was hunting for copper, which is worth real money these days everywhere, when in mid-dig, her shovel cut the fibre-logic cable which carried 90% of Armenia’s Internet.

    • What to do About Retail Usage Based Billing: A Modest Proposal

      OpenMedia.ca, which spearheaded the public uproar over usage based billing earlier this year, launched a Vote Internet campaign that quickly attracted political support. The campaign asks candidates to be pro-Internet, which includes standing up for an open and accessible Internet and stopping the “pay meter on the Internet.” While this predictably raises claims of retail price regulation, addressing concerns about retail UBB need not involve a return to regulatory approvals over retail pricing of Internet services.

    • Canadians encouraged to ‘vote for the Internet’

      Trust and economic recovery might be topping the polls as the issues most important to voters in Canada’s 41st general election, but some Canadians might believe keeping the Internet open and affordable trumps all others.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • RIAA Lobbyist Turned Judge Backpedals On BitTorrent Cases

        In the ongoing mass-BitTorrent lawsuits, last month U.S. District Court Judge Beryl Howell laid down a landmark verdict in favor of copyright holders. The verdict was widely publicized, but put in doubt after it was uncovered that the Judge was a former RIAA lobbyist. This critique appears to have had an effect. In two new orders in the same cases, Howell has now backpedaled on her earlier stance.

      • Statutory Damages In Copyright Law Make It More Appealing To Sue Than To Innovate

        There are all sorts of problems with copyright law today, but one of the biggest is the farce that is statutory damages. This is what allows everyone who sues someone for a single instance of copyright infringement to threaten them with the possibility of a $150,000 fine. Of course, even in situations where the $150,000 isn’t available, we still end up with rulings that seem totally disconnected from any actual “harm.” Defenders of the statutory damages provisions in copyright law come up with all sorts of twisted rationalizations for why ridiculously high statutory damages rates make sense, usually along the lines of saying that there’s simply no reasonable way to calculate actual damages. This is, of course, silly. Even if you can’t calculate exact damages, you can come up with something that at least approaches a reasonable level.

Clip of the Day

gNewSense 2.2


Credit: TinyOgg

04.09.11

Links 9/4/2011: More GNOME 3, Qt SDK

Posted in News Roundup at 1:32 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Linux high availability group working on critical enterprise application stack

    The Linux Foundation has formed a new working group to speed development within the Linux ecosystem that would make the operating system kernel more suitable for building high availability (HA) systems, the Foundation announced Wednesday.

    [...]

    So, not surprisingly, the Linux HA stack will include a lot of components that should aid in the clustering of servers. In addition to Linux, the software stack may include technologies such as the Corosync cluster engine, the Open Clustering Framework, the Linux Virtual Server, the Pacemaker resource manager, the Oracle Cluster File System (OCFS), the Global File System (GFS) and others.

  • That Other OS Re-re-reboots, Again

    Why is this OS still around? Who needs this aggravation? There is a better way to do IT: Debian GNU/Linux.

    Debian GNU/Linux is not perfect but it is a lot less work to keep it running. In the five years I have been using it I have only had much angst three times: a flub of openSSH, lots of display problems in the display on the beta of Squeeze and just yesterday, my wife found OpenOffice.org would not open files from Office that it previously had opened. Libre Office fixed that and a problem every couple of years compared to a monthly curse is heavenly.

  • The Battle for the Last Desktop

    Acer expects component shortages for tablet PCs and smartphones

  • Audiocasts/Shows

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • Sanity
    • GNOME Desktop

      • Gnome3 is a YES

        I wanted to check out Gnome3 on my own, in spite of the wide range of reviews [or because of them!] I especially appreciated this review: https://piecesoflint.wordpress.com/2011/04/05/10-things-i-love-about-gnome-3/. I don’t wish to repeat the findings, but add my own reactions.

      • New GNOME cuts the clutter

        Five years in the making, the newly released version 3 of the GNOME Linux desktop interface has been radically redesigned.

        The development team endeavored to develop a simpler interface for the shell, noted Jon McCann, one of GNOME Shell’s designers, in a Thursday announcement.

        For this release, the boxy look and feel has been replaced with a more aerodynamic, clutter-free visage. All the icons were redesigned, and new default font Cantarell was adopted. Applications can be called up by simply typing the first few letters of a program name. Frequently used applications can be pinned to a desktop dashboard.

      • Gnome 3 Review

        The long, loooong awaited Gnome 3. Probably the most popular linux desktop environment out there has finally gotten its well deserved and a needed major overhaul. Often times I hear people complaining about the lack of features in Gnome 2.x when compared to, say, KDE. Others, on the other hand, like its simplicity, ease of use, and the fact that no big changes have been made for quite some time. In fact, I myself can’t recall any significant changes to Gnome since I first started using it 5 years ago. Gnome 3 was written from scratch and the team was hoping to reinvent some things, but innovate at the same time, while making the new Gnome the best desktop environment out there. But, did they succeed? More after the break!

      • GNOME 3 Heroes

        GNOME 3 is an incredible achievement. Looking back to that first announcement in 2008, I don’t think any of us would have quite imagined how much the project would accomplish with a new dot oh release. Everyone can feel very proud indeed.

      • GNOME 3
  • Distributions

    • 4 Recommended Linux Distros To Help You Choose The Right One For You

      Just imagine if you tried out a distro that wasn’t meant for you?

    • Have You Heard of AUSTRUMI Linux?

      I haven’t thought of AUSTRUMI in quite a while. My memories of it are tiny, tiny, fast, fast, yet up-to-date able work on modern hardware (modern at the time). Then it fell off my radar around version 1.5.0 released in 2007. But 2.3.3 was just released a few days ago, so it was time to see its latest incarnation.

      AUSTRUMI is Slackware-based distribution that hails from Latvia. Yes, that’s a country; in the general vicinity of Lithuania, Sweden, and the western Russian border. It ships as an installable live CD (to HDD or USB) with support for several languages. It was once about a 30 MB download, but these days it is 199 MB. It comes with Linux 2.6.38.2, Xorg X Server 1.10.0, GIMP 2.6.11, Opera 11.10, LibreOffice 3.3.2, and lots (relatively speaking) of other handy applications. It includes several server applications as well as system tools and utilities. AUSTRUMI also ships with NVIDIA and ATI/AMD proprietary drivers, although the choice of using Open Source drivers is available to boot. Another boot time option is whether to run it completely in RAM or not as well as your preferred language and several other options.

      It comes with a very attractive FVWM desktop with transparency and a nice titlebar, clock, and quicklauncher on the side as well as a pretty theme and wallpaper. They’ve also used Conky to display some machine statistics across the top of the screen.

    • 3-in-1: How 3 Old Friends Can Be Found In Same Place

      Post about SLAX was soon followed by post about Puppy. I felt in love with Puppy from the first sight. It’s a pity I had to remove it from my HDD to replace with Debian Squeeze.
      SLAX is based on Slackware.

    • New Releases

      • SystemRescueCd 2.1.0 updates Xfce desktop

        Version 2.1.0 of the SystemRescueCd Linux distribution has been released, the first major point update to SystemRescueCd 2.0.0 from early January. Based on the Gentoo LiveCD and using Xfce as its default desktop, the SystemRescueCd is configured as a tool kit for administering or repairing an operating system and recovering data after a system crash. Supported file systems include Ext2, Ext3 and Ext4, ReiserFS, XFS, JFS, VFAT, NTFS, ISO9660 and Btrfs.

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Smile becomes Mandriva partner

        Mandriva Pulse 2 is the Open Source solution to manage business IT infrastructure whether it is homogenous, unisite, multisite, and
        comprising a handfull of machines or several thousand.

    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

      • Canonical/Ubuntu

        • I Don’t Like Unity; Should I Ditch Ubuntu?

          In my opinion most Ubuntu users who think the way my friend thinks are going to be upset about it. So, what to do? Should such users ditch Ubuntu and move to derivatives like Linux Mint (which is fast becoming my favorite)?

          Linux Mint has a very strong user-base and it doesn’t need Ubuntu’s failure to get new users. However, I can see quite a lot of users migrating to Linux Mint if they did not like Unity. While I have no issue whether you use Ubuntu or Linux Mint, I do have a suggestion to those who are not comfortable with Unity yet don’t want to ditch Ubuntu.

        • Ubuntu 11.04 May Default To Classic GNOME Desktop

          When Mark Shuttleworth and co announced last year that Ubuntu 11.04 would deploy a Canonical-developed Unity desktop environment instead of the GNOME 3.0 Shell or the classic GNOME2 desktop, many users were concerned by this move with Unity on Ubuntu Netbook not even being in great shape, etc. Concerns over Unity by default in Ubuntu 11.04 have only grown with the Unity interface in Ubuntu 11.04 Beta still being sluggish and broken in areas. Now it looks like Canonical may default Ubuntu 11.04 to using the classic desktop.

        • Test drive the whole Ubuntu archive with WebLive

          In my last blog post about WebLive I announced the availability on WebLive of the top-50 apps from the new Ratings & Review service.

          Today I’m happy to announce that this feature is no longer necessary as you can now test drive anything that’s available in the Ubuntu archive.

        • The Spiel About The Default Ubuntu 11.04 Desktop

          Earlier today Phoronix was the first publication to widely report that Ubuntu 11.04 may default to the GNOME classic desktop rather than the Unity desktop that Canonical has been developing viciously over the past few months. There’s just too many bugs outstanding and issues with Unity, but here’s the whole spiel about what their evaluation is coming down to in deciding whether to stick with Unity by default or instead use the classic GNOME desktop until presumably Ubuntu 11.10.

          A more elaborate email from Canonical’s Rick Spencer has now hit the Ubuntu development mailing list that further analyzes the situation and discussion that came out of the Ubuntu Technical Board meeting.

        • Ubuntu Expels One Of Its Developers

          Besides the MPlayer fighting that’s now going on, the battles within the Ubuntu community isn’t limited to GNOME vs. Unity on the desktop, but in fact the Ubuntu Developer Membership board and Community Council have jointly decided to expel one of the Ubuntu developers.

          The two Ubuntu groups have decided to kick Artur Rona out of the Ubuntu development community for at least two years, according to this mailing list post. This Polish developer had been responsible within the Ubuntu community for handling merges, syncs, and security updates for some packages.

        • Mark Shuttleworth talks Narwhals

          Natty Narwhal (Ubuntu 11.04) removes GNOME, adds new kernel, and offers a major patch for scheduling processes. Mark Shuttleworth talks to Linux User about all this, Debian relations and the future of Ubuntu…

        • Knowledge-Sharing on Agenda During Ubuntu App Developer Week

          Have an idea for a great Linux application that’s missing from the 30,000+ downloads in the Ubuntu repositories? Or just interested in learning some programming pointers? If you answered yes, the latest and greatest Ubuntu App Developer Week, which starts Monday, April 11, 2011, is for you. Keep reading for details…

        • Flavours and Variants

          • Elementary OS Review: Delight to Use, Few Issues Persist
          • Linux Mint Debian 201101 – Really, really nice

            There were two tiny wrongs with LMD – one, the lack of Compiz; two, the one-time boot glitch. Other than that, Linux Mint Debian was surprisingly good-looking and good-working, with none of the pessimistic predictions about its stability and usability.

            I’m thoroughly pleased with the distro. It’s a near perfect 10! The Mint dev team has scored two tremendous releases, one after another, not an easy feat by any means or standards. This is really amazing. What more, LMD is a beacon of hope for all those frightened Ubuntu users and Unity haters. If you don’t like the direction Ubuntu is going, there’s Linux Mint and its Debian edition waiting for you. Stable, fast, beautiful, the sum of all good.

            Let’s not forget – this is a rolling release, so install once and enjoy forever. It’s also probably going to be supported for eons. And this is just the first edition. Think how this thing will look like in a year or two, given more time to buff and polish.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Eurocom Launches Dual Processor Phantom 4.0 Server-on-the-Go Solution

      Eurocom Corporation (www.eurocom.com), the world’s leading developer of highly personalized, high-performance notebook PCs and energy efficient All-in-Ones has been developing a dual CPU notebook solution for years. Eurocom technicians have been testing and verifying the systems performance and quality since the beginning of 2011 and now the system is ready for shipping.

    • The WINDspeed Pocket Hotspot: great for Linux users but piss-poor documentation.

      I must admit that I haven’t found a suitable use case for a MiFi device until now — where I find myself tasked with procuring a no-fuss Internet connection for visiting family. Each of the big carriers in Canada sells a personal WiFi hotspot of some sort, but being a fan of the little guy I went instead with WIND Mobile’s Huawei E583C — aka, the WINDspeed Pocket Hotspot.

    • The MosKeyto’s Buzz

      A review of a USB drive might seem like a silly notion, but when the USB drive is barely bigger than the USB port itself, it seems worth mentioning. I recently was sent a LaCie MosKeyto USB drive, and I must admit, it’s even smaller than I expected it would be. In fact, the cover to the Flash drive is actually bigger than the drive itself!

    • Phones

      • Nokia/MeeGo/Maemo

        • Nokia offering new SDK for Qt

          Developers who want to take advantage of Nokia’s cross-platform application and user interface framework can now access the latest release candidate.

          Qt is designed to let developers write and deploy applications across desktop, mobile and embedded OSes without rewriting source code. The Qt SDK 1.1 Release Candidate is now available for download, Nokia said in a blog post on Thursday.

    • Tablets

      • Google begins tablet version of Chrome OS

        Details in Google’s source code reveal that company programmers have begun building a tablet version of Chrome OS, its browser-based operating system.

      • Acer expects component shortages for tablet PCs and smartphones

        Commenting about the tablet PC market, Acer Taiwan president Scott Lin pointed out that the company is currently working aggressively over its tablet PCs and is doing a marvelous job; however, Japan’s earthquake may affect component supplies for its smartphone and tablet PC lines.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Why Facebook open-sourced its datacenters

    Facebook has opened up a whole new front in its war with Google over top technical talent and ad dollars. Instead of simply hiring away Google engineers, the social networking service is now aiming to do for its datacenters what Google is doing with Android—that is, it’s taking an open-source approach that will let the company harness the energy and know-how of a larger ecosystem of programmers and engineers to make its ad business that much more profitable. Facebook has framed the announcement as part of its commitment to openness, but there are much larger forces at work here. Specifically, despite what most people think, Facebook and Google are hardware companies, and the former’s open-source datacenter will potentially help it compete in the datacenter arena with its much larger and deeper-pocketed rival.

  • Facebook’s Open-Source Servers Will Change the Industry. Right?

    Facebook’s bid to open-source its server architecture sounds like a technology with broad applications. But it remains unclear how the Open Compute Initiative will affect the traditional server market.

    Facebook said Thursday that it is making the design documents and specifications of the servers used at its Prineville, Ore. data center public at OpenCompute.org. The company claims that the design of the new servers is 38 percent more power efficient than its older models, and costs 24 percent less to make.

  • Facebook open sources its server, data center designs: Hardware fallout to follow

    Facebook on Thursday launched an initiative it calls the Open Compute Project, an effort to share the specs and designs of the custom servers in its data center in Prineville, Ore. In other words, Facebook is going to open source its hardware designs just like the software industry largely has.

  • FLOSS Weekly 160: Open Source Software At The Department Of Defense

    Hosts: Randal Schwartz and Simon Phipps

    Download or subscribe to this show at twit.tv/floss.

    We invite you to read, add to, and amend our show notes.

  • Project Harmony Launches Today

    “Project Harmony is like Creative Commons for contributor agreements. We’ve set out to capture the best practices of free and open source software contributions, across a diverse array of project cultures, communities, and values.” said Allison Randal, a community participant in Project Harmony. “The public review process for the Alpha versions of the documents launches today, and runs through May 6th. After a year of hard work by the original ~100 drafting volunteers, we’re really looking forward to broader participation in this public review.”

  • Web Browsers

    • Chrome

      • Google Chrome 12 Protects Against Malware

        Google is updating its Chrome web browser, Chrome 12, with new performance and security features. Chrome 12 is now available in Google’s dev-channel, providing users with a sneak peak of what Google has in store . Chrome 12 includes a new version of the V8 JavaScript engine as well as an overall code cleanup.

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox 4

        But it’s rock solid, fast, and dependable. I no longer feel like I need to apologise for using Firefox as my browser.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

  • Education

    • Moodle 2.0 Science: Monitoring Your Students’ Progress

      By the end of this article, you will be able to do the following:

      * Check that your learners are looking at the resources that you add to your course
      * Track completion of activities
      * Plan what your learners need to achieve for the completion of your course
      * Evaluate the effectiveness of your quizzes by using result analysis
      * Identify gaps in learner’s understanding by using quiz grade analysis
      * Use assignment reports to identify learners who need extra help
      * Gain a valuable overview of your learners’ progress by effectively using the gradebook

  • Project Releases

  • Programming

Leftovers

  • The Bizarre Cathedral – 96
  • Alcatel-Lucent Launches Wired Networking Mesh
  • Cablegate

    • Dear Queen Beatrix,

      It is with anger and disbelief that I now read that the current interior minister of your government is willing to give up the freedom of Rop Gonggrijp to please the United States. As you can read here, Uri Rosenthal has no problem to extradite Rop Gonggrijp to the United States should they so desire.

      And why? Because he helped Wikileaks to publish the truth. Because he helped the truth to be put in the spotlight of public scrutiny. A truth that is tough to accept, but true to his nature, Rop Gonggrijp defended the freedom to tell the truth.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality/UBB

    • Pensioner in Georgia cuts Armenia off from internet

      An elderly woman in Georgia is facing a prison sentence after reportedly causing internet services in neighbouring Armenia to crash.

      The country found itself offline for hours on 28 March after cables linking Georgia to Armenia were damaged.

    • BT escapes prosecution over web snooping

      BT will not be prosecuted for snooping on the web browsing habits of its customers.

      The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has dropped a request bring charges against BT and Phorm – the firm that supplied the monitoring system.

      The Webwise software used cookies to track people online and then tailored adverts to the sites they visited.

Clip of the Day


Credit: TinyOgg

04.07.11

Links 7/4/2011: Firefox 7 and GIMP 2.8 to Come This Year

Posted in News Roundup at 6:18 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Dual boot adventures
  • Yahoo: The Linux Company

    While Yahoo isn’t as big as it used to be, it still, according to Dummer, has 100,000s of servers, 640-million users, and over a 1 billion visits a months. According to Netcraft’s list of the most popular Web sites in the world, that’s still good enough to put Yahoo in as the 13th most popular Web site on the globe, or the fourth if you count all the international Google sites as one. In other words, Yahoo is still a player.

  • The GNU/Linux-Adoption Algorithm!

    Just for fun, I isolated the GNU/Linux-adoption algorithm

  • Windows/Linux driver support comparison

    Recently however I came across a bad situation with Windows 7 64-bit and the Intel 82567/82568 network card, which is present in a lot of desktops and laptops. The issue? Well, there are a few issues actually, but the main problems are the NIC dropping its connection at random and also not linking to some switches right away which causes the Windows 7 logon process to lag.

  • Server

    • 10,000-core Linux supercomputer built in Amazon cloud

      The customer that opted for the 10,000-core cloud cluster was biotech company Genentech in San Francisco, where scientist Jacob Corn needed computing power to examine how proteins bind to each other, in research that might eventually lead to medical treatments. Compared to the 10,000-core cluster, “we’re a tenth the size internally,” Corn says.

  • Google

    • Larry Page Starts as Google CEO

      The first day at a new job is an exciting and stressful time. Thankfully, Google’s new CEO already has a pretty firm grasp of the company’s workings, having co-founded the company 13 years ago with Sergey Brin. Larry Page and Brin served as co-presidents for the search company until 2001, when they recruited former Novell CEO, Eric Schmidt.

  • IBM

  • Kernel Space

    • Linux Foundation Takes Aim At Embedded Devices

      According to Jim Zemlin, the Executive Director of the Linux Foundation, Linux is now moving beyond just being a server operating system.In Zemlin’s view, Linux has become the fabric of modern computing.

      In an effort to help nurture the continued growth of Linux, the Linux Foundation today announced the formation of a High Availability Linux working group, as well as the release of the Yocto 1.0 embedded Linux project.

    • Where Will Linux Be in 20 Years?

      It was 20 years ago this summer that Linux was born. Over that time Linux has transformed both itself and the IT industry.

      According to Jim Zemlin, the Executive Director of the Linux Foundation, the same core fundamentals that have helped Linux to reach its current stature will help to propel it forward for the next 20 years.

      “Linux itself really has no roadmap or grand plan persay, it sort of has a direction in which it is blowing,” Zemlin told InternetNews.com. “What makes Linux so great is that there are so many self-forming communities around Linux that use a single kernel to address so many different market segments.”

    • Celebrating 20 Years of Linux [INFOGRAPHIC]

      The Linux Foundation is celebrating 20 years of the famous FOSS operating system, Linux — or GNU-slash-Linux, depending on how hard-line a fossie you’re talking to — with a slew of special events, both online and IRL. Linux enthusiasts can check out the official anniversary site for details.

    • Linux 2.6.39-rc2 Is Uncommonly Calm
  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Wishlist for gnome (and shell) 3.2
      • GNOME 3.0′s RAM usage

        …is surprisingly low. Unlike what some people would make you believe, GNOME Shell & friends don’t eat 883 MB of RAM. As you can see below, baseline memory usage is under 120 MB… And you know what? That’s less than the amount of memory that GNOME 2.30 uses on startup on Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (127 MB+ even if you cut down on some useless services).

      • GNOME Shell Extensions: Additional Functionality For GNOME Shell (Dock Task-Switcher, Windows Navigator, User Theme, Etc.)
      • GNOME 3 First Impressions
      • GNOME3 Live image 1.0.0 released – It is about time
      • Gnome 3.0 first impressions, or “Is this thing on?”
      • GNOME 3 and the focus on usability

        GNOME 3 is out and of course I was very curious to give it a spin. As the GNOME developers claim they care a lot about usability and have given the new desktop design a lot of thought, I was pretty excited, since I care about these things as well. Haiku still has a lot of usability issues that we need to sort out. Maybe we can learn a few things. So what are my impressions? To be honest, I have pretty mixed feelings.

      • GNOME 3 and Its Fallback Desktop

        I like the GNOME 3 fallback desktop better than GNOME 3 itself.

        Amid all the attention given to the new GNOME 3 with its overview page, you don’t hear much about the fallback. Nor are you likely to stumble across it on your own, since it’s buried in Applications -> System Settings -> System Info -> Graphics -> Forced Fallback -> On, a location that’s both obscure and deep.

        However, you might want to search out the setting if your computer lacks the hardware acceleration needed to run GNOME 3. Set it to On, and the next time you log in, you’ll be using the fallback.

      • The inevitable is here : Ubuntu gnome remix

        It was predicted since canonical announced unity…
        It was anticipated since people tried and disappointed on unity…
        It was desired since people saw, tried and experienced gnome 3.0 and its new shell…
        It was inevitable since shuttleworth commmented that no classic desktop for ubuntu 11.10…

      • GNOME Developer Center now online

        In conjunction with the release of GNOME 3, the GNOME Project has opened the GNOME Developer Center to help new developers find their way around the desktop environment’s technologies. The centre includes instructions on how to install tools for GNOME development, along with “ten minute tutorials” for C, C++, JavaScript, Python and Vala, covering the creation of, as examples, a guitar tuner, image viewer, WebKit-based Message board and a Clutter-based Image viewer.

  • Distributions

    • Testing stable; stable testing
    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • PCLinuxOS 2010 E17 Review

        After spending a week using PCLinuxOS I can say that this is definitely a distributions to rival all others. PCLinuxOS is maintained by the staff and volunteers of the PCLinuxOS Magazine. When you grab yourself a copy of this nearly flawless operating system be sure to stick around their website and freely read through the PCLinuxOS magazine archives to learn Linux while your at it. The endless variety of options when using PCLinuxOS seems to be an important focus of the project. This distribution comes in many desktop versions including Gnome, Gnome Zen Mini, XFCE, LXDE. KDE, and OpenBox. Thats not all, PCLinuxOS is available in 85 languages using the Addlocale tool, and has over 12000 packages available from the repositories. The sleek and minimalistic interface definitely improves workspace efficiency. PCLinuxOS 2010 Enlightenment 17 would be a great choice for Linux newcomers.

    • Debian Family

      • Backing up your data in Debian/Ubuntu derived distros

        Today I want to discuss backing up your computer in case of major problems or when your hard drive conks out. Because ALL hard drives will eventually fail, often without much warning. Backing up your computer data (photos, music files, documents), system settings and software preferences is something we should all do on a regular basis so your information and precious memories aren’t lost. And if you like to install different operating systems from time to time like I do, or just to do a clean install of a newer version of your operating system, having a recent back-up is indispensable.

      • Canonical/Ubuntu

        • GNOME 3 is out: will Ubuntu reconsider?

          GNOME 3 introduces “GNOME Shell”, a new window display and activities management interface that uses the Mutter compositing window manager.

        • Gnome 3 Fallback mode – Get your productivity back

          One thing is certain though, the Fallback Mode is more productive and useful than the standard, default Gnome 3 session. You don’t get the full repertoire you may expect, but there’s progress, good, healthy progress. In one fell stroke, you gain some 50-60% of your expected desktop functionality, which restores a bit of sanity and hope. Theoretically, you could get your old desktop back with some careful work on extra features, backward compatibility and a dab of visual polish. Experienced Linux distribution developers could pull this off easily, rebranding the skeleton looks with their own unique touch. Once again, we go back to Linux Mint, which has shown the art of subtle visual transformation many times over in the past.

        • 10 Things I Love About GNOME 3

          Fortunately for GNOME, their latest version of their popular desktop environment manages to break very few eggs, if any, and still magically makes omelets regardless of that. GNOME 3 designers and developers have had a lot of time to think and plan about the design of the latest desktop and it shows very clearly in several areas. Some refinement and improvement could come in future releases (and that is actually being worked on right now), but for now I am loving the GNOME 3 desktop as it stands today just fine. Why? I’ll give you 10 reasons:

        • Drag Me to Shell, p1.

          This is part one of what will be a multipart blog series: how tremendously exciting, eh?! In all seriousness, with GNOME 3 imminent, I thought rather than do a review of the desktop it would be much more interesting to talk about it from the perspective of a relatively hardened Linux enthusiast actually using it within a business environment.

        • First look: GNOME 3.0

          After a lot of preparatory work, the GNOME project has released the first version of the third generation of GNOME. With its modern design approach, subtle graphics effects and fresh UI concept, the new version presents itself much more modern and sleek than its predecessor – but it also needs to be handled differently.The GNOME Shell showed no sign of stability problems during our tests. Our primary test systems were a desktop computer with Radeon HD 4350 and a notebook with Intel’s G965 chip-set; both systems were running preview versions of Fedora 15.

        • Mac in Black: A disconcerting look at GNOME 3
        • Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal Beta Review

          Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal Beta 1 is released and it brings in some much needed UI(User Interface) improvements. I was impressed by the changes so much that I decided to install this beta release as my new default operating system instead of Ubuntu 10.10.

        • Where are Ubuntu servers being used?

          Earlier today, Ivanka Majic tweeted a link to the map of where Ubuntu Servers are being used around the world and I thought that was pretty cool so I wanted to find out a little more about how this information was gathered.

          According to the website, the application shows Ubuntu logo over each city where Ubuntu Server is used and the data is collected through volunteers who visit the application and agree to add their city to the map. Also stated on the site is the fact that personally identifying information is stored in the application database. Those who visit the application website can choose to add their information using their IP address or just see where Ubuntu Server is already being used.

        • Canonical Commits to Netbooks Over Tablets for Ubuntu

          Canonical has not yet built an Ubuntu Linux distribution for tablets and will continue development of the OS for PCs and netbooks, company executives said.

        • First Look At Ubuntu Linux 11.04 ‘Natty Narwhal’ Beta

          So that’s Ubuntu 11.04, and its somewhat bold step forward, and somewhat away from other distributions. What do you think of it, in looks alone or after using the beta a bit? Give us your take in the comments.

        • Ubuntu 11.04: is this the end of the road?

          If this amount of change had been incorporated into a release some years ago, when Ubuntu was two or three years old, it is unlikely that people would have noticed and commented as much as they have. Change takes place in the early stages of development of just about anything.

          When change of this magnitude comes after six years and a half – more than four lifetimes in the tech industry – then people start to ask why.

          Is this the end of the road as far as radical design changes for Ubuntu go? Or is there more hidden up the sleeve of the Canonical founder, changes that will make it look more and more like a Dinky Toy than a serious operating system?

        • Flavours and Variants

          • Elementary OS review – ‘Jupiter’ is massive, but it’s largely hot air…

            What, another Ubuntu-based Linux distro? Yes, but Elementary OS is meant to be something more than just an Ubuntu spin with a different wallpaper. We take a brief look at the new distro to see whether it lives up to its original promise…

            [...]

            Elementary OS won’t replace Ubuntu on our machines just yet, but we will definitely keep a close eye on the project.

          • Spotlight On Linux: wattOS

            So many computers head for landfill when they are still able to carry out useful work. However, some organizations and individuals do what they can to put these machines into the hands of people who can use them. Naturally, this is an ideal application for Linux, and having had a quick look at it, I suspect that wattOS would make a good choice for refurbishing older computers.

            wattOS is derived from the current version of Ubuntu, giving it an advantage when it comes to hardware support. Another good thing about being tied to one of the big distributions is that there’s less of a chance of being stuck for a application that you need.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Phones

      • Nokia/MeeGo/Maemo

        • Nokia admits ‘open’ Symbian is not open

          Nokia has admitted that its “open and direct” Symbian source code is not open, proving – once again – that the word has been stripped of all discernible meaning.

          Late last week, a little over three months after the Symbian Foundation shut down its web servers, Nokia returned the Symbian source code to the web. It announced the move with a blog post entitled “We are open!”, and the post was penned by Petra Söderling, the “Head of Open Source” for Symbian smartphones.

        • Nokia confirms Symbian no longer open source
        • Plans for the First Qt Contributors’ Summit Continue

          The first Qt Contributors’ Summit is scheduled to be held at the ParkInn Alexanderplatz in Berlin, Germany on June 16-18, 2011.

      • Android

        • Android and the Great Openness Debate

          Google’s motivations in protecting its Honeycomb source code are understandable to Slashdot blogger and consultant Gerhard Mack, who notes, “they are worried their code won’t be stable on other devices. Unfortunately, they are underestimating what the community could do for them if they opened up the code. There are plenty of hobbyist programmers who absolutely love to mess with phones and would check in fixes as needed.”

        • Penguin chief: Linux patent and copyright FUD ‘not relevant’

          Fear ye not, Linux faithful. Thy software is no more susceptible to patent or copyright attack than any other piece of closed source software.

          That’s according to Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin, who told penguins gathered as his group’s annual Collaboration Summit on Wednesday not to believe the FUD – fear, uncertainty, and doubt – claiming that violations are unique to their beloved Linux or open source in general.

          [...]

          But the challenges to Linux and open source aren’t just coming from the likes of Microsoft. They’re coming from inside the Linux camp too. Foundation member Oracle, the world’s biggest database maker, is taking fellow Foundation member Google, the web’s number-one search company, to court, saying that Google’s smartphone operating system violates its Java patents. It’s a claim Google has denied and is contesting.

        • Google’s Andy Rubin Says Android Remains An Open Source Project

          Writing in a blog, he said : “As I write this the Android team is still hard at work to bring all the new Honeycomb features to phones.

          “As soon as this work is completed, we’ll publish the code.

          “This temporary delay does not represent a change in strategy” .

          While admitting that Google was placing limitations on those seeking to ship devices with Google apps as well as tighter restrictions on entry into the Android Market, Rubin said these were always in place from the inception.

        • Google: we’ll open source Android 3.0 when it’s ready
    • Sub-notebooks

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

Clip of the Day

Richard Stallman – What can individuals do?


Credit: TinyOgg

04.06.11

Links 6/4/2011: Linux 2.6.39 RC2, GNOME Desktop Reaches 3.0

Posted in News Roundup at 6:38 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Microsoft has lost the war to Linux

    Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin has decided that he has won the war against Microsoft and his sending his troops home.

  • Problems Addressed

    The fact is the vast majority of hardware works with GNU/Linux these days. Dell demands it. HP demands it. Lenovo demands it.

  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

    • GIMP Paint Studio 1.5 beats its own record

      The very nearly almighty Ramon Miranda has finally released a huge update to his ever-in-demand GIMP Paint Studio pack of GIMP add-ons for digital artists. Over 200 brushes, new high resolution patterns that resemble artistic media, and much more is what you get.

    • The 5 Best Open Source Graphics Programs

      Do you want to create your own promotional materials for your small business? Before you shell out big bucks for Adobe Creative Suite or another set of proprietary graphics software tools, you should think about what open source software has to offer. If you’d like to create professional work without breaking the bank, I’ve got five open source graphics apps that will get the job done.

      If your business focuses entirely on graphics work of some kind (Web design, desktop publication, etc.) then you may want to invest in tools like Adobe Creative Suite. Even though I’m a big fan of open source software, there are some jobs that require or at least benefit greatly from proprietary tools — though in skilled hands I’ve seen free and open source tools produce results that rival proprietary tools.

    • Instructionals/Technical

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • KDE Releases April Updates, Codename: “Congrats”
      • KDE 5 Menu

        Note in bold: no official plans here, however many continuously maintained software projects start with N+1 version development long before N version is discontinued. So yes, I really think the current works at UX level are “the” KDE 5 development.

        [...]

        Ideas are rarely 100% original, and art is built on stealing.

    • GNOME Desktop

      • The GNOME Desktop Project Unleashes GNOME 3.0

        After five years of planning and design, GNOME 3.0 has been officially released. The totally rewritten desktop has had its share of both praise and condemnation in recent months due to what the project describes as “its most significant redesign of the computer experience in nine years.” They further say, the “revolutionary new user interface and new features for developers make this a historic moment for the free and open source desktop.”

      • A shiny new ornament for your Linux lawn: Ars reviews GNOME 3.0

        The developers behind the GNOME project have announced the official release of GNOME 3.0, a significant redesign of the open source desktop environment. The update introduces a new desktop shell that offers a streamlined window management workflow and a more modern look and feel. The new version also represents a major architectural overhaul, with many important enhancements to the GNOME platform’s technical underpinnings.

        The effort to deliver GNOME 3.0 has a long history. It took the developers years to reach a consensus about how to proceed with the new version, and years more to implement it. The protracted development period has largely paid off in stability and coherence. It’s fit for duty out of the starting gate, though there is still plenty of room for further improvement.

      • GNOME 3.0 Hits Desktops Today

        “In the face of constant change, both in software technology itself and in people’s attitudes toward it, long-term software projects need to reinvent themselves in order to stay relevant. I’m encouraged to see the GNOME community taking up this challenge, responding to the evolving needs of users and questioning the status quo,” says Matt Zimmerman, Canonical CTO.

      • GNOME 3.0 released: better for users, developers
      • The Two Most Urgent Tasks: Simplicity and a Keyboard
      • Fonts in GNOME 3: Cantarell, Tweaking, and Trailblazing

        Nicolas Spalinger explains why Cantarell is more than just a font—it’s a symbol of a whole new design process. And he shows you how to tweak the font settings in GNOME 3.

      • PyGTK, GObject, and GNOME 3

        Sumana Harihareswara interviews Tomeu Vizoso and John “J5” Palmieri about PyGTK, GObject, introspection and PyGObject. What’s new, what’s been hard, and what’s next?

      • How We Got Here: Part II of a Design History of GNOME 3 & the Shell

        Daf Harries continues his interview with Jon McCann and Jakub Steiner. Should we be treating code and design contributions the same, or differently? What pitfalls from GNOME 2 were designers trying to avoid? How do we deal with community indecisiveness?

      • How We Got Here: Part I of a Design History of GNOME 3 & the Shell

        Daf Harries asks Jon McCann and Jakub Steiner: what was the seed that got GNOME 3 going? How does modularity cause problems? And how do new contributors learn a project’s design philosophy?

      • Letter From The Editor

        With GNOME 3.0, the GNOME Desktop takes a step forward.

    • Xfce

      • Linux Mint Xfce Released

        A couple of weeks ago I wrote about the release of Linux Mint 10 LXDE, the first of the lightweight desktop distributions in the current Mint series. Today they have released Linux Mint Debian Xfce, another lightweight desktop version. In addition to the obvious difference – Xfce / LXDE desktops – if you are familiar with the Linux Mint naming convention you will also have noticed the other major difference between these two lightweight distributions. The LXDE distribution is based on their Ubuntu-derived Mint 10, while this new Xfce distribution is based on their Mint Debian, which is derived directly from Debian without passing through Ubuntu along the way. The Release Notes list some of the advantages of this; the two big ones for end users are continuous updates (rolling release) and improved performance with reduced resource use.

  • Distributions

    • New Releases

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Try Mageia 1 Beta1 right now!

        As has been stated in the Mageia roadmap, Mageia 1 Beta1 is now available for tests. The first Mageia stable release is planned for 1st of June (which is now quite near!). Our focus is always on improving distribution content but also lots of work was done on localisation support (locales, main applications, Asian locales). Core packages versions include: kernel 2.6.38.2, KDE 4.6.1, GNOME 2.32, Firefox 4.0, … More information is available in the release notes and web announcement.

    • Debian Family

      • Canonical/Ubuntu

        • Maps.ubuntu.com shows ubuntu servers around the world

          Information is so much easier to digest – and so much more impressive to look at – when you can see it presented graphically.

        • Beyond Ubuntu CDs, Ubuntu Devices?

          For years, Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu Linux, has given away CDs of its Linux operating system to anyone who wanted them. That’s given away as in free, no cost, nada. But, all goods things must come to an end.

          As Gerry Carr, Canonical’s Head of Platform Marketing, wrote on an Ubuntu blog, “It’s with some regret that we are announcing the end of the ShipIt Programme and the CD distributor programme. When we started ShipIt in 2005 broadband was still a marketing promise even in the most connected parts of the most developed nations. We knew that this represented a significant stumbling block to the adoption of a new technology like Ubuntu. So we invested in making the CDs free and freely delivered to anywhere in the world. Since then we have shipped millions of CDs to every country in the world and brought Ubuntu into the lives of millions of individuals, we hope making them a little better.”

        • Falling In Love With ‘Sexy’ Ubuntu 11.04 aka Natty Narwhal

          I flirted with Ubuntu 11.04 yesterday and found it a bit annoying – a typical user experience when you see massive changes. After spending a night with Natty (and ‘she’ kept me awake all night) I now know more about this sexy beast.

          80% of my complains faded as the dawn broke. One of my biggest complaints was my inability to customize the launcher panel. I installed compiz settings manager and was able to customise the launcher. There is an option (experimental) for Unity 3D which lets you do just that.

        • Flavours and Variants

          • Linux Mint Xfce (201104) released!

            In the long run, switching our alternative desktops to a rolling base also simplifies their maintenance. To users, this means faster updates and synchronised releases. To us, this means more focus on the main edition.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Infotainment server rides the rails with up to twelve cores
    • Phones

      • Nokia/MeeGo/Maemo

        • MeeGo releases pre-alpha tablet platform

          The MeeGo project released a pre-alpha version of its promised Tablet User Experience (UX), officially opening up development for the UI layer. Based on MeeGo v1.2 core and Linux 2.6.37, the preview version includes a touch-optimized user interface for tablets, as well as a new panel UI concept and a suite of built-in browser, personal information management, and media playback apps.

      • Android

        • iOS vs. Android Arguments Escalate

          Let’s say you’re a mobile developer and you’re trying to decide whether to put your eggs in the Android or the iOS basket. Recent articles suggest that it’s not going to be an easy decision, and it’s not even clear if it’s an argument worth having.

          There are a number of factors coming together that have triggered these arguments over the last couple of weeks. First of all, recent news reports like this one from Engadget suggest that Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) could be tightening control over Android, trying to restrict the fragmentation that has been a consistent criticism of the operating system.

        • Maps for Android 5.3 adds Latitude location history

          Google has added Location History to Google Latitude in its latest Maps 5.3 for Android application. Users may also check-in from home and leave tips via the Hotpot recommendation engine, says the company.

    • Tablets

      • Sony May Have a Honey of a Tablet in the Works

        It appears that Sony (NYSE: SNE) is definitely planning to join the tablet wars: Its CEO Howard Stringer told the Nikkei newspaper that the company was planning to deliver a Honeycomb-based tablet no later than the end of the year, and possibly, according to some versions of his comments, as soon as this summer.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Web Browsers

    • Chrome

      • Google Experiments With Anti-Malware Warnings in Chrome

        One of the great ironies of computer security is that the computers aren’t as much of a security problem as people are. It’s well known in the anti-malware community that user apathy in protecting against malicious software is the largest security problem of all. The answer to this ongoing problem, though, is smart software that helps prevent users from downloading or exposing themselves to malware. Working with that premise, Google has implemented a new feature in its Chrome browser designed to warn users when malware is likely to be distributed to their computers on a drive-by basis. It’s a good idea, and hopefully it will be taken further.

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox 4 review – was it worth the wait?

        Firefox 4 is undeniably an excellent release that brings a lot of improvements and genuinely useful features.

      • Ever Wonder Which Firefox Add-ons Slow You Down the Most?

        image

        The best thing about Firefox is that it’s incredibly customizable, but have you ever wondered how much of a price all those add-ons take? Here’s how to see which add-ons slow down Firefox startup time the most.

        Thanks to @codinghorror for pointing it out on Twitter, we can now know for sure, thanks to Mozilla Add-ons list of slow-performing extensions during startup—this doesn’t mean they necessarily slow Firefox down once it’s loaded, of course.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • Interview: Charles H. Schulz on LibreOffice and The Document Foundation

      Anyone who has ever looked for alternatives to Microsoft Office probably knows about OpenOffice.org, a full featured competitor that is completely free. It started out as a proprietary StarOffice suite developed by a German StarDivision company until it was acquired by Sun Microsystems in 2000 which opened up the code to community oriented development that resulted in many improvements and two new major releases (OpenOffice.org 2 and 3).

      Last year Sun Microsystems, and by that the OpenOffice.org project as well, was acquired by Oracle causing many to wonder what they intend to do with it. Not long after a group of developers left the project to form The Document Foundation and a LibreOffice project.

      Charles H. Schulz has been with OpenOffice.org for many years and has intimate knowledge of what is going on. He was kind enough to answer some questions about the The Document Foundation, LibreOffice and their future.

  • Programming

Leftovers

  • Security

    • Insecurity

      Using GNU/Linux is a good layer of defence. Most malware is aimed at that other OS and GNU/Linux is simple and modular, much more easily and quickly patched. Being open source means many more people, also in layers, are testing/examining the code, and being Free Software, many more people, also in layers, are in a position to fix the problems.

    • Major law firms fall victim to cyber attacks

      Hackers have penetrated four major Bay Street law firms in the past seven months with highly sophisticated cyber attacks designed to destroy data or to steal sensitive documents relating to impending mergers and acquisitions.

      Daniel Tobok, president of Toronto-based Digital Wyzdom Inc., who investigated the attacks, would not name the firms. The attacks, which he said appeared to originate from computers in China, show that Canadian law firms are a target for hackers and potentially, state-sponsored cyber espionage. They follow similar attacks on governments and major corporations in recent years.

  • Finance

    • Blacklisted Economics Professor Found Dead: NC Publishes His Last Letter

      Professor Outis Philalithopoulos was found dead in his home three days ago; the coroner’s report cited natural causes that were left unspecified. Unfortunately, all of the professor’s academic work has disappeared; the only trace left appears to be the following letter, which he sent to an admirer shortly before his death. The understandably concerned recipient of the letter has shared its contents with Naked Capitalism, and has insisted that her identity be protected.

    • Austerity Comes to America

      The State of Michigan, hard hit by manufacturing job losses, is planning to reduce unemployment benefits. That can’t turn out well.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • Scott Walker gives cushy $85.5K/year government job to major donor’s young, underqualified son

      Scott Walker’s administration is all about cutting costs, which is why it gave the largely unqualified son of a major campaign donor a $81,500 senior managerial job in the state Commerce Department. A state official confirmed that the young gentleman got his job after his daddy put in a good word for him. As ThinkProgress points out, Walker’s anti-union legislation allows him to directly appoint dozens more people for high-paying gubmint jobs.

  • Censorship

    • YouTube pulls Harper Imagine clip

      A video featuring Conservative Leader Stephen Harper performing Imagine by John Lennon has been removed from YouTube for copyright reasons.

      As of Wednesday morning, the video had been taken down and replaced with the message that said: “This video is no longer available due to a copyright claim by Lenono Music.”

      Lennon’s widow, Yoko Ono, owns the rights to Imagine through Lenono Music.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality/UBB

    • What Does a Gig Cost?

      The Montreal Gazette ran a major story over the weekend focused on the costs for ISPs to transport a gigabyte of data (picked up by others as well). As those following the usage based billing issue will know, the ISP overage costs – which run as high $10 per GB in Canada – have attracted the ire of customers and raised questions about the actual costs for ISPs.

      Developing a better understanding of actual network costs was a big part of the paper I posted last week on UBB. This post features part of the discussion on costs, though the complicated appendix that uses Bell’s submission on network costs as part of the deferral account proceeding must be accessed from the original paper.

  • DRM

    • Could Anonymous be harming public opinion for the Hotz case?

      As I type this article I have visions of flame wars, insults and bad feeling. I would hope that it is seen as an article which merely makes an observation and asks a question (with a little of my own opinion thrown in).

      I have never supported or condoned the DDOS attacks and I believe the announcement from Anonymous and the subsequent downtime of the Playstation network with its family of websites, shows a rather interesting result.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Trademarks

      • AutoDesk v World

        Autodesk makes CAD software. By all reports it is good software and it is widely used. The licensing fees are substantial but many who use AutoCAD feel it is money well spent. However, other businesses wishing to provide CAD software have been persecuted for trying to make use of the files produced by AutoCAD (.dwg). One aspect of this is Autodesk seeking to obtain a trademark, DWG, to have leverage over competition. USPTO turned down that request but AutoDesk has made a 412-page reply asking the application to be granted for a trademark.

Clip of the Day

GNOME 3


Credit: TinyOgg

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