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04.08.14

Phoronix Kernel-oriented News

Posted in News Roundup at 4:58 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Linux

Linux 3.15

Graphics Stack

NVIDIA

  • NVIDIA Fermi/Kepler GPUs Are The Best Bet For Ubuntu 14.04 Nouveau

    In my testing of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with the Linux 3.13 kernel and Mesa 10.1 for the open-source graphics driver stack provided by Nouveau for NVIDIA GeForce graphics hardware, only the Fermi and Kepler GPUs are running reliably. While these newer NVIDIA GPUs are running stable with Ubuntu 14.04, the performance is still a wreck due to lack of reclocking.

  • Nouveau Picks Up Slightly Better OpenGL 4.0 Support
  • Nouveau Becomes Friendly Towards Non-Root X Server

    The xf86-video-nouveau driver as of today supports server-managed file descriptors. As explained in the earlier Phoronix article, Last month we wrote about Red Hat working on a suid root wrapper for the X.org Server and other improvements being led by Red Hat’s Hans de Goede to run Xorg in more configurations without needing root support. As part of this, sever managed file descriptors (FDs) has been one of the changes needed by the X.Org graphics drivers for supporting this change of running the xorg-server without root rights. Besides needing changes to the DDX drivers and the X.Org Server (those changes are landing with X.Org Server 1.16 this summer), systemd-logind is also needed.

Benchmarks

Red Hat News: Honours, Big Partners, Expansion, and Community Projects

Posted in News Roundup at 4:37 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Awards

  • Red Hat Wins Software Vendor of the Year at Channel Middle East Awards 2014

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that it has won the prestigious Channel Middle East award for ‘Software Vendor of the Year’ 2014. The award recognizes Red Hat’s effective channel strategy and focus to empower its partners and introduce effective programs to drive growth within the channel. The Channel Middle East Awards serve as a platform for honouring companies that are top of their class when it comes to channel development and market expansion in the region.

People

Linus Torvalds vs. Kay Sievers (Red Hat)

  • Open war in Linux world

    Kay Sievers, a well-known open-source software engineer, is a key developer of systemd, a system management framework for Linux-based operating systems. Sievers was banned by kernel maintainer Linus Torvalds for failing to fix an issue that caused systemd to interact with the Linux kernel in negative ways. Specifically, the command line entry “debug” ran both the base kernel’s debugging routine and that of systemd, potentially flooding some systems.

  • [RFC PATCH] cmdline: Hide “debug” from /proc/cmdline
  • Torvalds rails at Linux developer: ‘I’m f*cking tired of your code’

    Never one to mince words, Linux kernel chief Linus Torvalds has once again handed a verbal smackdown to a Linux developer, this time for failing to address a serious bug that could prevent systems from booting.

Google

Cisco

  • Cisco edges away from VMware, tries Red Hat on for size

    Red Hat is joining in with Cisco and working with its OpFlex protocol in Netzilla’s ACI take on nearly but not quite open software-defined networking. Red Hat sees ACI involvement as a way of spreading its KVM technology and outflanking VMware.

  • Cisco Opens Up SDN Policy with OpFlex
  • Who’s up for yet another software-defined net protocol? Cisco wants to see some hands

    Cisco has unveiled an openly defined protocol for controlling network hardware, but it lacks an essential ingredient: participation from other network hardware makers.

    The new OpFlex protocol was announced by Cisco on Wednesday. It is designed to let admins transfer policy commands to any network hardware that supports OpFlex. A draft of the protocol has already been submitted to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) with the hopes of becoming a recognized standard.

Expansion

Fedora

Fedora 21

  • Fedora 21 to Feature KDE Frameworks 5 and MATE 1.8

    “KDE Frameworks 5 don’t provide any UI or applications on their own, but are meant as extensions and addons for the Qt toolkit. In future there will be various desktop shells like Plasma 2 and applications built on top of KDE Frameworks 5 providing the full-featured KDE desktop,” said Red Hat’s Jaroslav Reznik.

  • Fedora 21 Will Have Java 8, Other Additions

    Besides approving Mesa 10.1 for Fedora 20, the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee approved today several features/changes to be found in Fedora 21.

News About Debian and Its Derivatives

Posted in News Roundup at 4:36 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Package Managers

  • Synaptic Package Manager 0.81.1 Is Out

    Synaptic is a graphical package management program for apt. It provides the same features as the apt-get command-line utility with a GUI front-end based on GTK+. Most importantly, users can install, remove, upgrade and downgrade single and multiple packages.

  • Debian Developers Release APT 1.0
  • APT’s New Version

    16 years old and still ever changing: Not even the name remains stable. What used to be called “deity” was announced as “Apt”, first released as “APT” [1], shipped as “apt-get” and “apt-cache”, interpreted as “A Package Tool” and “Advanced Package Tool” and is now also available as “apt” … But the initial wisdom holds: “it’s still a good word in its own right”. And this word has surely influenced the way we manage our software on phones, servers and space stations.

  • Debian Could Get PPA Support

    “We need ensure that we cater to our users, and there’s millions of them. From those running the latest software in unstable, to people who simply want a rock solid core release. The size of Debian is increasing, and will reach a point where we’re unable to guarantee basic compatibility with other packages, or the length of time it takes to do so becomes exponentially longer, unless something changes,” said Neil McGovern.

Software

Comparison

  • Debian Vs. Ubuntu Vs. Mint 2014 – Server Reviews From ThreeHosts.com

    Threehosts.com compares Mint, Ubuntu and Debian to show which is the best Linux Distribution.

  • Debian Wheezy/Jessie/Sid Benchmarked Against Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

    All benchmarking for this article was done from the same Intel Core i7 4770K “Haswell” system with HD Graphics 4600, 16GB of RAM, and 120GB Samsung SSD 840. No hardware or settings changed between the clean installs of the different Linux distributions. The operating systems tested from this Intel Core i7 desktop were:

    - Debian 7.4 “Wheezy” stable with the Linux 3.2 kernel, GNOME Shell 3.4.2.1, Mesa 8.0.5, and GCC 4.7.

    - Debian 8.0 “Jessie” testing with the Linux 3.12 kernel, GNOME Shell 3.8.4, Mesa 9.2.2, and GCC 4.8.2.

    - Debian “Sid” unstable with the Linux 3.13 kernel on top of the Jessie changes.

    - Ubuntu 14.04 with the Linux 3.13 kernel, Unity 7.1.2 desktop, and Mesa 10.1-rc3.

Init Systems

Branches Debate

  • Should you use Debian testing or stable?
  • Debian Stable or Debian Testing: Which Linux is right for you?

    So there you have it. There is a simple summary for all of this:

    Debian Stable if your first priority is a rock-solid system, and you don’t necessarily need to support the very latest hardware. This is often the case if you are setting up a server of some sort, but it may also be true if you are going to use a bit older .system as a desktop workstation,

    Debian Testing if you want or need to have the latest hardware support, kernel dvelopments and advanced filesystems

    Derivative distributions if you want a lot of additional packages included in the base distribution, thus saving you the time and effort of installing and configuring them.

Installer

Wheezy

  • Debian 7.4 “Wheezy” Live CD Officially Released

    The Debian project has just released the Live CD version of the recently launched Debian 7.4 in several separate images with various flavors.

  • Debian’s Next Release Takes Shape
  • Debian Developers Are Preparing an LTS Version for “Wheezy”

    “At the moment it seems likely that an extended security support timespan for squeeze is possible. The plan is to go ahead, sort out the details as as it happens, and see how this works out and whether it is going to be continued with wheezy. The rough draft is that updates will be delivered via a separate suite (e.g. squeeze-lts), where everyone in the Debian keyring can upload in order to minimise bottlenecks and allow contributions by all interested parties,” said Moritz Muehlenhoff in the official mailing list.

Derivatives

  • Parsix GNU/Linux 6.0 Test 3 Is a Nice Distro Based on GNOME 3.10.3 and Debian Wheezy

    Parsix GNU/Linux, a live and installation DVD based on Debian, aiming to provide a ready-to-use, easy-to-install desktop and laptop-optimized operating system, is now at version 6.0 Test 3 and is ready for testing.

  • Tails 0.23 is out

    Tails, The Amnesic Incognito Live System, version 0.23, is out.

  • Clonezilla Live 2.2.2-32 Is the Perfect Solution for Recovery on Linux, Windows, and Mac OS

    Clonezilla Live is a Linux distribution that is designed to do bare metal backup and recovery on a wide variety of file systems and operating systems. It’s very similar to other older cloning software, such as True Image or Norton Ghost.

    The distribution is based on Debian and, as usual, the developers have upgraded the underlying GNU/Linux operating system and the release is now based on the Debian Sid repository, as of March 31, 2014.

  • Grml 2014.03 “Ponywagon” Is Based on Debian Jessie

    Grml is not a regular Linux distribution for regular users. It’s packed with a sysadmin’s favorite tools and allows admins with packages for installation, deployment and system rescue. This latest version has been dubbed Ponywagon and it comes with a couple of interesting features.

LMDE

  • Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 201403 review

    Only the Cinnamon and MATE editions of Linux Mint Debian Edition 201403 were released. If there’s going to be a KDE edition, it probably will be released in about a month. Prominent features of this release are support (in the installer) for computers with UEFI firmware and for GPT partitions. But the installer, as you will read in the next section, is the weakest part of this distribution, a problem it shares with most distributions that are based on Debian. And the cause of that weakness is that it does not use the Debian Installer. Rather, the installer is a custom application that does not belong on a modern desktop operating system.

  • Debian, Mint (LMDE), SolydX and Tanglu, compared and contrasted

    When I wrote about the Linux Mint Debian Edition Release Candidate last week, I promised to look at it in more detail when the final release was made.

Knoppix

Ubuntu Derivatives News: Trisquel, elementary OS, Ubuntu Studio, Linux Mint, Peppermint, Bodhi, and Lubuntu

Posted in News Roundup at 3:36 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Trisquel

elementary OS

Ubuntu Studio

Mint

  • Linux Mint programs for Windows XP users

    The biggest challenge for Windows XP users switching to Linux Mint is having to change the programs you’ve known and used for years. Fortunately, some programs are available on both Linux and Windows. In addition, there are Linux programs that duplicate the functionality of your favorite Windows programs.

  • Which Linux Mint apps can replace Windows XP software?

    Some Windows XP users might be considering Linux MInt as a replacement operating system. But just replacing the operating system isn’t enough, you’ll also need Linux applications that will replace the ones you used in Windows. ZDNet has a roundup of Linux Mint applications that might fill the void when making your move from Windows XP to Linux Mint.

  • Review: Linux Mint MATE 201403

    It’s been a while since I’ve done a review. In fact, it’s been a while since I’ve posted in any form, because this semester has turned out to be a lot busier than I anticipated. It likely will remain so until it ends; the only reason why I can post a review right now is because of spring break, and even that has been busy for me. Anyway, I initially wanted to do a review of Frugalware because it looked intriguing, but I couldn’t get the live USB to work. I’m reviewing this (which I had planned for later) instead. If you’ve passed by this blog, you’ve probably already seen my thoughts on Linux Mint, so I’ll skip the introduction. I tried this updated ISO file as a live USB made with MultiSystem. Follow the jump to see what it’s like. There isn’t too much that has changed since last year, so I will simply link the review from then, point out any changes, and put out any other thoughts that occur to me about this.

  • Linux Mint Might Use The Same LTS Base For Linux Mint 17, 18, 19 and 20
  • Next Three Linux Mint Releases After “Qiana” to Be Based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

    Linux Mint is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu, but that wasn’t always the case. Now, the creator of Linux Mint has just announced Linux Mint 17 “Qiana,” which will be released almost a couple of months after Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) is made available.

  • MintBox 2 mini-PC now available in Europe
  • Linux MintBox 2 sells out in European debut

    The MintBox 2 is a small form factor, fanless PC designed to run quietly at low power.

    The machine features a die-cast, solid metal case which acts as a passive heatsink and cools down components without needing any fans. While the case design adds to the weight it reduces noise, with the only sound coming from the internal 500GB SATA hard drive.

  • Linux Mint 17 to Be Called “Qiana,” Release Date Announced

    Clement Lefebvre, the creator of the Linux Mint distribution, has just announced that the next version of the Mint operating system will be called “Qiana” and it should be available by the end of May 2014.

    Linux Mint is one of the most popular Linux distributions out there and it’s only superseded by Ubuntu. Actually, Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu and makes use of its repositories, but that may not happen for very long anymore.

  • Minty Review, Some Howtos, and a Poll

Peppermint

  • Inside Peppermint Linux – An interview with Shane Remington and Kendall Weaver

    This time however I have been lucky enough to get not just one member of the team but two. I recently sent an email to the Peppermint Linux team with a series of questions and what follows are the answers provided by Shane Remington (COO of Peppermint) and Kendall Weaver (CTO of Peppermint).

  • Peppermint 4 – An OS for everyone? & The Probem of Linux Advocacy

    When I’m introducing someone to Linux, I don’t believe the “all or nothing” approach works, so if you are new to Linux and would like to see the benefits it can offer you, download and burn onto disk the latest version of Peppermint and follow these steps.

  • Peppermint 4 – Turns a netbook into a Chromebook

    As you may or may not know, I have recently acquired a HP Chromebook and my first article about the Chromebook looked at whether it was possible to run another operating system alongside ChromeOS.

    Today I am taking a look at Peppermint 4. Peppermint 4 is designed as a hybrid operating system aimed at cloud computing and also average ordinary everyday home use.

    I last reviewed Peppermint Linux in August 2012 (Peppermint 3) and my overall impression then was positive. In this review I will review Peppermint Linux from scratch and I will also look at what has changed since version 3 to show how Peppermint has moved on.

  • Peppermint introduces cloud-based open source desktop to Africa

    Open source makes a lot of sense in rural areas and in third world countries. Lightweight and open source systems that are easy to use, and which allow normal users to become power users and contribute back to the open source community, can be ideal for countries like Cameroon, located in middle Africa.

  • Open source opening educational doors in Appalachia [also from OpenSource.com]

    As the program has grown over the past years, the cost of licensing for the video editing software has grown as well, beyond the operating budget of the organization. Faced with this challenge, PAGE turned to open source technology. Elizabeth McIntosh, a member of the Steering Committee for PAGE, led the charge. “I’d heard about the open source movement through my friendship with Brendan Szulik at Duke, and thought it might be able to help us.” PAGE participants historically used Final Cut Pro to document and edit their digital stories, but this year will use open source alternatives Kdenlive and Blender. Both offer a good user experience, without the heavy scale-up costs associated with non open-source solutions. The ability to rapidly learn the technology and to use it as the program continues to grow are the largest benefits.

Bodhi

  • Introducing eppDater – GUI for Apt-Get Package Updates

    One of the things I am working on for our Bodhi 3.0.0 release this summer is a simple GUI system update tool written in Elementary and the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries. Today I would like to share an early version of this tool I am calling eepDater (pronounced epp-date-er), which is written in python utilizing the EFLs.

  • Bodhi Linux 3.0.0 Alpha Release

    As promised I’ve put together our first Bodhi Linux disc that is built on top of the upcoming Ubuntu 14.04 release. Keep in mind this is a very early image not intended for production machines. There will be issues.

Lubuntu

Ubuntu News: Community Management, Convergence, Criticism, and Imminent LTS Release

Posted in News Roundup at 3:30 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Community

Mobile

  • Microsoft Copies Canonical’s Convergence Idea, Cripples It

    Canonical has been working on its vision of complete OS convergence for quite a while now and the first results have already appeared, but it seems that Microsoft is also trying to do the same and it has called it Universal Apps.

  • ​10 reasons why the Ubuntu Phone should be your next mobile device

    The Ubuntu Phone is set to launch this year. With more and more major players getting on board as hardware suppliers, you can bet the darling of Linux mobility will slowly find its way into every market imaginable. The big question mark is the US market. With Android and IOS having a stranglehold on US customers, can this new mobile platform make it? I firmly believe that the Ubuntu Phone not only can be your next mobile device, it should be. I’ll give you 10 reasons why.

  • New Ubuntu Touch App Switcher Looks Awesome

Server

  • Drag-and-Drop Cloud Orchestration with Ubuntu Juju

    No, they’re not kidding. As Sally Radwan, Canonical’s cloud product marketing manager, recently explained, “A few years ago, the cloud team at Canonical decided that the future of cloud computing lies not only in what clouds are built on, but what runs on it, and how quickly, securely, and efficiently those services can be managed. This is when Juju was born; our service orchestration tool built for the cloud and inspired by the way IT architects visualize their infrastructure: boxes representing services, connected by lines representing interfaces or relationships. Juju’s GUI simplifies searching, dragging and dropping a ‘Charm’ into a canvas to deploy services instantly.”

Integration

  • Ubuntu Complete Convergence Demonstrated with the Weather App

    “An example of Ubuntu convergence in action. Here you see the Weather Channel powered Ubuntu weather app first the size of a phone, then a tablet, then desktop, and the content all re-aligns to make the very best use of the space. We then shrink the app back down and everything continues to adjust. All from a single code base,” wrote Jono Bacon on Google+.

  • Ubuntu in your browser

    I remember, when the good folks at Canonical introduced the Ubuntu tour feature on their website, I wished for there to be a way to access my Ubuntu desktop via a browser for real. Although it is possible to use VNC clients to remotely access your Ubuntu desktop from anywhere including your Android phone, it would be sure good to be able to access your desktop from any computing device without having to install a client side application.

Ubuntu One

Criticism

  • Criticism Towards Canonical Is Mostly About FUD and Hidden Interests

    Canonical got a lot of flak over the years for the decisions regarding its Ubuntu operating system, some of them justified, but most were just unfair. The truth is not in the middle as you might think because there are much bigger interests at play.

  • Is Canonical as arrogant as Apple?

    Canonical has had a rocky relationship at times with the rest of the open source community. The company has sometimes gone in its own direction and rather blithely disregarded criticism from others in free software. Datamation takes a look at the root of Canonical’s problem and thinks that it’s more about relationships than it is about specific software issues.

Ubuntu 14.04

KDE and Qt News: KDE Frameworks 5, Plasma Next, Qt Creator 3.1, KDE Commits

Posted in News Roundup at 3:23 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

KDE Frameworks 5

Plasma

  • Plasma Next News: Proposed Plasma Experience Dialog

    A new dialog for choosing the Plasma Next look and feel has been proposed in a blog post by Thomas Pfeiffer, member of the KDE community and creator of the KDE Human Interface Guidelines.

  • Plasma Next Alpha

    This week, as well as being a centrefold model in a tabloid rag, another of my life ambitions came true when I had the glory of being the release dude. Plasma 2014.6 is the first version of Plasma using KDE Frameworks 5 and the developers are hard at work coding on it. The release schedule required an Alpha so I was tasked with working out how to release some tars.

  • KDE: Monday Report #10

    In which we mention the recent Alpha, gush about Community Design its problems and gains. Talk about whats coming for Plasma Next AND hand out freebee’s…

  • KDE Releases Alpha Version of Next-gen Plasma Workspace

    KDE today releases the first Alpha version of the next-generation Plasma workspace. This kicks off the public testing phase for the next iteration of the popular Free software workspace, code-named “Plasma Next” (referring to the ‘next’ Plasma release-see below “A note on versioning and naming”). Plasma Next is built using QML and runs on top of a fully hardware-accelerated graphics stack using Qt 5, QtQuick 2 and an OpenGL(-ES) scenegraph. Plasma Next provides a core desktop experience that will be easy and familiar for current users of KDE workspaces or alternative Free Software or proprietary offerings. Plasma Next is planned to be released as 2014.6 on the 17th of June.

Qt

  • Qt on Android Episode 4

    After we’ve learned how to set up the development environment and how to use Qt on Android, it’s time to move forward and in this article we are going to learn about different deployment systems and how to sign the package in order to publish it in any Android markets.

  • Qt Creator 3.1 RC1 Released, Qt 5.3 Advances

    Digia is working hard and fast to get the next version of the Qt5 tool-kit out the door along with their Qt Creator integrated development environment.

  • Qt Creator 3.1 RC1 Now Ready for Testing

    Qt Creator, a cross-platform IDE (integrated development environment) tailored to the needs of Qt developers and part of the Qt Project, has just reached version 3.1 RC1 and is now available for download and testing.

Development

Misc.

  • Interview with Aaron Seigo About Bodega Appstore

    The most important thing is of course the ‘digital asset’ term. That can be anything. For example, applications. Applications can be self contained – think how android does its APK files. Of course, things on Linux are often more complicated. Apache isn’t exactly a self-contained thing. And look further – perl, php, ruby, they all have their own addons like gems that need managing. Generalizing further, there are manuals. And books in general. Music, movies, pictures, you can go on.

  • Calligra 2.8 Is Too Sweet for Words Alone

    Calligra Suite is a massive collection of office writing and editing applications with a database creator and a few other tools added to the mix. Several of the nine modules go well beyond the tool sets found in other office packages. The big advantage to Calligra is that development has continued. Similar office suites for Linux have stalled or forked without much to distinguish one from another.

  • Krita on Steam – Early Access Now Available

    A few days ago I overviewed Calligra, the KDE office suite, which also includes Krita, the powerful image editing tool. Although I’ve mentioned it as being free, it looks like Krita Gemini, which is the name by which Krita goes on Steam, actually costs $22.99, covering the work needed to build, release and maintain it on Steam.

04.07.14

Links: Privacy Erosion and Other Technological Erosions of Rights

Posted in News Roundup at 7:52 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

With technological transitions come the powers to emancipate or to oppress

Privacy

NSA/GCHQ

Germany

Europe

  • US Criticises European Anti-Spying Internet Proposals
  • A difficult breakup between US, internet

    It could be a difficult breakup between the US government and the internet.

    A plan unveiled last month would see the US relinquish its key oversight role for the internet, handing that over to “the global multistakeholder community”.

    US officials say the move is part of a longstanding effort to privatise the technical oversight of the internet.

  • US claims EU plans to build ring-fenced network may ‘break global trade rules’

    European Union plans to build a separate communications network to prevent data from passing over US networks is being opposed by the US, which claims that it would breach international trade laws.

    The opposition of the US to the plans comes at a delicate stage of negotiation between the US and EU over a trade treaty that would give more power to multinational organisations – including communications companies – to sue national governments over claimed breaches of trade rules.

Snowden

CIA

  • Former CIA Director Calls Female Senator Too ‘Emotional’ On Torture Report

    Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) has chaired the Senate’s Intelligence Committee for five years. So when she suggested last month that investigators should make public a report on the U.S.’s interrogation techniques because it would “ensure that an un-American, brutal program of detention and interrogation will never again be considered or permitted,” one might have seen it as the strong words and fair assessment of a person who has deep experience on the issue.

  • Hayden Faults Administration, Not CIA, on Benghazi Talking Points

    Former deputy CIA director Michael Morell told the House Intelligence Committee this week that despite reports from the chief of station in Libya that no protests occurred outside the American diplomatic facility in Benghazi prior to the September 11, 2012, terrorist attack on it, he edited the administration’s talking points to include references to such protests. His CIA analysts in Washington believed they had occurred, and the station chief, after all, was 500 miles away in Tripoli.

  • When the barrels of guns are lifted, truth vanishes – Kristinn Hrafnsson

    For the public revelations that the CIA and NSA were spying on the committee that was supposed to have oversight of their activities should be of great concern as it is a major breakdown in the system of checks and balances that should be inherently present in a healthy democracy. Despite all of the Snowden revelations there is also no indication that the NSA has changed its practices or made changes to how they carry out operations. By not publishing information that the public has the right to know the media has also failed and according to WikiLeaks spokesman Kristinn Hrafnsson, it is: “… an absolutely disgusting break with all the basic principles of journalism that I know of. And they claim that this is done upon the request of the US authorities for the security concerns. That is not acceptable.” Unfortunately today, he says: “We have submissive and lame editorial boards that will simply do as they are told.”

Venezuela, Cuba

  • Low Intensity War Challenges National Independence of Venezuela

    Over the past six weeks the so called salida ya [exit now] strategy launched by the Venezuelan opposition has developed, in part, into a low intensity war against the democratically elected government of President Nicolas Maduro. This essay will examine two strategic objectives of the Bolivarian revolution that serve as pillars of resistance to the anti-democratic elements of the counter revolution: the struggle to preserve national independence and the campaign to develop and expand the communal structures that are the organized expressions of popular power.

  • Report: US Agency Created ‘Cuban Twitter’ To Foster Dissent

Syria

Torture

Drones

Racism

Censorship

Chromebooks News: Chromebooks Gain at Microsoft’s Expense, Chromebooks for $99 Today at Best Buy (When Trading in Windows XP System)

Posted in News Roundup at 4:14 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

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