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11.14.13

Applications and Instructionals: November 14th

Posted in News Roundup at 11:56 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

11.13.13

Applications and Instructionals: November 2013

Posted in News Roundup at 6:22 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Canonical/Ubuntu News for November

Posted in News Roundup at 6:14 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • Ubuntu’s Saucy Salamander is a Slick but Spiritless Upgrade

    Ubuntu 13.10′s new Scopes feature is fed by heuristics to offer matches to your accumulated browsing and search requests gleaned from Github, reddit, Wikipedia, Flickr, Google News, The Weather Channel and Yelp. I find this level of search invasion too intrusive. If I wanted that approach to marketing, I would just bypass Ubuntu completely and grab a Kindle or rely more fully on the Google search engine.

  • Ubuntu 13.10: A desktop tour (Slideshow)

    The most new-user friendly of all Linux desktop distributions, Ubuntu has a new, better release: Ubuntu 13.10, Saucy Salamander.

  • Mark Shuttleworth Apologizes for the Trademark Infringement Letter Sent to Fixubuntu.com
  • Mark Shuttleworth Regrets the “Tea Party” Remarks and Other Canonical Mistakes
  • Mark Shuttleworth Sends Out Apologies
  • Ubuntu 13.10 – meeting the Saucy Salamander

    Looking back on my time with Kubuntu 13.10 the thing which stood out the most was that not much stood out. Apart from having some network issues which slowed things down during my first installation attempt, my time with the distribution was quite good. The installer is nicely laid out, the KDE 4.11 desktop is quite polished, providing a clean, feature-rich environment. I like that Kubuntu comes with a guest account for those odd times people wish to borrow my computer. I’m also happy to see there is an option in the KDE System Settings panel to turn off the guest account for people who see the guest account as a security concern. The new user account manager is slick and easy to use, I’m quite happy to see it included in this release. So far I’m tentatively happy with the new Discover software manager. It looks pretty and it seems to work well enough. The software manager’s interface is a little busy for my taste, but otherwise I have no complaints. I think most people will take to it and those who don’t can fall back on the older package manager. Overall, Kubuntu 13.10 feels like a stable, mature release that has some nice new features, but nothing ground shaking that would put off existing users. I’m actually sorry this version is not a long-term support release and will only receive security updates for nine months, the short support cycle seems to be the only weak point in an otherwise excellent desktop operating system.

  • A review of “Instant Ubuntu”

    I try to write articles for the readers on this site that I hope they will find useful and so I agreed to write the review on the basis that if it is a great book then I can share that knowledge and if it isn’t then I can also share that knowledge.

  • Install Everpad 2.5.6 in Ubuntu 13.10
  • Install Cairo Dock 3.3.2 in Ubuntu 13.10
  • Valve’s SteamOS will not be based on Ubuntu

    Today in Open Source: SteamOS will not be based on Ubuntu. Plus: Metro Last Light out for Linux, and the Tuxmachines site has been sold

    [...]

    Tuxmachines Site Sold
    Foss Force is reporting that the Tuxmachines site has been sold. Here it is in case you missed it last month.

    One of the most popular Linux sites, Tuxmachines.org, announced on October 28th that it has been tentatively sold for $1,000.

    When Ms. Linton, who has also been involved with DistroWatch, started Tuxmachines it quickly grew to be an important destination on news about Linux and other open source projects.

    More at Foss Force

    It’s sad that the site is changing hands, but hopefully the new owner will keep it going for a long, long time.

  • Installation and disk partitioning guide for Ubuntu 13.10
  • How-to configure keyboard layouts in Ubuntu Unity (video)
  • Install Ubuntu 13.10 using a USB key from Window or another Linux distribution

    A USB key or thumb drive or USB stick is the best device to use in installing your favorite Linux distribution. It’s not just because it’s reusable forever (unless you mess it up), but the system runs much faster than if you used a CD or DVD disc for installation.

  • Grsync : Graphical rsync backup tool on Ubuntu ( 12.10 / 13.04 / 13.10)

    grsync is a graphical rsync tool in ubuntu linux. It provides a graphical user interface to backup or sync important files & directories to remote machine or in local machine using rsync. It currently supports only a limited set of the most important rsync features, but can be used effectively for local directory synchronization.

  • Flavours and Variants

    • Pear OS 8 Has Been Officially Released

      The highly anticipated Pear OS 8 Linux distribution has been officially released today, November 9, by David Tavares, the father of the Pear Linux Project.

      There’s no official announcement for Pear OS 8, but we can tell you that the distribution boasts a new iOS 7 design, created by Ivan Matias Suarez. Moreover, the brand-new Pear OS 8 distribution features a set of pre-installed applications, including Pear Cloud, Clean My Pear 2, MyPear 6, as well as more than 3,000 downloadable packages from its generous software repository.

    • Pear OS 8 Could Arrive for Microsoft Surface Tablet

      David Tavares, father of the Pear Linux project, has just announced that he started a crowdfunding campaign for a new project, called Pear OS 8 Tablet Edition, a version of the Pear OS 8 Linux operating system for the Microsoft Surface tablet.

    • Taming The Iguana…..

      So we found ourselves on unsure footing. While I am sure that the developers of Mint and Zorin are confident in their longevity within the the community…..

      It’s simply a risk we cannot take. They are both some of the best examples of what Linux is and should be on the desktop. Both of these distributions will be used in our Reglue computers, as each of them has a specified purpose, depending on the power and size of the computer being installed.

11.07.13

Embedded/Devices Linux News for October-November 2013

Posted in News Roundup at 6:35 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • Qseven COM runs Linux on AMD G-Series SoC

    Hectronic will soon begin sampling a Linux-compatible Qseven computer-on-module based on AMD’s dual-core, 1GHz G-Series SoC. Claimed as the first Qseven COM to use the new AMD SoC, the H6069 is equipped with 2GB of soldered DDR3 RAM and an optional 32GB SSD, and features dual display support, 12 Watt power consumption, and optional industrial temperature range operation.

  • Setting up a Raspberry Pi as a home server
  • ARM/FPGA hybrid SoC taps Cortex-A53, 14nm process
  • Your car is about to go open source

    Automakers want to standardize on a Linux-based OS that would make vehicle infotainment systems act more like smartphones

  • Automotive-oriented hypervisor taps ARM TrustZone
  • AMD Gizmo SBC gains open source bootloader

    Sage Electronic Engineering, has released a free board support package for AMD’s community-backed Gizmo SBC equipped with the open source, Coreboot-based SageBIOS bootloader. SageBIOS BSP for Gizmo further supports the $189, G-Series-based Gizmo board with “free payloads and drivers to enable peripherals,” says the company.

  • Qt embedded GUI supports Android and Linux

    Digia announced an Android and Linux-targeted embedded version of its cross-platform Qt GUI framework called Qt Enterprise Embedded that combines a Qt Creator based IDE with a new embedded Boot to Qt stack. The Digia-backed Qt project also released the beta of Qt 5.2 with a new Scene Graphic renderer and the first production-ready support for Android and iOS.

  • Wind River Linux adds 64-bit ARM, adopts Yocto 1.5

    Wind River announced Wind River Linux 6, featuring Yocto Project 1.5 Linux kernel and toolchain, and expanded multi-architecture hardware support including 64-bit ARMv8. Wind River also announced a faster new Yocto-compatible version of its carrier-grade Wind River Open Virtualization software.

  • Yocto Project Adds Mac and Windows Cross-Compiler for Intel’s Linux-Based Galileo Board

    But the less obvious engineering feat was achieving cross compatibility between the board’s custom Linux OS and Arduino’s application development software necessary to port C code to the device from Windows and Mac, as well as Linux.

  • 3 Embedded Linux Projects Built With the Yocto Project

    In August Intel launched the Yocto Project Innovation Challenge to help showcase developers who are building – or simply imagining — Yocto-based embedded Linux applications and devices.

  • Multi-core MIPS SoCs add Linux support

    Wind River announced Wind River Linux support for Cavium’s newly shipping Octeon III system-on-chips. Aimed at high-end networking applications, the 28nm-fabricated Octeon III SoCs offer as many as 48 MIPS64 cores clocked up to 2.5GHz, support MIPSr5 architecture features like hardware virtualization, and integrate accelerators for deep packet inspection (DPI), packet processing, security, search, and QoS.

  • Trio of Bay Trail-I boards includes Nano-ITX SBC

    Portwell announced a computer-on-module along with a pair of single-board computers built around Intel’s new embedded-specific Atom E3800 (Bay Trail-I) system-on-chips. The three Linux-friendly boards include a Type 6 COM Express Compact COM, a Mini-ITX style embedded motherboard, and an SBC implemented in the rarely seen Nano-ITX form factor.

  • How to attend a robotics show robotically

    Suitable Technologies is offering $50 rentals of its “Beam” mobile telepresence robot, so 50 robotics enthusiasts can remotely attend the RoboBusiness conference in Santa Clara, Calif. on Oct. 23-25. The Ubuntu- and ROS-based Beam will be available to the first 50 applicants, letting them explore the show at up to 1.5 meters/sec and interact with others via video conferencing.

  • Tiny SBC runs Linux on 2GHz TI OMAP SoC

    ISEE announced a highly compact single board computer powered by a 2GHz dual-core Cortex-A15 based Texas Instruments OMAP5432 system-on-chip. The IGEPv5 SBC ships with a Yocto-built Linux stack, but also supports Android, and is packed with I/O including five USB ports, mSATA, microSD, HDMI, DisplayPort, audio in/out, gigabit Ethernet, WiFi and Bluetooth wireless, and more.

  • PicUntu 4.5 installer loads Ubuntu onto Rockchip RK3188 devices
  • 3 Embedded Linux Projects Built With the Yocto Project

    In August Intel launched the Yocto Project Innovation Challenge to help showcase developers who are building – or simply imagining — Yocto-based embedded Linux applications and devices.

10.28.13

Late October Links/News About Canonical, Ubuntu, and Derivatives

Posted in News Roundup at 10:07 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • Canonical/Ubuntu

    • PHP Attacked, the Shuttleworth Tea Party & More…

      It seem that many of Ubuntu’s detractors became upset at the reference to “the Open Source Tea Party.” My gawd, it was just a joke–and to make sure everyone knew he was just kidding, he followed it with a winky emoticon.

    • GIMP 2.9 (2.10 Development Builds) Available In New PPA For Ubuntu 13.10

      Thorsten Stettin has created a new PPA for Ubuntu / Linux Mint users who want to use the latest GIMP 2.9 development builds.

    • Ubuntu 13.10 Finally Released, Big Yawner

      Ubuntu 13.10 is officially released. Of course, it’s been in the news so much that the official announcement today feels like old news. But at least news of 14.04 will replace 13.10 next week. Until then, though, Ubuntu 13.10 is released for “Desktop, Server, Cloud, Phone, and Core products.”

    • Why system76 always ships the newest ubuntu
    • Ubuntu races toward convergence

      Canonical is moving ahead toward the convergence of mobile phone and desktop operating systems with the launch of Ubuntu 13.10 on Thursday.

    • Convergence In The Cloud

      Many of you will have heard about Ubuntu’s convergence goals on the client side — running a single, consistent code-base and experience that adapts to phones, desktops, tablets, and TVs…but are you aware of our convergence on the cloud?

    • Interesting facts about Ubuntu Linux

      Since the first release nine years ago today, Ubuntu Linux has been powering millions of PCs around the world. Love it or hate it, the Ubuntu project has made a great stride for the overall betterment of Linux, and no one can deny that. As its founder Mark Shuttleworth puts it, Ubuntu is all about total commitment to everyday users, making things “just work” for them.

      Celebrating its 9th birthday today, I am going to share interesting facts and history behind Ubuntu Linux.

    • 10 best features of Ubuntu 13.10

      Jack Wallen lists the 10 features that make Saucy Salamander a more polished Ubuntu distribution.

    • Taking Saucy Salamander for a spin

      On Thursday 17 October last week the latest release of Ubuntu 13.10- christened Saucy Salamander was released. The distribution- especially this current release- has been rocked by several controversies and has since dropped to number 3 on distrowatch. It however remains a veritable force to reckon with in the Linuxsphere where it has spawned a host of derivative distros such as the number one ranked Linux Mint. Countless blogs have been written on how to install it. I am here to offer some local tweaks to those guides.

    • Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Opens For Development

      Things won’t get off to a rollicking start just yet. The early part of every development cycle is spent getting things up-to-date by syncing the latest versions of key development packages.

    • Happy Birthday, Ubuntu 4.10 Warty Warthog

      The first version of Ubuntu 4.10, Warty Warthog, was released on October 20, 2004, nine years ago, marking the beginning of a great journey.

    • Reflections On Ubuntu 13.10
    • Flavours and Variants

      • Xubuntu 13.10
      • Ubuntu Studio 13.10
      • Q&A: Clement Lefebvre: The man behind Linux Mint

        I got a Masters in Computer Sciences from the University of South Paris in 2001. I was mostly interested in game development, but as it happened, I worked for banks, telecom and software companies in France and in Ireland. I had various job titles (web developer, IT engineer, software developer, J2EE architect), and in one company I was teaching rather than coding, but most of time my job was to design and to develop software or web applications.

10.24.13

Canonical/Ubuntu-Related Links for September-October 2013

Posted in News Roundup at 4:22 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • Canonical/Ubuntu

    • The state of XMir
    • More FUD Bites The Dust

      Remember the “GNU/Linux costs more…” FUD from M$ and sycophants? Here’s what the French National Police found:
      “Part of the TCO reduction comes in upfront costs: savings on licences and cost of licence access, and, when it comes to hardware purchasing, the force can buy desktops without an OS already installed, saving €100 or so per PC.

      However, the savings aren’t just from software licences costs: the change has also meant a reduction in local tech support needed, while Canonical charges the organisation €1 per machine per year to provide support.”

    • Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) review: Smart Scopes in, Mir out

      With the Mir display server failing to make the cut, Ubuntu 13.10, rather than being a stepping-stone on the way to form-factor convergence with 14.04, seems more like an obligatory release.

    • Quantal, raring, saucy…

      Saucy, now officially known as Ubuntu 13.10, is a wonderful achievement by a very large and diverse collection of teams and individuals. Each of us is motivated by something different – in fact, we might have very different visions of what the ideal desktop looks like or what the default set of applications should be. But we manage, in the spirit of ubuntu, to work together to make something wonderful like 13.10, which serves the needs and goals of a very large number of people and communities.

    • Ubuntu 13.10 review: The Linux OS of the future remains a year away

      As the user types a search query in the Dash, the partial query is transmitted to Canonical’s servers, which will analyze the input and decide what to present. The new backend uses a number of heuristics to attempt to find the most relevant results to send back to the user. Some of the Internet sources that the new backend can tap include Github, reddit, Wikipedia, Flickr, Google News, The Weather Channel, and Yelp.

    • Ubuntu 13.10 ‘Saucy Salamander’ Final has been released! | Installation Instructions With Screenshots

      Finally, the most expected distribution in Linux World, Ubuntu 13.10 ‘Saucy Salamander’ final has been released, there is no official release announcement yet, but the download page of Saucy has been updated with the final packages. Just like most of you, We also expected it very long. This awesome distribution has come with plenty of new features and improvements.

    • Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander
    • Canonical steals Windows 8.1′s thunder with Ubuntu 13.10 release

      LINUX DISTRIBUTOR Canonical has announced its free Ubuntu 13.10 Linux operating system (OS) release, which is available for both PCs and smartphones from today.

    • Download Ubuntu 13.10 Manual Ahead of Official Release
    • Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux 13.10 Brings Few Changes to Desktop
    • Ubuntu 13.10: OpenStack Havana Support, Cloud, Server Updates

      Ubuntu 13.10 for servers and the cloud will feature OpenStack Havana, new deployment tools and other updates aimed at enhancing the scalability of the Linux-based operating system.

    • Ubuntu 13.10: It just works

      Find out why Jack Wallen thinks that Ubuntu 13.10 is a solid, reliable platform that just works. Do you agree?

    • Ubuntu Phone 13.10: The Runway Is Clear For Mir

      While the Ubuntu 13.10 release is just over one week away, Mir still hasn’t officially landed in the Ubuntu Phone images as the new display server. There’s been some bugs but it looks like it will now be landing rather soon.

    • Ubuntu Spotted on Merc’s Driverless Research Car [Video]

      Google’s now-famous driverless cars initiative seems to have kick-started a new kind of war. Various manufacturers are fighting tooth and nail to bring the most advanced driverless car technology to the market as fast as they can. But what’s even more intriguing to me was the presence of Ubuntu, first on Google’s driverless cars, and now here, on this Mercedes-Benz driverless research car. Autonomous long-distance drive technology demonstration on a Merc.

    • Canonical Gears Up to Release Ubuntu 13.10

      Canonical announced that the next version of Ubuntu for server and cloud environments will be released on 17 October.

    • Canonical’s Saucy Salamander gives Ubuntu some speed

      Canonical continues to make the Ubuntu server edition speedier and more versatile in cloud environments.

    • Ubuntu 13.10 Review: A great Linux desktop gets better

      Ubuntu 13.10 may not be the most exciting desktop Linux, but it is very solid and contains many useful new features.

    • Mir Finally Turned On For Ubuntu Touch 13.10

      After a few days of wrangling, the very latest Ubuntu Touch images have the Mir Display Server replacing Android’s SurfaceFlinger.

    • Top Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 13.10 ‘Saucy Salamander’
    • Ubuntu 13.10 vs. Ubuntu 13.04: Reasons to Upgrade

      Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) is scheduled for launch on October 17, but users of the previous operating systems from Canonical are wondering why they should upgrade at all, given the fact that the new one doesn’t seem to have too many features.

    • Inside the Ubuntu 13.10 Linux ‘Saucy Salamander’ Linux Desktop

      The open-source Ubuntu Linux operating system, which in recent years has become one of the most popular distributions, is about to get a major update. On Oct. 17, Canonical, the lead commercial sponsor behind the Ubuntu project, will release Ubuntu 13.10, also referred to as the “Saucy Salamander,” with new desktop, server and cloud-facing features. On the desktop, the Saucy Salamander does not mark a dramatic visual departure from its predecessor, Ubuntu 13.04, also known as the “Raring Ringtail.” The 13.10 desktop does, however, benefit from a new Smart Scopes feature, which provides a unified search capability across local and network drives, as well search results from other user-definable online locations. With the Saucy Salamander, Ubuntu has also merged security and privacy settings into one system, making it easier to control and manage. In addition, the new Ubuntu release benefits from the recent Linux 3.11 kernel, providing improved performance and stability. For cloud users, Ubuntu 13.10 includes the latest OpenStack Havana release, as well as improvements to the Ubuntu Juju service orchestration system. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the features packed into the Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander release.

    • Would It Be a Disaster If Ubuntu Ceased to Exist?

      Over the past few years Ubuntu has become somewhat divided from the rest of the Linux community and it could easily be renamed “Linux Marmite,” as you either love it or hate it.

    • Ubuntu, Knee-Deep in the Big Muddy

      Criticism gives you two main choices: either you can learn from it, or ignore it and keep on with what you are doing. Sadly, with the introduction of Smart Scopes on to the dash, Ubuntu 13.10 is mostly opting to ignore criticism, pushing ahead with changes that few seem to want and violating Unity’s original design principles in favor of contradictory new ones.

    • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 337

      Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #337 for the week September 30 – October 6, 2013, and the full version is available here.

    • Karma Machine: An Example of Ubuntu App Convergence
    • Meet Ubuntu Classic Distro, Ubuntu 13.04 Reimagined Without Unity – Screenshot Tour

      Users who wanted Ubuntu without Unity can now try a new distribution called Ubuntu Classic that provides all the features, without any of the Unity components.

    • XMir update for Ubuntu 13.10

      While we are on track to successfully deliver Mir for Ubuntu on smartphones, we are unfortunately not going to be able to deliver Mir + XMir + Unity 7 as the default experience on the desktop.

    • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 336
    • Ubuntu pre-installed and in retail worldwide

      In the early days of Ubuntu, it was always a challenge to promote an OS that was so new and little known to the market; we were often asked ‘Ubun what…?”! Over the years, Canonical has grown rapidly, has innovated even faster and the community has spread the word all across the globe. Today, with over 25 million users, Ubuntu is now a safe and perfect choice for customer, offering a stylish and intuitive interface that is fast, secure.

    • Ubuntu 13.10 final beta: Ubuntu for smartphones is almost here

      There are lots of interesting things ahead for Ubuntu desktop users in the next release, but what’s really going to be important is how well Ubuntu does on the smartphone.

    • Re-Energizing LoCo Teams

      I believe that in the entire history of Ubuntu we are at the most exciting time we have ever experienced.

    • Installing Ubuntu
    • GLAMOR Acceleration Makes It Into Ubuntu 13.10

      One week after writing about the sad state of RadeonSI / GLAMOR support in Ubuntu 13.10, the GLAMOR EGL library has made it through the Saucy Salamander’s queue and landed into the archive for next month’s Ubuntu 13.10 release.

    • How to get the best out of Ubuntu on Nexus 7

      I have been using Ubuntu Touch 13.10 as a daily driver on my Nexus 7 for about two and a half months now. There are a few minor hiccups and setbacks, but I can honestly say that it has improved drastically from the original MWC Demo.

    • Building an Ubuntu App Developer Advocacy Community

      I have talked in the past about how critical I feel app developers are to the Ubuntu convergence story. If developers can go from idea to implementation to publishing quickly and easily, it will make the overall Ubuntu platform more attractive and featureful for users, partners, OEMs, carriers and more.

    • Powerful New Ubuntu PC Unveiled By System76

      A powerful new Ubuntu PC has been revealed by Linux computer company System76.

    • Book review: The Official Ubuntu Server Book (3rd edition)

      All in all, I was very happy with the book. It takes some difficult subjects and boils them down nicely, giving the reader a way to quickly get services up and running. The miscellaneous tips provided are quite useful and will probably save readers a good deal of time over the course of a career. Server administration sometimes comes across as a dark art and it is nice to see a book which so thoroughly shines a light onto the subject. Whether you are studying to become a system administrator or just looking to set up a server at home to handle personal e-mail, I think this is a good text to get newcomers started.

    • Ubuntu 13.10, Ubuntu Touch Launch Date: Oct. 17

      Will Canonical offerings for PCs, smartphones, tablets catch on?

    • Lightweight Ubuntu Software Center Alternative `AppGrid` Now Available For Ubuntu 12.04, 12.10 and 13.10

      AppGrid, the lightweight (but proprietary) Ubuntu Software Center alternative which we covered recently, was updated yesterday and it should now work on Ubuntu 12.04, 12.10 and 13.10. Initially, the application was only available for Ubuntu 13.04.

    • Ubuntu on Windows Azure gets Juju DevOps

      Want a really easy orchestration tool for Ubuntu on Microsoft’s Azure cloud? It’s here now with Ubuntu Juju.

    • Playing with Coder (on Ubuntu)
    • Full Circle Magazine #77 has arrived!

      Full Circle – the independent magazine for the Ubuntu Linux community
      are proud to announce the release of our seventy seventh issue.

    • Ubuntu Linux 13.10 Preview: Docking With Mir

      Ubuntu continues to push the envelope and aggravate the community with each new release. In this newest version, there aren’t any “Unity” type changes to the UI, but one of the more controversial changes in recent memory is just about ready for prime time as they change the underlying Window Manager to “Mir”. Let’s take a quick look at that and some of the other changes from version 13.04 to 13.10.

    • Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) Final Beta released

      The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the final beta release of Ubuntu 13.10 Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core products.

    • Ubuntu 13.10 Beta Review

      The distro before the LTS comes with some new toys in the shape of Canonical’s display server Mir. Is it a sign of good things to come?

    • Ubuntu 13.10 Beta Downloads Go Live – This Is What’s New

      The final beta of Ubuntu 13.10 has been made available for download.

    • Ubuntu 13.04 vs. Ubuntu 13.10 In A VMware VM

      After showing improved performance with the new VMware Fusio 6, are there any upgrades in moving virtual machines from Ubuntu 13.04 to the soon-to-be-released Ubuntu 13.10?

      As the latest Phoronix benchmarks to deliver, after I finished that VMware Fusion 6.0.0 testing on Ubuntu 13.04 from the Haswell-based MacBook Air system, I upgraded to Ubuntu 13.10 to see if there’s any performance improvements to find with the 13.10 “Saucy Salamander” packages over 13.04 stable.

    • Ubuntu 13.10 “Saucy Salamander” screen shot preview

      Ubuntu 13.10 , code-named Saucy Salamander, is set to hit a download mirror near you sometime next month. But that won’t happen until major bugs have been fixed.

    • Ubuntu GNOME 13.10 Will Not Include GNOME 3.10

      Along with the release of Ubuntu 13.10 Final Beta, Canonical also unveiled the second and final Beta version for the upcoming Ubuntu GNOME 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) Linux operating system.

    • Ubuntu 13.10: Meet the Linux distro with a bizarre Britney Spears fixation

      On the surface, based on the second beta just released, Ubuntu 13.10 is shaping up to be a solid, if slightly dull, Linux distro.

    • PicUntu 4.4.3 brings Ubuntu Linux to devices with RK3188 quad-core chips

      Have an Android tablet or TV box with a Rockchip RK3188 processor, and wish it ran a desktop operating system rather than a mobile OS? A new build of PicUntu is available, bringing the full Ubuntu Linux experience to devices with RK3188 processors.

    • Xubuntu 13.10 Beta 1 Screenshot Tour
    • Ubuntu GNOME 13.10 Beta 1 Screenshot Tour
    • The Elementary Desktop

      Dobbie03 submitted his desktop to our Desktop Showcase, which is what you should do if you want your desktop featured here! All you have to do is post a nice big screenshot of your work to your kinja blog (the one that came with your commenter account), and include links to the wallpaper, widgets, skins, and tools you used to customize it!

    • Canonical Says It’s Not Ignoring Ubuntu Desktop Because of Ubuntu Touch

      Canonical has assured its community that the Ubuntu desktop version is not lagging behind the Ubuntu Touch and that they are just aiming towards complete convergence.

    • Thoughts on Mir and the community

      I, for one, am looking forward to comparing Wayland, Mir and X over the coming year to see which one best serves my needs. When we have options we all win.

    • Who is the Ubuntu Community Council?

      As we come up on just a few more days left to submit nominations for the Ubuntu Community Council, I thought I’d take a few minutes to write about my experiences on the council for the past 4 years (and 2 more if you’ll have me!) and why I highly encourage others to nominate themselves of folks in the community who they feel are qualified.

    • Flavours and Variants

      • Elementary OS 0.2 Luna – now that’s more like it1

        Elementary OS 0.2 Luna is a linux distro that has become quite popular recently. It is based on Ubuntu and designed to look somewhat like a mac. There have been many attempts to get a mac like feel on the linux desktop and Pear OS is the most significant one. However all of them fall short somewhere or the other.

      • And the winner is…

        1. Muelle by Manuel Puentes with 1261 Votes (15%)
        2. Two Jack Lake by C Ayers with 1050 Votes (12%)
        3. A Winter Magic by Luciash D’Being with 1033 Votes (12%)
        4. Smolikas by George Blades Voulgarakis with 923 Votes (11%)
        5. Moody by Robert Wicek with 813 Votes (10%)

      • Multimedia Production Studio ArtistX 1.5 Distro Is Based on Ubuntu 13.04

        ArtistX 1.5, an Ubuntu-based distribution that aims to enable artists and creators from a number of fields to work via a live and free environment, has just been released.

      • New Bodhi Linux Arrives after Six Months with New Schedule

        Just when things were looking pretty dull today, I spotted an exciting tidbit of news. Jeff Hoogland announced a new release of Bodhi Linux today, September 12, 2013. It’s been six months since 2.3.0 was released and today’s announcement addresses that and future plans as well.

      • MintBox 2 ships with Core i5 and Linux Mint 15
      • Linux Mint 15 ‘Olivia’ with MATE Desktop Environment [Overview & Screenshots]

        Each Linux Mint release usually offers four flavors, to say nothing about LMDE: Mint Cinnamon, Mint MATE, Mint KDE and Mint Xfce. The MATE edition is based around a desktop environment forked from GNOME 2, featuring a similar interface and a familiar user interaction experience. MATE started as a need of some users to have the classic GNOME 2.x interface once GNOME 3 was released with huge interface changes. MATE does offer a classic, solid and familiar interface, and it also provides a compositing window manager for graphical effects and transparency.

      • Pear OS 8 Beta 3 Is Now Available for Testing

        On October 3, David Tavares has announced the immediate availability for download and testing of the third and last Beta release of the upcoming Pear OS 8 Linux operating system.

      • Why I’m excited for Linux Mint 16, even though I don’t like Mint

        Every six months, my world gets thrown into a state of pure, blissful chaos.

Free Software/Open Source-Related Links for September-October 2013

Posted in News Roundup at 2:37 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • Free Software/Open Source

    • Open source is brutal: an interview with Google’s Chris DiBona
    • Jobs Demand Rising for Linux and Open Source Skills

      Have you been looking for a job, or perhaps some work on the side? If so, and you have Linux or other open source skills, the news is good. Demand for Linux and open source workers continues to rise. We’ve covered this trend as reported by careers sites such as Dice.com, and by The Linux Foundation, but one of the most detailed breakdowns appears at LinuxCareer.com, through its IT Skills Watch report. In addition to reporting on demand for Linux skills, it breaks down how the demand looks for workers with skills in other areas ranging from PHP to Apache Tomcat.

    • Rupee slide: Indian cos like iGate, Hungama Digital opt for open-source softwares to cut costs

      Indian enterprises are increasingly moving to open-source software, recognising the cost benefits and flexibility it offers over proprietary software. A falling rupee, which increases licensing costs, is likely to hasten the shift from softwares made by companies like SAP, IBM and Oracle.

      The government has already embraced open-source in a big way — the Aadhaar project is a case in point. Now, companies like Hungama Digital Entertainment, Uttam Energy, Bilcare, payment processor Euronet, insurer Star Union Dai-chi and IT outsourcer iGate — have also started using open-source software. And the list is growing.

    • Twitter turns to open source to prevent service disruptions

      To prevent disruptions and scale up its service while keeping costs down, Twitter has had to drastically change its core infrastructure, taking up open source tools while doing so.

    • Community management tips from Greg DeKoenigsberg of Eucalyptus
    • United Nations lauds open source for water resource planning

      Unesco, the educational, scientific and cultural organisation of the United Nations, is promoting the development and use of open source solutions for water resource management. At the end of June, in Paris the UN officially launched a network of experts ‘Hydro Open-source software Platform of Experts’ (HOPE), to “contributes to the dissemination of innovative practices”.

    • Special Journal Issue: The Unstoppable Rise of Open Source

      Oldenbourg Verlag just published a special issue on open source that I edited. Titled “the unstoppable rise of open source” it provides a five-article overview of open source past, present, and future.

    • Why Open Source?

      In all my writing work, I use only Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) to get the job done. I’ve been questioned about this a number of times, and the best answer I can give people is: It’s complicated. There are lots of reasons I use FOSS over all other options, and I think I’m ready to put them all out there for y’all to see.

    • Finally SOS Open Source Goes Open Source!

      I am happy to inform my readers that finally SOS Open Source will soon be released in open source!

    • Open source to bridge the global digital divide

      I vividly remember my first experience using the Internet in 2000. The amount of information I was hit with by typing my first search term, university, was far beyond my wildest imaginations. This plethora of knowledge filled my mind with wonder, excitement, and enlightenment. I suddenly had the power to read, analyze, and learn about anything and anyone. The knowledge created by some of the greatest minds in the history of mankind was at my disposal, free of cost and just one single click away. I felt empowered.

    • Technology Trumps Dogma, And Other Open Source Insights

      Marten Mickos is one of the most respected leaders in open source. Here’s why.

    • 10 open-source alternatives for small business software

      You can’t run a business—even a small one—without technology. You need computers, smartphones, file storage, a website, and a whole host of other tech assets. So how do you afford it all with a budget that’s tighter than a hipster’s jeans?

    • IBM Releases FusedOS Operating System

      Just days after a brand new cloud operating system was released, IBM is out with a new operating system of its own. FusedOS is IBM’s new research project that’s now an open-source general purpose OS.

    • Open Source Software is Only the Beginning

      Open source is all about collaboration. When you write some code and put it out there for others to read, use, and build upon, you’re giving a gift to the world. With the instant global communication the Internet provides us today, countless developers around the world can (maybe even anonymously) collaborate, giving and taking code, sharing knowledge with each other, and advancing our collective corpus of work.

    • When Open Source software get nothing in return

      There was a slight compensation when the German city of Munich reportedly were planning to distribute free CDs of Ubuntu 12.04 to its residents. That’s a step forward but certainly not good enough. Why I say it’s not good enough is because they can do more – a lot more than what they are currently doing.

      Since these organizations will more than likely have their own support team and not rely on purchasing support contracts, the only reasonable source of revenue via clients buying support contracts for Open Source software gets blocked.

    • Why and how to set up your own wiki with Dokuwiki

      DokuWiki is a simple but versatile wiki. Find out how to install, configure, and begin using DokuWiki.

    • Open-Source Systems You May Have Taken for Granted: 10 Examples
    • Quantity, Reason and enduring Freedom

      Where is Free & Open Source Software headed to? On the one hand, there is a trend that seems to veer it towards a more professional field, with new analysis and tracking tools that aim at improving not just the quality of code but its legal compliance as well. More and more large companies adopt FOSS either as users or as developers, or both, and that’s a good thing too. But does this announce the upcoming end of copyleft licences and that more structured approaches will ultimately kill the wild and spontaneous bunch that FOSS “once” was? No it won’t. First, the FOSS adoption among enterprise field does not depend on one license only. There’s also a lot of enterprise software released under GPL, by the way. But perhaps we have to accept and embrace Free and Open Source Software for what it is: an undefinable field that is at the same time a state of the art, a set of business models around software and services, a demand for our digital freedoms and a set of best practices on digital innovation alongside an extremely effective way to license software. And yet I’m not even sure I’ve covered it all. Today FOSS is growing not just in the enterprise: it’s at the core of the Makers’ movement and the 3D Printing revolution; it has inspired the Open Hardware movement, the Open Knowledge and countless other initiatives. Very few of these have reached a maturity stage and even inside the realms of FOSS development, things continue to be the same: at the beginning, a developer has an itch to sratch, and code to share with the world….

    • How Things Work: Open-source software

      Most students at Carnegie Mellon have used, or at least heard of, open-source software. Examples of such software include the browser Firefox and the mobile operating system Android. Open-source software, in most basic terms, makes its code publicly available for modification and distribution by users. Proponents believe that creating an open community of programmers who modify software for their own uses provides the best possible experience for users, allowing them to customize according to their own needs.

    • I Didn’t Know They Use Open Source! – Part 3
    • Why Hasn’t Open Source Taken Over Storage?

      Open source products have very uneven penetration into the world of business technology. If you look at content management systems or languages, open source rules. But if you look at the market for ERP software or for storage systems, open source hasn’t made much of a dent.

  • Events

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

  • Programming

    • Easy OpenCL with Python

      Use OpenCL with very little code — and test it from the Python console.

    • When open source invests in diversity, everyone wins

      It’s results like this that convince Jessica that when open source communities invest in diversity outreach, everyone benefits. Since implementing a beginner series, intermediate workshops, and open source sprints, the Boston Python user group has over quintupled in size, from 700 members to 4000+. They are now the largest Python user group in the world. That type of growth is something all open source communities should aspire to.

    • writing a lua interpreter
    • Shell Scripting vs Programming

      The shell is the most basic of environments for working with your Linux system. Whatever you may think of working in a text environment, I guarantee that once you have fully experienced the power of simple text, you will be forever convinced. Text is compact. Text is fast. System administration over a network is best experienced at the shell level. Those forced to resort to graphical tools over a slow Internet connection are also quickly converted.

10.23.13

Applications/Games-Related Links for September-October 2013

Posted in News Roundup at 6:52 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

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