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08.16.12

Links 16/8/2012: Calligra 2.5, LibreOffice 3.5.6 Released

Posted in News Roundup at 1:24 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Keeping up with the Robinsons
  • From Windows to Linux Part One: The Newbie

    For almost three years, I’ve been using a HP netbook for all my computing needs. That includes surfing the net, writing emails, watching movies, blogging at GeekMom and my personal blog, and beginning my first novel. The workload was causing the little thing to die a slow and most unnatural death. There were huge lag times waiting for sites to upload or for Works to save. I use a HP Mini 110-1030NR running Windows, but I had begun to steal one of my husband’s laptops because I was so frustrated.

    One of the biggest problems I seemed to have was memory allocation. The netbook has a limited memory of 1 gig, which caused many of the problems. Once the netbook had performed a couple of tasks, it bogged down and became virtually unusable.

  • From Windows to Linux Part Two: System 76
  • Tesla CTO talks Model S, batteries and in-car Linux

    For most people who identify themselves as techies, Tesla’s Model S is something of a dream car. The all-electric vehicle accelerates fast, can maintain a high top speed, has a range of up to 300 miles, and packs a 17-inch flat panel display with a Linux-based computer system that provides access to just about every aspect of the car’s performance and entertainment system.

  • Why Linux Has Been an Attention Getter Lately

    Always a popular operating system, Linux has been getting a lot more buzz lately. All of this new news has helped to propel Linux operating systems to the public eye, and awareness of this system’s existence is now starting to spread beyond technology enthusiasts and computer coders.

  • Desktop

    • Building Computer Labs for Free

      I found an article about a teacher building a computer lab on $0. That’s mostly what I did for years refurbishing whatever PCs were in storage or not being used in schools where I taught. GNU/Linux is very flexible and installs on a wide variety of machines without concerns about drivers for the particular machine since most drivers needed to boot are part of the Linux kernel.

    • Removing Barriers for Linux Hardware

      I have squirmed in my seat while typing that reply. Free and Open Source Software doesn’t have borders. The hardware shouldn’t either.

    • Follow-up to “Pricing Hardware that Runs GNU/Linux”

      In Pricing Hardware that Runs GNU/Linux, I started what I hope will be a new practice at ZaReason — giving rebates at the end of each accounting cycle, giving back any profits that occur during that time period.

      For the last two weeks I have been cringing, literally cringing. How do I tell people that there won’t be any rebates this cycle? It was break-even.

    • ZaReason UltraLap 430 Ultrabook Ships With Linux OS Installed

      Along similar lines to what Dell has been creating within its Dell Project Sputnik, where the computer manufacturer has combined an XPS 13 Ultrabook and Linux together.

    • Dreaming of a Linux Ultrabook? Meet the New ZaReason UltraLap 430
  • Kernel Space

    • Linux Display Switching Support For Apple MacBooks

      Canonical and others continue to hack on rudimentary support for graphics display switching for Apple MacBook laptops bearing multiple graphics processors.

    • New Linux drivers for old kernel versions

      The developers of the new Linux Kernel Backporting project plan to offer the drivers that come with recent Linux kernels in a form that will allow these drivers to be combined with older kernel versions. The initiative originates from compat-wireless – a project that was started by the Linux kernel’s Wi-Fi driver developers quite some time ago and has offered tar archives that allow, for example, the Wi-Fi drivers that come with Linux 3.5 to be combined with Linux 2.6.24 and above. For several months, these archives have included Ethernet and Bluetooth drivers as well as Wi-Fi drivers.

    • Graphics Stack

      • Marek Lands Radeon Gallium3D MSAA Changes

        Marek Olšák, the prolific independent contributor to Mesa/Gallium3D and the open-source Radeon Linux graphics driver, has landed a number of commits today in Mesa pertaining to MSAA, a.k.a. multi-sample anti-aliasing for newer Radeon GPUs.

      • NVIDIA 304.37 Linux Driver Brings 41 Official Changes

        The first certified NVIDIA 304 series Linux graphics driver has been released. The NVIDIA 304.37 Linux x86/x86_64 graphics driver packs in 41 official changes affecting several areas of this leading proprietary graphics driver.

        The NVIDIA 304.37 Linux “certified” driver succeeds the earlier 304.22 beta and 304.30 beta drivers. As such, the 41 listed changes to this certified driver update aren’t all brand new if you used one of these earlier 304 series betas, but overall there’s some exciting stuff.

      • Wayland Support For Cursor Themes

        After several interesting news items in recent days about Wayland, the latest is that Wayland/Weston now has support for cursor themes.

      • AMD Open64 4.5.2 Supports Piledriver, Other Features

        AMD quietly released an update to their preferred compiler, Open64, last week. The AMD Open64 4.5.2 compiler supports their next-generation “Piledriver” Fusion APUs.

      • Radeon PRIME Import/Export Support For Libdrm
      • NVIDIA 304.37 released
      • Integrating Videobuf2 With DMA-BUF Still Being Done

        Aside from the ongoing DMA-BUF PRIME enablement work, Linux kernel developers are also still hacking on Videobuf2 with DMA-BUF support.

      • AMD Publishes “Southern Islands” ISA Documentation

        AMD has published their instruction set architecture (ISA) documentation for the “Southern Islands” graphics processors that are used by their Radeon HD 7000 series products.

        There’s no big press release for it or anything right now, but the Southern Islands shader ISA programming guide is available from the AMD developer web-site.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

  • Distributions

    • Best Educational Linux Distributions

      When it comes to using technology in education, there has been a lot of progress. These days, you see little kids doodling passionately on their iPads instead of papers. Moreover, with the use of desktops and laptops for teaching basic programming and computer essential to kids, technology has become an integral part of education.

      That said, as a FOSS enthusiast, the technology that is currently being used in schools is not the best course of action when it comes to introducing kids to computers. Not only are closed-source software and operating systems expensive, they also alienate the students from the ideals of sharing and freedom. iPads, iPhones, and iMacs do nothing except cultivate an insatiable gadget lust that further makes their parents shell out enormous amounts of cash for their kids.

    • [arch-dev-public] Migration to systemd

      Systemd has a overall better design than SysV, lots of useful administrative features and provide quicker boot up. Considering that it has been around in our repositories for some time and that it could be considered stable enough for production use, I would suggest to replace iniscript by systemd once the ‘Missing systemd units’ is over. Thus we will avoid duplicating our efforts on two init systems.

    • Arch Linux proposes switch to systemd
    • Arch migrates to SystemD ..and gets a little-bit better Gnome support!
    • The rise of the Linux hyper-distro

      Linux as a one-size-fits-all operating system may be fading into the background as new specialized distros assert themselves in consumer space.

      This is not to say that Linux is going away. Hardly. If anything, the sheer pervasiveness of Linux is what’s fueling the trend to which I refer: the rise of more specialized distributions with one or a few major objectives that stand apart from the idea of an all-in-one operating system.

    • New Lightweight Linux Distro Emmabuntüs Released

      If you have an old computer lying in your garage and would like to use it for some of your needs, here is a perfect distro for you. Emmabuntüs claims to be sleek, accessible and equitable.

    • New Releases

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Saving Mandriva

        The new management at Mandriva believes that a community-centric approach is the way to save the company from bankruptcy and rebuild lost trust. Do they have it right?

      • On life, death, and Linux

        After a rather long period without visiting the Mandriva community chat (because of an excess of work that is taking a toll on me), I learned that Eugeni Dodonov, a former Mandriva engineer, lost his life in a bike accident a month ago.

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat Unveils OpenStack Distribution

        Another open source vendor has tossed its hat into the OpenStack ring. A red hat, to be more precise. Now in preview release, Red Hat‘s (NYSE: RHT) own OpenStack distribution based on the open source OpenStack framework for building and management public, private and hybrid IaaS clouds.

        The news that Red Hat was planning on launching its own OpenStack distribution broke back in April when a GigaOm report let the news slip. Red Hat joining the OpenStack community seems like a case of “if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.” It’s no secret that the vendor was facing increasing competition from the OpenStack community, and now it really is official the company that helped build the Linux empire back in the good ol’ days has seen the OpenStack light.

      • Zarafa Groupware, ClearOS Linux Get Integrated
      • Installing mod_geoip for Apache2 On CentOS 6.3

        This guide explains how to set up mod_geoip with Apache2 on a CentOS 6.3 system. mod_geoip looks up the IP address of the client end user. This allows you to redirect or block users based on their country. You can also use this technology for your OpenX (formerly known as OpenAds or phpAdsNew) ad server to allow geo targeting.

      • Red Hat releases Openstack preview
      • Red Hat Plans Enterprise-Ready OpenStack Distribution
      • Will OpenStack Wearing Red Hat Give it Cred?
      • Private Clouds Get Public Boost From Red Hat

        The OpenStack project got a boost today when Red Hat released a preview version of its own version of the open source cloud software. The preview edition isn’t meant to be run in production, but will give cloud hackers a chance to tinker with the software and provide feedback ahead of Red Hat’s official release, expected next year.

      • 75% Customer Wins Replacing Legacy Systems: Red Hat

        With Microsoft recently announcing a new wholly-owned subsidiary (Microsoft Open Technologies, Inc.) to allow it to engage in open source projects, analysts are busy speculating what this means for the existing open source vendors. However, Paul Cormier, Exec. VP, Products and Technologies, Red Hat, seems unperturbed by this recent turn of events and terms it a great thing. “I think in some sense it was inevitable, and it is a sign of Microsoft publicly acknowledging that open source is a part of mainstream computing environment,” he adds.

      • Red Hat to release enterprise-ready OpenStack
      • Fedora

        • Fedora 18 Linux Set To Package Spherical Cow Load of Features

          The clock is starting to tick down on the Fedora Linux release with the feature freeze now in place. As such, now is as good a time as any to take a look at some of the new features that are likely to land when Fedora 18 goes live at the end of the year.

        • Fedora 17 KDE Beefy Miracle: is Fedora in decline?

          There are two Linux distributions which get the attention of a wide Linux-related community with enviable periodicity. Financially stable companies support both these distributions, and they are always on the peak of innovation. These are Ubuntu and Fedora.

          The latest release of Ubuntu 12.04 happened in April 2012, and I wrote about the whole “product line” of Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Xubuntu.

    • Debian Family

      • On Debian’s Birthday, Raphaël Hertzog Looks Back at dpkg

        Debian is turning 19 and is hoping users will be celebrating all over the world. Raphaël Hertzog looks back in is own way, by looking back at the development of dpkg. August 16 is the big day for Debian, but even the birthday post suggests a bug squashing party as one idea.

      • Derivatives

  • Devices/Embedded

    • BeagleBone gets I/O ‘capes’

      Fans of the BeagleBone single board computer, little brother to BeagleBoard, now have access to 20 plug-in boards to add a camera, LCDs, weather sensors, and other I/O, writes Steve Bush.

      Called ‘capes’ after the cloak worn by the beagle superhero BeagleBoard mascot, the boards have been designed by the open source community and will be available through www.beaglebonecapes.com.

    • ARM Cortex-A9 powers Origen 4 Quad dev board

      The Origen 4 Quad is a bare-bones dev board built around Samsung’s quad-core ARM-powered Exynos 4412 processor.

      Although the board is primarily targeted at devs who want to code and test apps, the Origen 4 Quad can also be used to power an Android or Linux based system.

    • Phones

      • TizMee brings Tizen apps to MeeGo

        Although the Tizen project has officially replaced MeeGo as the mobile operating system that Intel and the Linux Foundation are supporting, some MeeGo developers are still pushing MeeGo forward, especially as it is available on the Nokia N9 and N950. Developer Mike Sheldon has gone further than most by producing the first public release of TizMee, an application which lets Tizen apps, and other HTML5 apps, run on MeeGo-based devices.

      • Looking Back at One Year of Tizen

        The Tizen project is approaching its one-year anniversary, which makes for a good opportunity to look back at how far the project has come. The Linux Foundation announced Tizen in September of 2011 as a combination of Intel’s previous work on MeeGo and the LiMo Foundation’s handset platform. Samsung formally joined the party a bit later, bringing with it code from the company’s Linux-based Bada product line.

      • HP Spins Off webOS Into A Brand New Company Called Gram; Mission Unknown

        Ever since HP killed off webOS hardware, the fate of the webOS GBU (general business unit) was as yet unknown. But according to a flyer that has floated out of the HP office, it would seem that the webOS group, along with Enyo and Cloud services, has branched away from the mother ship to start a brand new company: Gram.

      • Android

        • Android 4.0 Hits More Tablets, Smartphones

          Android 4.0, also called Ice Cream Sandwich, is still being pushed out to smartphones and tablets far and wide. The 2011 version of Android offers significant upgrades to the system software of devices that hit the market earlier this year. Here are the latest devices blessed with the good graces of the system software update gods.

        • Songza debuts new tablet UI for Android

          Songza today announced that they have released a new version of the streaming music service which features a tablet-optimized interface.

        • Presumed Kindle Fire successor hits FCC
        • Android Is Winning

          This word comes from Gartner, a top research firm for these sorts of things. Overall, within the last quarter, Android outsold iOS devices nearly three to one while capturing 64% of the worldwide market share. Samsung was the top dog accounting for 90M handset sales.

        • Nightly Builds Of XBMC For Android Now Available
        • Android Programming with App Inventor

          MIT App Inventor, re-released as a beta service (as of March 5, 2012) by the MIT Center for Mobile Learning after taking over the project from Google, is a visual programming language for developing applications for the Android mobile computing platform. It is based on the concept of blocks, and applications are designed by fitting together blocks of code snippets. This may sound like a very childish way of programming, especially for seasoned readers of Linux Journal. But then again, App Inventor will tickle the child programmer in you and make you chuckle at the ease with which you can develop applications for your Android device. In this article, I describe how to use the camera on the Android device, develop e-mail and text-messaging-based applications and also show how to use location sensors to retrieve your current geographical location. Let’s get started.

        • Verizon adds $350 Galaxy Tab 2 (7-inch) to tablet roster
    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Canonical: Making the Open Cloud Seamless for Users

        In preparation for a detailed review of Google’s recently-released Nexus 7 tablet, we’ve compiled a table summarizing the key specs of the Nexus 7 with those of the latest 7-inch Android tablets from Samsung, Barnes & Noble, and Amazon. Watch for our complete, in-depth Nexus 7 review to be published here soon.

      • Aakash 2 To Be Launched Soon

        The announcement of the first Aakash tablet had taken the world by storm due to its ultra-low price point. The pre-orders that followed the announcement made it pretty clear that it was going to be a commercial success. However, the poor technical specifications and the clunkiness of the actual product disappointed quite a few users.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Pixar Releases Open SubDiv On An Open Source License

    Most people can probably agree that Pixar is one of the most influential animation studios of all time. Their films have been not only critical and commercial hits, but important to the progression of animation technology as well. The technology Pixar uses in their films is some of the most impressive in the business. Now you can use it yourself for free.

  • Pixar open sources production animation code, patents

    Disney-owned Jobs-derived animation outfit Pixar has open-sourced some of its production software.

    Pixar started life as a software company and still operates a division selling its RenderMan wares, which have been pressed into service making innumerable films beyond the walls of Pixar itself.

    The code released as open source is called Open SubDiv, and “… implement high performance subdivision surface (subdiv) evaluation on massively parallel CPU and GPU architectures.”

  • Walt Disney Open Sources BRDF Explorer
  • Open Source Still Draws Proprietary Vendors Into the Fold

    The proprietary competition is very different when it is sitting alongside everyone else in developing, deploying or integrating with open source software. Today’s proprietary vendors talk bullishly about their integration with, contribution to, and support for open source software, which is a far cry from belittling open source as a hobby or demonizing it as not enterprise-ready.

  • One bug, millions of dollars lost: An argument for open source solutions

    On August 1, Knight Capital Group, a financial services company, lost $440 million in less than an hour because of a software bug. As I understand it, this bug could have been avoided if more thorough testing was done before release but, as the Omaha World-Herald reports, the company “rushed to develop a computer program so it could take advantage of a new Wall Street venue for trading stocks…and failed to fully work out the kinks in its system.”

  • oVirt 3.1 “narrows gap” with proprietary virtualisation

    oVirt 3.1 has become the second official release of the oVirt project. With it, the developers of the virtual datacentre management platform say they have narrowed the gap between “the open source virtualisation platform and proprietary alternatives”. In February, version 3.0 became the first official release of oVirt, and offered a range of virtualisation management components that also formed the backbone of Red Hat’s own RHEV product (Red Hat Enterprise Virtualisation). The oVirt project is supported by Canonical, Cisco, IBM, Intel, NetApp, SUSE and Red Hat.

  • Study shows half of all websites use jQuery
  • Cash-strapped students have access to free software

    Students heading back to school can find hundreds of free programs to download or use as online-only applications. While they might not be as feature-rich as their paid counterparts, you might be surprised at what’s available.

    Put away your wallet and take note of these freebies for personal computers.

  • Companies struggle to get past open source ‘big data’ experimentation

    Speaking at a Computer Weekly roundtable on the topic, Bob Harris, chief technology officer at Channel 4, said big data initatives will likely require organisations to adopt new technologies.

  • IU’s Suresh Marru invited to join Apache Software Foundation

    BLOOMINGTON, Ind.— The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) recently asked Suresh Marru of the Indiana University Pervasive Technology Institute (PTI) to join its exclusive membership. This honor is bestowed on IT developers whose skills have significantly contributed to the foundation’s projects.

  • TACTIC Digital Asset Management Software Goes Open Source

    TACTIC, which had been targeted at digital content creators, is being released under the Eclipse Public license, which is generally considered less restrictive than the more frequently used GPL. This allows any individual, team, department or enterprise to download the TACTIC software for free and start using it for projects. Southpaw will continue and expand its support packages and professional services, as well as offer a commercial license for any organizations that prefer or require such licenses.

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox OS To Replace Gecko With Servo

        Mozilla’s aspirations to build its own mobile platform while its browser is losing market share and its replacement to Microsoft’s Outlook has been put on innovation hold is incouraging. It’s even more interesting when we have seen hardcore mobile companies like RIM and Nokia failing to keep up with Android and iOS. What will Firefox bring to the market is not known at the moment.

        Firefox OS, or formally known as Boot To Gecko, does sound interesting since Gecko is Mozilla’s HTML rendering engine rather than the browser itself. However very few details and explainations about this project can be found.

      • Firefox OS Now Available For Raspberry Pi

        Mozilla had announced plans to create its own mobile OS based on HTML5 technologies. Some of the builds of this OS are available but it’s yet to release on any devices. However, Oleg Romashin has successfully ported Firefox OS to run on Raspberry Pi and builds are available for download.

  • SaaS

    • CFOs See Value in Cloud Computing, Which Open Source Platforms Can Boost

      From staffers in the IT organizations at many enterprises to departmental-level workers, cloud computing deployments are a hot topic. Businesses of all sizes are managing public and private cloud deployments and apps, and gaining efficiencies from them. But how does the average CFO feel about cloud computing? Do CFOs even understand the cloud? Google recently sponsored a study of 800 CFOs to find answers to these questions. Here are the details.

    • A Quick Overview of Hadoop
    • Open Source Cloud Lifts Up Rackspace, but Weighs Down VMware
    • ownCloud 1.0.5 Desktop Client Released
    • Rackspace Delivers OpenStack-based Private Cloud Platform, with Support
    • Revealed: Limited Edition “I Fight for an Open Cloud” T-shirt

      Two weeks from today The Linux Foundation will debut CloudOpen. This is a really exciting time in cloud computing, a time when developers and open source projects are clearly leading the way in technology innovation. The building blocks are in place thanks to decades of open source software development, and everybody is looking for their edge.

      CloudOpen will provide a vendor- and project-neutral venue for collaboration and for advancing key technologies. CloudStack, Eucalyptus Systems, OpenStack, Gluster, oVirt, Chef, Puppet, Xen, KVM, OpenShift, Ceph and more will all be there, as will the vendors and users who want to understand how best to work with these projects.

    • Contributing to Apache CloudStack as a Non-Committer

      If you’re a contributor to an Apache project, it means that you can commit directly to the project’s repository. For instance, with Apache CloudStack (incubating) contributors are allowed to directly push commits into the git repository.

      Non-committers, however, have to submit patches for review. Don’t worry, it’s not an onerous process at all. The first time you submit a patch, it will take a minute or two to create an account on Review Board, but it’s a piece of cake from start to finish.

    • Intel, Sina and others launch OpenStack-friendly alliance

      Burgeoning Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) initiative OpenStack received a welcome endorsement last week when Intel teamed up with some local Chinese players to launch the China Open Source Cloud League (COSCL) – a new alliance which will accelerate development of the project in the huge domestic cloud market.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • VirtualBox 4.2 nears with release candidate

      With the arrival of a first release candidate, version 4.2 of VirtualBox is past its feature freeze and is nearly complete. VirtualBox 4.2, which entered beta testing earlier this month, will be the next major update to Oracle’s open source desktop virtualisation application and will bring various improvements and new features, such as a new “expert mode” in wizards aimed at making them quicker for experienced users.

    • Announcement: VirtualBox 4.2 Release Candidate 1 released
    • LibreOffice 3.5.6 Released

      The Document Foundation today announced the latest update to their 3.5 branch of their office productivity suite. Today’s release brings important bug fixes to users of this series.

    • Download LibreOffice 3.5.6 Office Suite

      The Document Foundation has announced earlier today, August 15th, that the sixth maintenance release of the LibreOffice 3.5 open source office suite software is available for download.

      According to the developers, LibreOffice 3.5.6 is dedicated to more conservative users, and it is here to fix various bugs and to further improve the stability of the software. A detailed changelog can be found in the official release announcement.

    • Oracle halts open-source HPC project

      Oracle researchers are winding down development of the Fortress programming language for high-performance computing, an effort started nearly 10 years ago by Sun Microsystems.

      The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, which originally funded Fortress, pulled its backing in November 2006. Work continued at Sun and Oracle, however.

  • CMS

    • Open source page reminds clients to pay

      In terms of usage, Crumbs is currently on GitHub as both a WordPress theme and static placeholder, and Fairbanks said if using the former, you should remember to deactivate widgets and plug-ins so the client’s settings are saved and can be easily reactivated later. Better, though, would be to never get to this stage, and be more businesslike. Agreeing with our news article last week on contracts, Fairbanks recommended always using a contract (he said docpool.co is another good source of information) and also refining it to close up any gaps where a non-payment could slip through.

  • Healthcare

    • Big data in healthcare: Transparency is transformative

      The healthcare industry is experiencing off-the-charts growth in data generation. Growing numbers of clinical solutions generate more data every day–including electronic medical records, communication systems, and digital image archiving. On top of that, wearable sensor networks compile information on patients’ heart rate, brain activity, sleep patterns, temperature, muscle motion, and numerous other clinically useful data points. This enhanced ability to capture data from everywhere generates massive sets of information. This information is invaluable for healthcare and modern clinical practices–as long as we can manage it properly.

  • Semi-Open Source

    • Zenoss Core 4 Advances Open Source IT Monitoring

      While Zenoss Core has long been able to monitor multiple types of network and server infrastructure components, with the new release Windows monitoring gets easier. The Zenoss Core 4 release is now able to perform remote monitoring of Windows systems without the need for additional third-party agents.

      Floyd Strimling, Technical Evangelist and VP of Marketing & Community at Zenoss, explained to EnterpriseNetworkingPlanetthat Zenoss Core 4 has a more native ability to monitor Windows. Strimling said that the system leverages WMI and perfmon to gather data from virtually any available metric via Zenoss’ native templates and collection technology.

    • Zenoss Releases Open Source Zenoss Core 4
    • Open Source IT Monitoring Scales Up with Zenoss Core 4
  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • GNU automake 1.12.3 released

      GNU Automake 1.12.3 has been released.

      This is mostly a bug-fixing release, addressing few old bugs in Yacc/Lex support, and some weaknesses in Automake’s own testsuite.

    • Gnucash On Android Hits Beta

      Gnucash is a free and open source software for maintaining personal finances. After being useful on the desktop, the developers are porting it on Android so that you can manage your finances on the move. The software was on alpha till date, and a new beta version has recently been released.

    • GCC Compiler Is Up To 7.3 Million Lines Of Code

      After providing Git stats on a number of graphics drivers, which proved to be interesting, here’s some development stats for the Free Software Foundation’s GCC. GitStats was run on the Git mirror of GCC as of 13 August to generate some rather intriguing numbers.

      The Git activity goes back to 23 November 1988 and during the course of these past 8,665 days on 7,270 of those days there were code commits made to this leading open-source compiler. In total, GCC in Git is currently up to 77,053 files amounting to 7,348,239 lines of code as of yesterday.

    • gnutls 3.1.0

      I’ve just released gnutls 3.1.0. This is release is a major feature update on gnutls 3.0.x, but is fully binary and source compatible with it. The main addition are support for the TPM module to store cryptographic keys, and simplified functions to access encrypted structures.

    • GCC 2012 Cauldron Covered Fission, Cilk, C++11, Etc

      The 2012 GCC Cauldron happened last month in Prague. The event, which was keynoted by Richard Stallman and celebrated 25 years of the GNU Compiler Collection, had a number of interesting talks. Videos and slides from the open-source compiler discussions are now available online.

      Those interested in links to the slides, videos, and other information pertaining to last month’s GCC Cauldron in the Czech Republic, see this GNU.org Wiki page. There’s also a YouTube channel.

  • Public Services/Government

    • Maximize the public benefit of federal technology by sharing government-developed software under an open source license.

      Openness: Open Sourcing ensures basic fairness and transparency by making software and related artifacts available to the citizens who provided funding, consistent with the President’s 2009 declaration that “Information maintained by the Federal Government is a national asset.”

    • Brazil at forefront of open source initiatives

      Since the workers’ party won the Brazilian Presidential election in 2003, an open source movement has continued to grow in government and public spheres. Now, the country appears to be at the forefront of open source initiatives, which isn’t news to most inside the community that, despite initial uncertainties, saw the movement growing each year. The workers’ party has without a doubt signaled that open source should be included at the top of the government’s agenda.

    • ‘Basque Country’s open source law challenges other Spanish regions’

      The new Basque Country law, to make all software developed for the government publicly available as open source, is a leading example to all other autonomous regions in Spain to adopt similar policies. Cenatic, the country’s resource centre on open source, expects the regions will take up the challenge.

  • Licensing

    • Furore over changes to licensing policy at CA/Browser Forum

      The Certification Authority Browser Forum’s (CA/Browser Forum) new licensing policyPDF has caused a furore within the very organisation meant to be responsible for guidelines and best practices for SSL certification. Prominent member organisations, including cryptography specialists RSA, BlackBerry manufacturer RIM and US carrier Verizon, are missing from the latest member list, updated in August. Entrust, a founder member of the organisation, has loudly expanded on the reasons for its withdrawal, which it explains is due to the organisation allegedly forcing members to make patented technologies available licence-free. In a posting to CA/Browser Forum’s public mailing list, certificate provider StartCom has responded by calling the allegation “a lie which I’m sure you are very well aware of”.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Willow Garage Marries Open Source and Robots, with an Eye Toward the Future

      For years now, in the field of robotics, open source platforms have been ushering in all kinds of innovation. And among the commercial companies focused on open source robotics, none is as prominent as Silicon Valley-based Willow Garage. Scott Hassan, a Google veteran, founded Willow Garage in 2006 as a well-funded robotics research shop. In addition to building innovative robots and robotics platforms, Willow Garage helped organize the Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF).

      Recently, the folks at Willow Garage hosted members of the press for a talk on robotics. Some of the predictions made are really worth noting.

    • Mailing lists: Community or communication?
    • Kicking Off a Year of Open Source Everything

      Berlin filmmaker Sam Muirhead is attempting to live a completely open source life for one year. Here’s why.

      The phrase ‘Open Source’, to many people, means ‘software you don’t have to pay for’—but really it’s so much more than that. It’s a way of thinking and working focused on transparency and collaborating with others. It’s about sharing ideas, plans, and developments for the benefit of the commons. And it’s definitely not just software.

    • Open Source Cars? Yes it works and the cars look great

      When you think of open source, you probably think of software first and foremost, and maybe about open source devices as well. While it is linked mostly to software, Open Source is not limited to that field at all, as it is also a design philosophy. But an open source car? How would that even work?

    • Open source desert racing cars in Arizona
  • Programming

    • Vim as your IDE

      To follow this article you required basic idea of how to use Vim and its command based editing. And it focused on how to make it an IDE.

    • Jodhpur boy gets invite for Google’s ‘mentor summit’

      A boy from Jodhpur has been chosen among 50 computer experts from across the globe by the Google for its ‘Mentor Summit’ to be held at its headquarters in California on October 20-21. The objective of this summit is to bring together the mentors of the Google Summer of Code 2012, which is a global programme that offers student developers stipends to write code for various open source software projects.

  • Standards/Consortia

    • Khronos: 20 Years Of OpenGL

      Among the fun facts shared last week in celebrating the 20th birthday of OpenGL was that covering the OpenGL specification with all of its extensions is longer — in terms of lines, words, and characters — than the bible.

      Last week at SIGGRAPH in Los Angeles besides releasing OpenGL ES 3.0, introducing OpenGL 4.3, and talking about Valve’s games on Linux, they were also celebrating twenty years of OpenGL.

    • New open source Calligra Suite release enhances ODF document support

      Calligra has published the second stable release of its open source suite that includes word processing, spreadsheets and a sketching program. The new version greatly improves the support of Open Document Format (ODF) documents, said one of its main developers on Tuesday.

      The Calligra Suite is an application suite for Linux that includes programs not found in traditional office suites, so the development team prefers to call it an “integrated work applications suite.”

Leftovers

  • Security

    • Oracle releases unscheduled fix for critical vulnerability
    • Google warns of using Adobe Reader – particularly on Linux

      On its August Patch Day, Adobe has fixed numerous critical memory-related bugs in Reader for Windows and Mac OS X – but has chosen to overlook Linux users. The researchers who discovered the holes now fear that potential attackers could find enough clues to build an exploit by comparing the current Windows version of Reader with the previous one. This would leave Linux users defenceless. On top of that, even the patched versions still contain a total of 16 open security holes.

    • Microsoft patches critical security holes in Windows, Office, IE

      Microsoft has fixed 26 vulnerabilities in its software products, including several considered critical, the company said on Tuesday in its monthly security patch report.

      The security holes, described in five critical and four important bulletins, affect multiple products, including Windows, Internet Explorer, Exchange, SQL Server and Office. In the worst-case scenarios, exploits could give attackers control of affected systems.

    • Insightful Comment on “8″

      This comment came in response to the announcement of a bunch of vulnerabilities fixed in that other OS and Adobe’s software for that other OS. On top of all that “normal” angst, the radical change in UI is unwelcome by many. M$ has clearly over-reached. They have cowed most OEMs and retailers for decades and now they are attempting to add more burdens to the end users in order to bypass the grumbling loyal OEMs, ISVs and retailers who have supported M$ for so long. The dam holding back FLOSS on retail shelves is crumbling. Breakage will be great but a better world awaits. Enlightenment has its costs but no one wants to return to the Dark Ages of IT.

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • U.S.-Funded War in El Salvador Casts Shadow over Romney/Ryan Campaign

      Amidst reports that Mitt Romney launched Bain Capital with funds from investors tied to 1980s Salvadoran death squads, his new running mate Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) is getting foreign policy briefings from a man who actively covered-up some of the worst atrocities committed by those same death squads. The GOP’s vice-presidential candidate also earned his political stripes working under neoconservative Republicans who funneled billions in U.S. aid to those military hitmen. Though the war in El Salvador was just one chapter in history, Romney and Ryan’s relationship with that war may provide a snapshot into their worldview.

  • Finance

    • Choosing Ryan, Embracing Austerity

      Whatever electoral calculations drove Mitt Romney to choose Paul Ryan as his vice-presidential running mate, the choice also has a deeper meaning. Ryan’s arrival at the top of the Republican Party represents the rise of the most vocal and visible proponent of austerity in US politics today. Ryan represents the US parallel to the regimes now controlling, for example, Greece, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Their shared strategy is simple. First, deliver austerity policies to the biggest corporations and the richest 5 percent of the citizens. Second, in return, those two groups’ money will reduce political opposition to the austerity pushers and win them re-election with overwhelming legal and illegal funding.

    • Goldman Sachs Free to Keep Stealing

      Goldman again got off scot-free. On August 9, the Justice Department dropped criminal fraud charges. Evidence the equivalent of enough firepower to sink a carrier battle group was buried and forgotten. More on what happened below.

      Black’s Law Dictionary says:

      “Fraud consists of some deceitful practice or willful device, resorted to with intent to deprive another of his right, or in some manner to do him an injury.”

      It includes “all acts, omissions, and concealments which involve a breach of legal or equitable duty, trust, or confidence justly reposed, and are injurious to another, or by which an undue and unconscientious advantage is taken of another.”

    • Five Reasons Why Crisis Persists

      It is difficult to imagine and impossible to count all the costs of this persistence. Consider, just for examples, (1) damaged physical and mental health of the unemployed, (2) rising anxiety about increasingly insecure jobs and benefits, (3) strained and destroyed relationships, (4) interrupted or aborted educations and (5) lost skills and job connections. Consider, too, the gross inefficiencies (tens of millions of unemployed alongside trillions in unused raw materials, tools, equipment, offices, factories and stores; millions of empty homes alongside millions of people rendered homeless by the crisis).

    • Senator Carl Levin is Very Pissed Off: No Prosecution of Goldman Sachs

      Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations Chairman Carl Levin, D-Mich., issued the following statement on the Department of Justice’s announcement regarding Goldman Sachs:

    • Sen. Levin Statement on DOJ Announcement on Goldman Sachs
  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • Flashback: U.S. propaganda in the run up to the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
    • Stars Earn Stripes, NBC’s New “War-Musement” TV Show, Panned by Nobel Peace Laureates, Veterans, and Others

      Nine winners of the Nobel prize for peace are calling on NBC to cancel its new TV series, “Stars Earn Stripes” (S-E-S).

      The network unabashedly used its monopoly on the U.S. broadcast of the summer Olympic games to promote this new “reality” series, which debuted this week.

      The show features eight celebrities competing in what NBC calls “missions inspired by real military” activities — such as firing missiles and other simulated deadly weapons — alongside teammates and trainers who served in the military or did other related work.

      The Laureates’ letter notes that “war isn’t entertainment,” and they call the show “a massive disservice to those who live and die in armed conflict and suffer its consequences long after the guns of war fall silent.” (A pdf of the letter can be downloaded below.)

    • An anonymous group goes on a PR rampage to defame Uber in Boston

      Uber has been having a bit of a rough go of things in Boston the past few days. First a cease and desist order was given to the company after one of its drivers was caught in what played out as nothing less than a sting operation by the Keystone Cops. The city caught major pushback and relented, but today the plot thickens. It seems that someone in Boston is taking the abusive spouse role, promising that they’re only beating on the service because they care.

  • Censorship

  • Privacy

    • The new totalitarianism of surveillance technology

      A software engineer in my Facebook community wrote recently about his outrage that when he visited Disneyland, and went on a ride, the theme park offered him the photo of himself and his girlfriend to buy – with his credit card information already linked to it. He noted that he had never entered his name or information into anything at the theme park, or indicated that he wanted a photo, or alerted the humans at the ride to who he and his girlfriend were – so, he said, based on his professional experience, the system had to be using facial recognition technology. He had never signed an agreement allowing them to do so, and he declared that this use was illegal. He also claimed that Disney had recently shared data from facial-recognition technology with the United States military.

  • Civil Rights

    • ECUADOR SHOCK AT THREATS FROM BRITISH GOVERNMENT

      An Ecuadorian government spokesperson commenting on the threats by the British Government to enter the Embassy said:

      “We are deeply shocked by British government’s threats against the sovereignty of the Ecuadorian Embassy and their suggestion that they may forcibly enter the embassy.

      This is a clear breach of international law and the protocols set out in the Vienna Convention.

    • Julian Assange: UK issues ‘threat’ to arrest Wikileaks founder

      Ecuador has accused the UK of making a “threat” to enter its embassy in London to arrest Wikileaks’ Julian Assange.

    • Julian Assange can be arrested in embassy, UK warns Ecuador

      The diplomatic and political minefield that is the fate of Julian Assange is expected to come a step closer to being traversed when Ecuador’s president, Rafael Correa, gives his decision on whether his country will grant the WikiLeaks’ founder asylum around lunchtime on Thursday.

    • Julian Assange asylum: Ecuador is right to stand up to the US

      Ecuador has now made its decision: to grant political asylum to Julian Assange. This comes in the wake of an incident that should dispel remaining doubts about the motives behind the UK/Swedish attempts to extradite WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. On Wednesday, the UK government made an unprecedented threat to invade Ecuador’s embassy if Assange is not handed over. Such an assault would be so extreme in violating international law and diplomatic conventions that it is difficult to even find an example of a democratic government even making such a threat, let alone carrying it out.

    • Peruvians rally to change course of Computer Crimes Bill

      In a wave of civic action, Peruvian citizens have sent over 5,000 letters to their representatives in Congress using Access’ speakout platform in response to the Computer Crimes Bill being quietly fast-tracked through the legislative process.

      The bill could be called up for a final vote in the Plenary Assembly at any time, though legislators have yet to publicize a schedule. The vote is expected to occur as soon as new commission assignments are finalized, but a new president of the Commission of Justice and Human Rights, could move the bill back to committee for further debate and consultation with affected stakeholders.

08.14.12

Links 14/8/2012: Red Hat Embraces OpenStack, Calligra 2.5 Released

Posted in News Roundup at 11:29 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Linux Top 3: SUSE Secures Boot, Ubuntu Boots Wayland, Slackware 14 Boots Up

    Every Linux distro in one way or another is trying to come to grips with the upcoming Secure Boot problem that Microsoft is unleashing on the hardware world with Windows 8. Red Hat has outlined its plans, which are to acquire a key and then to essentially ‘play along’ with the Microsoft Secure Boot.

  • Linux and Open Source news for Week 32 of 2012
  • Desktop

  • Server

  • Kernel Space

    • We Interview Leann Ogasawara, Canonical Kernel Team Manager, Marathoner and Mother

      I first met Leann Ogasawara at the Ubuntu Developer Summit in Oakland, California back in May of this year and ever since hearing her talk about the various projects she works on I wanted to get a interview in.

    • Linux Benchmarks This Weekend: Btrfs, VMware, Cloud
    • Qualcomm Atheros Publishes New Network Driver

      While Atheros network adapters were once notorious under Linux, their wired and wireless network adapters in recent years have been backed by permissively-licensed open-source drivers from the company. This work continues with Qualcomm Atheros announcing this week the release of a new ALX network driver.

    • Experience the Next Automotive Revolution

      There are many significant milestones marking the path of automotive history from the early beginnings in the 19th Century to the era of modern transportation technology today. However, there are only a few revolutions that caused a paradigm shift within the entire industry.

    • 30 Linux Kernel Developers in 30 Weeks: John Linville
    • Graphics Stack

      • NVIDIA Employee To Meet With X.Org Developers In X.Org Developers Conference

        It seems that NVIDIA is trying its best to engage better with Linux developers, thanks to comments by Linus Torvalds and Valve’s interest in steam for Linux. After a NVIDIA employee tried to open up in Linux kernel mailing list, its time for them to meet up and engage with other developers in X.Org Developers conference to be held next month.

      • A Look At OpenGL ES 3.0: Lots Of Good Stuff

        The OpenGL ES 3.0 specification was released earlier this week at SIGGRAPH 2012. The slides from the OpenGL ES BoF session have now surfaced with more perspective on this latest Khronos standard targeting OpenGL on mobile devices.

      • ETC2 Texture Compression Looks Good For OpenGL

        With OpenGL ES 3.0 and OpenGL 4.3 there is now mandatory texture compression support in the form of ETC2, the Ericsson Texture Compression method.

        The slides pertaining to the mandated ETC2 support in the latest GL standards from SIGGRAPH 2012 have now been uploaded. ETC1/ETC2 was designed by Ericsson Research and this means of texture compression is quite interesting. ETC2 also isn’t covered by patents like the notorious for open-source but widely-used S3TC texture compression.

      • Rootbeer: A High-Performance GPU Compiler For Java

        In recent months there has been an initiative underway called Rootbeer, which is a GPU compiler for Java code. Rootbeer claims to be more advanced than CUDA or OpenCL bindings for Java as it does static code analysis of the Java Bytecode and takes it automatically to the GPU.

      • Wayland Support For Cursor Themes

        After several interesting news items in recent days about Wayland, the latest is that Wayland/Weston now has support for cursor themes.

      • R300 Gallium3D Performance Is Topping Out

        Recently I showed benchmarks of the Radeon Gallium3D driver for a mature Radeon HD 4870 graphics card over the past two years to look at the performance improvements made to this open-source Linux graphics driver. Up today are benchmarks of an old Radeon X1950PRO (R500 class) ATI graphics card when using the original “R300g” Gallium3D driver and testing every major Mesa release going back to Mesa 7.8 with the classic R300 driver.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • Support the 2012 KDE Randa Meetings: Inspired and Intense

        The KDE Randa Meetings are a small gathering of KDE contributors in the village of Randa, Switzerland. For the fourth year, the intense Randa sprints will include key KDE projects and top developers, all collaborating concurrently under one roof, isolated from noise and distractions. Funds are being raised to support the meetings.

      • Digia Sends Open Letter To The KDE Community, Promises Commitment To The Qt Ecosystem
      • Amarok Now Supports StatsSyncing With Last.FM

        Finally the feature we all have been waiting is here. Amarok will now support StatSyncing with Last.FM, the largest music social network in this planet. In short, it now means stuff from Amarok like rating of song, First Played and Last Played timings, tags etc will be available in Last.FM and vice versa.

      • Calligra 2.5 Released

        Words, the word processor has improved tables editing support. Sheets has a stand alone docker that help to preserve space and also makes data entry easier. Stage, the presentation program has several fixes to stabilize the program and make it more usable. Kexi, the database application now offers a full screen mode through F11.

      • Calligra 2.5
      • Krita 2.5 Comes With Enhanced Brushes

        Krita is a KDE based art creation suite that aims to make digital painting easier. A new version of Krita, Krita 2.5 specially comes with several enhancements in brushes that make the paintings more realistic.

      • Qt’s Move Gives FOSS the Jitters

        “I think this is a great development,” opined Google+ blogger Kevin O’Brien. “First, it gives Qt the stability of support by a company, which should give it the resources to move forward. Second, Digia made a point of reaching out to the KDE community when they made the purchase. At a time when KDE is moving into a dominant position, this stability is important.”

    • GNOME Desktop

      • GNOME Commit-Digest Issue 201
      • GNOME opts for pristine GNOME OS dev environment

        The GNOME Project is coming away from its annual GUADEC conference with a new goal for itself: creating a new operating system on which to develop apps. But is GNOME OS an indictment against current Linux application development practices?

        The new project, GNOME OS, is emphatically not meant to be a replacement Linux distribution to challenge the likes of Ubuntu, openSUSE, and Fedora.

      • Preview of GNOME 3.5.5

        Matthias Clasen gave readers of his blog another one of his release previews this Saturday of the upcoming GNOME 3.5.5. The big feature this release is the “new screen lock implementation.” Beyond that, various applications and System Settings received some improvements as well.

  • Distributions

    • Snowlinux 3 Crystal Review: With LTS Linux Kernel and Gnome 2 desktop

      True that Linux world is going through a rapid change. There are three types of Gnome based distros I see:

      1. Distros which are using Gnome 3 as such
      2. Distros which have Gnome 3 but have their own modification as well, like Unity in Ubuntu, Cinnamon in Linux Mint, etc.
      3. Distros which still prefer Gnome 2 or Gnome 2 derivative like Linux Mint Mate, Scientific Linux.

    • Reviews: Hello, Peppermint Three

      When I first started using Peppermint OS I found there were little things that put me off, not technical problems, but a simple case of habit and user preference. For example, I like to know which application I’m launching and I might have different image editors or text editors for different tasks. Peppermint’s approach of labeling items by task rather than by program name took a little adjusting. However, I have to admit newcomers to Linux will probably prefer the Peppermint way of doing things as they will not recognize specific program names. That comes with time. I also found trying to tell web services apart from locally installed applications was a trial and error process. There doesn’t appear to be a clear cut way to tell them apart. Otherwise, I think I like the way Peppermint provides some basic software on a very tight platform and lets users customize from the ground up. It does make for a good deal of gathering software post-install, but the performance and lack of unwanted items in the menus more than make up for it.

      The above were my personal desires compared to what I found in Peppermint and that’s not really a fair way to judge an operating system. A better evaluation would compare what Peppermint does with what the project’s goals are. The Peppermint website claims to offer a fast, lightweight distribution with a focus on providing web apps and services. These goals are all accomplished and both the setup of the OS and navigation of the user environment are made easy. I suspect users, especially those new to Linux, will be able to dive into Peppermint without much difficulty. This little distribution is a fairly niche product, aimed at people who want a platform for web services and/or want a low-resource base. In being focused Peppermint is able to provide a simple, polished distribution to suit its target audience.

    • MacPup LINUX – How do you like this Apple?

      During previous reviews of Puppy LINUX distributions such as Wary, Slacko and Lucid I have received comments asking “Have you tried MacPup?”. Well up until now no I haven’t.

      I downloaded the ISO for MacPup a few weeks ago but I’ve only just reached the point where I have had time to have an in depth look.

    • New Releases

      • First release candidate for Slackware 14

        The first release candidate for Slackware 14 has been released. The new version contains many refreshed packages compared to the current version 13.37 (code-named “Leet”) which was released in April of last year. The updated packages include a current long-term kernel based on Linux 3.2, GCC 4.7, version 2.15 of GLIBC, version 1.12.1 of X.org, and Perl 5.16.0. The Xfce and KDE desktops have also been updated to the latest stable versions.

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Mageia 2 GNOME: not that good

        Mageia is a distribution forked from Mandriva some time ago. That’s not a secret. Also, it’s not a secret that Mandriva’s preferred desktop environment was KDE. Even the fact that the latest version Mandriva 2011 has only a KDE option proves that position.

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat Announces Preview Version of Enterprise-Ready OpenStack Distribution

        Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the immediate availability of the preview release of Red Hat’s OpenStack distribution based on the popular open source OpenStack framework for building and managing private, public and hybrid Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) clouds. With this, Red Hat delivers the next step in its plans for the industry’s only enterprise-ready OpenStack distribution with Red Hat’s award-winning commercial support, certified ecosystem of hardware and application vendors and leadership in delivering trusted open source clouds for organizations worldwide requiring enterprise-grade solutions and support.

      • Red Hat finally commits to OpenStack for the cloud

        Red Hat has long supported OpenStack cloud software… in theory. In practice though the Linux giant wouldn’t commit to OpenStack until now.

        On August 13, Red Hat, announced the immediate availability of the preview release of Red Hat’s OpenStack distribution. This test release is based on the Essex version of popular open source OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud framework.

      • Red Hat offers up OpenStack preview, supported version planned for ’13
      • Red Hat Prepares Enterprise-Focused OpenStack Distribution
      • Red Hat Releases Open Source OpenStack Cloud Preview

        Red Hat is out today with the first public preview release for its Enterprise OpenStack cloud distribution.

        The preview release is the first milestone on the path to what will become Red Hat’s Enterprise OpenStack commercially supported release at some point in 2013. OpenStack is one of the leading open source cloud platforms and has the support of major IT vendors like Dell, HP, IBM, Cisco, AT&T and Rackspace.

    • Debian Family

      • Debian changes default desktop environment from GNOME to Xfce

        Almost in silence, Debian oldtimer Joey Hess made a commit that will switch default desktop task from GNOME to Xfce in Debian’s forthcoming 7.0 Wheezy release. And that was an excellent choice, if I may add!

        Xfce is full featured, but lightweight desktop environemnt whose best days are yet to come. It aims to be fast and low on system resources, while still being visually appealing and user friendly. And those are all good reasons for Joey to make it the default, so a desktop environment can fit on Debian installer’s CD#1, which GNOME currently does not.

      • Organize a Debian Birthday party in your city

        On August 16, the Debian community will celebrate its 19th birthday since Ian Murdock’s original founding announcement. As is tradition, the Debian communities all around the world will gather to celebrate it with Debian Birthday parties.

        A Debian Birthday party is a fun event, globally marking the appreciation and the joy of being part of our community and could consist of workshops, talks, or bug squashing parties both virtual and in real life. Check if there is one in your area, and if not, it’s not too late to organize one and mark the event in the wiki!

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

  • OSI Signs Declaration of Internet Freedom

    Declaration of Internet Freedom is an initiative to make the Intenet as free and open. It aims to defend the rights of netizens in having access to the content on the Intenet in a transparent manner while protecting everyone’s privacy.

    OSI, a community non-profit organisation which promotes awareness of non-propreitary software and approvers of open-source conformant licesnses, has recently posted that they have been added as a signatory to the Declaration of Internet Freedom movement.

  • The open source technology behind Twitter

    Without open source, Twitter wouldn’t exist. Every Tweet you send and receive touches open source software on its journey between computers and mobile devices. We were curious about how much open source is used at Twitter. Beyond that, we wanted to discover how open source may influence the culture at Twitter, Inc.

  • Does Open Source Threaten American Software?

    After all, critics of open source will note, “Intellectual Property” (a lawyer’s term for patent, copyright and trademark rights) is America’s key advantage in global competition. Open source throws that away. Might as well turn over the keys of American exceptionalism to China and turn out the lights, goes the implication.

  • Web Browsers

  • Project Releases

    • coreutils-8.18 released [stable]

      Executive summary: 8.18 removes the su program, fixes an 8.17 regression in ls –color and tweaks sort’s memory constraints. All other fixes are for old (present since “the beginning”) and relatively obscure bugs.

  • Public Services/Government

    • The Government of Extremadura launches public consultation on the Regional Digital Agenda

      The Government of Extremadura opens up public consultation for the participation in the development of the Digital Agenda of Extremadura; an integrating, sustainable and intelligent project of all actions projected on Information Technology and Communication matters into the region, involving all stakeholders and tied agents in the ICT sector in Extremadura.

  • Programming

    • GCC Moves Forward With Conversion To C++

      The GCC initiative to convert more of the code-base from C to C++ as the implementation language for this leading open-source compiler is nearing fruition. On Sunday, Google’s Diego Novillo published a set of GCC patches for merging the C++ conversion into trunk.

      The set of six patches so far implement the changes made within GCC’s cxx-conversion branch and change the default boot-strap process so that stage one of the compiler build always happens with a C++ compiler. It’s possible the cxx-conversion branch could be merged for GCC 4.8, which will be released in 2013. Back in April I wrote about the aim for the C++ switch being GCC 4.8.

    • Java for graphics cards

      Phil Pratt-Szeliga, a postgraduate at Syracuse University in New York, has released the source code of his Rootbeer GPU compiler on Github. The developer presented the software at the High Performance Computing and Communication conference in Liverpool in June. The slides from this presentation can be found in the documentation section of the Github directory.

Leftovers

  • Health/Nutrition

  • Finance

    • ‘Are you kidding me?’ — Eliot Spitzer reacts to Goldman Sachs getting off ‘scot-free’

      So how do we make sense of this? Goldman Sachs emails call their own investments junk and crap, and Goldman Sachs salespeople refer to clients as Muppets and elephants, yet the Justice Department says there’s not enough evidence to bring a case on behalf of Goldman Sachs investors who lost vast sums of money.

    • Government won’t prosecute Goldman Sachs in fraud probe

      It’s at the discretion of the prosecutor whether to prosecute.

      Some prosecutors — for example, in cases involving petty (brown-skinned) street crime — need only something approximating the possibility of a conviction, or near enough, so long as they have a single shaky witness from blocks away who might even look credible if cleaned up (or “coached”).

      Other prosecutors — for example, in cases involving Jon Corzine or others of Our Betters — need no less than a “smoking gun” plus crime scene photos of the perp as the bullet leaves the chamber — without which, they say, they just don’t have enough to go to trial (do click, my characterization isn’t far off; and yes, that’s our hero Pat Fitzgerald talking).

  • Civil Rights

    • Google, Salesforce were allegedly offered ‘TrapWire’ spy tool

      Now approaching its 10th day of a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack, WikiLeaks has released information about a video-surveillance program that is possibly being used by the US government and large organisations, such as Salesforce and Google.

      The program, called TrapWire, was developed by US-based Abraxas Corporation, which is alleged to be staffed by many former US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) agents. TrapWire is meant to identify terrorists who approach a facility multiple times as they conduct their surveillance. According to Abraxas’ documentation on TrapWire, it is able to correlate video surveillance with other data, such as watch lists. It can, for example, identify suspected terrorists using facial recognition or stolen vehicles by reading number plates, and then correlate this information with other event data that it already has.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Trademarks

    • Copyrights

      • The Humble Music Bundle

        Hi everybody. Well, this comes too late. This bundle is already over… I’m sorry for that. Anyway, i’d like to introduce to you a new bundle concept by the Humble Bundle team. This time, there were not games, but music albums from some famous internet’s musicians. These albums also came all in FLAC and MP3 high quality files!
        Let’s take a look in detail:

      • LendInks, Mob Mentality and the DMCA

        Every day, people are gunned down when they leave the relatively safe main streets of Reddit, Facebook or Twitter to wander into bad neighborhood forums where they’re not known. The usual weapons are words and the common advice is to grow thick skin for protection. Consequences are usually low; feelings are about all that ever get hurt.

        Sometimes, however, mobs form. Posses meet up outside a hated website and hit the owners with barrages of venomous email. If a site has a forum or a Facebook page, they try to take over. If it’s supported by ad money, they might launch a campaign against the advertisers, as happened in 2010 with Cooks Source Magazine–a New England site brought down by web users for cavalierly stealing content.

        If all of this fails to satisfy the mob’s thirst for blood, they might take their anger directly to the website’s landlord, the hosting company, with burlap bags filled with DMCA take-down notices the host can’t afford to ignore.

08.12.12

Links 12/8/2012: CDE Open-Sourced, Wikileaks Exposes TrapWire

Posted in News Roundup at 10:00 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • Finance

    • Levin: Decision not to prosecute Goldman Sachs shows weakness

      The U.S. Justice Department’s decision not to prosecute Goldman Sachs Group Inc for its subprime mortgage trades resulted from either “weak laws or weak enforcement,” the senator who asked for a criminal investigation of the firm said on Friday.

    • Yesterday Was “Relieve Goldman Sachs of Their Legal Exposure” Day

      I mentioned yesterday that Goldman Sachs got a rare “reverse Wells notice” from the SEC, when they were told that a mortgage-backed securities deal which they earlier heard they would face prosecution for would not net them any civil enforcement. But that was just the beginning. Later in the day, they learned they would not face any prosecution from the Justice Department for the misdealings brought to light in a Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations report a year ago.

  • Censorship

    • Australian Gov’t Drops Plan To Snoop On Internet Use — For Now

      Australian Attorney-General Nicola Roxon has been forced to back down on her government’s unpopular plan to force ISPs to store the web history and social networking of all Australians for two years. The plan has been deeply unpopular with the public, with hackers attacking the government’s spy agency

  • Civil Rights

    • Confirmed: New Nationwide “Trapwire” Surveillance System Is Actively Recording, Monitoring Everything

      If you didn’t believe that everything you do is monitored before today, this latest confirmation should seal the deal. The information, of course, was not officially released, but when hackers gained access to highly secure emails at global analysis firm Stratfor earlier this year the cat came out of the bag.

      With New York recently launching an all-seeing domestic awareness system, many Americans who don’t live in Mayor Bloomberg’s police state believe they are safe from the watchful eye of Big Brother.

    • Wikileaks: CIA-connected private intelligence firm TrapWire watching Americans

      The latest WikiLeaks release has shone a spotlight on an alleged domestic and foreign surveillance program run with cloud-based software provided by Virginia company TrapWire, many of whose top leaders and employees are former members of three-letter American intelligence agencies.

    • WIKILEAKS: Surveillance Cameras Around The Country Are Being Used In A Huge Spy Network

      The U.S. cable networks won’t be covering this one tonight (not accurately, anyway), but Trapwire is making the rounds on social media today—it reportedly became a Trending hashtag on Twitter earlier in the day.
      Trapwire is the name of a program revealed in the latest Wikileaks bonanza—it is the mother of all leaks, by the way. Trapwire would make something like disclosure of UFO contact or imminent failure of a major U.S. bank fairly boring news by comparison.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • How YouTube lets content companies “claim” NASA Mars videos

        Lon Seidman knew he wasn’t going to get rich from his three-hour video discussion of the Curiosity rover landing on Mars. The local media entrepreneur did a live Google+ Hangout about the event and posted the resulting video to YouTube, expecting it would earn him a few bucks and attract some new readers to his site, CT Tech Junkie. During the discussion, Seidman played a number of NASA videos about the Curiosity mission. He knew he was on safe ground because works of the federal government are automatically in the public domain.

08.11.12

Links 11/8/2012: GNOME OS, OSI for Internet Freedom

Posted in News Roundup at 8:15 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • How To Emulate A TI Calculator On Linux

    For a lot of geeks, the Texas Instrument Scientific Calculator was their best friends during classes in high school. Not so long ago, I remember programming a Space Invader game in TI-Basic during a Maths lesson. But as a downside to growing up: a lot of us had to leave our precious TI at the bottom of a drawer. Thanks to emulation and our favorite OS, it is possible to use a TI again with nostalgia. Two programs are available for that purpose, both with their advantages.

  • Desktop

  • Server

    • Linux distributors duke it out in cloud OS market

      Linux operating system distributor Suse says it is gaining ground among cloud service providers as their choice platform for delivering the open source OS to customers, but at least one analyst says the market is still split between the Suse, Red Hat and Canonical’s Ubuntu.

      Suse issued updated figures this week saying that it works with 20 cloud service providers (CSPs) to offer Linux OS to 15,000 enterprises. It lists major CSP customers as Amazon Web Services, Dell, Intel, Verizon and, most recently, Microsoft Azure.

      “The latest addition of Microsoft Windows Azure to the Suse Cloud Program demonstrates Suse’s growing momentum as the de facto standard enterprise Linux operating system offered by cloud providers,” the company said in a press release issued this week.

  • Audiocasts/Shows

  • Kernel Space

    • HelenOS 0.5: Micro-Kernel Multi-Server OS Release

      HelenOS 0.5.0 represents improvements made to this open-source operating system since March of 2011. Some of the key improvements to this original operating system are USB support (USB v1.1). a re-implemented networking stack with full TCP support, Realtek RTL8139 / Intel E1000 network drivers, read-only EXT2 and ISO9660 file-system support, read-write MINIX FS support, and some new ported applications. The ported applications to HelenOS include GNU Binutils, PCC (Portable C Compiler), and MSIM (MIPS R4000 simulator).

    • Linux Foundation Heads to Korea, Thanks to Samsung

      The Linux Foundation is bringing Linus Torvalds to South Korea. Torvalds will be a key speaker at the inaugural Korea Linux Forum which is set to occur October 11 to 12 in Seoul, South Korea.

      Linux is certainly no stranger to Asia, though the Linux Foundation seems to have had more events (and success) in Japan in recent years. The move to have an event in Korea is being driven by consumer electronics giant Samsung.

    • MTE Explains : The Origin Of The Penguin Tux

      Apple’s logo is a half-bitten apple. Windows’s logo somewhat looks like a window (at least in the beginning). So why is there a penguin as a mascot for Linux? And why is it called Tux? And where does it come from? And why is it a mascot and not a logo? And so on. Yes, we have a lot of questions about Linux, but strangely, there is a lot more about the penguin.

    • Kernel Log: Major overhaul of Nouveau

      The kernel driver for NVIDIA graphics chips is undergoing a major overhaul. KVM is now available for MIPS. The new “lslocks” lists locked files and displays the programs that locked them.

    • Graphics Stack

      • Mesa Release Shake-Up: Mesa 8.1 Is Now Mesa 9.0

        Well, there isn’t a major Mesa release happening this month as was originally planned. There also isn’t going to be a Mesa 8.1 release. Instead, Mesa 9.0 will be released in September.

        Intel’s Ian Romanick began laying out these new plans last night with the other Mesa developers. This shake-up is happening in part because Intel’s planning for OpenGL ES 3.0 support in Mesa by early next year — plans they publicly announced earlier this week at SIGGRAPH in Los Angeles.

      • GLAMOR 0.5 Acceleration Library Released
      • MSAA Anti-Aliasing For AMD Radeon Evergreen GPUs
      • Mesa Support For OpenGL 3.1 Core Contexts
      • Celebrating 20 Years Of OpenGL At SIGGRAPH 2012

        SIGGRAPH 2012 in Los Angeles is in full swing this week and beyond the usual exciting announcements — new OpenGL specifications and other Khronos announcements — the 20th anniversary of OpenGL is being celebrated from this leading industry graphics conference.

        For those not at SIGGRAPH LA 2012 (unfortunately I’m not there to provide any live coverage on Phoronix), here are some Internet resources:

      • X.Org Server 1.13 Nears: Baking Cookies

        The non-critical bug window for X.Org Server 1.13 is now closed and Keith Packard has announced the release of xorg-server 1.12.99.904.

        The new features, like the driver re-work for PRIME DRI2 offloading and the nuking of XAA and new GLX support, is detailed in X.Org Server 1.13 RC1 Packs In Many Changes.

      • NVIDIA To Meet With X.Org Developers Next Month

        NVIDIA doesn’t usually show up at the annual X.Org Developers’ Summits/Conferences, but for some reason at least one NVIDIA employee will be trekking to Germany for meeting with the open-source developers.

        Earlier this week I was surprised (as shared on Twitter) when I received an automated notification that Andy Ritger signed up to be at XDC2012. Andy Ritger is a long-time NVIDIA Linux/UNIX engineer who served as the manager of the NVIDIA Linux Graphics Driver Software until Hardy Doelfel took over in late 2011.

      • A Linux LiveCD To Play With Wayland/Weston

        If you’re sad about Ubuntu delaying their Wayland System Compositor and want to take Wayland/Weston for a spin, there’s another alternative for playing with this next-generation Linux desktop technology.

        For a Wayland-based LiveCD that is designed for showing off Wayland/Weston and related technologies, there is the oddly-named RebeccaBlack OS. The developer of this Linux OS, who says that distribution is named in honor of his favorite celebrity (Rebecca Black), released a new spin this week.

      • Running Wayland: It Works, But A Lot Of Work Remains

        Following the news shared today that Ubuntu’s delayed their Wayland System Compositor adoption from Ubuntu 12.10 to at least Ubuntu 13.04 there was the more positive news that there’s an updated third-party spin of an Ubuntu derivative running Wayland. This article has some more information on that new “RebeccaBlack OS” release along with screenshots that provide a glimpse of where the Wayland adoption is at today.

      • X.Org Server 1.13 Nears: Baking Cookies

        The non-critical bug window for X.Org Server 1.13 is now closed and Keith Packard has announced the release of xorg-server 1.12.99.904.

        The new features, like the driver re-work for PRIME DRI2 offloading and the nuking of XAA and new GLX support, is detailed in X.Org Server 1.13 RC1 Packs In Many Changes.

      • ARM Still Tackling Linux Xen Virtualization Support

        More than a month ago I wrote about ARM working on Linux virtualization support via Xen. This work still hasn’t landed in the mainline Linux kernel, but it continues to move along.

      • Radeon Gallium3D Has Made Much Progress In Two Years
      • Intel Announces OpenGL ES 3.0 Plans For Mesa

        Coming out of SIGGRAPH 2012 is a new branch of Mesa from Intel’s Open-Source Technology Center that’s working on full open-source OpenGL ES 3.0 support for Intel HD hardware.

        This OpenGL ES 3.0 branch of Mesa currently has “pre-alpha quality” support for OpenGL ES 3.0 for Intel HD hardware and it won’t be merged until after the Mesa 8.1 release. However, Intel hopes to have beta OpenGL ES 3.0 support officially ready and in mainline Mesa for Q1’2013.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • Tips on Choosing your Linux Desktop Environment

      GNOME and KDE are the top desktop environment choices you come across when you are about to choose a Linux distribution. Choosing between them isn’t much of a pain if you are going straight for Ubuntu, but if you’re a bit picky about your desktop, then knowing a bit more about desktop environments becomes a must. So, what are desktop environments anyway?

      A desktop environment consists mainly of the graphical user interface and a collection of tightly integrated applications blended seamlessly to provide a complete user experience. So, in a desktop environment you’ll most likely find a common set of elements like icons, menus, pointers, panels, desktop widgets, and even wallpapers. Basically, a desktop environment is what you see when you log in to your computer. An operating system on the other hand is the one that lies underneath, helping your computer to boot and manage a bunch of other processes.

    • The naturalness in the evolution of desktop environments

      I’ve been browsing distrowatch.com lately noticing something that is happening for some time now, but maybe surprised me for the first time because it is still happening. What I am talking about is that there are more Linux distributions releasing new versions using Gnome 2.32 than Gnome 3.4!

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • What’s new in Gwenview 2.9?
      • Dolphin immediately useful

        Like many, I read this already famous blog post about the stripped-down Nautilus with growing surprise. I won’t go into what I think it’s wrong with it as others have said enough already. I’d like to focus on the positive: the very first point made.

      • Great News for Qt and KDE ..and a bit of Red Hat!

        What a KDE does in a Gnome blog? Normally it gets FUD, but this time we are going to praise it! I got double hit from KDE yesterday. First by the awesome news that Digia Committed to Thriving Qt Ecosystem and secondly by trying Rebecca Black.

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Gnome PackageKit Now Faster, Supports Multiple Parallel Jobs

        Gnome PackageKit, the tool that is used to install packages and apps in most distros like Fedora now supports parallelization. For developers, it means that they can now process several jobs at the same time, while for end users, it means that they can now expect a faster PackageKit.

      • GNOME OS Is Coming

        At the GUADEC conference in Spain, GNOME’s annual conference for developers, some of the core developers have decided to go ahead with a concept they are calling GNOME OS.

        Before you start rolling your eyes, expecting Yet-Another-Linux-Distro, let me reveal that is is slightly more complicated than that.

      • GNOME OS

        In my last post I described how, during this year’s GUADEC, members of the GNOME community came together to plan where the project could go in the next 18 months or so. The slides from Xan and Juanjo’s talk give some of the background to those discussions. We took copious notes during the planning sessions that were held; these will all be available online soon, so you can get a more detailed picture if you want one. In what follows I’ll try to give a bit an overview.

        But first, a clarification. The idea of GNOME OS has been around for a couple of years, and there has been a fair amount of confusion about what it means. Some people seem to have assumed that GNOME OS is an effort to replace distributions, so let me be clear: that is not the case. While the creation of a standalone GNOME OS install does feature as a part of our plans, this is primarily intended as a platform for testing and development. In actual fact, all of the improvements that we hope to make through the GNOME OS initiative will directly improve what the GNOME project is able to offer distributions.

      • GNOME OS is on the way – but mainly for testing and development

        The GNOME project, which is facing heavy criticism over usability issues, is to build a touch-capable ‘GNOME OS’ as a way of improving the overall experience for users and developers

      • Gnome OS to land in 2014

        Developers have revealed they are working on a Gnome OS, potentially extending the reach of the open-source platform to tablets.

        At the moment, Gnome is a desktop environment that sits on top of Linux OSes – but has been ditched by Ubuntu in favour of its own Unity interface.

        At a Gnome conference, developers said they were working on an OS, targeting a release date of March 2014, according to their slides. However, the Gnome OS isn’t meant to replace existing distros, such as Ubuntu or Mint.

      • GNOME OS: a bid to catch up with the big boys
      • A freasy future for GNOME
      • The new GDM, the new Screen Shield and Ubuntu

        This is a quick look to the new Lock (Screen Shield) of Gnome Shell, and the new interface of GDM, which both come to brake more the visual coherence between Gnome and Ubuntu that ships LightDM.

        LightDM or GDM is just a small detail, but it’s not the only one. It’s the File Manager, the File Previewer (aka Sushi), the Scroll bars.. So even if you install GS in Ubuntu, experience will be much different from the Vanilla Gnome. Anyway.

  • Distributions

    • In Search of the Best Linux for Windows Refugees

      “If you want to make the transition easy for Windows users, you have to be talking about KDE,” said Google+ blogger Kevin O’Brien. In fact, “there was even a great video a couple of years ago from ZDNet Australia where they showed people the new KDE and told them it was the new Windows,” he recalled. “Not only did folks believe it, but they said it was a much improved Windows.”

    • Linux Deepin 12.06 review

      Linux Deepin is a distribution derived from Ubuntu Desktop. The latest edition, Linux Deepin 12.06, which is based on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, was released on July 17, That means it was released later than expected, as the version number clearly indicates that the release date should have been in June, not July. But that is a minor issue. Better released late with major bugs quashed, than on time, but bug-ridden.

    • 5 popular Linux distros

      It’s nearly impossible to tell how many people are using any given Linux distribution. Each distro probably has some internal statistics that they can use to judge relative popularity, but tracking how many people have installed a distro or use it regularly is currently not possible. However, we can look at some general trends online to get an idea of a distro’s relative popularity.

    • ROSA Marathon 2012: first-ever usable LXDE distribution

      Some time ago I made a decision not to look at LXDE-based distributions. One of the reasons for me was a lack of usability, because of keyboard layout configuration. I need to type in Russian and English both, which means I need to switch between different layouts quickly and often. None of the LXDE distributions I’ve tried had this option: Debian, Fedora, Knoppix, PCLOS, Porteus, SliTaz, Zorin OS 6 Lite.

    • ROSA Marathon 2012 GNOME Edition final
    • ROSA Marathon 2012 GNOME preview
    • New Releases

      • LinHES R7.4 “rdt”
      • Clonezilla 2.0.0-1
      • Updated Waldorf testing images: 20120806

        The previous CrunchBang 11 “Waldorf” development images have now been replaced by some updated builds. For anyone unaware, these builds are based on Debian Wheezy sources. Wheezy is the current testing branch of Debian and therefore is likely to experience changes, bugs and breakages. These builds are not recommended for anyone who requires a stable system, or is not happy running into occasional breakages.

      • Snowlinux 3 “Crystal” released!

        The team is proud to announce the release of Snowlinux 3 “Crystal”.

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • August 2012 issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine released

        The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the August 2012 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved.

    • Red Hat Family

      • This Is One Incredible CEO

        The Motley Fool’s readers have spoken, and I have heeded your cries. After months of pointing out CEO gaffes and faux pas, I’ve decided to make it a weekly tradition to also point out corporate leaders who are putting the interests of shareholders and the public first and are generally deserving of praise from investors. For reference, here is last week’s selection.

        This week, I want to take a closer look at Red Hat (NYS: RHT) CEO Jim Whitehurst and show you why a mixture of growth, hiring, and humility makes him a fantastic leader.

      • Scientific Linux 6.3 Review: Simply outstanding

        Yesterday, 8th Aug., Connie Sieh announced the release of Scientific Linux 6.3, an enterprise-class distribution built from source package for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.3: “Scientific Linux 6.3 i386/x86_64 is now available.

      • Fedora

        • Moving to Arch Linux from Fedora

          A little over seven weeks has passed since I wrote my thoughts on Fedora 17, and finally, those little paper cuts became too much.

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Japanese Bacon

            When I was at the Community Leadership Summit and OSCON a few weeks back I had the pleasure of meeting Masafumi Ohta who is a passionate Ubuntu user who had flown from Nerima-ku in Japan to the event. Masafumi very generously gave me a print copy of Ubunchu; thanks, Masafumi, for the kindness!

          • Ubuntu App Showdown: 15 Hot Apps to Watch

            Ubuntu App Showdown contest was introduced more than a month ago by Canonical to encourage application development for Ubuntu in a big way. And the initiative is showing results already. More than 150 applications were submitted out of which, 133 has been qualified and made it to the final list. Judges will vote on the apps and will declare the winners very soon. Meanwhile, here’s our list of top 15 apps (in no particular order) from Ubuntu App Showdown contest, which we think are the best of the lot. Read on.

          • 10 Awesome New Ubuntu Apps Developed for the Ubuntu App Showdown
          • Ubuntu may drop Nautilus 3.6 from Quantal!?

            These are really interesting news that come directly from Ubuntu’s Sebastien Bacher in Launchpad Bug Tracker. Sebastian basically says that Ubuntu cannot follow Gnome upstream as Gnome lack to plan their work in advance or communicate enough with Ubuntu about their new features.

          • # Kubuntu Gets KDE Support In Firefox Again
          • Ubuntu 12.10 May Ship With Older, But More Featured, Nautilus

            Over in the development land of Ubuntu 12.10, a new version of the ‘new Nautilus’ has landed – bringing with it yet another feature removal.

          • Ubuntu debates replacing Nautilus file manager

            In a bug report on Launchpad, Ubuntu developer Sebatien Bacher has suggested that Ubuntu might ship Nautilus 3.4 with version 12.10 of the Linux distribution – currently available as a third alpha – instead of the latest upstream version of the file manager. Nautilus 3.6, which is currently in development, would be included in the repositories but not be bundled by default. This would mark a departure from recent practices where the Ubuntu developers had always shipped the latest version of Nautilus with their custom Unity desktop interface.

          • ZaReason UltraLap 430 is the first Linux Ultrabook

            Dell might be preparing to offer its XPS 13 with Ubuntu 12.04 this Fall, but Linux boutique ZaReason has beaten them to the punch by putting the UltraLap 430 up for sale. It’s the first Ultrabook on the market that’s shipping with Linux.

            The $899 base price gets you a decently-specced unit. A 1.8GHz 3rd generation Intel Core i3 processor starts things off, and it’s teamed up with 4GB of DDR3 memory and a 32GB mSATA SSD. The Intel base hardware adds 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and HD 4000 graphics to the mix — as well as a pair of USB 3.0 ports. The UltraLap’s 14.1-inch display offers a native resolution of 1366 x 768, and there’s an HDMI port in case you want to output video to a secondary display.

          • Ubuntu Delays Wayland System Compositor

            Ubuntu 12.10 will not be shipping with a Wayland-based system compositor as was once hoped for, but the experimental system compositor can be enabled from a PPA in a very primitive state.

          • Top 10 Ubuntu App Downloads for July 2012

            Canonical published today, August 3rd, this month’s top 10 app downloads from Ubuntu Software Center. As you can see below, the most appreciated apps are still the games from the Humble Indie Bundle V. Without further ado here they are!

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Bodhi Linux Moves To Faster ARMHF

              Bodhi Linux ARM branch will now move to ARMHF branch.

            • Fuduntu review

              Fuduntu is mentioned in several comments in my blog and that makes me want to try it. I have never used Fuduntu before and at the first glance, I thought it is just a derivative of Ubuntu with Fluxbox ( I thought the name was Fubuntu), but then I checked again and realized it is based on Fedora and the name is Fuduntu. And the perfect time has come, a friend just gave me an old laptop yesterday and I am also having some free time so I decided to download and try the newest version of Fuduntu (2012) that uses kernel 3.4.4.

            • 10 things to do after installing Fuduntu
  • Devices/Embedded

    • Extending Raspberry Pi’s GPIO Interface with Gertboard

      Our favourite little board is determined not to stay away from the news for long. In yet another innovation for Raspberry Pi, the low-cost, credit-card sized hobbyist board, a new add-on interface was announced.

    • Raspberry Pi cases round-up: Eight inventive holders in photos

      The Raspberry Pi mini-computer has taken the tech world by storm. If you’re one of the lucky few to get one, one of the first things you’ll need is a case. Here’s a few to choose from.

    • BeagleBoard cape plug-ins are all the rage

      The BeagleBoard organization recently announced the availability of over 20 new plug-in boards for its ARM-powered computer platform – which runs both Google Android 4.0 and Linux Ubuntu.

      Essentially, the plug-in boards, or “capes” are designed to extend the already formidable (developer) BeagleBoard ecosystem with additional hardware, such as robot motor drivers and sensors that measure location and pressure.

    • Hackberry A10 $60 Developer Board Launches

      If you are looking for something similar to the Raspberry Pi Mini PC, but with a faster processor, extra memory, built in storage and wireless connectivity.

      You might be interested in the new Hackberry A10 Developer Board which is now available to purchase for around $60, and is capable of running a variety of operating systems including Ubuntu, Fedora, and other Linux based distros.

    • Phones

      • Android

        • [Video] Ubuntu For Android Shows Its Power

          Canonical had earlier announced plans to launch Ubuntu in Android based devices. Ubuntu for Android is a new initiative that will allow your high-end phone to work as a full desktop computer. In a video shown below, we can have an idea of what it will actually look like.

        • Could Android Find Success on the Desktop?

          Is Google preparing to do what it was rumored to do for so long, namely bring the Android mobile OS to the desktop? Today’s Android user on a smartphone may scoff at the idea but there are signs that Google might have the desktop in its sights, and it’s also clear that Chrome OS has not been the revolution on laptops or desktops that Google had hoped it woud be. Here are some of the rumblings about the possibility of Android on the desktop.

        • Ubuntu for Android Gets Shown Off and Detailed, We Want This as Soon as Possible

          Up until now, we have only heard rumors and seen still pictures of what Ubuntu running on an Android device will look like. Today however, a video has surfaced of the service up and running and it is exciting to see. It was promised that Ubuntu for Android “transforms your high-end phone into your productive desktop, whenever you need it.” While you might be skeptical at that claim, after watching the video your opinion might change.

        • Has functionality finally caught up with the Android spec race?

          Samsung has woken up to context: the Galaxy Note 10.1 has a fast quadcore processor and twice as much memory as most rivals, but listen to Samsung’s pitch and you’d hardly know it. Instead of the usual breathless glee over hardware and technical abilities, the Note 10.1 tells you exactly what it can do with all that’s under the hood. Namely, bring the stylus back in style, and create a compellingly different approach to tableteering, distinct to what Apple’s iPad offers.

        • Android races past Apple in smartphone market share
      • Ballnux

Free Software/Open Source

  • OSI Signs Declaration of Internet Freedom

    We just received confirmation that OSI’s request to be added as a signatory to the Declaration of Internet Freedom has been accepted. We endorse this Declaration and encourage authorities worldwide to embrace it and implement regulations protecting the principles it espouses.

  • Can open source be democratic?

    Open source has created a new way of mobilising communities but it has also allowed a democratic deficit to open up between developers and users. Glyn Moody offers his take on this gap and how it is being slowly closed.

  • Some Prominent Open Source Forks

    Penguinistas used to worry about the dreaded fork, especially of Linux. “What if Linux forks and becomes like Unix?” was a question often being posed in the open source media. Linus Torvalds would do his best to put those fears to rest, explaining that under the GPL forks are usually to be welcomed.

    He was of the opinion that if a fork improves a product and is liked by the users, those changes will almost certainly be rolled back into the originating application. If not, and the fork is indeed a marked improvement on the original, then the fork becomes the standard bearer at the expense of the original application.

  • Open-source Movements Butt Heads Over Logo

    A gear logo proposed to represent and easily identify open-source hardware has caught the eyes of the The Open Source Initiative, which believes the logo infringes its trademark.

    The gear logo is backed by the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA), which was formally established earlier this year to promote hardware innovation and unite the fragmented community of hackers and do-it-yourselfers. The gear mark is now being increasingly used on boards and circuits to indicate that the hardware is open-source and designs can be openly shared and modified.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • VMware Virtualization With OpenGL Still Smacks Oracle VirtualBox

      Earlier this year I said VMware’s virtual GPU driver was running fast for Linux — in comparison to Oracle’s VM VirtualBox 3D guest acceleration support. This continues to be the case with VMware’s OpenGL stack leading the way with superior support and performance. Recently I ran some desktop virtualization tests under VMware Fusion 4.1.3 and Oracle VM VirtualBox 4.1.18 from the Retina MacBook Pro with OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion host. Even with the OS X host, VMware’s 3D support exposed to the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS virtualized guest was much faster.

    • VMware Fusion Stuns VirtualBox In CPU Tests

      Aside from VMware virtualization smacking Oracle VirtualBox when it comes to the OpenGL support that’s passed through to VM guests, VMware Fusion 4 also does a nice job at outperforming VirtualBox when it comes to computational-focused workloads.

  • Funding

  • Project Releases

Leftovers

  • Security

  • Finance

    • An open infrastructure could curb high-frequency trading disasters

      In yesterday’s New York Times, Ellen Ullman criticized the SEC’s suggestion that mandated software testing could prevent automated-trading catastrophes like the one that shook the market and nearly bankrupted Knight Capital at the beginning of this month. More testing won’t work, according to Ullman, for a few reasons. First, computer systems are too complex to ever “fully test,” because they comprise multiple software and hardware subsystems, some proprietary, others (like routers) containing “inaccessible” embedded code. Second, all code contains bugs, and because bugs can be caused by interactions between modules and even by attempts to fix other bugs, no code will ever be completely bug-free. And finally, it is too difficult to delineate insignificant changes to the software from those that really require testing.

    • The Post-Work Economy

      And we’re sure not going to let the Luddites have their way, so we better get used to a society with an ever-smaller number of available jobs.

      * Remember bank tellers? ATMs do most of the work they used to do.
      * Remember paper maps? GPSs fill that gap now.
      * Newspapers? Magazines? Paper books? Electronic media is eating them all.
      * Records and CDs? I don’t have to tell you what happened to those, do I?
      * Media production in general? Technology does 90% of that now.
      * When’s the last time you dropped off a roll of film to be developed?
      * Office jobs? Sure, they’re still there in a FIRE economy. But each office gets more done with fewer heads.
      * Phone operators? Radio station DJs? Most of that’s automated now.
      * Fewer cops on the streets? Well, good thing we have those red-light automatic-ticket machines at every intersection, isn’t it?

    • ‘I’m sick to my stomach’: anger grows in Illinois at Bain’s latest outsourcing plan

      The Sensata plant in Freeport is profitable and competitive, but its majority owner, Bain Capital, has decided to ship jobs to China – and forced workers to train their overseas replacements

    • Goldman Sachs Leads Split With Obama, as GE Jilts Him Too

      Goldman Sachs Group (GS) employees have changed to red from blue.

      Four years ago, employees of New York-based Goldman gave three-fourths of their campaign donations to Democratic candidates and committees, including presidential nominee Barack Obama. This time, they’re showering 70 percent of their contributions on Republicans.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • “Americans for Job Security” Targets WI GOP Senate Race, from the Shadows

      A mysterious dark money group that has received Koch-connected funding called “Americans for Job Security” has dropped $689,000 on ads in Wisconsin attacking GOP Senate candidate (and billionaire hedge fund manager) Eric Hovde. It is the first major ad buy in the 2012 election cycle from the secretly-funded group, which is officially registered as a 501(c)(6) nonprofit “trade association” like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce or PhRMA, but does not appear to advance the interests of any particular industry or trade.

    • Conservative School Choice Group Spends Big Supporting Pro-School Choice Democrats

      The American Federation for Children Action Fund Inc., a pro-school privatization group bankrolled by conservative financiers, has spent more than $113,000 supporting five Milwaukee Democrats running for State Assembly and Senate, who are facing primaries on August 14.

  • Civil Rights

    • What makes our NDAA lawsuit a struggle to save the US constitution

      I am one of the lead plaintiffs in the civil lawsuit against the National Defense Authorization Act, which gives the president the power to hold any US citizen anywhere for as long as he wants, without charge or trial.

      In a May hearing, Judge Katherine Forrest issued an injunction against it; this week, in a final hearing in New York City, US government lawyers asserted even more extreme powers – the right to disregard entirely the judge and the law. On Monday 6 August, Obama’s lawyers filed an appeal to the injunction – a profoundly important development that, as of this writing, has been scarcely reported.

  • DRM

    • UK Readers Can Now Purchase DRM-Free Books From Tor UK

      As of today, Tor UK, Pan Macmillan’s science fiction and fantasy imprint, has made its ebooks DRM-free and available to purchase from the Tor UK Ebookstore. In a move announced earlier this year, Tor UK has joined sister company Tor Books in New York in removing Digital Rights Management from all its titles so that once you purchase a Tor UK book, you can download it as many times as you like, on as many ereaders as you like.

08.09.12

Links 9/8/2012: New CentOS, Sony Linux Tablets

Posted in News Roundup at 5:19 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Mars Curiosity. Where is Linux?

    With all the excitement about the Sunday AM (ET) landing of the NASA Curiosity rover on Mars, I’ve felt that something has been missing.

    I’ve seen multiple press releases from vendors all highlighting how their tech is helping NASA.

    One of the releases I got was from Intel’s Wind River division. Wind River has a robust embedded Linux operating system offering.

    However, that’s not what they sold to NASA for Curiosity.

  • Desktop

    • Which Linux Desktop Will Dominate in the Future?

      Sometimes, being right is no fun. Three years ago, I suggested that the Linux desktop was headed for a future dominated by KDE, and that GNOME would be at a disadvantage. Looking back, I conclude that I was right, if only approximately.

      What I did not foresee was that GNOME 3 would not only lag behind KDE for code maturity and innovation, but fail catastrophically with users, resulting in alternative interfaces, ranging from Ubuntu’s Unity to Linux Mint’s re-creations of GNOME 2 in Cinnamon and Mate.

  • Audiocasts/Shows

  • Kernel Space

    • Intel’s Imad Sousou: Open Cloud Standards will Emerge With More Collaboration

      Standardization is the biggest issue facing the open source cloud today, says Imad Sousou, director of Intel’s Open Source Technology Center. Adoption of open formats and interfaces will ensure flexibility and choice for users and vendors of the cloud.

    • Building a Linux kernel module without the exact kernel headers

      Imagine you have a Linux kernel image for an Android phone, but you don’t have the corresponding source, nor do you have the corresponding kernel headers. Imagine that kernel has module support (fortunately), and that you’d like to build a module for it to load. There are several good reasons why you can’t just build a new kernel from source and be done with it (e.g. the resulting kernel lacks support for important hardware, like the LCD or touchscreen). With the ever-changing Linux kernel ABI, and the lack of source and headers, you’d think you’re pretty much in a dead-end.

    • Keeping Linux Kernel Training Current
    • Linus Torvalds Will Be In Korea To Attend Korean Linux Forum

      The Linux Foundation is partnering with Samsung to organise the first-ever Korean Linux Forum, taking place Oct. 11-12, 2012 in Seoul, Korea at the JW Marriott. The goal of this event is to increase Linux development and collaboration from the talent pool in Korea and other countries in the Asia region.

      The Korea Linux Forum will feature keynotes from Samsung’s Head of Software R&D Center KiHo Kim, Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman, Google’s Tejun Heo, Intel’s Chief Linux and Open Source Technologist Dirk Hohndel and Linux creator Linus Torvalds.

    • Kernel Development Made Easy? Not yet.

      If someone asked me “What is your favorite part of the Linux operating system?”, I would have to say the Linux kernel itself. And it’s much the same for Unix too. Having that source code of the kernel loaded up in Emacs ready

      for some serious tweaking gives you a strange sense of power at your fingertips. But it’s not having that sheer power that I love, it’s simply having the ability to edit that kernel source code freely without any restrictions. But there does lie one major hurdle. Only serious and advanced Linux users and developers have the understanding and ability to configure and build kernels from source. It’s not easy and takes some time to learn the skills to really make it worthwhile and successful. But at the moment, there’s no real incentive to learn how to configure and build a custom kernel other than just curiosity itself. And that curiosity has to come from within the user.

    • Fujitsu’s Yoshiya Eto Becomes Vice Chair of Linux Foundation Board

      e are pleased to announce that Yoshiya Eto of Fujitsu is the new Vice Chair of The Linux Foundation board. He joins officers Doug Fischer (Intel), Chairman, Alan Clark (SUSE), Secretary of the Board, and Frank Fanzilli, Treasurer. All Linux Foundation Board of Directors can be seen here: http://www.linuxfoundation.org/about/board-members

      Essential to Linux’s ongoing growth around the globe and in the industries it is transforming is collaboration across geographies. We’re seeing more participation in Linux development than ever before from companies in Japan, China, South Korea, South America and throughout Europe.

    • Graphics Stack

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • XFCE Makes Mint Even Fresher

      This latest XFCE Mint 13 distribution is a complete Linux distro unto itself. Even more significant is that the Mint 13 development team ushered in this distribution on the heals of team Ubuntu phasing out its own XFCE Ubuntu distro, which was called “Xubuntu.” This latest version is clearly a fast and fun-filled alternative to other desktop options.

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • Kolab 3: Ready For the Cloud – The Open Groupware Receives a Major Overhaul
      • Fixing Slow Window Movment in 4.9

        Unfortunately a small bug entered 4.9: when using an Aurorae theme moving the window through the titlebar is delayed. It’s a bug we discovered a few days after the final tagging through the work on porting Plastik to QML.

      • Bored Of Windows 8 Metro? Install The Awesome KDE

        Yes, it is true. Soon you will be able to install the awesome KDE desktop in Windows 8, thanks to the KDE Windows Initiative. Builds and setup files for KDE 4.8 on Windows XP, Vista and 7 are already available, and developers are working day and night to port it on Windows 8. The below video shows the performance of KDE in Windows 8 desktop. True, its not as responsive as Linux, but it works.

      • An Opportunity to Contribute to Research and KDE

        A research team from the University of Maryland Baltimore County has launched an online study to explore the usability of KDE notifications. Participants are asked to describe a recent KDE notification experience to deepen the understanding of what makes a good or bad notification. Results from the research will help improve the usability of KDE notifications, and will make a contribution to the academic field of Human-Computer Interaction.

      • Digia to Acquire Qt from Nokia

        Digia, the software powerhouse listed on the NASDAQ OMX Helsinki exchange (DIG1V), today announced that it has signed an agreement to acquire Qt software technologies and Qt business from Nokia. Following the acquisition Digia becomes responsible for all the Qt activities formerly carried out by Nokia. These include product development, as well as the commercial and open source licensing and service business. Following the acquisition, Digia plans to quickly enable Qt on Android, iOS and Windows 8 platforms.

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Linux Mint Team Forks Nautilus, Brings Out Nemo

        The Linux Mint developers have have forked Nautilus and are bringing out a new file manager based on it. The move comes after Gnome developers made some controversial changes to Nautilus like removal of dual pane, compact and sidebar views, Go menu etc which some users considered important.

      • Gnome Shell 3.5.5 Released
      • Gnome OS, The Future Of Gnome

        The GUADEC summit is over and Gnome developers have finally made plans of what future or Gnome may look like. Gnome developer, Allan Day blogged about a new brick in the block – Gnome OS.

      • Gnome Worstation OS Followup

        The last post seemed to get some attention. I also think it has been misunderstood. So I would like to briefly reframe it.

        It wasn’t a rant about GNOME Shell or about design driven development. Neither was it a dismissal of the urgency for a strong developer story. I like the fact that we take risks and innovate in design. I also think that our developer workflow is broken, and fixing it is a priority.

      • GNOME Workstation OS

        I wanted to give my one cent about the GNOME project, and where I think it could be successful. It would be two cents if I were actually involved in any constructive manner, but I am not. So it is one cent.

      • Devs Cast Net to Capture Nautilus Improvements
  • Distributions

    • Quick review for SING , first distro of 31 Flavors of Fun project
    • Saluki Linux 023 – Why use anything else????
    • The Baskin & Robbins of Distros : 31 Flavors of Fun Experiment
    • Review: Stella 6.3

      A couple weeks ago on an unrelated review, I remember a commenter asking if I could review a Linux distribution called Stella. It seemed interesting, but I didn’t think much of it until the last few days when its release of version 6.3 made news on several major Linux news sites. At that point I knew I should check it out, so here it is. (Also, if Tennessee Williams were alive today, I think that “A Linux Distribution Named ‘Stella’” would have made a great title for one of his plays. Yes, I really did have to make that pun, and it won’t be the last time either.)

    • New Releases

      • antiX 12
      • NetSecL 4.0.0
      • ROSA 2012 (GNOME)
      • SalineOS 1.7
      • Damn Small Linux Returns, Hints at Modernization

        Damn Small Linux was one of my favorite distributions… back in 2005. I stopped following it closely when it’s hardware support became too outdated for my everyday machine. But they’re back with hints of a more modern version to come.

      • GParted 0.13.1

        This release of GParted fixes a failure to mount rescued file systems larger than 2 GiB or file systems that start after the initial 2 GiB of the disk device. Also includes language translations updates.

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Saying Goodbye To PCLOS

        The bull doesn’t seem to be part of PCLinuxOS anymore, as it was in 2010 when I first started using it. The distro changes its look with each new release and nowdays the logo is something akin to a CPU usage graph. Other than that, I can’t tell you a thing about the greatest and latest version of PCLOS.

    • Red Hat Family

      • Apache Deltacloud Hits Open Source Cloud Server Milestone

        Back in 2009, Linux vendor Red Hat launched an ambitious project known as Deltacloud in an effort to prevent cloud server silos. With Deltacloud, many clouds can be managed and abstracted to enable operational efficiency and prevent cloud lock-in.

      • Scientific Linux 6.3 Beta 1 Review: Simply outstanding but why on older linux kernel & Gnome shell?

        Initially what I did is install it with the default options in virtualbox. Once the installation was over, I was really disappointed by the limited number of apps there and it definitely didn’t look very different from another run-of-the-mill linux distro. That too with older Linux and Gnome 2 and not 3! Then I reinstalled it again to give it a second look and there I understood my folly. Scientific Linux is for the advanced users who want to take control of the entire installation process. It gives amazing freedom to the user to customize from a rich source of apps it has within the DVD itself. Even for desktop, it gives you choice of Gnome and KDE at the installation. Below pictures show you step by step installation process.

      • Scientific Linux 6.3 Released

        Scientific Linux is a stable distribution based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux co-developed by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Its aimed at higher performance computing and can work as a server too. Along with regular upstream packages from RHEL, it also features Sun Java JDK, IceWM window manager and the R language used in statistical computing.

      • Fedora

        • The Top Features Of Fedora 18 “Spherical Cow”

          With Fedora 18 entering its feature freeze and branching today, here’s a rundown of some of the most interesting features to be found in this next Fedora release.

        • Freezing the Cow: Fedora 18 Features Freezed

          With the Alpha release date of 28th August for Fedora 18 (codenamed Spherical Cow), approaching near, the Fedora developers were able to reach a feature freeze today.

        • Secure Calling in Fedora

          Sometimes you learn about what’s going on in a distribution by accidentally breaking something. Such was the case for me recently with respect to Fedora.

          Fedora is an RPM based GNU/Linux distribution that does focus on providing a free software license clean repository, with the one unfortunate exception of the Linux kernel itself including binary blobs, and that publicly fights against software patenting. Fedora also happens to focus on enabling community self service a lot. For this latter reason too it came to pass that I maintain some of my upstream packages directly in Fedora over two years ago, rather than having this done by an intermediary Fedora package maintainer, as more often occurs in other GNU/Linux distributions.

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • On Earth as It Is in Cloud

            Ubuntu for one has now reached 12.04 LTS in its server iteration (and desktop), where LTS stands for Long-Term Support. This means five years of cover for companies requiring official certification and audit compliance as well as enterprise-level security guarantees from Ubuntu’s commercial parent Canonical.

          • Three Top Ubuntu Alternatives

            Over the past few years, I’ve come to the conclusion that cutting-edge software availability is the leading indicator of which Linux distribution I’m going to end up with. Perhaps this is why I’ve found myself flailing into the arms of Ubuntu and Ubuntu-based distributions recently? More often than not, I can find the software I want with a deb package or PPA ready to go.

            It’s time savers like the one mentioned above that has made non-Ubuntu centric distributions not worth spending much time with. It’s not a lack of ability on my end, rather it’s a lack of wanting to spend a weekend setting up a new installation just to meet my needs. My time is valuable, so any distribution I select to meet my needs will be reflective of this.

            In this article, I will be looking at distributions based on Ubuntu and/or Debian (only), then exploring what makes each spin-off unique.

          • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 277
          • Insync For Linux Brings Google Drive Desktop Sync to Ubuntu
          • Ubuntu App Showdown Winners Announced

            Out of 133 apps submitted in Ubuntu App Showdown contest organized by Canonical, only three made it to the finals and we have final top three apps decided by panel of judges at Ubuntu. The apps were judged on appearance, stability, platform integration, innovation and “Scratching and Itch” and Lightread, Fogger and Picsaw won Gold, Silver and Bronze prizes respectively.

          • Free Official Ubuntu Book For Approved LoCo Teams
          • Ubuntu May Drop Nautilus, Consider Nemo Or Marlin

            The recent controversial changes in Nautilus 3.6 have made different distribution developers to think the other ubway. While the Linux Mint team is busy developing a fork of Nautilus, Ubuntu developers are thinking to drop 3.6 series Nautilus in Quantal and use 3.4 instead. Sebastein Bacher, a software developer at Canonical posted in a bug in Launchpad that Ubuntu 12.10 may go back to use Nautilus 3.4 even though 3.6 are in the repos.

          • Ubuntu App Showdown winners announced

            The winners of the Ubuntu App Showdown have been officially announced. In the end, the three-week coding challenge produced 133 applications. A jury of five Ubuntu members then picked the three winners: Lightread, Fogger and Picsaw. These three applications are already installable from the Ubuntu Software Centre.

          • Valve software announces its games library will come to Ubuntu

            Valve, the makers of the popular game-distribution service Steam, has announced plans to convert its software and games for the Linux operating system, specifically Ubuntu. It follows comments made by Gabe Newell, Chief Executive and co-founder of Valve, who said: “I think that Windows 8 is kind of a catastrophe for everybody in the PC space”.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Bodhi Linux On Raspberry Pi Hits Beta

              Interesting developments are happening for Raspberry Pi everyday as new OSes get ported to it. After Debian, Arch, Fedora and KDE, it was Bodhi Linux that got an updated ARM port specially for the Raspberry Pi.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • The 256MB World

      Gentlemen, meet the Raspberry Pi.

      [...]

      Last night’s demo was running Debian Linux…with LXDE! Truly, they are developers after my own heart; I’m hoping this gives another big boost to the LXDE project. And the demo included the unit playing a first-person shooter video game — sorry, I’m not a gamer, so I didn’t recognize which one — with quite impressive speed.

    • The Raspberry Pi Challenger: The Hackberry A10

      With all the hype surrounding Raspberry Pi, the credit-card sized, low-cost developer board, little attention is being paid to the new kid on the block : Meet the Hackberry A10 Developer board.

    • Phones

      • Android

        • Motorola teases new phone ahead of August 10 announcement (NOT REALLY)

          Motorola has taken to Facebook to tease their next smartphone ahead of its Friday announcement. The first of 4-5 clues indicates that the handset will be 4G LTE ready. It’s pretty much a foregone conclusion at this point that we’ll be getting the Droid Razr HD’s debut later this week but we’ll still be watching closely.

        • Control Your DSLR Cameras With Android Devices

          Android is like a Swiss knife. It runs on your smartphones, tablets, smart TVs, microwave ovens, cars and much more. That’s not all. There are areas where Android can do what you never before expected. One such area is controlling your DSLR cameras via your Android devices.

        • Wanna see three dozen shots of the unannounced Sony Xperia T (Mint)?

          As many of you know, a photo or two of an unannounced phone finding its way online is not all that uncommon. In fact, most Android devices we’ve encountered have, at some point, been treated to an “in the wild” or “blurrycam” shot. Every once in a while you get a model that stands still for an extended period of time and poses for an entire gallery. Such is the case with the yet-announced Sony Xperia T (codename: Mint).

        • Multiuser Support For Android: Is AndroidBook Coming?

          One of the strongest points of the older Linux, Unix systems were their support for multiple users from the very beginning. The *nix world has always been proud of the fact that this feature has been in their beloved OSes long before Windows developers thought of it.

          Having said that, this is not true for Android, the OS notorious for bringing the fame and glory to the Linux world.

          While it must have been an easy decision not to have multiple user support on an OS destined only for handheld mobile phones, Android has long past crossed this barrier. While still popular only on embedded devices, people have already started porting Android on x86 machines and sending patches to enable this feature since 2011 and there has never been a real need for multiple user support.

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

Free Software/Open Source

  • Who Loves Hadoop?
  • Open Source for the Space Age

    NASA has started a rather ambitious project: to provide open-source everything. The main site is located at http://open.nasa.gov. From here, there is access to data, code and applications, among other things. This is a great launching point for anyone interested in space science and NASA work. In this article, I look at what kind of code is being made available that you might want to explore.

  • Events

    • LinuxCon/CloudOpen Party Details Revealed

      LinuxCon is known for its deep technical content and unmatched networking opportunities. This year LinuxCon and CloudOpen will provide 140 sessions, 15 keynotes, nine co-located events, and three onsite Linux training opportunities.

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Why Firefox is handicapped in browser race

        According to the cleverly named traffic counter outfit StatCounter, Google’s Chrome browser has long passed Internet Explorer and Firefox as the number one browser in the world, with Chrome now reaching the 33 percent mark (33.81 percent for those watching at home) for browser share.

  • SaaS

    • OpenStack Foundation Picks Up Steam, Will Put Board in Place

      The OpenStack cloud platform hasn’t been short of powerful companies backing it, and now the OpenStack Foundation is finally heading into high gear, including preparing to hold elections to its board later this month. If you haven’t checked on how much support this promising cloud platform has, here are some details on the foundation and its structure.

  • Databases

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • LibreOffice 3.6.0 is Here
    • The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 3.6 with a wealth of new features and improvements

      The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 3.6, the fourth major release of the best free office suite ever, which provides a large number of new features and incremental improvement over the previous versions. Innovations range from invisible features such as improved performance and interoperability to the more visible ones such as user interface tweaks, where theming has improved to more closely match current design best-practice. A full list with screenshots is available here: http://www.libreoffice.org/download/3-6-new-features-and-fixes, because a picture says more than a thousand words.

  • Education

    • Foradian CEO explains benefits of open source school management software

      –>

      Last month, a professor at the Higher Institute of Computer Science and Management of Kairouan in Tunisia told us how implementing and customizing Fedena, an open source school management solution from Foradian, enhanced collaboration and understanding between administrators, students, and instructors. Unni Koroth, Foradian’s co-founder and CEO, was kind enough to answer our questions about Fedena—and to explain precisely what makes open source school management systems so appealing.

  • Project Releases

  • Licensing

    • Compliance Lab in the news

      Joshua Gay and I were recently interviewed for an article by Bruce Byfield, “The FSF Compliance Lab Doubles.” Bruce shares our excitement in super-charging our ability to help the free software community with licensing issues. Byfield discusses how our expanded capacity means that we are better able to make use of the volunteers we have, as well as to recruit new members to our licensing team. If you would like join the licensing team and help answer community questions about free software licensing, please send an email to licensing@fsf.org.

  • Openness/Sharing

    • OSCON 2012: Kaitlin Thaney calls for open science

      At the recent OSCON 2012 convention, Kaitlin Thaney, Manager of External Partnerships at Digital Science, shared in her talk a fresh approach to scientific research. Her views offer a way out of the stagnation of many research fields, where the rewards system (how researchers get evaluated for job positions, raises and promotions) and the economics of funding discourage researchers from openly sharing their data and tools with larger communities and the public.

    • Open Data

      • Unleashing the Potential of Open Data

        It seems a long while ago now, but June was a pretty hectic month in this neck of the woods, since it saw the final push to get ACTA rejected in the European Parliament. But of course, plenty of other things were happening then, and one in particular that I wanted to cover was the release of this UK Open Data White Paper entitled “Unleashing the Potential”.

        It’s a measure of the glimmers of hope that the entire UK open data project emits that the document is available not only as a PDF and in Microsoft Word, but also as an .odt file – kudos to those involved for making this happen.

Leftovers

  • The Internet Archive Starts Seeding Over a Million Torrents

    An anonymous reader writes with news that The Internet Archive has started seeding about 1,400,000 torrents. In addition to over a million books, the Archive is seeding thousands and thousands of films, music tracks, and live concerts.

  • Health/Nutrition

    • Good Week for Chemical Reform

      A bill to improve reporting standards for toxic chemicals has passed out of committee to the U.S. Senate for a vote, and anti-regulatory czar Cass Sunstein has headed back to academia.

      The Safe Chemicals Act (S. 847) would promote the use of safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals and put common sense limits on toxic chemicals. It has been approved by the U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee and passed to the full Senate for a vote.

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • Why Is the U.S. Government Funding Islamic Terrorists Who Are Killing Christians?

      Most Americans are Christians.

      But few know that the acts of our American government are leading to the persecution of Christians in numerous countries.

      According to the Vatican’s official news service – Fides – and many other Christian news sources, the Syrian opposition is targeting Christians. Priests and bishops on the ground in Syria confirm these reports.

  • Finance

    • Economics as Sleaze (Blog)

      The Wall Street Journal (WSJ), even as a Murdoch project, ought to know and do better than its lead opinion piece on “Tax Fairness” (July 23, 2012, p. A13). The gross pandering to right-wing self-delusion accomplished there by Ari Fleischer would win any economics student a well-deserved failing grade. The piece purports to interpret a recent Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, “The Distribution of Household Income and Federal Taxes, 2008 and 2009 “. The quality of the writing in such sentences as “A new Congressional Budget Office Reports (sic) shows (sic)….” reminds us that Fleischer was the press secretary for the similarly English-language-challenged former President Bush. The editing that misses such gross mistakes suggests that the WSJ would get failing grades in English as well as economics.

      Fleischer’s foray into economics makes the following points explicitly: (1) rich people pay too much in taxes relative to middle class and poor people, (2) the US tax system is thus “unfair” to the rich,(3) it became more unfair over the period covered by the CBO report, 1979-2009, and (4) President Obama is a liar because he says that the unfairness runs the other way. As I can easily show, the quality of Mr Fleischer’s economics suggests that he not give up his day job to do more economics.

    • GoldenTree Hires Goldman Sachs Trader Salem in Mortgage Push

      Asset managers including Canyon Partners LLC, Brevan Howard Asset Management LLP and D.E. Shaw & Co., known for betting in markets such as real estate, government notes or company debentures, have been wagering on mortgage securities as potential returns narrow elsewhere, accelerating gains in housing debt. The $1 trillion market for U.S. home-loan bonds without government backing offers “probably the most upside in structured products,” though carries more risk than notes such as collateralized loan obligations tied to companies’ health, Tananbaum said.

    • Czech Position: Presidential candidate Dlouhý leaves Goldman Sachs

      Czech presidential candidate Vladimir Dlouhy will end his engagement with the U.S. investment bank Goldman Sachs that he started in 1997 as from end-October and he is also going to leave the Telefonica Czech Republic supervisory council, has has told Ceska pozice server.

      “I will also terminate all other positions in the private sector,” economist Dlouhy, 59, industry and trade minister in the 1990s, said.

      He told the server that large investment banks are not perceived so negatively in the Czech Republic like in the United States.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • Corporate “Sin-Washing:” Embracing the Olympic Brand Pays Off for Sponsors

      Global corporations like Dow Chemical, Adidas, and McDonald’s are paying upwards of $100 million USD to sponsor the 2012 London games and associate themselves with the Olympic brand — but with their brands already well-established, what do corporations get in exchange for these expensive sponsorship deals?

      According to Dave Zirin, sportswriter and columnist for The Nation, the payoff comes through “corporate sin-washing.”

    • Koch-Funded AFP Hails Walker as Conquering Hero, Rallies the Troops for November

      Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker flew to DC over the weekend to thank the Americans For Prosperity astroturf group for its help with the Wisconsin recall. Walker headlined AFP’s 2012 “Defending the American Dream” Summit two months after winning his June 5 recall battle — with a $10 million assist from the organization that was founded and is funded and led by billionaire David Koch. (The $10 million spent by AFP was $3 million more than what was spent by Walker’s opponent.)

08.07.12

Links 7/8/2012: OpenGL 4.3, Nautilus Forked

Posted in News Roundup at 7:25 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Upcoming Conference will Showcase Linux’s Growing Success in Vehicles

    If you’ve followed Linux for any length of time, you know that it is finding many of its biggest opportunities at the server level, in mobile devices, and in embedded Linux deployments–all of them areas that lie outside the desktop. In recent years, Linux has also had a growing impact on cars, with big backers behind Linux-based automotive initiatives. With that in mind, The Linux Foundation is hosting its Automotive Linux Summit, taking place Sept. 19-20, 2012, at the Heritage Motor Centre in Gaydon/Warwickshire in the United Kingdom. Here is what’s on tap for this global meeting on Linux and cars.

  • I want a little penguin powered friend.

    It may not look like a penguin. It doesn’t eat fish neither does it have a blubbery outer coating (unlike me). It is however about as tall as a Gentoo penguin and it does walk a bit like a penguin. What am I talking about? It is the new love of my life with two brains (well cpu’s) and penguin powered with the Gentoo Linux operating system and I want one!!

    The little friend I want is called NAO (not to be confused with Sodium Oxide) and comes from the country of love. Don’t worry, you will not have to learn French though (although the girls love it when you do…va va va vooom :) as NAO can speak several different languages, stands about 58cm high, has more sensors than the Borg, is more flexible and can dance better that I can.

    You should have guessed by now that I am talking about a robot. One of the most advanced robots for public sale that I have ever seen. The company which develops and makes these little beauties is called Aldebaran Robotics (not to be confused with the planet in Star Wars). You can access the main web site here to feast your eyes on the ultimate of geeky drool inducing technology. Did I mention NAO also runs on Linux?

  • TLWIR 43: You Know That the GNU/LInux Shift is Coming When the Eggheads Start Conspiring
  • Kernel Space

    • Talking Phoronix On The Linux Action Show
    • Intel Works On Haswell HDMI/DP Audio Linux Support

      Intel’s open-source hardware enablement under Linux of next year’s Haswell architecture continues. New HDMI audio patches have been published while the DisplayPort audio patches are still forthcoming.

    • Apple Thunderbolt Display Presents Problems For Linux

      For the past few weeks I have been trying out the Apple’s Thunderbolt Cinema Display under Linux. While this 27-inch Apple Thunderbolt Display is beautiful and delivers stunning quality, it does illustrate another area where the current Linux hardware support currently comes up short. There’s both good and bad news about using a Thunderbolt-based display under your favorite Linux distribution.

    • 30 Linux Kernel Developers in 30 Weeks: Arnd Bergmann

      Linux kernel developer Arnd Bergmann is interviewed for this week’s 30 Linux Kernel Developers in 30 Weeks profile. Bergmann shares with us his focus areas at the moment as well as some specific advice for newbies.

    • Graphics Stack

      • Basic Texture Support, Multi-Tile For Freedreno

        The open-source Freedreno driver — the reverse-engineered creation for supporting the Adreno-based Qualcomm’s Snapdragon graphics hardware — picked up a few more features this weekend.

      • Coreboot: Replacing Intel’s Binary Video BIOS Blob
      • The Huge Nouveau Kernel Driver Rewrite Surfaces

        Over the weekend there was the push by Red Hat’s Ben Skeggs that effectively reworks/rewrites the Nouveau DRM kernel module for reverse-engineered open-source NVIDIA graphics under Linux.

        Skeggs work rewrites a large portion of the Nouveau kernel driver code — it measures in at about 50 commits and thousands of lines of code have been changed. We knew a big Nouveau DRM rewrite was happening following minimal changes for Nouveau with the Linux 3.6 kernel but on Saturday was when the code finally landed within the Nouveau project’s kernel repository.

      • Khronos ASTC: Royalty-Free Next-Gen Texture Compression
      • OpenGL 4.3, OpenGL ES 3.0 Specifications Unveiled

        Just as I reported last week would happen at SIGGRAPH and in late May first talked about OpenGL ES 3.0, today at the first day of SIGGRAPH LA 2012 the Khronos Group announced the release of the OpenGL 4.3 and OpenGL ES 3.0 graphics API specifications.

        It’s been twenty years since the release of the original OpenGL specification and this royalty-free multi-platform graphics specification keeps moving forward. New functionality provided by the OpenGL 4.3 specification includes: compute shaders leveraging GPU parallelism within the context of the graphics pipeline, shader storage buffer objects, texture parameter queries, high-quality ETC2/EAC texture compression as a standard feature, debug capabilities to receive debugging messages during application development, texture views for interpreting textures in different ways without data replication, increased memory security, and a multi-application robustness extension.

      • OpenGL 4.3 Support Is A Ways Out In Mesa

        While the OpenGL 4.3 specification was just released (along with OpenGL ES 3.0), there’s already a beta NVIDIA Linux proprietary driver supporting this latest desktop graphics API from Khronos. AMD will also soon be released a Catalyst beta with the GL 4.3 / GLSL 4.30 support. However, the open-source Mesa support will still be a ways out.

        The Mesa documentation was updated today to reflect what’s left in supporting the latest revisions of the OpenGL standard. Unfortunately, there’s a lot left with officially Mesa/Gallium3D still being limited to OpenGL 3.0 compliance.

      • Khronos Group updates OpenGL and OpenCL graphics standards

        The Khronos Group has released the latest version of its OpenGL graphics standard, 20 years after SGI first opened up the code.

        The latest revision, OpenGL 4.3, adds the ability to harness the GPU for shading and draw commands, ETC2/EAC texture compression is included as standard, and an improved debugging system has been added, along with security enhancements aimed at stopping information leakage between applications.

      • New OpenGL Standards Promise To Bring Better, Faster Graphics To Mobile And Desktop
  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • Amarok’s Context View Getting A New UI

        KDE music player Amarok is getting a new UI for its context view. The new UI is written in QML that makes it fast as well as good looking.

      • KDE Ships August Updates to Plasma Workspaces, Applications and Platform

        These updates are the fifth in a series of monthly stabilization updates to the 4.8 series. 4.8.5 updates bring many bugfixes and translation updates on top of the latest edition in the 4.8 series and are recommended updates for everyone running 4.8.4 or earlier versions. As the release only contains bugfixes and translation updates, it will be a safe and pleasant update for everyone. KDE’s software is already translated into more than 55 languages, with more to come.

      • Qt Developers Work Out Plans For Time-Based Releases

        Following the Qt 5.0 release, developers of this open-source tool-kit will aim to issue feature updates on a six-month cycle.

        Joao Abecasis reignited the discussion today concerning setting up time-based releases for Qt. “While releasing Qt 5.0.0 is an ongoing process, I think this is a good time to start planning future releases (5.0.1, 5.1.0, etc.) and, most importantly, we need to discuss *how* we’ll get them out on time. With the setup we now have we should quickly move to a strict time-based release schedule. A predictable schedule allows all interested to align with the project and contribute to make the next release the traditional Best Release Ever ™ of Qt.”

      • Final 4.9 version of KDE SC
    • GNOME Desktop

      • Linux Mint developers work on GNOME file manager fork

        Once upon a time, the GNOME Linux/Unix desktop team could do no wrong. That was a long time ago. More recently, GNOME has lost many of their Linux desktop supporters. Now the GNOME developers’ proposed changes to Nautilus, the GNOME file manager, is losing them more fans. The Linux Mint developers have started work on their own fork of Nautilus: Nemo.

        Clement “Clem” Lefebvre Linux Mint’s lead developer told me, that the Mint, or more properly the Cinnamon desktop, itself a fork of the GNOME 3.x desktop, programmers reacted “to the upcoming regressions in Nautilus 3.6 (loss of the compact view, loss of some desktop icons, changes in paths hierarchy..etc,) by creating a fork in github called ‘nemo.’”

      • Linux Mint team forks Nautilus

        The latest 3.5.x branch of Nautilus sports redesigned tool and menu bars but has also removed the dual pane, compact and sidebar views, the Go menu, and other features. Nemo currently includes very few visible changes from the 3.4.x branch of Nautilus, and the Linux Mint project has not yet officially announced what its plans for the new file manager entail, but it seems clear that its creation was prompted by the recent changes to Nautilus.

      • Is GNOME in Free Fall?
      • Nemo: The Linux Mint Team Forks Nautilus

        After Cinnamon, Muffin and MDM, the Linux Mint team works on yet another fork: Nemo, a file manager forked from Nautilus 3.4.x.

        Nautilus 3.5.x, which will become Nautilus 3.6 stable and will be a part of GNOME 3.6, has got a new toolbar and menubar, but there were also some features that were removed, like the dual pane feature, sidebar tree view and others. And this, it seems, wasn’t what the Linux Mint developers want for their users, so they’ve decided to fork Nautilus 3.4.x, which still has these features.

      • A preview of Gnome Disks 3.6

        Red Hater David Zeuthen in his blog introduces all the new features in Gnome Disks 3.6 and also refers to the upcoming new options for Gnome 3.8. There are some nice additions; some are just optics and some are useful tools, but in my opinion not everything is perfect and complete.

      • Speed Up with Midori!

        Sometimes, human minds get stuck without a reason between two options, jumping from the one to the other, never finding exactly what they are looking for.

        This is what happens to most people with today’s browsers. Almost no one completely likes Firefox and Chrome for their own personal reasons, but everyone keeps trying both when a newer version becomes available. Time to make a step towards something “greener” and give Midori a try!

  • Distributions

    • Zorin OS 6: The ultimate Linux distro for Windows users?

      Every once in a while I try some new version of Linux, some overhauled or updated “distribution” of the operating system that supposedly improves the user experience. And inevitably I get frustrated with it because, well, it’s just not Windows.

    • IPFire drops Reiser4 filesystem support

      IPFire, the hardened Linux distribution for firewall appliances, was recently updated to IPFire 2.11 Core update 61 and along with the enhancements, the developers announced that they are ending support for the Reiser4 filesystem. Rarely found in the wild, Reiser4 is an advanced filesystem, and sequel to ReiserFS, which offers an efficient journalling system, plugin support (for metadata or encryption), disk-layout optimisation and transaction support.

    • Review of Calculate Linux 12: KDE with a twist!

      I wanted to try out some Linux distros which are not Fedora or Ubuntu based. So, in came Calculate Linux 12 Desktop version and I liked what they have done with KDE here. The KDE ISO is big (2.3 GB) and I downloaded it from the calculate linux site. Just a day before Calculate Linux, I tried out Scientific Linux – given similarity in names and a large ISO size, my expectations were really high!

    • The 31 Flavors of Fun project has been started

      If you still remember, Todd Robinson from On-Disk.com is trying to create and release 31 different usable and complete Linux distros everyday in August 2012. Three distros have been released, they are named SING, SOHO and Debian_live_VTWM.

    • Quick review for SING , first distro of 31 Flavors of Fun project
    • Bridge 2012.8 Xfce Screenshots (08/04/2012)
    • PoliArch 12.05 Screenshots (08/06/2012)
    • New Releases

    • Red Hat Family

      • Intersouth-funded company raising $2M in debt financing

        Intersouth’s Katrin Burt is listed as a director and Lee Congdon, chief information officer of Raleigh-based Red Hat (NYSE: RHT), also is a board member at Adaptivity.

      • First look at CentOS 6.3

        For the most part using CentOS 6.3 was a pleasant experience. Installing codecs, Flash and various extras did require that I hunt down and install several additional repositories, which is a bit more work than is required from most other popular distributions. Further, some software isn’t available for CentOS, even with the extra repositories (searches for items such as the VLC media player failed to find any matches). However, when we consider CentOS isn’t aimed at the desktop crowd I feel the distro can be forgiven for the additional work required. Once the system was set up with the software and repositories I wanted it was smooth sailing from there. CentOS comes with good administrative tools, slightly aged, but still perfectly functional software and it will be supported for a good long time.

        One aspect of the default install I really appreciated was the fact that both GNOME 2 and KDE 4 were available. Most distributions these days put just one desktop environment on a disc while CentOS provides two, along with a full office suite and plenty of other popular applications and they still manage to keep their live disc under 2GB. The distribution doesn’t provide excitement or new, shiny features, it is pleasantly laid back and mature. The system is fairly light and stays out of the way. It’s a good option for people who want to install their OS and forget about it for the next several years.

      • Fedora

        • Kororaa 17: User-friendly KDE spin of Fedora 17

          But, Kororaa changed my view – it is definitely user friendly and offers a more complete out-of-the-box distro than Fedora with the usual smoothness that characterizes Fedora.

        • Fedora Linux Project Manager Robyn Bergeron on Open Source Leadership

          Robyn Bergeron became the Fedora Project Leader earlier this year. In her tenure so far, the Beefy Miracle (aka Fedora 17) has been released. She’s also had to contend with Secure Boot and is now busy getting everything lined up for Fedora 18.

          I recently got the chance to chat with Bergeron, to talk about what she’s doing. She told me that there are a lot of good things about the job of Fedora Project Leader (FPL) One of those good things is the fact that people aren’t afraid to raise the flag if you’re something is missing.

        • Fedora 18 Picks Up Last Features – There’s No Btrfs

          The feature freeze and branching of Fedora 18 is scheduled to occur tomorrow. The FESCo meeting happened today where a few of the last features were approved for the Spherical Cow release.

    • Debian Family

      • Debian 7 First Beta Now Available

        The Debian Installer Team has released the first beta release of Debian 7 codenamed Wheezy. This is a development release for testing purposes only and not intended to be used in enterprise, business and production environments. It ships with a lot of bug fixes and new hardware support for a number of devices. The release announcement can be found here.

      • First beta for Debian 7.0′s installation media
      • Debian Wheezy May Ship With XFCE As The Default Desktop Environment

        Debian developers are planning to switch the default desktop environment of Debian 7 codenamed Wheezy from Gnome to XFCE. The move comes mainly to make the distro lightweight and also reduce the size of the installation image.

      • Gnome Clocks Almost Ready

        Gnome developers have laid out plans to make Clocks a core application in future Gnome releases and there have been some impressive work on this app. Some screenshots:

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu for Beginners: System Settings

            In the previous article you were able to find out what Ubuntu software center is capable off. Today you are going to read a bit advanced theme: System Settings.

            Once when you get comfortable with Ubuntu you will want to: change desktop appearance, test sound, create accounts on your system for other people and much more.

          • Android With Ubuntu – If Looks Could Kill

            It was not long ago (February) when we heard a tad bit about Ubuntu for Android. It was basically a project from Canonical to bring the popular Linux system to Android smartphones. However, a video highlight for some of the system’s capabilities was filmed at the Forum Internacional Software Livre in Brazil last week. The aim was to provide us with an up-to-date look at the progress the project has been making, currently.

          • Android meets Ubuntu, makes a smashing debut

            Once upon a time, Linux was a small experiment running in the backrooms of NOC (Network Operations Centers) and MIT/Berkeley labs. Then came the Internet and the home computing craze and the advent of the OS for the consumer side. If Windows and macOS were the two mainstream choices you were thinking of, you’d be right. However, Canonical has changed that over the last 5 years with their OS, Ubuntu.

          • Ubuntu for Android – The First Sneak-Peek

            Not a long time ago, we reported about the possible integration of two Linux ‘bros’- Ubuntu and Android into one device. We see the dream coming true, sooner than ever.

          • Ubuntu Accomplishments Live Video Tutorials Coming Up
          • Flavours and Variants

            • My Installation of Linux Mint 13 “Maya” Xfce

              Well folks, this is it. After many months of looking for a suitable replacement for my setup of Linux Mint 9 LTS “Isadora” GNOME, I have found one and have followed through with it. There were two reasons why I wanted to make this upgrade/switch: I wanted to stay up-to-date and take advantage of the support promised in the latest LTS release, and I needed to either reinstall my current OS or install something else because my present installation of Linux Mint stopped recognizing my laptop’s ethernet card when I accidentally pulled out the power adapter cord from the laptop about 2 months ago. I got by with wireless Internet, but it was painful, and it had become so painful in the last few weeks that I couldn’t stick with it for much longer. The following is a log of my experience installing and customizing Linux Mint 13 LTS “Maya” Xfce on my laptop. As of the moment that I write this sentence, this will simultaneously be the last post that I write with the old version of Linux Mint and the first that I write with the new version. I have to confess that I’ve become somewhat attached to the way that I’ve customized the old version (and that’s what made finding a suitable replacement so difficult), but given that it looks like I can do the same things in the new version, I eagerly anticipate having the new version installed. Follow the jump to see what happens.

            • Six Key Improvements in Bodhi Linux 2.0.1

              It’s been less than a year since I first wrote about Bodhi Linux 1.2.0, but already the popular, Ubuntu-based Linux distribution has reached its second major milestone.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • A New, More Powerful Challenger to the Raspberry PI!

      Sure, it costs almost twice as much, but look what you get for your $60.00!

      Hackberry A10 developer board: $60 PC board with Allwinner A10 CPU

      “A Hackberry A10 Developer Board with 512MB of RAM is available for $60. A 1GB model should be available soon for $65.

    • Adafruit launches educational distro for Raspberry PI

      Adafruit Industries has published a new Linux distribution called “Occidentalis” for hardware hacking and teaching electronics using the ARM-based Raspberry Pi mini-computer. Its developers say that they decided to create Occidentalis because Raspbian – a Debian-based distribution released by the Raspberry Pi Foundation last month – didn’t include many of the tools and software components that most hardware hackers would need.

    • More Android and Linux Support for Raspberry Pi

      The credit-card sized $35 Raspberry Pi computer is gaining software support which should make it more usable by enthusiasts. As we have reported it is a device that is designed to be educational and to encourage a new generation of programmers.

      These latest additions by third-party developers are not for the faint-hearted. They are meant to be challenging. The tiny inexpensive computer, which is sold uncased, has been designed by the Raspberry Pi Foundation based in Cambridge U.K. The only version now available costs $35, but a a slightly lower-specified $25 model should be coming soon.

    • TakkTile turns digital barometers into open-source robot touch sensors

      Tactile Array turns digital barometers into opensource robot tactile senors

      Freescale Semiconductor’s MPL115A2 is a tiny thing that will sit quite comfortably on the tip of your finger. It’s hard not to marvel at the engineering that went into the creation of something so small, yet so sensitive. The little metal square is minute enough to be plunked into a cell phone, offering up location pinpointing technologies that supplement GPS, gauging positions based on changes in atmospheric pressure. Harvard’s Biorobotics team was clearly impressed when it discovered the technology, devising a fascinating implementation that extends beyond the walls of the cell phone. The sensors would go on to form the core of the department’s TakkTile open-source boards capable of bringing sensitive touch sensing to robot hands.

    • Azul Offers Free Zing JVM to Open Source Community Projects

      Following on from the release of Zing 5.2 at the end of April, Azul Systems have announced that they are making their pauseless Zing JVM freely available to open source developers and projects for use in development and testing.

    • Phones

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Samsung announces redesigned Galaxy Note 10.1

        It might have taken more than half of the year to come to fruition, but Samsung today announced the redesigned Galaxy Note 10.1. Details for the tablet include a 1.4GHz quad-core processor, 2GB RAM, 10.1-inch display, 5-megapixel main camera, and a 1.9-megapixel front-facing camera. Since we’re talking “Note” here then you might already know this guy has the S Pen capability for note-taking, markups, drawing, and more. Rounding on the specs, the Galaxy Note comes in three storage capacities, 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB, each with expandable microSD card slots.

      • Can Samsung’s Big Note Bring the Stylus Back in Style?

        Samsung has taken its line of Note devices to full-fledged tablet territory, offering up the Galaxy Note 10.1. It’s a full-sized Android tablet that features both a touchscreen and a stylus for pen-assisted drawing, note-taking and input. The Galaxy Note 10.1 comes with an accelerometer, a digital compass, a light and a gyroscope.

      • 4G isn’t fast enough for tablet and smartphone users
      • An Enormous Galaxy Note For Stylus-Wielding Arty Types

        An Enormous Galaxy Note For Stylus-Wielding Arty TypesIf you were a fan of the original stylus-packing Galaxy Note, but always thought that 5.3-inches was just too small: good news. Samsung’s finally released the long-awaited quad-core 10.1-inch version of the Note, and you should be able to get your hands on it by the end of this month.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Apache Deltacloud Hits Open Source Cloud Server Milestone

    The project moved to the Apache Software Foundation in 2010 and became a top level project earlier this year.

    Now after three years of effort, Deltacloud has finally hit its 1.0 release. A 1.0 release is usually a major milestone signifying that an open source project is mature and ready for consumption. In Deltacloud’s case, the effort has already been deployed and integrated into Red Hat’s commercial CloudForms effort that officially launched in June.

  • How to Enhance Your Router With Open-Source Firmware

    The stock firmware included on many broadband routers takes advantage of only a fraction of the hardware’s capabilities. We explain how to use use powerful open-source firmware to unleash the beast in your router.

  • Giant robots and open source

    I know why you’re excited this week … you’ve seen the “Kuratas”, a 13 foot tall, 9,900-pound robot you can ride in at speeds of up to 6 miles per hour and which is equipped with a water bottle cannon and Gatling guns that can fire 6,000 BBs per minute (the operator can fire the armaments just by smiling … no, really, watch the video).

    The Kuratas robot, built by Japanese artist Kogoro Kurata and marketed by Suidobashi Heavy Industry, can be controlled by the onboard operator, a remote control device, or a smartphone and runs V-Sido, a “next generation robot OS”.

  • Pixar opens beta on open source subdivision
  • 4 Tips On Scaling From Open-Source Pioneers
  • Southpaw Technology Announces Open-Source TACTIC For Asset Management

    If you’re planning on getting into the design field and you have all these crazy-cool ideas, there are a few things you’ll need: A design engine, modeling software and an asset management suite. The first two are pretty easy to get your hands on, but the third can become a bit tricky, unless you decide to use TACTIC from Southpaw Technology.

  • Cloud Foundry Evangelist Escapes VMware’s Gravity

    VMware has lost another high-profile employee: Dave McCrory, a senior technical marketer for the company’s open source cloud building platform, Cloud Foundry. The move comes amidst a growing number of questions around the platform, which was built to remake VMware as a cloud computing company capable of competing with the likes of Google, Amazon, and Microsoft.

  • Open Source: Choice of Companies

    Businesses, across all industries, yearn for highly reliable technologies to support their IT infrastructure. However, on the software side, high upfront costs, license limitations and support often become the barriers to implementation. Thus, free and flexible software have become the choice for an increasing number of companies, regardless of size.

    To cite an example of its unwavering promise, enterprises can always look at Google and RedHat as just two of the well known proponents of open source software. But considering that we are an SMB-dominated dog-eat-dog environment, what is the true value of the open source software? Are there risks to integrating open source codes to your system?

  • SaaS

    • 5 Things to Make the Hybrid Cloud Enterprise-Ready
    • Exclusive: eBay puts OpenStack to work

      OpenStack, the open source “cloud operating system,” has stirred community excitement and attracted a vendor following, including Cisco, Dell, HP, IBM, and Red Hat. But until now one thing has been lacking: A high-profile corporate customer willing to talk about its OpenStack implementation.

      Today, eBay is announcing that it’s using OpenStack to manage a high-volume dev, test, and experimentation environment where apps are created for eBay Marketplaces. According to Jean-Christophe Martin, Cloud Architect for eBay, the current OpenStack implementation is small, but eBay is looking at extending that footprint as the open source project matures.

  • Healthcare

  • Business

  • Funding

    • Google’s RISE Awards to Give Grants to Promising Educational Projects

      Are you involved with any open source efforts focused on K-12 or university-level students? Do you happen to have involvement with any projects in the rapidly growing field of open source robotics? If so, you may be a good candidate for a Google RISE (Roots in Science and Engineering) award. Through this annual program, Google makes grants of $5,000 to $25,000 to organizations around the world, and you can apply for a RISE grant today.

  • Public Services/Government

    • Canary Islands’ government increasing and encouraging open source use

      The government of the Canary Islands will increasingly be using open source applications. It is moving to open source for its telephony needs and will install a handful of open source applications on governmental desktop PCs. “We are strongly encouraging the use of OpenOffice.”

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Adobe releases its first open source font
    • New Font From Adobe For Release
    • Open Data

      • A new skepticism on open data?

        Resistance to open data is much older than the concept of open data itself. Those who control—and/or benefit from the control of—data have traditionally resisted its open dissemination.

        This resistance is being steadily eroded by government policy (see open data policies in the US, UK, and a long list of other national, state and local governments), by growing social and political movements in Europe, by technological advances such as the move to “Big Data,” and by the continued work of the broader open source, open content, open access community.

  • Programming

    • LDTP 3.0 automates GUI testing on Linux

      Shortly after the release of Cobra 2.0, the GNU/Linux Desktop (GUI Application) Testing Project (GNU LDTP) also released a new version of its Linux testing tool. LDTP 3.0 includes many of the new features that were included with the Windows version, including enhanced language support. Linux-specific additions include the ability to change the state of check boxes in Firefox and fixes to the program’s interactions with Qt and the Python-ldtp interface.

Leftovers

  • Security

  • Finance

    • Fresh claims in Goldman negligence case

      Goldman Sachs Asset Management has been accused of causing a pension scheme client’s money to be invested in sub-prime mortgage-backed securities in mid-2007 even though it knew, at the same time, that Goldman Sachs’ proprietary trading desk was short selling MBS “on a very large scale in order to profit from falling prices”.

  • Censorship

  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • Exploring Anti-Net Neutrality Arguments

      As I noted recently, net neutrality is back in the spotlight, so I thought it would be useful – and maybe entertaining – to look at an anti-net neutrality article for the insights it gives us about how the other side views things. It’s called “Pick Up On One and Let The Other One Ride”, and appears in the Huffington Post.

  • Copyrights

    • Form Over Function – The ECJ Rules On Software Copyright

      Seldom does a fact bear repeating as frequently as the maxim, “There is no copyright in ideas”. And despite the regularity with which this fundamental principle of copyright law is cited, its application remains a bone of contention.

      Since the Statute of Anne (1710), the common antecedent of modern copyright law, this creature of statute exists exclusively for the protection of the material expression of ideas, and not the underlying ideas, facts or discoveries contained in the work.

      For this reason, copyright protection vests at the moment a work is recorded in physical form, and only to the extent that it is recorded. As a result, an author will hold the exclusive rights to reproduce and distribute his/her novel while the ideas that inspired the storyline (the general plot, setting and timeline) may be lawfully reproduced by another.

08.06.12

Links 6/8/2012: HP TouchPad Has Latest Android, VirtualBox 4.2 Beta 1

Posted in News Roundup at 11:25 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Is usability breaking Linux adoption?

    I have been a Linux (Linux in this article refers to Linux based Operating System) user for a quite a number of years, actually, since I owned my first PC about four years ago. All through I have been using Fedora Linux , and it has not been an easy ride all along.

    Linux users have to learn how to use text editors, and how to work their way around configuration files. Initially, the issue was that Fedora Linux ships without a number of drivers, so called proprietary drivers and software. Proprietary drivers are drivers that do not conform to open source licensing terms. This means that the operating system ships lacking support for common media formats including MP3 and will also lack firmware drivers required for the functioning of some hardware such as sound cards and graphics drivers.

  • Desktop

    • Perfect Storm Brewing: The Linux Desktop – Part Two

      In “Perfect Storm Brewing: The Linux Desktop – Part One” I described some of the attributes that made for a low desktop penetration for Linux. Notice that not one of the issues was “ease of use” or “ease of porting applications”, but all had to do with installed base and volumes of systems being sold presently.

    • Adafruit launches Raspberry Pi Educational Linux Distro, hastens our hacking

      The Raspberry Pi is already considered a hacker’s paradise. However, that assumes that owners have all the software they need to start in the first place. Adafruit wants to give the process a little nudge through its Raspberry Pi Educational Linux Distro. The software includes a customized distribution of Raspbian, Occidentalis, that either turns on or optimizes SSHD access,

    • Brightness

      The future of IT clients is bright. People are loving small cheap computers, x86/amd64 PCs running GNU/Linux and, of course more servers than ever running GNU/Linux. I don’t see much possibility of this trend slowing in the near future, because fast and efficient is the right way to do IT. Any way you measure efficiency, GNU/Linux, Android/Linux and FLOSS are superior to that other OS. The world can make its own software and does not need to rely on a monopoly. The Wintel monopoly will have to change or die. A few units on ARM or smart phones won’t cut it when a better OS costs ~$0 per unit.

  • Server

    • Harvard goes PaaS with SELinux Sandbox

      Running students’ submitted programs is a security challenge for any university Computer Science department. When Harvard University contacted me about some work they are doing with the “sandbox” tool on Fedora 17, we decided it would be a great opportunity to see how they could get more out of it and share our findings with the community.

      In a lot of ways, Harvard is setting up a simple PaaS (Platform as a Service). We discussed tools like OpenShift and Secure Linux Containers, but the immediate issue was that once they begin offering ‘Intro to ‘C’” courses online, the students will upload programs to a Harvard web server that will be compiled and tested. And, to no one’s surprise, they were concerned about what the students “C” applications might attempt to do.

    • CME Group CIO – The challenges of upgrading an electronic trading platform to Linux

      Having now moved to Linux, CME is looking to refresh the order entry and market data parts, as well as upgrade the exchange’s network infrastructure.

  • Audiocasts/Shows

  • Kernel Space

    • First release candidate of Linux kernel version 3.6

      Linus Torvalds has issued the first release candidate for Linux 3.6, closing the merge window for major changes. Among the new additions is a feature called “Suspend to Both” that offers hybrid standby functionality – when hibernating, the system will preserve its memory contents both in working memory and on a system storage device. Hybrid standby usually behaves like Suspend to RAM; however, if there is a power cut during hibernation, the system can restore the main memory contents from the storage device and resume as expected.

    • Find ‘Skater Tux’ and Win Cool Linux Skateboard
    • The 3.6 merge window is closed
    • Download Linux Kernel 3.6 Release Candidate 1
    • Graphics Stack

      • Intel Hacks On Tablet Shell For Wayland’s Weston

        Aside from the normal desktop shell for Wayland’s Weston reference compositor, open-source Intel developers have resurrected work on a tablet-oriented shell for this fledging display server.

      • Intel X.Org Update Restores 830GM/845G Acceleration
      • X.Org Foundation Issues Hasty CFP For XDC2012

        The X.Org Developers’ Conference 2012 is happening next month. Unfortunately, continuing to reflect the hastily-managed organization, the board has now come up with a call for presentations.

        XDC2012 is happening from 19 to 21 of September in Nürnberg, Bavaria, Germany. This three-day event focused upon X.Org and FreeDesktop.org projects (including Mesa and Wayland) will take place from the Nürnberg SUSE office. It’s just another developer event following in their yearly tradition to get together to hash out plans for future X.Org Server releases, Wayland, open-source 3D drivers, etc.

      • Intel Sandy Bridge Is Performing Well On Mesa 8.1
      • Intel Updates VA-API Video Acceleration Code

        Intel’s Video Acceleration API (VA-API) has seen updates to its core library as well as to the Intel-specific VA-API Intel driver.

        The libva-1.0.16 that was announced by Haihao Xiang of Intel adds API support for handling data structures for JPEG baseline decoding, clearing up another bit of the API, and adding a test case for VA-API JPEG decoding. The announcement of this generic VA-API library update can be found on the libva mailing list.

      • AMD RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver Runs A Bit More

        Earlier this week the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver hit the glxgears milestone for handling AMD’s latest-generation Radeon HD 7000 series graphics cards on an open-source OpenGL driver. There’s still much work left, but it’s moving bit by bit.

        The pace of the open-source AMD HD 7000 series support has been disappointing, but with the very simple glxgears OpenGL test running, more milestones will hopefully be reached soon. Since the gears milestone on Monday, there’s been more RadeonSI commits to the mainline Mesa Git repository.

      • Intel Lands Some Haswell Commits For X.Org Driver

        For the past several months there’s been open-source driver development activities within the Linux kernel and Mesa library as it pertains to Haswell, the 2013 Intel micro-architecture to succeed this year’s successful Ivy Bridge platform. There’s xf86-video-intel DDX driver commits landing today pertaining to Haswell.

        Haswell commits to the xf86-video-intel X.Org driver aren’t as exciting as the Intel DRM driver commits within the Linux kernel or the user-space 3D work for Haswell, but is important nevertheless since there’s still more than a half-year until the 2013 Intel processors ship. Aside from work on the Intel SNA architecture, not many interesting things happen these days within the Intel DDX driver since all the important bits are now handled in kernel-space by the Direct Rendering Manager and the DDX drivers are on the way out with Wayland.

      • Intel Sandy Bridge Is Performing Well On Mesa 8.1

        A few days back I published benchmarks showing Intel’s Ivy Bridge hardware regressing with Mesa 8.1. While those problems are still outstanding, the good news is that Intel’s previous-generation Sandy Bridge hardware appears unaffected. Overall, Sandy Bridge is performing well with the soon-to-be-released Mesa 8.1 library for open-source Linux graphics drivers.

      • AHCI vs. IDE Modes With A SATA 3.0 SSD On Linux
  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • Gnome Disks Gets A Major Overhaul

      Gnome 3.6 is going to be released soon and the developers are working hard to make this the best Gnome release ever. One of the apps that desperately needed and upgrade was Gnome Disk Utility. Luckily, one may find some great changes of Gnome Disk Utility in Gnome 3.6.

    • CDE released as open source

      IconWe have some very good news for those of us with a love for the Common Desktop Environment. I’m a huge fan of CDE – I’ve even dedicated an article to it – so I’m excited about this. CDE has been released as open source under the LGPL, and can be downloaded as of today for Debian and Ubuntu. Motif will follow later.

    • MATE vs Unity, GNOME 3: Open Source Desktop’s Future?

      MATE, the open-source desktop environment whose name no one is sure how to pronounce, is now nearly a year old. Many of us never thought it would make it this far, but the interface has held own against competitors like Unity and GNOME Shell. But does MATE have a long-term future in the fast-evolving world of desktop Linux? Here are some thoughts.

      When MATE debuted last August, it was a one-man effort by a developer who called himself Perberos to keep alive the GNOME 2 desktop environment, which the GNOME project had deprecated in favor of GNOME 3.

    • Three LXDE-based distributions: race them face-to-face

      I am in a very interesting situation. Some time ago, I promised myself to stay away from LXDE-based distributions. At the same time, I wrote about three of them in the last 6 weeks.

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Disk Improvements Within GNOME 3.6

        While disk management improvements might not be the first thing you think of when it comes to a desktop environment update, the disk utility (Disks) and udev within GNOME 3.6 will offer some new features.

      • GNOME needs to go to the Moon

        Even as the prospect of a another new Windows blunder and some new OEM deals have some wondering if this might be the time people start paying attention to the Linux desktop, disruptions within Linux desktop development communities may be threatening the future of the Linux desktop.

      • GNOME’s Future: Open Source Desktop Interface In Doubt?

        GNOME, the project responsible for what has been one of the open-source world’s most popular desktop interfaces for well over a decade, is teetering on the edge of crisis mode. At least, that’s what one developer suggests in a recent personal blog post ominously titled “starting into the abyss.” Does GNOME, despite its rich and influential past, really face such a dismal future? Here are some thoughts.

        Personally, I’d be pretty sad to see the GNOME project die. I haven’t used the desktop environment on a daily basis since development on GNOME 2.x ended in favor of GNOME Shell, but I grew up as a Linux user with GNOME. The open-source ecosystem just wouldn’t feel the same if I knew I no longer had the option of running GNOME software.

      • Speed Up with Midori!

        Sometimes, human minds get stuck without a reason between two options, jumping from the one to the other, never finding exactly what they are looking for.

        This is what happens to most people with today’s browsers. Almost no one completely likes Firefox and Chrome for their own personal reasons, but everyone keeps trying both when a newer version becomes available. Time to make a step towards something “greener” and give Midori a try!

  • Distributions

    • Stresslinux Torture-Tests Your Hardware

      Stresslinux is a lean, mean torture machine with 750MB of hardware-pummeling goodness for probing and load-testing your computer’s hardware. Why, you ask, would anyone want to torture their nice hardware? Perhaps “torture” isn’t the best word; think load-testing to expose defects, “burning in” a new machine, or to figure out some limits for overclocking.

    • Stella 6.3 Screenshots (08/03/2012)
    • This Week in Linux: Debian, Fedora, & Slackware

      This week in Linux brought the last developmental release of openSUSE 12.2 and Fedora’s approval of the MATE desktop for version 18. But besides that Debian Wheezy progresses, Fedora is getting a new installer, and Slackware deploys new package browser online.

      Debian Wheezy, or what will be Debian 7.0, is progressing forward in development. Despite nearly 600 bugs remaining on the to-do list no talk of a delay has been overheard in the hallowed halls of Debian as of yet. Of course, Debian isn’t on any kind of schedule and all we really have are educated guesses of the release date. Debian Wheeze went into new version freeze nearly a month ago. Another bit of good news out of Debian team is that the next version, Debian 8.0, will be codenamed “Jessie” after the cowgirl in Disney’s Toy Story.

    • New Linux distribution aims to club most benefits of other distributions

      There is a wide variety of distributions for Linux, with the differences mainly depending on the users’ needs. This could cause indecisive developers and enthusiasts to have more than one distribution of Linux installed at any time. Now, there is a distribution of Linux in development that aims to have the best features of all the different popular distributions.

      According to Bedrock, the new Linux distribution, “If one would like a rock-solid stable base (for example, from Debian or a RHEL clone) yet still have easy access to cutting-edge packages (from, say, Arch Linux), automate compiling packages with Gentoo’s portage, and ensure that software aimed only for the ever popular Ubuntu will run smoothly – all at the same time, in the same distribution – Bedrock Linux will provide a means to achieve this.”

    • Bedrock Linux Makes Most Of The Available Linux Distributions

      Open source lovers would love to know that a new Linux Distribution is in town with the name ‘Bedrock Linux’. It aims to get the best of all the distros and be as transparent as ever. You get to have all the mutually exclusive benefits such as a stable base from Debian or a RHEL clone, while having a hand on the Arch Linux packages. Users don’t have to worry about running their favorite Ubuntu-only software simultaneously while automating compiling packages with Gentoo’s portage. Having something as minimal as Tinycore or SliTaz and as user-friendly as Mint, does have a mass appeal. Bedrock gets you exactly that.

    • Slackware Current Goes Beta – And I Upgrade Now

      Alright. Enough about that Arch Linux for a while. Let me return to my first love… Slackware, baby! :)

      A few days ago, Pat V. announced that the Current branch of Slackware has now gone beta. Well, let me tell you how I do things. Ever since I started running Slack as my primary OS back around 10.1 or so, I always upgrade to Current from stable once it goes beta. Up until this time around, I’ve always used the standard UPGRADE.TXT method found on the servers along with an in depth perusal of the CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT. I guess you could say that’s the “Slacker Way” of doing it.

      I have three production systems running Slackware as the main operating system; my main system, my home office laptop, and my workshop system out back. They were all running fully updated 13.37 at the time I started this project. Normally, I would have started with the system that was lowest priority and easiest to restore should I do something stupid… that would normally be the shop system. However, it was awfully hot out there this week. I decided to sit in the AC and upgrade the home office laptop first.

    • New Releases

    • Red Hat Family

      • Investing In Clouds Means Seeking Applications

        echnology journalist Adrian Bridgwater says clouds are a social phenomenon. They’re not as important for what they do as for what they enable, namely closer connections among people.

        This is not the way most investors see the technology. Most investors see companies involved in building clouds, like Rackspace (RAX), or developing cloud software, like Red Hat (RHT), as having more value.

      • Red Hat: Open cloud requires open APIs and stacks
      • Fedora

        • Kororaa 17: What Fedora should be!

          Let’s be realistic for a moment here. I believe that there is not a single Fedora user who doesn’t use repositories that conflict with Fedora’s policy and default selection ideology. Not even the most hardcore Fedora developers can use the completely useless system that Fedora is out of the box, without adding third party sources and pieces of proprietary software.

        • Why Fedora?

          No, I don’t think Ubuntu is bad, or has Linux cooties or anything. It’s a good distro if it best meets your needs. There are some really awesome people in the Ubuntu community. A few that come time mind immediately are Jorge Castro, Alan Pope, Jonathan Riddell and of course Jono Bacon. So why did I switch? Well let me start with the Fedora Core Values:

          * Freedom
          * Friends
          * Features
          * First

          There is a really good write-up of the values and what makes Fedora Different on the Fedora website. If you aren’t familiar with Feodra, it’s values and what makes Fedora different, go read that…I’ll wait until you come back, and then give you my personal take on this.

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu from Android demo video

            When someone talked about Ubuntu from Android, it was somewhat akin to something which is rather hush hush, as very little was spoken about this particular project in February. This particular project from Canonical intends to deliver the hugely popular Linux operating system to the Android smartphone platform. Well, someone decided to come up with a demo video of Ubuntu for Android, where it will highlight a fair share of the system’s capabilities. First filmed at the Fórum Internacional Software Livre in Brazil last week, this is as up-to-date as it gets.

          • Five Latest Unity Lenses For Ubuntu

            One of the most beautiful and powerful feature of Ubuntu Unity is the lenses. These lenses enable instant searches in the Unity dash itself. For e.g., you can search Youtube videos straight from the dash by just typing the title of video. The main idea behind separating these kind of small features in individual lenses instead of providing in a bundle is to let the users decide to install them based on their preference and need, thus keeping the Unity dash clean and uncluttered.

          • Ubuntu for Android Looks Awesome [VIDEO]
          • Ubuntu 13.04 Developer Summit Sponsorship Open

            Canonical announced a couple of days ago, August 1st, that the sponsorship for the upcoming Ubuntu Developer Summit 2012 event is now open for submissions.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Quelitu 12.04

              I’ve been meaning to test Quelitu for quite some time. This weekend I finally got around to it. And the bottom line is, this might be the lightweight Linux I’ve been seeking for computer refurbishing…if only it had its own ready-to-run install disk.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Adafruit Announces its Own Raspberry Pi Linux Distro Geared for Better Hackability

      The initial fervor over the Raspberry Pi Linux PC has perhaps faded a bit, but that’s fine because the thing has been available long enough for master tinkerers such as Adafruit Technologies to do terrific things with it.

      Adafruit has actually developed its own Linux distro for Raspberry Pi called “Occidentalis v0.1” (a play on “Rubus occidentalis”, the Latin term for “black raspberry”), which is geared for optimum hackability. The Adafruit gang loves the Raspberry Pi but felt that the latest distro from the latter (Raspian Wheezy) lacked enough features; instead of throwing the baby out with the bathwater, Adafruit took the good work done in Wheezy and built Occidentalis around it.

    • Empowering your hardware engineers

      Your new embedded design becomes a reality when the first prototype arrives. This is an exciting time in any design cycle, but it can also be the most stressful. Sleep may not come so easily for the hardware team. When you think about it, the prototype is the realization of a new schematic, a new PCB layout, and a board full of new components. The likelihood of all these new design elements coming together and working out of the box are pretty slim.

    • Phones

      • Android

        • Android 4.0 ported to Raspberry Pi’s $35 Linux computer

          The Raspberry Pi foundation announced today that its popular $35 Linux computer will soon be able to run Android 4.0. Google’s mobile operating system is being ported to the device by Broadcom developer Naren Sankar.

          The Raspberry Pi foundation was originally founded in 2009 with the aim of building a low-cost computer that can be used to teach computer programming to young students. The organization’s $35 computer—a bare board that is roughly the size of a deck of playing cards—has a 700MHz ARM11 CPU and 256MB of RAM. It sparked considerable demand when it launched earlier this year.

        • Samsung to unveil new Galaxy Note in late August

          Samsung Electronics is set to take the wraps off a sequel to its popular Galaxy Note smartphone at an event on August 29, about two weeks before the possible debut of Apple’s new iPhone.

        • Even Bigger Galaxy Note Set to Launch August 29th

          Even Bigger Galaxy Note Set to Launch August 29thSamsung’s updated Galaxy Note is on the way, with Samsung confirming that its Galaxy Note 2 is scheduled to be the star of its showing at this year’s IFA trade show.

        • DLNA certification pegs Sony Xperia LT30 as the Sony Xperia T

          A device that we know as the Sony Xperia LT30 may be coming to market with a different name if this DLNA certificate is to be believed. The certificate lists the device as having a product name of “Sony Xperia T.”

        • Call of Duty: Black Ops Zombies arrives on Android
        • Desktop Android? Multi-user Android support is on its way

          Your smartphone is your smartphone, your tablet is usually your tablet, but your desktop, well you probably share it sometimes with friends, family, and co-workers. That’s one of the reasons why Android, the popular Linux-based device operating system has never been seriously considered for the desktop. Without multi-user support, it’s not great for a shared computer. That may be changing. We now know that Google has been slowly introducing multi-user support into Android.

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • HP TouchPad gets Android 4.1 Jelly Bean

        Since day one, the HP TouchPad hasn’t been treated very well by its parent company, and as always, it’s been up to the hacker community to save the day. Last month, Google open-sourced Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean) for third-party modification. As such, nobody should be surprised to learn TouchPad owners can now install Jelly Bean on their tablet (albeit it’s currently a CyanogenMod 10 build).

      • Samsung’s August 15 event looks awful Galaxy Note 10.1-ish

Free Software/Open Source

  • Netflix Unleashes Source for Chaos Monkey

    In other words, Chaos Monkey is a tool used to simulate failures in “cloud” services so that the operators can be better prepared for unexpected outages. By inducing failures in the system, developers are able to implement fixes and contingencies on their own terms, rather than waiting for a serious problem to develop before being able to deploy countermeasures.

    Netflix claims that Chaos Monkey has been used to cause over 65,000 failures in their system over the last year, and while most went by without issue, a few of them brought issues to light which Netflix engineers were able to repair so they won’t cause outages down the road.

  • Adobe releases Source Sans Pro, a new open source font

    Adobe has open sourced a new font family called Source Sans Pro. The font itself is now available in OTF and TTF formats. The company is also releasing the underlying source material so that the font can easily be modified and improved by third parties. Adobe is releasing the fonts under the terms of the SIL Open Font License, an OSI-approved license that broadly allows modification and redistribution.

  • Open source: The stealth stimulus package

    If I asked you to account for your energy consumption, you might list your laundry equipment on the spreadsheet. We’d see how much you spend using your dryer each month — quite a large amount. Worried by the cost, you might then opt for a clothesline in your yard. Naturally, your costs have gone down. But has your energy usage? You’re actually consuming as much energy as before, but you may decide to omit it from your spreadsheet because you’re no longer paying for it.

  • The Application Component Doctor Will See You Now

    Sonatype has launched Insight Application Health Check, an application component analysis designed to assess the integrity of open-source components at every phase of the software lifecycle. As a Component Lifecycle Management (CLM) player, the company says that this is a means of understanding the potential risks and opportunities associated with each component in use.

  • Wind River Becomes Key Sponsor for ISC Open Source Routing Initiative
  • Adobe debuts its first open source type family
  • Apache Deltacloud 1.0 Supports Open-Source Cloud Interoperability

    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) announced Deltacloud 1.0, a new open-source cloud interoperability toolkit.

  • Open source: The stealth stimulus package

    If I asked you to account for your energy consumption, you might list your laundry equipment on the spreadsheet. We’d see how much you spend using your dryer each month — quite a large amount. Worried by the cost, you might then opt for a clothesline in your yard. Naturally, your costs have gone down. But has your energy usage? You’re actually consuming as much energy as before, but you may decide to omit it from your spreadsheet because you’re no longer paying for it.

    This tendency to account only for the resources we pay for and to ignore the value of the resources we don’t is called “the clothesline paradox” (first coined by Peter van Dressler). It was also the subject of O’Reilly Media CEO Tim O’Reilly’s well-received keynote at the recent Open Source Convention (OSCON) in Portland, Ore.

  • Adobe open sources its first font family
  • Mozilla

    • New Photos of Mozilla’s Mobile OS Have Arrived Online

      Back in February, we reported on how Mozilla is in an alliance with Telefonica and Qualcomm to become a serious player in the smartphone arena with its own open mobiile operating system. And, just recently, we reported that Techweek Europe had posted a series of screenshots, seen here, showing Mozilla’s mobile operating system with a look and feel that Mozilla claimed was non-representative of the final OS. Now, adding credibility to sightings of the new OS in the wild, Robert Nyman, a Technical Evangelist for Mozilla, has posted a Flickr gallery of screenshots of what some are calling “Firefox OS.”

    • Mozilla expands in Berlin and US

      Mozilla is expanding its San Francisco office and will open another one in Berlin’s new Factory tech campus, the company recently announced. The branch in San Francisco is supposed to add 125 new employees for a total staff of 275 by the beginning of next year. Mozilla has confirmed that it will be hiring in Berlin as well, but has not yet given concrete numbers for that office.

    • Why We Love Firefox. And Why We Hate It.

      Admit it. You are in a love-hate relationship with Firefox. Either Mozilla gets Firefox right and you are jumping up and down, or Mozilla screws up and you threaten to ditch the browser in favor of Chrome. Mozilla’s passionate user base keeps Firefox dangling between constant ups and downs, which is a good thing, as long as Mozilla is going up. Unfortunately, that is not the case right now. Mozilla’s market share has been slipping again at a significant pace. There has been some discussion and finger pointing and it seems that the rapid release process has to take the blame this time. Are we right to blame the rapid release process?

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • Oracle Releases VirtualBox 4.2 Beta 1

      Oracle has put out their first (beta) development release of Oracle VM VirtualBox 4.2. The 4.2 release series brings several new features to this easy-to-use virtualization platform.

      Key features of VirtualBox 4.2 Beta 1 include improved support for Microsoft Windows 8, the GUI has an expert mode for wizards, support for up to 36 network cards, support for limiting network I/O bandwidth to virtual machine guests, support for starting VMs during system boot, and experimental support for drag ‘n’ drop from the host to Linux guests. Additionally, more support for guest and guest-to-host drag ‘n’ drop is planned.

    • Oracle releases VirtualBox 4.2 Beta 1
    • Download VirtualBox 4.2 Beta 1
  • Business

    • Study: During Hard Times, FOSS Has Tremendously Helped Small Businesses

      At the recent OSCON conference, the folks at O’Reilly released the results of a study, done in conjunction with the ISP Bluehost, called “Economic Impact of Open Source on Small Business: A Case Study.” It includes an extraordinary amount of data based input from over two million Bluehost customers and 4,000 survey respondents. The study makes the case that open source has had a profound impact on small businesses during these tough economic times.

    • Semi-Open Source

      • Open Source ERP Buyer’s Guide

        Open source is still a small subset of the ERP market, yet its promise of low cost and added flexibility means it merits investigation, especially for entry-level ERP deployments.

  • Funding

  • Openness/Sharing

    • Harvard creates software for 3D printing articulated action figures

      Harvard’s plan is to commercialize the software. They feel it will be useful for animators who want to print out and experiment with a physical version of the characters they create. There’s also a market for allowing anyone to create their own characters and have action figures printed and sent to them.

      Clearly this software is a little ahead of its time in terms of home 3D printing. Right now you’d be able to create the models and basic joints to clip together yourself, but using metal joints and being able to apply a color coating to recreate the character perfectly are desirable. Maybe that will be possible a few 3D printer generations from now.

    • Open Data

  • Standards/Consortia

    • IETF, W3C and IEEE publish statement on modern standardisation

      The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) presented a joint statement on modern global standardsPDF in Vancouver. The paper calls for fair, consensus-based processes, transparency and access for all to the principles of modern standardisation. Standards, they say, should not be determined by a few large corporations.

Leftovers

  • Security

  • Finance

  • Privacy

  • Civil Rights

    • “Anti-Occupy” law ends American’s right to protest

      I was stunned upon hearing a news report about a protest going on in China. Teachers, parents with their young, school-age children and pro-democracy activitists (one estimate was 90,000 people) marched in Hong Kong to government headquarters last Sunday to publicly protest a new required “Patriotism” class, to be taught in the school system starting in 2015. The protestors think that the effort of the Chinese government here is to brainwash their kids in favor of communism.

      What stunned me was that this protest, in China, against the government’s upcoming policy, at the government headquarters, would not now be tolerated here in the United States of America.

      Thanks to almost zero media coverage, few of us know about a law passed this past March, severely limiting our right to protest. The silence may have been due to the lack of controversy in bringing the bill to law: Only three of our federal elected officials voted against the bill’s passage. Yes, Republicans and Democrats agreed on something almost 100%.

    • America the Great … Police State

      For those of us who had hoped that the Obama administration would present us with a rebirth of the old republic that was so rudely erased a few years ago by that team of judicial wreckers, Bush and Gonzales, which led, in turn, to a recent incident in Cambridge, Mass. that inspired a degree of alarm in many Americans. But what was most alarming was the plain fact that neither the president nor a “stupid” local policeman seemed to understand the rules of behavior in a new America, where we find ourselves marooned as well as guarded (is that the verb?) by armed police who have been instructed that they are indeed, once armed, the law and may not be criticized verbally or in any other way and are certainly not subject to any restrictions as to whom they arrest or otherwise torment.

      This is rather worse than anyone might have predicted, even though the signs have been clear for some years that ours is now a proto-fascist nation and there appears to be no turning back; nor, indeed, much awareness on the part of our ever-alert media. Forgive me if you find my irony heavy, but I too get tired of carrying it about in “the greatest nation in the country,” as Spiro Agnew liked to say.

    • FBI Agents Raid Homes in Search of “Anarchist Literature”

      When FBI and Joint Terrorism Task Force agents raided multiple activist homes in the Northwest last week, they were in search of “anti-government or anarchist literature.”

      The raids were part of a multi-state operation that targeted activists in Portland, Olympia, and Seattle. At least three people were served subpoenas to appear before a federal grand jury on August 2nd in Seattle.

      In addition to anarchist literature, the warrants also authorize agents to seize flags, flag-making material, cell phones, hard drives, address books, and black clothing.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • We need to go the extra mile with broadband

      Here in the rural areas of the United Kingdom we have waited patiently for broadband to reach us. We have made do with expensive satellites and community WiFi for a decade. Many homes are still on dial up, with no mobile coverage in many places.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Trademarks

      • Microsoft dumps Metro from Windows 8

        Microsoft has dropped “Metro”, the name given to the squaretastic user interface for Windows 8 and Windows Phone, claiming it was just a code name all along.

        Litigation, though, may be the real reason as it seems the word may be owned by a European company or individual that objected to its use.

    • Copyrights

08.03.12

Links 3/8/2012: Linux 3.6 RC1, KDE 4.9 in Chakra

Posted in News Roundup at 8:49 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Desktop

    • Dreaming a Little Dream of the Ideal Linux Distro

      “It is hard to say what an ideal distro looks like because there are many important niches,” noted Slashdot blogger Chris Travers. “What I need as a software developer for my laptop is very different than what I’d want to deploy my software to.” For his development laptop, he prefers Fedora. “On the server, though, I would prefer to deploy to a more conservative distro, like Debian Stable or Scientific Linux.”

    • Commodore 64 at 30: the specs compared

      The Commodore 64 turns 30 this month. How does it compare to modern computers?

  • Kernel Space

    • Another round of Leapocalypse

      Some Linux sever administrators found out that time was not on their side yesterday, when an errant signal from some Network Time Protocol (NTP) servers broadcast a new leap second that adversely affected many servers unprepared for the change.

    • Bogus leap second disrupts Linux systems

      During the night of 31 July to 1 August, various servers that provide time information via NTP (Network Time Protocol) incorrectly announced that clients should apply a leap second. On Tuesday evening, Marco Marongiu pointed to this issue on one of the NTP project’s mailing lists. Now, reports from users whose systems applied a leap second at 00:00 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) – 2am CET – can be found in places such as a Mythtv forum, on Twitter, on Google+ and on the NTP project’s mailing lists.

    • Kernel Log: Development of Linux 3.6 under way

      The kernel developers have added the VFIO userspace driver framework and a hybrid standby option to Linux 3.6. The 64-bit ARM code will be called “arm64″ after all. The widely used software collection util-linux has been extended to include a range of new tools.

    • New Linux kernels bring performance improvements

      Kernel 3.0.39, recently released, and kernel 3.2.25, coming soon, include not only smaller changes and enhancements but also a long list of performance optimisations. This marks a change in the strategy for maintaining older kernel versions; previously, these kinds of adjustments generally weren’t made to stable and long-term kernels to avoid introducing bugs.

    • Linux 3.6-rc1
    • Graphics Stack

      • Xi Graphics’ Proprietary X Server, Drivers Have Faded Away

        Xi Graphics, the company that once developed proprietary X Servers and graphics drivers for Linux and UNIX platforms, has faded away.

        Going back to the early 90′s there was Xi Graphics Inc that specialized in creating high-performance X Servers and graphics drivers for Linux/UNIX. Their proprietary Accelerated-X product was compliant against X11R6.4 and was licensed to a range of major companies, universities, and individuals for its features and performance. They also developed their own in-house graphics drivers for different hardware (namely early ATI hardware), which they claimed to be the fastest.

        Among the advertised features for their products was hardware-accelerated support for multiple displays / stretched displays, support for IBM AIX, SPARC support, and “Our ATI graphics support has been the fastest on UNIX/Linux for years. No kidding.”

      • Intel Continues Gaining Ground For Linux Graphics

        Following the success of Ivy Bridge and their continued open-source contributions, Intel graphics continue to gain market-share on the Linux desktop.

        Last month I mentioned Intel Winning Over NVIDIA For Linux Enthusiasts. The trends cite the publicly-available OpenBenchmarking.org data, which largely reflects the latest happenings of Linux enthusiasts.

        The auto-generated statistics for the month of July are now available and they continue to reflect Intel’s growing market-share when it comes to Linux graphics use.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

  • Distributions

    • WattOS R5: Not Ideal, But Still Nice

      I heard about this OS from couple of my readers, who left the comment on the blog posts. They mentioned this OS as the extreme light one.

    • Does Archlinux need a new slogan?

      Last week Archlinux released the install media 2012.07.15. In a post on the website they told us that the most noticeable change was the fact they no longer ship their installer, the Arch Installation Framework (AIF), with it. This means, that after downloading the ISO, you will have to perform all the installation steps manually. Or, to put it in their own words, “This means a menu driven installer is no longer available and we rely more on documentation to guide new users.”

    • Vine 6.1 Screenshots (07/31/2012)
    • I always come back to Zorin OS
    • New Releases

    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu 12.10 Continues Strong On The PandaBoard ES

            Back in June I showed how Ubuntu 12.10 was continuing to improve the ARM Linux performance and since then showed that on TI OMAP4 hardware Ubuntu is faster than Fedora, while today I have more benchmarks to share. Up now are the latest PandaBoard ES benchmarks from a more recent Ubuntu 12.10 development build for the ARMv7 Cortex-A9 dual-core development board.

          • Ubuntu Accomplishments: Building Maturity

            Progress on Ubuntu Accomplishments has been moving apace. For those of you who have not been keeping score, we released 0.1 earlier this year which provided a first cut of the core system working. We then followed up with our 0.2 release which brought many refinements to the system based upon user feedback and the increased level of testing by our 600+ users. In September 2012 we plan on shipping our 0.3 release, and our goals are very clear for this release: quality, visibility, and growth.

          • The Endeavour Desktop

            Space-based desktops have a special place in my heart, and this shot of space shuttle Endeavour shadowed by the Earth below it is a great one. Flickr user Michael Farquhar used this photo as the bedrock for his customized Ubuntu desktop. It’s gorgeous when you sit down, not at all distracting when it’s time to work, and well-placed widgets keep informative data around the sides of the screen.

          • New Ubuntu 12.10 Unity Concept Looks Amazing

            After introducing last week a very nice video that presented an amazing mockup of the Unity interface for Ubuntu OS, we’re now proud to announce today, August 2nd, another nice concept that looks simply marvelous.

            First of all, be aware that the above mockup of Ubuntu’s Unity interface is unofficial, created by an Ubuntu user, and it has nothing to do with Canonical.

          • Gumstix Waysmall Silverlode is a tiny PC with Ubuntu Linux

            *

            The Gumstix Waysmall Silverlode is a tiny, low power computer designed for commercial or industrial applications. But under the hood it’s running a version of Ubuntu Linux optimized by Linaro to run on ARM-based processors. So it could also theoretically find use as an inexpensive desktop computer or media center PC.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Bodhi Linux RaspBerry Pi Beta

      As for changes, this release is now utilizing Terminology as it’s default terminal emulator and PCManFM file browser has been replaced with the native EFM (Enlightenment File Manager). The issues our first image had with networking and flash drives should also be resolved with this release. Also worth noting is that the AppCenter is now configured to work by default in the Midori web browser – but the synaptic interface runs fairly slow on the Pi hardware.

    • Phones

      • Take That, Touchpad: No Open WebOS Support For You

        Open webOS is marching toward its first release, but it won’t have many products to run on, because previous webOS devices will not be supported. The reason for that circumstance is the fact that the new operating system is based on the Linux 3.3 kernel and requires SoC support. In HP’s words:

        “For Open webOS we are aiming for support on future hardware platforms where SoC’s support Linux 3.3+ kernel and where open source replacements for proprietary components are integrated. Existing devices cannot be supported because of those many proprietary components, including graphics, networking and lack of drivers for a modern kernel (but of course, there is the Community Edition for those interested in improving the TouchPad).”

      • Open WebOS: No (official) support for existing devices
      • Open WebOS Releases Core Apps; Reveals Touchpad Won’t Be Supported 44
      • Android

        • Google Cracks Down on Deceptive Android Apps

          Google sent out an email to its developer community with news that Google Play is undergoing policy changes to crack down on shady behavior in the Android market.

        • HTC Evo 3D, EVO Design 4G Gets Android 4.0

          Sprint has started pushing Android 4.0 OTA upgrade for HTC Evo 3D, EVO Design 4G. This upgrade brings Google Chrome browser, Face Unlock and other features synonym to Android 4.0. Some enhancements include:

        • DROID RAZR HD Appears in All Its Glory Thanks to Another Forum Leak

          One day after the international RAZR HD appeared over at XDA, the U.S. version, better known as the DROID RAZR HD, has appeared via Droid Forums. We now have a confirmation on the name, thanks to a picture of the phone’s About screen – not that we were questioning it to begin with, since Motorola employees gave that up long ago. We also get a look at the backside, which is full-on kevlar, and in my opinion, much more appealing than the backside that we saw on the international version.

          If you thought for a second that this wasn’t coming to Verizon, the 4G LTE logo on the backside along with “Verizon” being mentioned in the system version should help ease your mind there. On-screen navigation keys are present. The “HD” in the name clearly means the resolution of the device, so we will likely see a similar 720p Colorboost display to the one included in the Atrix HD.

        • Canalys Researchers Report Strong Android Smartphone Numbers

          Market researchers at Canalys have published their final Q2 2012 country-level shipment estimates for smartphones, and the news is all good for Android. The firm reported that 158 million smartphones were shipped globally in the second quarter, and 100 million of those were Android phones. Android has a whopping 68.1 percent of the global market–nothing to sneeze at. Meanwhile, smartphone shipments in China are on a tear.

        • Android 4.1 ‘Jelly Bean’ hits 0.8 percent market share
        • Ice Cream Sandwich now on 16 percent of Android phones
        • HP releases more Open webOS code, including System Manager and core apps

Free Software/Open Source

  • Open source NAC system PacketFence 3.5 released

    PacketFence is an unobtrusive solution that works with equipment from many vendors (wired or wireless) such as Cisco, Aruba, ExtremeNetworks, Juniper Networks, Nortel/Avaya, Hewlett-Packard, Meru Networks, Foundry/Brocade, Enterasys, Accton/Edge-corE/SMC, 3Com, D-Link, Intel, Dell, Aerohive, Motorola and many more.

  • An “Open Source” Cargo Container Building – The Epic Creative Co-Op

    The Woodlands/Houston, TX (August 1, 2012) – Imagine applying the concept of Open Source Software – where the code is published and made available to other programmers free of charge – to architecture. That is just what one Houston based multimedia development company did with a new commercial structure using upcycled cargo containers and recycled building materials. Every step of their 18 month building process is chronicled online and available for others to learn from.

  • ViewCast Supports Linux Open Source Community

    ViewCast Corporation is supporting the open source community through its partnership with KernelLabs, a coalition of like-minded Linux software engineers whose primary goal is to improve the Linux platform for audio / video applications.

    ViewCast is working with KernelLabs in the development of Linux drivers for all of its latest Osprey video capture cards. Most recently, Linux drivers for the Osprey 260e, 460e and 820e capture cards were made available through the KernelLabs website. The drivers will be submitted to the next Linux kernel and then available directly in the Linux distribution thereafter.

  • Rent A Chaos Monkey From Netflix

    Video rental company Netflix has used its extensive consumption of the Amazon Web Services cloud to give something back to the open source community. The company’s Chaos Monkey system was developed to ensure that its operations were capable of self-healing (or at least continuing to run) should instances in the AWS cloud fail. This month sees the firm open source its code.

    The firm’s Cory Bennett and Ariel Tseitlin have written on the Netflix techblog explaining that over the last year, “Chaos Monkey has terminated over 65,000 instances running in our production and testing environments. Most of the time nobody notices, but we continue to find surprises caused by Chaos Monkey, which allows us to isolate and resolve them so they don’t happen again.”

  • Open Source Intelligence Presentation featured at Hacker Halted – Hacking Conference, Miami, Florida in October of 2012
  • Adobe releases open Source Sans Pro font

    Working every day in an open-source environment, there’s always one area where open-source aesthetics fall down compared to the Windows and Mac ecosystems: professionally produced fonts.

  • Keyhole Software Releases Open Source khsSherpa Framework for HTML5 Development

    Leawood, KS, August 03, 2012 –(PR.com)– Software Consulting Firm Keyhole Software has announced the release of version 1.1.4 of the khsSherpa framework. khsSherpa, an open source JSON endpoint framework for Mobile and HTML5 support, now boasts RESTful Service URL Mappings. Version 1.1.4 is publicly available in the Maven Public Central Repository and gitHub.

  • Web Browsers

    • Chrome

      • Latest Browser Share Data Shows Very Slight Decline for Google Chrome

        It’s no secret that Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox–both open source browsers–have been locked in a neck-and-neck market share battle for some time now. The two browsers are on rapid release cycles, and are now tending to leapfrog each other for market share in small increments each month. Now that August is here, NetApplications is out with its updated browser share data for July, which shows that Firefox maintains a tiny share lead over Chrome, and that Chrome actually declined slightly in share during the month. Meanwhile, Internet Explorer retains more than half of the browser market.

      • Google Wants Chrome 21 to See You

        When Marc Andreeson created the first web browser, it was all about users simply viewing static web pages. A lot has changed over the years in the web browser world, and now with the latest Google Chrome 21 browser there is a host of new two-way interactivity options. The new features in Chrome 21 change the way that users look at browsers and the way that browsers look at us.

  • SaaS

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

  • CMS

    • Drupal 7.15 Released

      The Drupal team have announced a new release of Drupal, Drupal 7.15. This is a bug fix release only and no new features or security patches have been added in this release. Upgrading to this release is strongly recommended by the Drupal team. Upgrade instructions can be found on this page.

  • Healthcare

  • Public Services/Government

    • Open Forum Europe: ‘Widespread discrimination in IT procurement’

      ‘Use of discriminatory technical specifications is a widespread practice within the EU’, says Open Forum Europe (OFE), an organisation advocating the use of open standards and open source.

      The group examined 585 invitations to tender, published in March, April and May this year by public administrations looking for computer software products. OFE found that almost 1 in 5 of these, procurement rules are broken (17 per cent).

  • Openness/Sharing

  • Programming

Leftovers

  • Health/Nutrition

    • Three California Democrats Team Up with Monsanto

      In California, the battle over Proposition 37, which would require the labeling of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food products, is heating up. In late July, pro-labeling groups obtained a flier sent out by a group opposed to the proposition containing the endorsements of three Democratic California Assemblymembers, even though the Democratic Party of California (and over 90 percent of consumers) supports GMO labeling.

  • Security

  • Finance

    • Super Rich Holding $21 Trillion Overseas To Avoid Taxation

      At a time when the gap between the ultra-rich and the rest of us is reaching historic heights across the globe, at least $21 trillion (with a “t”) in unreported private financial wealth was recently discovered sitting in secret tax havens.

      While it can be difficult to imagine sums so large, consider this: the $21 trillion alone is the amount of the U.S. and Japanese economies combined. That reflects only financial wealth, and not the holdings and investments of this monied elite in mansions, yachts, private jets, etc. According to a recent reports by the Tax Justice Network, “The Price of Offshore Revisited” and “Inequality: You Don’t Know The Half of It,” this staggering disparity is only growing worse.

  • Civil Rights

    • Media, ACLU to argue against censorship at Guantánamo

      The chief war court judge has agreed to let media and civil liberties lawyers argue for openness at the start of a pre-trial hearing at Guantánamo in the death-penalty case of five alleged conspirators in the Sept. 11 attacks.

      A consortium of 14 media groups, including The Miami Herald, and the American Civil Liberties Union separately filed motions protesting protective orders that shield the public from access to secret information in the case.

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