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09.24.20

Red Hat is Spamming People in Order to Promote Its Sites and Its Products, Subscribing People to Mass-Marketing Lists Without the Recipients’ Consent

Posted in IBM, Mail, Marketing, Red Hat at 6:30 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

In the name of “engagement” (newspeak like the Linux Foundation‘s E-mail “blasts”, in their own words!), Red Hat turns into a spammer, apparently Windows-powered too

Need to stop SPAM

Summary: “Engagements” from Red Hat; have the IBM-led marketing people gone overboard, subscribing lots of people to marketing spam without bothering to ask for consent?

SO-CALLED ‘engagements’ have made Red Hat a bit of a marketing/spam firm, looking to promote its self-promotional articles by sending unsolicited mail spam to a lot of people (who knows how many) starting earlier this week.

“Come on, Red Hat. You can do better than this!”I don’t have any real grudge/issue with Red Hat (their CEO did an interview with us); I’ve often linked to OpenSource.com (many thousands of times since the site’s birth more than a decade ago), but I have a serious grudge when it comes to spam, or mass-mailing people without any solicitation or consent. IBM has routinely done those sorts of things to us, even as recently as last month.

Days ago we received this:

Red Hat email earlier

How quaint. We never subscribed to this.

Never ever gave that E-mail address to anybody at Red Hat either, so they must have looked that up somehow. What. On. Earth…

Then again this morning:

Red Hat email

Where does this come from and how does one unsubscribe (having never subscribed in the first place)?

Red Hat spam

OK, unsubscribed now. From something never subscribed/asked for in the first place! Time will tell if that took effect; maybe it’s as effective as attempting to remove systemd.

What’s behind this aggressive marketing operation?

Red Hat Engage

Is that you, Windows? Hiding behind another layer (security by secrecy/obscurity)?

Come on, Red Hat. You can do better than this! Stop trying to become what you used to be against.

Exploring the Relationship Between Red Hat and Microsoft: They’re Barely Even Rivals Anymore

Posted in GNU/Linux, Microsoft, Novell, Red Hat at 12:13 am by Guest Editorial Team

We need to slaughter Novell before they get stronger….If you’re going to kill someone, there isn’t much reason to get all worked up about it and angry. You just pull the trigger. Any discussions beforehand are a waste of time. We need to smile at Novell while we pull the trigger. ~Jim Allchin, Microsoft's Platform Group Vice President

Summary: The ‘older Microsoft’ (serial monopolist IBM) bought Red Hat, but evidence shows that one would be wrong to assume Red Hat really competes against Microsoft (any more than Novell did; there’s a strong relationship)

IT may seem painful to say this, but Red Hat does not quite act as a flag bearer to many GNU/Linux users these days. To many of us, with few exceptions, replacing Windows is the goal. Red Hat seems to be more interested in some kind of hegemony. It boils down to money, not principles.

“It boils down to money, not principles.”IBM never truly cared about replacing Windows since the OS/2 days; it’s just not in the market anymore. And for those who believe that Red Hat can be seen as a case apart, bear in mind they’re becoming inseparable quite rapidly. The most recent insider comment from TheLayoff Web site (spotted yesterday):

Screenshot: Red Hat theLayoff

One need not even look far back to see the strength of the relationship, which probably strengthened even further under IBM.

Nadella and Red Hat
Microsoft withdrew due to antitrust fears

In the clip below (2019), notice the gestures upon the entrance of Nadella (body language).

Red Hat Microsoft handshake

Shades of Novell and Hovsepian/Ballmer, right?

Red Hat Microsoft handshake closer

Then the handshakes and the sit-down with “Microsoft” on top of Jim’s head. Did they get the labels the wrong way around?

Red Hat Microsoft labels

Stay classy, Jim from Microsoft.

Here’s the full clip (locally stored):

We’ve been there before, sort of…

It’s about proprietary software. Where does Red Hat go?

09.11.20

Calling ‘Snaps’ and ‘Flatpaks’ What They Really Are: Ramps for Proprietary Software Inside GNU/Linux (the ‘App’ Mindset)

Posted in GNU/Linux, Red Hat, Ubuntu at 3:26 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Do we want GNU/Linux distros to become another Android with centralised (monopolised) ‘stores’ as opposed to repositories of Free/libre software everyone can modify and redistribute freely? Do we want “Steam” (DRM) for software?

Summary: Canonical’s gravitation towards the whole ‘store’ mindset (and Red Hat’s equivalent of that) seems to have raised concerns among and amidst developers of the Linux Mint project; they try hard to prevent users from adopting Canonical’s ‘store’ and there’s an explanation (above) of why that’s the case

THE RPM/DEB ‘wars’ can be found way back… going back to the 1990s. Debian-Private, which we started publishing a fortnight ago, is full of that. Many threads contain arguments over Red Hat’s ambition versus Debian’s. Now we have new kinds of packaging wars, with the Debian-based Ubuntu pushing ‘Snap’ (snapd) and Red Hat/Fedora pushing ‘Flatpak’ (used to require systemd). They’re hostile towards one another — since launch in fact! — and there are reasons to be suspicious of both.

“…the problem that Canonical is trying to solve is perhaps a business model problem rather than a technical problem.”The above interview (like the video) was published earlier this week and the latter speaks of ‘Snaps’ being snubbed by Linux Mint. There are reasons for that shunning. Alluding to Flatpak at one point, there’s that similar discussion about new ‘standards’ for packaging. Flatpak’s back end isn’t as proprietary… but now it’s IBM-led and there’s a close connection to Microsoft through GitHub. Probably not something worth running as root…

SolitudeThe more interesting part of this interview deals with why Mint developers went as far as making it very difficult to adopt ‘Snaps’. It also explains the purpose of Mint’s Debian-based fallback, which obviously uses apt/apt-get/aptitude/dpkg/deb etc. and does not depend on companies like Canonical.

The last minute of this video is perhaps the most interesting. It’s about Mint developers going out of their way to prevent or at least make it rather hard to install ‘Snaps’, many of which are proprietary software. It’s rightly noted that no distribution stands in the way of installing proprietary software to the extent Mint developers stand in the way of ‘Snaps’, but perhaps they correctly view this as Canonical’s power grab, emulating Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

Over the years I’ve experimented (a number of times on a number of machines) with ‘Snaps’ and I never found it particularly reliable; it wasn’t clear to me what the selling point was (other than, perhaps on the misguided side, domination of the server-side stack/software by one company).

‘Snaps’ are managed by proprietary software at the server (not client) side and they sometimes are, themselves, proprietary software as well. That in its own right ought to be a little alarming; the problem that Canonical is trying to solve is perhaps a business model problem rather than a technical problem. Even more than a decade ago Canonical came under fire for selling proprietary software as a business model (or reselling it on behalf of other companies). If those companies insist that this is necessary for “world domination” or whatever, then it means they disregard software freedom (in the same way Google does) and actually mean something like “financial sustainability” (for themselves). Attaining that so-called “world domination” (lots of proprietary ‘apps’ and whatnot) wouldn’t be unprecedented. Google has already done that with Android, whose overall market share exceeds Windows’. If we lose sight of software freedom and instead focus only on “market share”, then all we do is add another brand (like “Apple” or “Mac”) to the mix while failing to address paradigm changes or real threats. Almost nobody out there can argue that Android being widespread has been good for software freedom; sure, many people not have Linux on their small computers, but those computers mostly spy on them and let them access proprietary stuff managed closely (and often censored) by one company. Success should be measured in terms of principles (like software freedom) rather than “market share”, which can be seductive/alluring when one is accustomed to being a niche player for years if not decades. This whole immorality has already infected a number of key organisations, including the Linux Foundation, which is nowadays openly shilling for and outsourcing to Microsoft (GitHub and IIS) because its sole goal is to maximise revenue, not to help Linux.

09.10.20

The GNOME Foundation Arguably Gave a Patent Troll Even More Legitimacy by Settling and Failing to Dismantle Shoddy Software Patents

Posted in GNOME, GNU/Linux, IBM, Microsoft, Patents, Red Hat at 9:28 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

They’ve legally endorsed software patents

Summary: The IBM-connected GNOME Foundation wants us to think that letting a troll out on the loose is good news or “victory”; but actually, the patents of the troll are still in tact, posing a threat to many and setting no useful precedent (they technically settled over software patents)

THE other day I saw the post — a belated but very detailed post — about the GNOME Foundation’s patent lawsuit (and counter-suit). It’s from an IBMer and we know that IBM is a HUGE fan of software patents. It lobbies for them constantly, not only in the US but everywhere in the world. I was tempted to respond but did not do so until I saw the above video segment. It’s a video that I do not fully agree with and mostly disagree with for reasons specified several times before in relation to this particular lawsuit. Basically, the GNOME Foundation amassed a lot of money for a pro bono fight; there’s no disclosure/explanation what happened to all that money.

“It may seem like a win for Shotwell, but it’s a loss for the overall battle against software patents and arguably, at least by extension, a loss for programming, including Free software.”More importantly, however, the patent troll was left with the shoddy patents (not a single one was thrown out), free to sue lots of companies provided their products aren’t licensed as Free software or ‘open source’ (as per the OSI’s definition). What’s more, the troll got a zero-cost settlement, which can be used as a sort of ‘ammo’ proving the supposed ‘value’ of the patent/s at hand. So the GNOME Foundation did not actually complete the job; as IBM or OIN would have liked, they did not challenge software patents and in fact left the troll on the loose. It may seem like a win for Shotwell, but it’s a loss for the overall battle against software patents and arguably, at least by extension, a loss for programming, including Free software. That troll is still out there with all those patents. Since GNOME is mostly controlled by IBM (or formerly Red Hat), this whole thing shows how IBM policies supersede Red Hat’s. Bruce Perens recently highlighted those problems with OIN, which basically guards software patents from/against Free software-led reforms.

In this particular case the patent could be squashed using prior art, obviousness, and/or abstractness (Sections 101-103), but no such effort was followed through. Microsoft too was reportedly involved. Moreover, the troll in question received these patents from Microsoft’s troll, as we noted several times in the past.

The media never bothered covering this properly. Shallow journalism has become the norm, appeasing big sponsors.

08.29.20

[Meme] Congratulations to IBM for Putting GNU/Linux (Back) on ThinkPads

Posted in GNU/Linux, IBM, Red Hat at 11:56 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

A good sign of progress

ThinkPads meme: I call it 'Linux' and it started in 1991

Summary: As the latest news [1,2] puts it, mostly citing a tweet, there’s finally an easy way to get Fedora preloaded on ThinkPads (sold by IBM to Lenovo)

_____

  1. You Can Now Buy Lenovo’s ThinkPad X1 Carbon Gen 8 Laptop with Fedora Linux

    Fedora Project’s leader Matthew Miller announced today on Twitter that the first (of many to come) laptop from Lenovo with Fedora Linux pre-installed is now available for sale, the ThinkPad X1 Carbon Gen 8.

    About four months ago, Lenovo shocked the Linux community by announcing that they FINALLY plan to offer Linux laptops, choosing the Red Hat-sponsored Fedora Linux as default operating system.

    The first Lenovo laptops to ship with Linux are supposed to be the ThinkPad P1 Gen2, ThinkPad P53, and ThinkPad X1 Gen8.

  2. Lenovo Starts Offering Up Fedora Linux Pre-Loaded Systems From Their Web Store

    As a follow up from the news earlier this summer of Lenovo planning to certify their ThinkPad and ThinkStation lines for Linux from Ubuntu and Red Hat while also offering distribution choices like Fedora, that work is proceeding with Lenovo now offering up their first system from their web store that comes pre-loaded with Fedora.

    The ThinkPad X1 Carbon Gen 8 is available with Fedora preloaded while still offering up options from Core i5 through Core i7 10th Gen CPUs, 8GB / 16GB of RAM, a variety of display options (including 14-inch 4K), etc.

08.21.20

North Carolina, Home of Red Hat, Perhaps Has the Most Notorious History When It Comes to Racist Eugenics Projects

Posted in Red Hat at 6:50 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Recent: The Full Story (With References) of IBM’s Role in a Purge of Black People and Mixed-Race Couples

THE full book is available for purchase. We reproduce just a small portion of it below (“Ethnic Cleansing in Connecticut” and “North Carolina Confronts Its Genocide”; pages 1596-1635).

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Lots more in the full book.

08.20.20

OSI’s Chief Steps Down, Canonical Advertises Windows Again, and Red Hat Gives Award to Microsoft

Posted in GNU/Linux, Microsoft, OSI, Red Hat, Ubuntu, Windows at 9:55 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

OSI salaries
The only one in OSI who takes a salary, apparently (latest tax form here [PDF]), has left; as the ‘sellout’ or handover to monopolists accelerates so does the corporate revenue the OSI nowadays depends on (that money grew tenfold in a decade, just like at the Linux Foundation)

Ubuntu on Windows
The Official Ubuntu Blog is again boosting Microsoft’s attack on GNU/Linux, along with ZDNet and Phoronix. Again and again this happens as if Canonical is not pro-Linux and instead pro-dud. Why are they bothering with articles on WSL2 when very few people use it and it is an attack on GNU/Linux?

Red Hat's Microsoft award
This new blog post from Red Hat shows they’ve come to depend on and suck up to Microsoft [1, 2]

Summary: Patrick Masson leaves OSI, Canonical promotes Windows in its Ubuntu blog, and Red Hat continues to act like it refuses to even compete with Microsoft

THINGS deteriorate further. This is entryism.

The OSI GM has resigned (not fired, based on the wordings [1,2]) and one starts wondering whether the whole thing collapsing is a desirable end. There’s nobody even to replace him, except interim (typically suggestive of an unexpected power vacuum with little planning or foresight). Given the funding sources of the OSI, where money buys power, the next GM will likely be a very corporate person like the OSI’s President, Josh Simmons. He comes from the company that so viciously attacked RMS and suggested that the FSF should oust all who support RMS, thereby creating an unprecedented power vacuum and witch-hunt. Remember that both of the OSI’s co-founders are no longer there; one resigned in protest at the start of the year and Simmons et al banned the other. Maybe that partly led to Masson’s exit. It does not say why he left. Monopolists are always happy to exploit power vacuums, created as they intended so they can infiltrate everything. Microsoft initially infiltrated the OSI — with its shoddy licences — because of Mac Asay inside the Board (he’s still a Microsoft apologist and he tried working for Microsoft). Groklaw protested strongly against this.

“Assimilation tactics only need apathy and silence to prove effective. The further they progress, the harder it becomes to undo them.”So what does “Open Source” even stand for now? Monopolies? WSL? Windows? GitHub? Yes, it’s proprietary.

Putting this together with yesterday’s blog posts from the official Red Hat and Ubuntu blogs (screenshots at the top), at least we have a rough idea what we’re dealing with here…

Assimilation tactics only need apathy and silence to prove effective. The further they progress, the harder it becomes to undo them.

Related/contextual items from the news:

  1. Deb Nicholson to Join Open Source Initiative as Interim General Manager

    Deb Nicholson has been serving as our Director of Community Operations for just over two years and is now leaving to Conservancy to take on the role of Interim General Manager at the Open Source Initiative (OSI). Although Deb will no longer be on our staff, she’ll remain part of the Conservancy community, most formally as a volunteer on our Evaluation Committee that reviews applications from potential new member projects.

    In the two years since she became the Director of Community Operations, Deb has helped Conservancy welcome six new member projects, put on two Copyleft Confs, run two fundraising seasons and contributed over 50 posts to our blog.

  2. Announcing OSI’s New Interim General Manager

    The Open Source Initiative is bringing in Deb Nicholson as its new Interim General Manager. Nicholson will be supporting the organization through a period of growth and introspection over the upcoming year as stakeholders continue building on the non-profit’s past successes. She will be overseeing day-to-day operations, including marketing, staffing and infrastructure, as well as supporting board and volunteer activities.

    OSI’s President, Josh Simmons elaborates, “We’re thrilled to welcome Deb as an Interim General Manager at OSI. Her credentials are top notch, and she’s well respected within the free and open source software communities… I couldn’t ask for a better partner as OSI works through its second major transformation! Deb’s roots in the software freedom community and at Conservancy bode well for our movements as we strive to present a more unified front to advance our shared goals.”

    We would also like to take this moment to thank Patrick Masson for seven years of service as OSI’s General Manager and Director. He leaves behind a powerful legacy as OSI’s first full-time employee. Masson will be continuing his work as an outside consultant to support this transition as well as supporting FLOSS Desktops For Kids. We wish him all the best, both inside and outside, the open source community.

08.13.20

A Red Hat Response to Factual Information About Red Hat

Posted in IBM, Red Hat at 6:18 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

What’s the point even responding to the person whose salary comes from the company under scrutiny (based upon facts, no “conspiracy” anything)?

Red Hat on Red Hat

Summary: So far we’ve seen only Red Hat employees blasting our articles about Red Hat/IBM and the responses lack any substance, just name-calling (so we must be on the right track; there’s no refutation so far)

Lunduke cursing
We’ve seen worse…

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