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08.26.20

Microsoft Totally and Utterly Collapsing in Web Servers This Month

Posted in Microsoft, Servers at 2:41 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Related: On Web Servers, Microsoft’s Collapse Continues More Rapidly Under COVID (a Million Domains Lost in the Past Month) | Linux Foundation Newsletter is Microsoft Windows and Proprietary IIS

Netcraft August 2020
“As well as a marked decrease in total sites this month of 22.14 million (-15.8%), Microsoft also suffered in other metrics this month. The number of domains served using Microsoft software dropped by 8.27 million (-18.4%), and 19,000 fewer web-facing computers (-1.2%) are running Microsoft web servers. Microsoft also lost 633,000 active sites (-7.3%),” says Netcraft today (published 4 hours ago in the monthly report)

Summary: Microsoft has been reduced to very few Web servers and only about 4% of the market; as we noted earlier this month, this lock-down as a whole has been a disaster for Windows and IIS; it might not be long before IIS is altogether discontinued

08.13.20

On Web Servers, Microsoft’s Collapse Continues More Rapidly Under COVID (a Million Domains Lost in the Past Month)

Posted in GNU/Linux, Microsoft, Servers, Windows at 5:10 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

A dying breed, but the corporate media never talks about it

Ruined wall
Windows firewall

Summary: Even though the Microsoft-sponsored media repeatedly refuses (or strangely enough just ‘fails’) to report on it, the days of Microsoft’s IIS are likely numbered; it won’t be long before less than a million computers run it

THE corporate media does not like to talk about it (nothing for its advertisers to gain from it), but according to these latest statistics sooner or later there will be nobody left to use and pay for IIS except the Linux Foundation (yes, it uses Microsoft on some servers).

“…sooner or later there will be nobody left to use and pay for IIS except the Linux Foundation…”Microsoft has already lost more than 5% of its share in just two months [1, 2] and it’s again down from 4.52% to 4.51% of active sites (parked domains statistics are easy to game ‘on the cheap’, as Microsoft does routinely). In the past few weeks Microsoft lost 500 or so sites among the top million busiest sites (so they dumped Windows or perished, falling outside the one-million range with nothing to replace them), there are 1,000 IIS servers fewer than last month, and about 1,000,000 domains fewer than a month ago. Netcraft says that “Microsoft trails in third position with a total of 1.6 million web-facing computers, around half that of nginx and Apache.”

“Microsoft has already lost more than 5% of its share in just two months…”Actually, both nginx and Apache, on their own, have more than twice what Windows/IIS has and it’s important to remember that Microsoft has efficiency issues, so it’s possible that a lot more Windows servers are needed for dealing with the same loads.

Why isn’t the media ever mentioning this? Obviously, there’s nothing to be gained financially when your sponsor is Microsoft. Sites like ZDNet, the IDG network and others are heavily bribed by Microsoft. They’re not even good at hiding it. Sometimes they openly admit this.

A reader pointed out to us this new IDG ‘spam’ for Microsoft (upselling Windows Server), asking “where is the guide from Canonical for moving to Ubuntu?” Or “where is the guide from Red Hat for moving to RHEL?”

“Why isn’t the media ever mentioning this? Obviously, there’s nothing to be gained financially when your sponsor is Microsoft.”Like we showed earlier this morning, sometimes it feels like those companies 'defected' in some sense and basically quit competing with Windows because Microsoft pays them to act this way. Similarly, Microsoft seems to have bribed some major Web hosts to put parked domains on IIS (to make Microsoft seem vastly bigger than it really is). Bruce Perens spoke about it over a decade ago.

07.30.20

[Meme] It Was Only a Matter of Time All Along

Posted in GNU/Linux, Kernel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Security, Servers at 10:25 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Kamen Rider Build Banjou Ryuga: Hold it right there! Told ya!

Summary: Taking boot level control away from computer users was a bad idea all along; giving Microsoft control over Linux booting was the icing on the cake (having to ask Microsoft for certificate/permission), not to mention an FSF award for it

Karma or Hubris? Is #TorvaldsWasRight a Thing Now?

Posted in GNU/Linux, Kernel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Security, Servers at 8:58 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

This is why perceived ‘rudeness’ is sometimes necessary and well deserved

Red Hat won't boot
As widely reported right about now

Summary: Techrights did not forget how UEFI ‘secure’ boot came into kernel space (see the below); This proposal came from Red Hat and then foisted/pushed onto Linus Torvalds by at least 3 Red Hat employees (the mainstream media blasted Torvalds for his response to this ‘offensive’ technical move by Red Hat, helping Intel and Microsoft control silicon at CA level)
Red Hat UEFI push

Red Hat UEFI push

Red Hat UEFI push

Red Hat UEFI push

Red Hat UEFI push

07.27.20

Calling ‘Bullshit’ on the ‘Hey Hi’ (AI) Marketing Hype

Posted in IBM, Marketing, Red Hat, Servers at 12:33 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Watson logo

AI mentions

Summary: IBM and Microsoft both rely on mindless hype to market poorly-performing products and services; when will they set aside buzzwords and focus on substance instead?

I have worked on so-called ‘Hey Hi’ (AI) code since I was a teenager. At first I developed a game engine. Later I develop computer vision classifiers, mostly for medical applications. We called it “machine vision” or “machine learning” at the time, not “Hey Hi” (AI being a much older term with very broad scope). I understand the technical limitations and all the superficial/artificial hype. I peer-reviewed academic papers at the highest level, assessing the application of the methods in a practical context. I’m not clueless about this. EPO President António Campinos loves talking about “AI”, but what does he know about it anyway? Nothing. The term “AI” is so vague and broad that nontechnical managers name-drop it all the time.

“The term “AI” is so vague and broad that nontechnical managers name-drop it all the time.”The new CEO of IBM (Arvind Krishna), in recent interviews that I saw of him, props up “clown computing” (servers/clusters) and “Hey Hi” (AI) quite a lot; there’s not sufficient substance. Remember which part of IBM he came from. Here’s one video where they speak to Mr. “cloud and cognitive software” (“cloud everywhere, AI anywhere”). Have a look, as it predates by months the appointment/promotion of Krishna to CEO role:

He mentions “Watson” in the context of “Cloud Private” and containers. “Watson everywhere” is their motto. Watson to “sell cloud”…

“IBM will need to do more than rebrand systems administration “DevOps” and various algorithms “AI”; the CEO is probably a lot more technical than the new President (Whitehurst), which is better known for institutional openwashing (“open org”).”Red Hat is mentioned a lot (this was after they announced they’d buy Red Hat, reportedly because Krishna had pushed in that direction).

They mention Microsoft and Azure a lot (even if Azure is an overhyped failure with ongoing layoffs). Seeing all this “cloud everywhere” and “Watson everywhere” buzzwords salad, I’m not particularly encouraged about the future direction, which may lack technical substance and put emphasis on soundbites, instead. At around 7:20 he mentions doctors and access to knowledge; well, perhaps he hasn’t caught up with reports such as these:

Watson hype

IBM will need a lot more than brands like “Watson” to succeed. “You gotta bring cloud technologies, you gotta bring AI technologies” (Krishna’s words at 10:40) isn’t enough. IBM will need to do more than rebrand systems administration “DevOps” and various algorithms “AI”; the CEO is probably a lot more technical than the new President (Whitehurst), which is better known for institutional openwashing (“open org”).

I generally hope that IBM will bring GNU/Linux to the mainstream not only at the back end but also the client side. IBM, irrespective of our views about it, is by far the biggest influencer in this space. It’ll have a lot to do with the future direction of both Linux and GNU, not to mention a bunch of other stuff that goes on top (e.g. containers, databases, and Web frameworks).

06.22.20

Linux Foundation Newsletter is Microsoft Windows and Proprietary IIS

Posted in GNU/Linux, Microsoft, Servers at 3:52 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Only About 4.72% of the Web Uses It, But the Linux Foundation‘s People are on Microsoft’s Team and They Use Windows in Other Web Sites/Services, Even to Celebrate Sysadmin Day

Linux Foundation footer
There’s even more technical evidence to that effect

Summary: Another major fluke from the not-so-Linux Foundation, which now promotes a Windows site in the Linux Foundation’s Official Blog and in Linux.com as well (the Linux Foundation Newsletter… is Windows)

06.10.20

AWS is Not GNU/Linux and AWS Certification is a Bezos-Leaning Ploy That Rewards People for Memorising Proprietary Interfaces (Vendor Lock-in)

Posted in Free/Libre Software, GNU/Linux, Servers at 7:00 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

BHO-DJT Side-by-Side: They don't agree on anything... Except spying on the whole world and their own citizens

Summary: Clown computing is a scam and a trap; in practice it means outsourcing one’s programs and data to computers one does not own, does not truly control, and everything is subjected to change (spying, billing, interfaces, features, patent aspects); we need to move away from centralised clowns (“The Cloud”)

THE fact that Amazon started making its own distros was overlooked or overshadowed somewhat because of the timing of the announcement. It coincided with the date the media was almost 90% “COVID COVID COVID”…

And nevertheless, for about a week following the announcement we’ve managed to fish about a dozen articles (also in Daily Links at that time).

Is Amazon a friend of GNU/Linux? No, not really.

“Is Amazon a friend of GNU/Linux? No, not really.”Amazon’s technical/practical contributions to the platform that makes Mr. Bezos so rich aren’t noteworthy. Linus Torvalds recently blasted one patch from their direction, using strong language to describe that “stupidity”…

Clown computing is generally a massive threat to Software Freedom; Richard Stallman foresaw this threat and drafted (A)GPLv3 (along with others who recognised the threat). When the mainstream/corporate media started rebranding servers and “SaaS” as something like “cloud” (few other terms were attempted, but they did not catch on) Stallman blasted the trend and dismissed it — even in the media — as mere hype.

And guess what… Stallman was right. He’s usually right. He wasn’t born yesterday and he had plenty of time to think about the intricacies; he also speaks to rather knowledgeable people about it (in person and over E-mail).

“Clown computing is generally a massive threat to Software Freedom; Richard Stallman foresaw this threat and drafted (A)GPLv3 (along with others who recognised the threat).”AWS is perhaps the biggest ‘collective’ datacentre with GNU/Linux; Wikileaks exposed some locations of the pertinent datacentres a couple of years ago. As of half a decade ago, Amazon’s AWS (or similar) datacentres were spread across about a dozen countries. Many are US-based, where military-funded lawmakers draft bills called “cloud” something and give special powers (including data access) to the US government/authorities (US Army included).

Having said that, my main issue with AWS isn’t lack of returns (very minimal). They contribute almost nothing to development; they’re known to be exploiting lots of Free software projects, grabbing support contracts away from people and firms that actually develop the software. There were several controversies to that effect in recent months and Amazon is sponsoring/supporting events that strive to make it mainstream and “normal”… as if exploitation is to be celebrated as “success” (it’s rather unethical).

“GNU/Linux on the other hand (like UNIX/POSIX) is modular, standard and universal.”But here’s the thing that’s even worse; many people nowadays pursue certifications named after buzzwords. Or brands. They basically spend a lot of time and money joining some corporate cult without even being salaried by the respective corporation/s. One example of this is AWS certification. Putting aside the dynamic nature of their interfaces (which I’ve seen and used for almost a decade at work), those are proprietary and certification means training — and moreover training for things that change over time and thus render the certification obsolete or outdated.

GNU/Linux on the other hand (like UNIX/POSIX) is modular, standard and universal. It hardly changes over time. The same GNU scripts you put together back in the 1980s probably still work today (the opposite isn’t true; it’s not likely that a program or script you write today would work with a 1980s GNU toolchain). So once a person acquires the skills, they’re portable and globally useful. One can even switch from GNU/Linux to BSDs without great difficulty; the adaptations may be minor and there’s plenty of documentation about it online (not without out-of-date GUI screenshots).

“An Amazon empire of virtual machines and containers is certainly helpful to Mr. Bezos. But is that what we want for ourselves?”The bottom line is, don’t be misled into thinking that all those “GAFAM” certifications are worth much; you invest a lot in merely making the likes of Mr. Bezos a lot richer. You reinforce lock-in if not monopoly (memorising GUIs). The same can be said about GitHub. And sending more money to Amazon (AWS bills) isn’t contributing to Software Freedom, even if all running instances are basically GNU/Linux images.

Sure, GNU/Linux is dominant (probably de facto standard in today’s servers), but if we strive to accomplish more than just branding (“Linux everywhere”), then let’s think ahead and consider what a world we wish to live in. An Amazon empire of virtual machines and containers is certainly helpful to Mr. Bezos. But is that what we want for ourselves? We don’t even mention Microsoft’s offering that starts with an “A” because it's an overhyped miserable failure (the media writes about it because Microsoft is paying). In my daily life, at work, I hardly come across anyone who uses the “A” thing of Microsoft; they’re grossly exaggerating their relevance — typical Microsoft marketing stunt.

06.09.20

[Humour] The False Choice Between Two Proprietary Software ‘Cloud’ Giants That Act as ‘Hosts’ (for Users as Hostages)

Posted in Deception, Servers at 4:59 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

False dichotomy or “lesser evilism” at work… with people cheering for brands rather than principles

Two Giants And Small Humans: The Clown, Another clown, clown computing enthusiasts

Summary: The clown computing nonsense is one among several key distractions from Software Freedom; we need to learn to mock the whole clown computing hype; for one thing, start by calling it “clown computing” and those who promote it “clowns”

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