04.20.08

ISO Maxes Up Damage Control, OOXML Storm Looming

Posted in Antitrust, Corel, Europe, ISO, Law, Microsoft, Open XML, OpenDocument at 1:14 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

ISO sells stamps

At this stage, ISO seems to have a rough idea of what's to come. OOXML could still be binned, as it always should have right from the very start had it not been for corruption.

“Microsoft may have media control, but hardly any juridical control, especially not outside the United States.”There’s a big storm coming, but it’s too early to disclose the details. In the mean time, leak by leak and drop by drop, eventually the truth will dribble out. Microsoft may have media control, but hardly any juridical control, especially not outside the United States.

Yesterday we saw some new examples of scandals from France and from Norway. There have been some ugly incidents or observation also in Croatia, Germany, Poland, Sweden, the UK, Denmark and where not? The main difference between one country and another is the level of visibility of the process. In the UK, for example, the secrecy was unbelievable. Isn’t it an open standard they purport to be weighing on? Almost nowhere have proceedings been fully transparent and those who ‘dared’ to speak out were sometimes at risk of getting sued.

Like a family preparing for the hurricane, ISO seems to have secured the home, stocked up the shelves and done maximum damage control just before shutting its doors and taking OXML [sic] down to the basement where it can lose its mind with a set of headphones and a fully-changed Walkman.

It’s actually to be expected.

ISO now has skeletons in it’s closet so they don’t *want* an appeals to be filed. Anything they can do to put this whole mess in the past and bury those skeletons is what they’ll do. They’ve already:
* Put out an “Everything is okay” SNAFU FAQ
* Tried to convince people that people who actually want quality standards (not fake unimplementable specs) are just anti-OOXML because they’re pro-ODF
* Tried to convince people that the only opposition is just a group of weirdos that like to protest anything, likely sponsored by IBM

This type of attitude of course utterly despicable coming from what’s considered to be the “International” body responsible for industrial ‘rules’. How thoroughly has it been corrupted by Microsoft, having been hijacked? One has to wonder.

The Noooxml lobby has been rather quiet recently, but efforts continue to go into raising of awareness rather than tracking and documentation of known and newly-revealed scandals. Speaking of positives:

I find it important to share the effort for the promotion of interoperable digital standards policies globally. Some members of our community refer to it ironically as the “domino project”. Policies like the one of the Netherlands are going to inspire other administrations to take similar steps. The call for open standards, that is standards free of vendor capture, which preserve us the “freedom to leave” regarding standard based solutions, would mount. One small step triggers the next.

Another item which is worth mentioning is this coverage about Corel. To satisfy a reader’s request we recently summarised the Corel situation. It appears as though Corel is still not fully obliged to neither OOXML nor to ODF. It does, however, brag about PDF capabilities.

Support for Open Office XML (which has been implemented as a standardised version, but not yet in software) and the OpenDocument format allows document exchange with users of Office 2007 and OpenOffice and StarOffice. However, the “File Format Freedom” mentioned in Corel’s press release only applies to read access: Documents can’t be saved in either of the two formats.

It’s worth tracking to see where Corel’s development efforts are focused and spent from this point onward, having probably found something rotten in FreeThink's feedback. In short, there have been stories in the past that exposed Microsoft as it paid developers and/or businesses to steer away from ODF. In the same fashion, Microsoft offers generous incentives for big players and even government-funded bodies to embrace Silverlight. It’s anti-competitive use of money.

Microsoft Will Try to Break the Web at All Costs, Using XAML

Posted in GNU/Linux, Google, Microsoft, Novell, Patents, Red Hat, Standard, Windows at 12:23 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

How much will it cost to kill the open Web and elbow GNU/Linux?

A couple of days ago we discussed Novell’s Moonlight and explained why it assists Microsoft's fight against Adobe, Google, GNU/Linux, Ajax and many other rivals (or rival technologies employed by those rivals).

It ought to have become increasingly apparent by now that Novell and Microsoft are on the same boat, shooting cannonballs at those whom they perceive as individual or common rivals. One notable example of common rivals is probably Red Hat. Novell is part of the Microsoft ecosystem, which it will probably continue to defend while staying out of its more valued territories.

“Instead of open standards that everyone can implement, Microsoft wants the Net to become .NET (Silverlight), which is proprietary, totally controlled by Microsoft.”Microsoft has made it very clear that it wants to rip and replace some of the open fabric of the World Wide Web. Instead of open standards that everyone can implement, Microsoft wants the Net to become .NET (Silverlight), which is proprietary, totally controlled by Microsoft.

The lengths to which Microsoft will go are nearly as disturbing as its anti-competitive methods and goals considered in isolation. As an example we previously mentioned the US Library of Congress, which despite being a reservoir of national assets, was willing to accept millions of dollars from Microsoft. “What for,” you ask? to shut out some of Microsoft’s rivals with a more Microsoft-controlled redesigned Web site/portal [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. It’s similar to the BBC fiasco. Due to public accessibility regulations or at least obligations, The Library of Congress may be pushing the law here, if not turning this into a form of scandal.

Fall not for the impression that nothing is done to address this. The European Commission (EC), as angry as it already is about Microsoft's abuses, investigates abuse with Silverlight, which in its own right provides validation to arguments resisting it. If the EC got peeved, why shouldn’t others?

According to the following new article, Microsoft’s marketing blitz is all fake too, which is akin to the “grassroots” methods Microsoft is seen writing about explicitly in antitrust exhibits, as well as using it on the surface to this very date.

Is the Silverlight Adoption Rate Artificially Inflated?

[...]

So, that’s where we are today. Microsoft is now also claiming that they’re measuring the downloads per day in the millions (may not be accurate, that’s just what I remember from the last Channel 9 video I watched). Partners have been popping up everywhere and people are using Silverlight applications for what looks like everything under the sun. The problem is that this thriving partner community is a little misleading.

Everything from the Oscars to huge websites and the upcoming Olympics in China seems to be coming out in Silverlight nowadays. The problem I have with this is that these really can’t be used as effective case studies because they would be, in my opinion, biased. Microsoft essentially approaches these people who have huge reach on the Internet. They then send in consultants or MS people in droves to actually write the Silverlight app for the new partner (or cooperate with their existing dev team), and then provide financial incentives for being a flagship Silverlight adopter.

Microsoft is, as always, behind the choice of consumer-hostile, Windows-centric solutions. As we saw in the case of the Library of Congress, a form of bribery is seen as acceptable too (the price of breaking the Web and ‘punishing’ Linux users).

It is rather astounding that not much attention is paid, let alone awareness is raised, about a company spreading its patent poison through the Web (downstreaming in a big way). This is a company with an extensive history of saber-rattling, bullying, lawsuits by proxy, and obscene forms of intimidation. It goes without saying that Microsoft also uses this as a method for leaving its #1 competitor behind.

Silverlight toilet

« Previous Page « Previous Page Next entries »

RSS 64x64RSS Feed: subscribe to the RSS feed for regular updates

Home iconSite Wiki: You can improve this site by helping the extension of the site's content

Home iconSite Home: Background about the site and some key features in the front page

Chat iconIRC Channels: Come and chat with us in real time

New to This Site? Here Are Some Introductory Resources

No

Mono

ODF

Samba logo






We support

End software patents

GPLv3

GNU project

BLAG

EFF bloggers

Comcast is Blocktastic? SavetheInternet.com



Recent Posts