01.09.10

Transcript of The Guardian’s 10-Minute Microsoft ‘Advert’

Posted in Deception, FUD, Microsoft at 6:35 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Microsoft’s delusion, which was hosted by The Guardian, is put in textual form

LAST night we wrote about a CES special with Microsoft, in which The Guardian let Microsoft take the podium and tell a lot of lies. One of our readers has kindly created a transcript and also added links to the text — ones that help debunk the nonsense from Microsoft. Here it is:

Intro music. Female voice, “The Guardian.” More music and noises.

Male Narrator (MN): Hello and welcome to Tech Weekly from The Guardian where, as you can probably hear, we’re coming to you from fabulous lost wages. There’s gambling and debauchery aplenty but we’re in town for some serious business, to keep tabs on the Consumer Electronics show as the world’s most influential technology showcase rolls into town. Everyday this week, we’ll be talking to movers and shakers on the show floor as well as talking to guest pundits to discuss the latest news and gadgets coming at the event. In today’s show, we’ll be hearing from Microsoft about their plans for the future. We’ll be talking to the crowds about their favorite gizmos and having a look around the floor as the event opens its doors. So let’s hope the odds are good and the stakes are high because this is Tech Weekly at CES from The Guardian.

More music and noises.

MN: One of the biggest companies at CES in 2010 is and has been for the last decade is Microsoft. In recent years, the companies head honchos have opened the event with a keynote speech where they outline their vision of the future. Earlier I caught up with Microsoft’s Darren Houston, who heads up the companies consumer and online division, to find out more. I started out by asking him how important CES was to Microsoft and to the wider technology industry.

Darren Houston (DH): CES is really I, I consider really the premier consumer electronics show in the world. It’s also interesting because it’s a the beginning of a calendar year, so it’s often a time to reflect on the things that happened in the last calendar year and then look forward to the innovations and things you see in terms of what’s happening in the next calendar year.

MN: So could you run over a few of those things? What is the big vision that Microsoft has for 2010?

DH: We have three strategies in the consumer space. One is multi screens so moving off of just being a PC player and moving across multiple digital screens. The second strategy we call, “software plus services,” so not just working on software that is resident on a client or the device but also working software that is on line and leveraging the Internet to connect the pieces and a third important part of our online strategy is called “natural user interface.” This has been work that has been going on at Microsoft for years, some of it is on our competitors [2] like the Nintendo Wii or the iPhone but also it’s a lot of things we’re doing with things like multi-touch for Windows 7 or Natal, which is a project we have been working on just to use human movement to play games and things like that.

MN: Last year Windows 7 was the big announcement, you know showing off some of, some of the things … it, it’s … does. Windows 7 is now launched

DH: yeah

MN: and so the focus is more on the kind of next generation of stuff and you were mentioning mobile. Microsoft has been along in mobile for a long time but its market share’s diminished especially in the last couple of years as you know everybody, all of these new players have rushed in. Umh, what kind of trends are you seeing that Microsoft can harness to leapfrog or to fight back against the competition?

DH: We’re a partnering company. Our bet always is that ultimately as an industry grows and democratizes it is much better to have, you know, better value for the consumers, significantly more choice and the ability for the consumer say to say, I want a Sony TV but I want a Toshiba laptop and I want a Nikon camera and I want a Samsung phone. So we’re, our play very much in the mobile space is a horizontal market play and that is a big bet. It is a big bet around wanting to democratize the smart phone, bring it to more people and more places and I think in the longer term that, that bet will, that bet will play up, that we believe that we can bring technology to a broader set of manufactures and ultimately, that will mean more choice and lower cost for consumers. It’s kind of like all the talk about tablet now and we’ve been in the tablet business for years and if all the buzz helps really bring tablets into the mainstream then our ecosystem will help democratize that and give people more choice.

MN: Is that a strength or a weakness for Microsoft? You know, now you can’t escape the buzz about things that Microsoft would sit back and say, “We’ve been doing those for years.” Tablet is a brilliant example. Is that a weakness of the partnering strategy, that you sometimes you just need to get perfect examples into people’s hands straight away or else the momentum fades away?

DH: There are weaknesses to the partnering approach. If you can’t, if your partners and you can’t get it together and somebody else just because you are uncoordinated, you are suspicious of one another, you can’t create win-win opportunities and a vertical player comes and does it and end to end that, that is a weakness but I’m glad to be on this side of things because I think that ultimately choice and value wins out in the minds of consumers. You know, I think of the IT industry as a jungle, umm, there’s obviously lots going on inside the jungle but really the most important thing is the health of the overall jungle and is it delivering value to the end user. That’s what really says if Microsoft, Apple, Google others are going to be successful and at this very point in time I think the jungle is quite healthy.

MN: To expand your jungle analogy, I just wondered, I, it, it feels like all the big beasts in the jungle are trying to eat the same stuff. If you look at Microsoft, Apple, Google, all now are operating in a lot of very similar areas. Is there space for everybody to play nice?

DH: Obviously a bigger pie helps makes everyone’s slice’s bigger but obviously there is competition in everything we do. I mean if you look five years from now, this is a great, I mean, what is a phone, what is a PC in five year, what is a television is it a display or is it like a PC with with a big display? So there is a certain amount of convergence going on in the consumer space, people look over in other spaces and go, “Wow, I used to think that something out of something I did but now it seems very core to what I do.” People are feeling, and even Apple making this recent acquisition in the advertising space. You kind of scratch your head and go, “What’s going on there?” What is really, is it’s the dynamic of digitization of life and everything s becoming digital and when everything becomes ones and zeros it becomes interesting.

MN: So I want to pick up on a couple of specific things. You know, I live in the US now and I see more people using Bing and the market share is going up. Outside the US, ahem, Google is often in an even stronger position than it is in it’s home market. I mean in the UK,

DH: yeah

MN: Google is, is more dominant. How well is the attempt to grow Bing going outside the US?

DH: Yeah, yes. It’s actually, I mean, even outside the US we’re inching away at your statement at Google being very dominant, particularly in Europe it’s true. Actually, if you go to north Asia, it’s completely different, I mean, I think Google is mostly withdrawn from Korea, alright, because they are just too small or in China there a small player or in Japan or Russia they are small players but I think your point is right if we face different competitive dynamics in many of these different markets, generally Google though is the biggest player in almost any market and ah we’ve just gotta assume and hope that people want a choice. Now with Bing we’ve just started the investment on differentiation. As we continue to invest to make our search results better then you get more in to a situation of Coke Pepsi, Burger King McDonald’s that I think actually helps the small player because people do want alternatives in life but this is a long term thing.

MN: A while ago when we heard that Microsoft was thinking about bringing search adverts or advertising, which is the you know money making part of search, maybe into the desktop as well and kind of meld those two worlds. Can you just explain the thinking behind that because a lot of people were like, “My God! I don’t want adverts on my desktop!” and how is this going to happen? [laughs]

DH: We have tried some experience with ad funded Windows in places like Brazil and China, you know, where people maybe are not paying for Windows in any respects, we actually found that some people appreciated certain forms of ad funded windows more than they did the other form of Windows which was interesting because the brands brought some value but that’s just interesting, it’s not something we are pursuing right now but the other thing we’ve been doing is these Windows 7, we have these theme packs, so instead of going online and downloading a pretty picture of a field or a mountain or something we have new geo theme packs which are countries which are interesting. We also have brand theme packs. We have Ferrari Ducatti, Coke-a-Cola, and and actually people think we’ve charged for it but we haven’t it’s a pilot but we’ve found out that six of the top ten most used desktops since the launch of Windows 7 are actually brands and for instance the Avatar one last week was by far the number one. We did more than a million downloads of the Avatar desktop. For the advertiser, let’s say, for Ferrari to know that you are an avid Ferrari fan is a big deal for them [garbled]. So we’re playing around on the edges. We certainly wouldn’t do anything at this point that wouldn’t be opt in by the consumer but we are experimenting with a few thing that are having some early interesting success.

MN: You were talking about products and certainly Xbox as being very successful. In terms of other hardware that Microsoft’s tried to take on, like the Zune, a nice piece of hardware but does not seem to have caught the public imagination. Do we expect to see Microsoft at a point in the future going into hardware more because Xbox worked or are you going to stay away from it because Zune didn’t?

DH: We’re a software company so our passion, what our people work on, is they just want to bring great software to market and the times we’ve gotten into the hardware market there almost because we could not get the ecosystem to respond and even in the music player business we tried to get an ecosystem going but it never got to a big enough size so we tried to be a little more vertical but I think at our very core we are a software company and even the beauty of Xbox is really the software and how it then connects online and Xbox live is just like so powerful but it happens to come in a box that we have someone else has manufacture we don’t have factories manufacturing Xbox, it’s somebody else manufacturing it, we would rather have an open ecosystem in that area. So, so I think we will get into that business when we need to bring our software to life but it is always with the primary goal of being a software company but every industry is at a different nascent state, just like the smart phone market, it’s still early actually, it’s a very early chapter and our bet in the cell phone market is horizontal and that consumers want choice and that consumers are going to want value as this industry grows and right now in the early days the vertical players are showing more progress but I think ultimately a horizontal play in a big industry like that is the right way to go and that’s what we’ve done in the PC and what we hope to do in the phone business.

MN: That was Microsoft’s Darren Houston there talking about the future of the company. Now, as you can probably tell, we’ve moved out of our little room that we were in before and ….

talks to people from Reddit and Pocket Lint a CES virgin, laughs all around ha ha. Blather about Ballmer Natal and Slate PC promises. Me too moves, Natal is Wii, Slate is another tablet PC. … Sony person says Microsoft stuff does not make him exciting, uses XP, no one in their right mind would use Vista … very little that makes you go “aha, they’re on to something there.” Apple casts this pall over everything else … Not excited about Apple tablet PC, Apple keeps killing it. Is there a use case for Slate? Digital magazine, home control, media gateway to your Apple, docking station in your coffee table, no one wants to do that. iSlate? Why does my mom want an iSlate? Apple markets it for two years, so everyone knows what it does, the magic of Apple. … Pass the bathroom test. I can bring in my Kindle Apple Air and it’s not comfortable or hygienic while I’m taking care of things. Dude, that’s what my Blackberry is for… Highlights and Lowlights Panasonic 3D, $21,000 camera that looks like Wale, filmed in 3D, where things are going. We are in 3D right now, Amazing. Weird meta rubbish. What’s bad about Sony? I’ll save you the trouble, Alexis. Panasonic big TV, 12 foot TV, he wants a 200 inch TV. … Quadrocopter, fun for the kids, executive boys toy, I don’t’ know how much it costs, you can control with your iPhone. It was not able to work, to many wifi’s, non existence demo.

Talks to crowd. I want to see 3D TV. Was there last year and year before, wants to skype from TV. Samsung can make 2D to 3D. Multi media PC people likes tablet and touch

Music

Digital experience up the strip surprises MN. Something about water on a laptop, look it still works! I want my power, take a laptop in the rain up a pole! You can’t take it underwater and that’s useless anyway. Use it on the back on the police car in the rain while on a man hunt. Sulf fog, salt water corrosion. Computer works for 3 day in marine environment. snore… Juice care batteries for iPhone. A credit card add on for the iPhone, so people can take money. Run the app, type in the amount, slide the card. Authorized in real time and deposited in your bank at the end of the month! Motorola Android person talks about backflip, keyboard opens up. Motorola aggregates email, IM and other stuff. Backtrack, a touchpad on the back of the phone.

More music and that’s it. They will be back tomorrow. Got the website to see the video. MN asks you to laugh at him, thanks guests and listeners.

Female voice tells you to go to guardian audio website. Musical finale.

Any more comments would be welcome.

Share in other sites/networks: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Reddit
  • email

This post is also available in Gemini over at:

gemini://gemini.techrights.org/2010/01/09/guardian-microsoft-podcast/

If you liked this post, consider subscribing to the RSS feed or join us now at the IRC channels.

Pages that cross-reference this one

2 Comments

  1. Robotron 2084 said,

    January 9, 2010 at 10:46 am

    Gravatar

    Shame on Microsoft, advertising their products at a trade show! They should do as the other companies do. Responsible companies openly disclosing all the inadequacies of their products and demonstrate how their competitors have clearly better offerings. That’s the purpose of a trade show after all.

    I predict Microsoft will soon go the same way as Sega. I remember when they touted their “SEGA CD” system at CES 92′. They lied and told people it was a great system that had a bright future. Just look where their immoral lies got them.

    your_friend Reply:

    The shame is The Guardian’s uncritical hosting of such an advertisement. The Guardian owes it to their readers to research the issues so that they don’t blindly promote products with 50% return rates and the unethical company that makes them. Microsoft is indeed paying for their failures despite their their illegal attacks on competitors and manipulation of publishers. The market for lemons is not big enough to sustain Microsoft.

What Else is New


  1. Links 21/6/2021: Rocky Linux 8.4, IPFire 2.25 - Core Update 157, and SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP3

    Links for the day



  2. There Are Bigger Scandals Than Revisionism and Brand Dilution at the Linux Foundation

    There are some misconceptions that need tackling; back in February (more than 4 months ago) the so-called 'Linux' Foundation decided to associate with yet another controversial drive that has nothing to do with Linux; some people think it's a new thing and leap to conclusions



  3. Techrights Video Gallery Without JavaScript

    Some of the improvements made this morning to the gallery of recent videos



  4. IRC Proceedings: Sunday, June 20, 2021

    IRC logs for Sunday, June 20, 2021



  5. Links 21/6/2021: Linux 5.13 RC7, IRC.com by Freenode

    Links for the day



  6. Virtual Injustice -- Part 13: Let the Games Continue…

    "It would be nice to think that the events of 28 May have given the Enlarged Board pause for thought."



  7. Links 20/6/2021: Akademy 2021 Underway and Linux Foundation Blasted

    Links for the day



  8. EPO: Fake Patents, Fake (Paid-for) Patent Coverage, and Fake Awards for Public Relations Purposes

    The media has been thoroughly corrupted, patent legitimacy has been severely damaged (far too many European Patents aren't in compliance with the EPC anymore), and Team UPC is trying to undermine the EPC and turn Europe into another Texas



  9. Changes in IRC and New Features Over Gemini Protocol or the World Wide Web

    We examine more closely some of the latest changes in the site and the capsule (Web and Gemini, respectively); we show that it’s possible to keep abreast of IRC using nothing but a text editor, a Gemini client… or even the command line alone



  10. IRC Proceedings: Saturday, June 19, 2021

    IRC logs for Saturday, June 19, 2021



  11. We Need and Deserve a Saner Patent System in Europe

    The laughing stock that the patent system, the patent law firms, and patent media became (over the past few years) must be replaced; at the moment we have a cabal connected to a bunch of criminals running the entire show and the public understandably grows impatient (at least people who are sufficiently informed; the criminals have already intimidated and bribed a lot of the media and they're still bribing more of it, as we shall demonstrate later today)



  12. [Meme] IRC Wars in a Nutshell

    In terms of large IRC networks, we’re in trouble (unless we self-host) because they seem to be dividing themselves along political lines rather than anything technical or something of an on-topic/relevant substance. Using networks for Free software projects/organisations to push one’s political agenda is not acceptable because it’s starting to seem like in IRC space, FN has become the Front Nationale (French) and LC is Liberal Coalition. Both FreeNode and Libera Chat have managed to turn from technical platforms into political parties, in effect using technical networks (intended for technical projects) to push someone's political agenda and thus misusing them for personal gain. There’s no free lunch. As it turns out, FreeNode’s new owner (Andrew Lee) has just outed himself as a huge Donald Trump supporter who speaks of “these fuckers who stole that shit” (he meant the election, which he insists Trump actually won in 2020).



  13. IBM Handles More Removals of Signatures From Its Hate Letter Against Richard Stallman

    Less than a day ago IBM processed a request for removal (from its hate letter); as someone put it in a letter to us, also less than a day ago: “When all of this started in 2019, the Red Hat GNU developers showed off their colours. The best way to attack an organisation is from the inside. Using GNU developers was a dead giveaway. Google and Microsoft are very much on the team with IBM. I believe they’ve made headway into the Free/Libre software community and have persuaded senior Debianties to go along with them.” That same message, from an anonymous GNU maintainer, said: “The strategy to target major distributions is clear and present danger. I’m not sure what arguments of persuasion are being used, but I’m pretty sure their main tool is currency. RMS needs a lot of strategic support from experts who will rally to the Free Software cause. He needs great lawyers, some corporate minds, and intelligence specialists.” Sometimes it seems or feels like by simply buying Red Hat (the staff) IBM infiltrated the GNU Project and now it is vainly making claims like 'GNU is IBM' and thus IBM et al can command/tell the FSF who should run FSF, not only GNU. Such entryism isn’t hard to see; “An open letter in support of Richard Matthew Stallman being reinstated by the Free Software Foundation” has meanwhile garnered 6,758 signatures. The opposite letter is only decreasing in support (signatures lost).



  14. Links 20/6/2021: Debian GNU/Linux 10.10 “Buster” Released and LF Revisionism Resumes

    Links for the day



  15. The EPO's Enlarged Board of Appeal Has Already Lost the Case in the Court of Public Opinion

    Personal views on the sordid state of the Enlarged Board of Appeal (EBoA), which by extension bodes poorly for the perception of independence in every Board of Appeal (BoA); the patent tribunals have been captured by patent maximalists who either stack the panels or intimidate judges into ruling in a particular way



  16. Virtual Injustice -- Part 12: Carl Josefsson – Down But Not Out!

    António Campinos still controls Josefsson, who controls all the judges, so in effect all the legal cases (including some about European software patents) are manipulated by the Office the judges are supposed to judge



  17. Links 19/6/2021: Wine 6.11 and Proton 6.3-5 RC

    Links for the day



  18. IRC Proceedings: Friday, June 18, 2021

    IRC logs for Friday, June 18, 2021



  19. Virtual Injustice -- Part 11: Perceptive Comments and Caustic Criticism

    The EPO‘s management managed to silence a lot of the critical media (handouts and threats from Benoît Battistelli and António Campinos), but silencing comments is a lot harder; though we don’t know which ones were moderated out of existence…



  20. Links 18/6/2021: Mir 2.4, ActivityWatch 0.11, Microsoft Breaks Its Own Repos

    Links for the day



  21. [Meme] When the 'Court' Drops

    As the EPO sneakily outsourced courts to American companies and parties in dispute depend on their ISP for “access to justice” there’s a catastrophic impact on the very concept of justice or the right to be heard (sometimes you don’t hear anything and/or cannot be heard)



  22. The EPO's Virtual Injustice and Virtual ('News') Media

    A discussion of this morning's post (part 10 in a series) about the shallow media/blog coverage that followed or accompanied last month's notorious EPO hearing



  23. Links 18/6/2021: LibreOffice 7.2 Beta, Elementary OS 6.0 Beta 2, and Linux Mint 20.2 “Uma” Beta

    Links for the day



  24. The Self-Hosting Song

    Cautionary tales about outsourcing one's systems to companies that could not care less about anyone but themselves



  25. IRC Proceedings: Thursday, June 17, 2021

    IRC logs for Thursday, June 17, 2021



  26. [Meme] Swedish Justice

    The EPO‘s patent tribunals have been mostly symbolic under the Benoît Battistelli and António Campinos regimes; giving them back their autonomy (and removing those who help Battistelli and Campinos attack their autonomy) is the only way to go now



  27. Virtual Injustice -- Part 10: Vapid and Superficial Coverage in the 'IP' Blogosphere

    The media has come under attack by Benoît Battistelli; during the term of António Campinos most of the media critical of the EPO has mostly vanished already; so one needs to look carefully at comments and social control media



  28. Links 18/6/2021: RasPad 3 and Pushing Rust Into the Linux Kernel

    Links for the day



  29. Heli Pihlajamaa Promoting Software Patents to Patent Maximalists

    "Ms Pyjamas" from the EPO is promoting illegal software patents to a bunch of patent zealots (CIPA)



  30. The Lying by Team UPC, Led Again by Kevin Mooney

    Team UPC, or specifically Mr. Mooney, lies to the public about the prospects of the UPC; similarly, EPO and EU officials keep bringing up false claims about the UPC, so while the UPC itself has likely died for good the lies have not


RSS 64x64RSS Feed: subscribe to the RSS feed for regular updates

Home iconSite Wiki: You can improve this site by helping the extension of the site's content

Home iconSite Home: Background about the site and some key features in the front page

Chat iconIRC Channel: Come and chat with us in real time

Recent Posts