05.11.21

You Look for Linux News and Instead It’s Microsoft Noise and Openwashing

Posted in Deception, GNU/Linux, Kernel, Microsoft, Novell, Windows at 4:20 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link

Summary: Imagine trying to go about doing your own ‘business’, only to be confronted by paid-for plugs (sponsored) by the people trying to undercut/undermine your business; welcome to “Linux” in 2021

THANKS to the flailing Linux Foundation and sellouts such as SUSE, one cannot really avoid the thing that GNU/Linux seeks to replace. Microsoft tries hard to interject itself into just about everything, even Linux.

“Microsoft tries hard to interject itself into just about everything, even Linux.”This isn’t a novel Microsoft tactic. See the quote at the bottom to better understand the pattern we’re dealing with.

All the links from this video (in order) can be found here, but we’re omitting some of the worst ones, such as SUSE having the audacity to celebrate/champion Microsoft while shunning the FSF and RMS — the very origin of the operating system SUSE sells.

Related posts: [Humour] SUSE is Becoming Novell Again | SUSE is Still Pushing Microsoft Proprietary Software and Bragging About the Novell Patent Collusion With Microsoft

“I’ve killed at least two Mac conferences. [...] by injecting Microsoft content into the conference, the conference got shut down. The guy who ran it said, why am I doing this?”

Microsoft's chief evangelist

05.07.21

King of Linux

Posted in GNU/Linux, Kernel at 5:28 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Related: Free Software Freedom is Not Linux

Young Linus Torvalds
King Torvalds was only 13 (thirteen) when GNU got started by a 30 (thirty) year-old Richard Stallman

Summary: If the entire operating system is being called “Linux”, then we fall for a publicity or misattribution stunt

THE marketing stunt

Oh boy, that was blunt
RMS goes on a rant
Over another corporate runt

“GNU exists not…”“Linux turns 30″
Prepare the confetti
Home comes to SETI
RMS acting all petty

GNU exists not
Let’s ensure it will rot
Linux is hot
GNU just a pale blue dot

The 1980s were a fad
No matter what you’ve read
Cheer up, don’t be sad
Linux is the best we’ve ever had

Inclusive… of proprietary blobs
Unlike freedom-loving slobs
Linus in his bathrobes
Professional and inclusive of homophobes

TrophyZemlin and the guru magicians
Linux needs no technicians
Monopolies in search of attritions
For money they have infinite ambitions

Money is God
Like Zemlin with his iPod
His foundation is a fraud
But it receives the corporate nod

What next for kernel hackers?
Also known as corporate suckers
Sheltered in their CoC bunkers
While calling us “**********ers”

The Biggest Troll is the Linux Foundation, Still Looking to Provoke and Defame Free Software Communities in Order to Help a Monopolistic Takeover and to Shoehorn Tyrants Into Leadership Positions

Posted in Deception, Free/Libre Software, GNU/Linux, IBM, Kernel, Microsoft at 4:50 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link

Summary: Contrary to what the so-called ‘Linux’ Foundation is trying to say, the most toxic element is itself; it’s maligning the real community while protecting abusive and racist corporations that profit from war and tribalism-motivated hatred

THE above video is the latest of many on this topic (many of these links can be found in the IBM wiki). It’s a very important topic many are simply reluctant to even touch, perhaps for fear of being called all sorts of unflattering things. Many people lost sight of the fact that there was a hidden hand called ‘Linux’ Foundation in last month’s (and end of March) botched attacks on the founder/father of the GNU/Linux operating system, which turns 38 later this year. Foundation staff, both past and present, pulled strings behind the scenes. We took note of that. It’s obvious why they really dislike him. The sponsors can't stand him and are increasingly unwilling to coexist with him because it’s a war of ideas, not a cult of personalities. It’s no mistake or coincidence that IBM is happy to outsource its code to Microsoft, a de facto attack on sharing. To IBM, it's about overlapping interests and they want a monopoly back.

“Merely stating some inconvenient facts can get one ostracised.”A long time ago we came to the conclusion that, based on some recent hires, the so-called ‘Linux’ Foundation became a bunch of corporate trolls, some of whom came from Microsoft. Those people and the corporations they front for use the word “master” a lot (the video shows some recent examples), but they have the audacity to tell real communities that it’s “racist” and bigoted (and that lack of diversity in Computer Science/STEM is the fault of such communities). Upon closer inspection of course it’s just a lie. In fact, many of these communities are a lot more diverse than the corporations which have long made such accusations.

The video above takes stock of recent articles (e.g. “IBM Founder (Watson) Gave a Nazi Salute, Admired Hitler, Said Hitler Was Doing the Right Thing” and “New Interview With Edwin Black: IBM Has Never Apologised, Instead It Hid Its Role in Nazi Germany”), it shows that rather than promoting Free software or even “Open Source” — a term they prefer for openwashing their corporate masters — they’re training for outsourcing to proprietary traps (clown computing with mass surveillance).

IBM and Ivanka TrumpAs pointed out along the lines, imagine Greg K-H responding to Microsoft’s attacks on Linux the same way he responds to UMN’s rogue patches. Novell paid him his salary for a long time and some of that money came from Microsoft, so don’t expect staff of the ‘Linux’ Foundation to bite the palm which feeds. Those people are trolling the community, the real community, which they hope to weaken if not completely destroy. The front page of Linux.com currently shows 3 times the same headline (“‘Master,’ ‘Slave’ and the Fight Over Offensive Terms in Computing”), linking to the Web site of the Linux Foundation. “Watson®” is a lot more offensive than “Whitelist” and “Master”, as we said last year, but somehow we’re supposed to focus on communities as the real problem. A year ago we published “Let’s Ban Bombings, Not Words (Corporations Taking Away People’s Freedom of Speech So They Can Bomb ’in Peace’)”, earlier this year we published “Microsoft: Nationalism As A Service (NaaS)”, “The Linux Foundation is Trying to Obscure Racism Using Microsoft-Inspired Tactics (Vouchers Disguised as Actual Money)”, and there’s also “Linux Foundation, With Zero African-American Employees (in a Country Where 13.4% Identify as African-American), Boasts About Its “Support for the Black Community”…”

It’s a recurring theme, isn’t it? Very racist corporations, or corporate bullies that bomb people, are saying to the actual, real community (people who write code) that it is bigoted and intolerant, not inclusive etc. Classic corporate trolling. They’re hijacking civil rights causes to troll the very people who cherish and protect those. They even troll the IRC channels while sabotaging GNU/Linux. It’s not limited to race either; they leverage the gender card (e.g. “Linux Foundation (Men for Monopolies) Once Again Hijacking Women’s (and Minorities’) Voices for Public Relations” as cited in the video, just before “Removing Our Leaders Because of Diversity is Disingenuous and Hypocritical”).

IBM is not BLMAs we put it a few months ago: “The problem is, as we’ve noted before, this is a distraction from racists and bigots who profit from war. They don’t get a job at the Foundation by participating in protests but by cheering for billionaires.”

If we’re not citing a broad range of different sites, it’s mostly because there’s reluctance to touch the topic. Many who know this to be true don’t want to say it out in public. With concepts like “safe space” and “code of conduct” the ramifications might simply be too great. Merely stating some inconvenient facts can get one ostracised.

04.30.21

How to Kill the Brand “Linux”, Associating It With an Attack on Human Rights

Posted in Deception, GNU/Linux, IBM, Kernel, Microsoft at 3:44 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link

Summary: It seems clear that the so-called ‘Linux’ Foundation is just misusing the brand (“Linux”) like an asswipe or a wet tissue; by throwing the label Linux into controversial things that have nothing to do with Linux itself the Foundation basically alienates potential adopters

TODAY an associate sent us this terrible piece from Korean media, reaffirming the Linux Foundation's agenda that's undermining human rights; what does Linux stand for now? Some “vaccine passports”? What’s the connection to Linux?! Notice how this piece from the Korean publisher is referring to the Linux Foundation as just “Linux” (even in the headline!).

As I point out right from the get-go, I’m not against vaccination, but those “passports” are controversial for many legitimate reasons and as we pointed out a month ago, Richard Stallman (RMS) opposes these too, for they pose a threat to liberties, especially if they’re digital. They can necessitate the carrying of electronic surveillance devices (even for something as simple as entering a shop of ordering a cup of tea).

“It’s sad if not frustrating to see class politics and oppression using the name “Linux” even when the area doesn’t relate to operating systems or kernels at all.”A bunch of puff pieces (paid-for fluff sponsored by the Linux Foundation for IBM and Microsoft, to be filed under “innovation” rather than “lobbying” or “advertising”) confirm our suspicions. It basically boils down to a whole lot of buzzwords or hype waves.

Mozilla, a company that nowadays stands for censorship and social control (by oppressive means like deplatforming) is also not particularly impressed by this. A spying proponent, Mozilla, clarified that there’s no need for blockchain hype factor (see the official Mozilla blog, as of 8 days ago) and it seems to boil down to patents, or IBM and Microsoft profits (control over people’s lives is more important to them than the money, as that leads to political entanglements that may render them “too big to fail” and hence worthy of bailouts from taxpayers, which is why they also seek to control medical records).

It’s sad if not downright frustrating to see class politics and oppression using the name “Linux” even when the area doesn’t relate to operating systems or kernels at all.

What is the ‘Linux’ Foundation turning this trademark into?!?!

“Regarding vaccine passports,” Ryan said in IRC just a few moments ago, “we’re not going anywhere that needs one even though we’re both vaccinated. I’m extremely skeptical of the societal implications of this. For starters, closed-source software or not, and it will be, what do you store it on? A smart phone? This pressures people to get smart phones even if they otherwise have no need of them or can’t afford one. What do older people who haven’t ever used one because they can’t think of a need for it do? Go buy one and jack up Apple’s share prices just so they can show some restaurant a “passport” to get a breakfast sandwich?”

04.13.21

How the GNU Operating System Really Started (Almost a Decade Before Linux Came Out)

Posted in GNU/Linux, Kernel, TechBytes Video at 10:56 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

The true story of the GNU Operating System (no, it didn’t start in 1991 and not in Finland either… but in Massachusetts, with its announcement predating the first Linux release by over 8 years*)


Transcript below

Summary: Later this year Linux turns 30, but Linux is just a component added to the GNU Operating System, developed a very long time earlier based on the design of UNIX (the mainstream media likes to distort that part of history); here’s the creator of the GNU Operating System, telling me his story here in the United Kingdom (we did many clips like these and this one seems very timely)

[00:00]
Roy (RSS): The first thing I was going to ask you about [is] the origins of the GNU Project. I realise that you had to use some proprietary tools to begin with in order to … to itself. Do you remember what kind of editor you were using at the time and [what] development tools?

RMS: Well, I was using Emacs, not GNU Emacs

[00:30]
until I wrote GNU Emacs but after all that was the last Emacs there were many other Emacs editors before then. I wrote the first one for the PDP-10 and that was still available and there was also a kind of Emacs on the MIT LISP machine and between those two I could do all my editing on Emacs. But in general, the platform for bootstrapping the GNU system was UNIX, after

[01:00]
all, GNU’s Not UNIX. What does that mean? That was a customary way of saying that was a system designed to be compatible with and similar to UNIX.

____
* Initial release, or version 0.02, was on 5th of October, 1991 (the Linux anniversary). GNU was first announced on 27th of September, 1983, at 6:35:59 PM. There was a mention of a kernel in the second paragraph (highlighted in yellow): “Starting this Thanksgiving I am going to write a complete Unix-compatible software system called GNU (for Gnu’s Not Unix), and give it away free to everyone who can use it. Contributions of time, money, programs and equipment are greatly needed.

“To begin with, GNU will be a kernel plus all the utilities needed to write and run C programs: editor, shell, C compiler, linker, assembler, and a few other things. After this we will add a text formatter, a YACC, an Empire game, a spreadsheet, and hundreds of other things. We hope to supply, eventually, everything useful that normally comes with a Unix system, and anything else useful, including on-line and hardcopy documentation.”

03.17.21

The Corporate Linux Foundation is Now Using the ‘Code of Conduct’ Aggressively and Excessively to Censor People Using Bots, Not Human Assessment

Posted in Deception, Kernel at 7:40 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Video download link

Summary: Instead of protecting people, as the Linux Foundation likes to claim, it is engaging in automated social control, just like in social control networks or social control media (where mentioning the word “Memphis” gets you banned now)

THE people who run the so-called ‘Linux’ Foundation don’t use Linux. Some of them are Microsoft employees (still salaried entirely by Microsoft), which ought to tell us how much the foundation really does to represent “Linux” (as in the kernel).

“They work for monopolies, not communities…”For many people in the Free software community and even for some kernel developers the so-called ‘Linux’ Foundation has become a subject of scorn and ridicule. It’s like a force of occupation, not emancipation. They work for monopolies, not communities…

Before you beat us to it, yes… we’re well aware that nowadays even monopolies pretend to be “communities”…

Would that be a cynical ploy?

They also pretend to be “open” (openwashing) and “green” and “against racism”…

ObeyHours ago the so-called ‘Linux’ Foundation (or Corporate Linux Foundation) reaffirmed its support for monopolies by advertising yet another ‘event’ that cannot be accessed without proprietary software (Zoom). They’re doing it again and again. They clearly don’t understand or don’t care what “Linux” stands for…

But to make matters worse, a source told us about a “Linux Foundation bot censoring/CoC,” in effect a rather obscure process wherein the Linux Foundation censors people’s private speech using not as much as human assessment, just bots.

“The gentleman I spoke with,” our source said, “is in embedded and has been a GNU/Linux user for well over 15 years. He was interested in the origins of the Code of Conduct… I shared links etc. regarding the origins.”

As it turns out, the Corporate Linux Foundation is outsourcing decision-making associated with the Code of Conduct to bots, just as social control media sites do to lower or avert accountability. It also limits how many people they need to hire. Sometimes they hire people on the cheap, people whose language skills will impede judgement.

In the next (and final) part we’ll explain one example of this. Stay tuned…

03.10.21

Former Microsoft Employee on Behalf of Linux Foundation: We Present Another ‘Linux’ Report, Made on a Mac With Proprietary Software

Posted in Free/Libre Software, GNU/Linux, Kernel, Microsoft at 3:34 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Linux Foundation on Macs

Summary: The above was published by Jason Perlow a few hours ago, continuing a long tradition of Linux rejection at the so-called ‘Linux’ Foundation

03.06.21

How To Deal With Your Raspberry Spy — Part IV: Doing The Task

Posted in BSD, GNU/Linux, Hardware, Kernel at 7:59 pm by Guest Editorial Team

By Gavin L. Rebeiro

Contents

Cover

Copyright

1 Acknowledgements

2 Introduction

2.1 Prerequisite Knowledge
2.2 Apparatus

3 Fundamentals

3.1 Communication
3.2 Kernel Ring Buffer
3.3 Drivers
3.4 Operating Systems
3.5 Special Files

4 YOU ARE HERE ☞ Doing The Task

4.1 Preparing The Boot Media
4.2 Connecting Physical Components
4.3 Using Picocom
4.4 OS Installation

5 Thanks

6 OpenPGP Key

A Malicious Hardware

B Linux Kernel Source Tree Analysis

C Digital Multimeter Tests

Summary: We now spell out the steps taken to actually replace the Raspberry Pi OS with something more trustworthy (for background see Part I, Part II, and Part III)

We’ve now covered enough ground to make the installation of
NetBSD on our Raspberry Spy (over our UTUB) a relatively painless matter.

Let’s go through the process in little steps.

4.1 Preparing The Boot Media

I’m going to grab the appropriate NetBSD image by taking hints from the following:

NetBSD/evbarm on Raspberry Pi tells us everything we need to know to pick the right image. All the sections here related to booting are worth reading at least once. Also read sections about consoles and serial consoles at least once.

Raspberry Pi boot modes is useful if you want to dig deeper into the booting mechanisms of the Raspberry Spy. USB mass storage boot is particularly useful for booting off USB. Trust me, you don’t want to muck around with SD cards; they’re a nightmare.

NetBSD/evbarm can be referenced for general information about NetBSD on ARM boards.

The above links should give you a good idea of what’s going on and what needs to be done with regards to putting a NetBSD on a boot media that goes into a Raspberry Spy.

Let’s go through a concrete example.

My Raspberry Spy is of the model “3 B+” variety so I’m dealing with an ARM64 CPU architecture. We’ll follow along the instructions outlined in Installation procedure for NetBSD/evbarm; pay close attention to the section “NetBSD/evbarm subdirectory structure”; I follow these instructions as I explore Index of pub/NetBSD/NetBSD-9.1/evbarm-aarch64/.

I grab the appropriate image like so:

$ mkdir ~/Downloads/netbsd
$ cd ~/Downloads/minted
$ wget https://cdn.netbsd.org/pub/NetBSD/NetBSD-9.1/evb c
 → arm-aarch64/binary/gzimg/arm64.img.gz

Now that we’ve got the image, we can write it to our boot media. I’m going to assume you have an appropriate reader already plugged into your GNU/Linux box. I’ve got my USB thumb drive as “/dev/sdg” on my system. Use the right block device file on your system1. We base our procedure along the lines of “Installation for ARMv7 and AArch64 devices with U-Boot” section from Installation procedure for NetBSD/evbarm:

$ gzip --decompress --keep arm64.img.gz
# dd if=arm64.img of=/dev/sdg bs=1M conv=sync
 → status=progress
$ lsblk -f | grep sdg

We’re going to ignore the minutiae of writing to block devices, bootloaders, and other adjacent topics related to the utilities we just used; that’s left for another time. We care about learning how to use a serial console in this project so we must stay focused on our primary target.

We’re going to have a look at how to make a serial install possible via some editing of the “cmdline.txt” file that now resides in the boot media (on the boot partition which is of type “vfat”):

# mkdir /media/netbsd_image
# mount /dev/sdg1 /media/netbsd_image
# grep "console" < cmdline.txt
# root=ld0a console=fb
# grep "enable_uart" < config.txt
# enable_uart=1

The “console=fb” part is to get out OS image to use the HDMI output. We will get rid of that string from the file “cmdline.txt”. Who needs that anyway? One way to do it2:

# ed cmdline.txt
21
,p
root=ld0a console=fb
1
root=ld0a console=fb
s/console=fb//
,p
root=ld0a
wq
11
# echo ",p" | ed cmdline.txt
11
root=ld0a

Remember to check your edits!

We also ensure that “enable_uart=1” is set in the file “config.txt”:

# echo ",p" | ed config.txt
82
arm_64bit=1
kernel=netbsd.img
kernel_address=0x200000
enable_uart=1
force_turbo=0

Everything looks good! Additional useful information on the Raspberry Spy UART can be found in UART configuration. Pretty self-explanatory. That wasn’t so hard. Was it? Note that the following links document the files we’ve been messing around with:

The Kernel Command Line
config.txt

It’s a good idea to back up the state of your image, at this point3. We can now safely unmount our boot media and get on with the project:

# cd ~
# umount /media/netbsd_image

We change directory, before we unmount, so that we don’t get any “device busy” errors.

We’ve now got our boot media ready. Onwards!

4.2 Connecting Physical Components

Before you power up your UTUB, you should really check that the pins are working properly. The very basic test you should do is to check that the right voltage is being supplied. Check out Appendix C.

The pins on our UTUB and Raspberry Spy that we’re interested are the following:

• Raspberry Spy: Pin6 (Ground), Pin8 (GPIO14, TXD), Pin10 (GPIO15, RXD). You can find the layout in the official GPIO page.

• UTUB: I’ve got a CP2104 UTUB so I’ve got to only worry about the pins marked TX, RX, and GND. I have other pins on the module but they’re not relevant for this task.

We won’t be using any of the voltage pins on the boards because it’s more prone to errors. Just use the USB power supply that comes with your Raspberry Spy.

Don’t plug anything into power for the following sequence. Connect the jump-wires like so:

• Ground on UTUB to Ground (Pin6) on Raspberry Spy.

• TX on UTUB to RX (Pin10) on Raspbery Spy.

• RX on UTUB to TX on (Pin8) Raspberry Spy.

“We won’t be using any of the voltage pins on the boards because it’s more prone to errors.”Don’t make the rookie mistake of matching TX with TX and RX with RX; TX always goes to RX and RX always goes to TX. Keep this in mind, always, when working with UARTs. Colour-coding your jump-wires helps.

We’ll just go over the order of attaching the stuff to do with power on our devices:

• Attach the USB power adapter to the Raspberry Pi without plugging the adapter into the power outlet.

• Attach the UTUB to your GNU/Linux box.

• Attach your USB power adapter to your power outlet.

The logic for the above procedure is that you can ensure that your serial interface is up and running before you start getting input from your Raspberry Spy.

4.3 Using Picocom

Using picocom(1) is simple. All we need to do is select the correct baud rate and give the right device file as a parameter to picocom(1).

I’ll give you an extract from the manual page to enlighten you:

In effect, picocom is not an "emulator" per-se. It is a
simple program that opens, configures, manages a serial
port (tty device) and its settings, and connects to it
the terminal emulator you are, most likely, already
→ using
(the terminal window application, xterm, rxvt, system
console, etc).
When picocom starts it opens the tty (serial port)
given as its non-option argument. Unless the
--noinit option is given, it configures the port to
the settings specified by the option-arguments (or
to some default settings), and sets it to "raw"
mode. If --noinit is given, the initialization and
configuration is skipped; the port is just opened.
Following this, if standard input is a tty, picocom
sets the tty to raw mode. Then it goes in a loop
where it listens for input from stdin, or from the
serial port. Input from the serial port is copied
to the standard output while input from the standard
input is copied to the serial port. Picocom also
scans its input stream for a user-specified control
character, called the escape character (being by
default C-a). If the escape character is seen, then
instead of sending it to the serial-device, the
program enters "command mode" and waits for the next
character (which is called the "function
character"). Depending on the value of the function
character, picocom performs one of the operations
described in the COMMANDS section below.

We use “C-a C-x” (Ctrl+a followed by Ctrl+x)4 to tell picocom(1) to exit; for more, RTFM; in particular, pay close attention to the “COMMANDS” section.

Make sure you’ve set up all the physical connections, as advised. It’s time to attach our UTUB to our GNU/Linux box and then make sure we invoke picocom(1) correctly:

# picocom --baud 115200 /dev/ttyUSB0
picocom v3.1

port is         : /dev/ttyUSB0
flowcontrol     : none
baudrate is     : 115200
parity is       : none
databits are    : 8
stopbits are    : 1
escape is       : C-a
local echo is   : no
noinit is       : no
noreset is      : no
hangup is       : no
nolock is       : no
send_cmd is     : sz -vv
receive_cmd is  : rz -vv -E
imap is         : 
omap is         :
emap is         : crcrlf,delbs
logfile is      : none
initstring      : none
exit_after is   : not set
exit is         : no

Type [C-a] [C-h] to see available commands
Terminal ready

It really is that simple. You’ve now got a serial terminal ready and listening.

4.4 OS Installation

Now that you’ve got a serial terminal operational, all we have to do to install NetBSD on the Raspberry Spy is to plug the USB power adapter into the power outlet. Keep a close eye on what goes on in the output of your serial terminal:

...
[   7.4246937] root device:
[  11.6252523] use one of: mue0 sd0[a-p] ddb halt reboot
[  11.6252523] root device: sd0
[  13.9755661] dump device (default sd0b):
[  15.7257992] file system (default generic):
...

You should be promoted to pick a root device. I pick “sd0” as it’s the first ’disk’ offered by NetBSD (which can only be my boot media)5. I go for the suggested defaults, for everything else. No need to overcomplicate things, at this point.

You will probably see your Raspberry Spy reboot once or twice during the OS install process. Just pass the same parameters for the boot device, and you should be good to go.

Eventually, you should be met with the following:

...
NetBSD/evbarm (arm64) (constty)
...

login:

If you login as “root”, you should have a nice login shell presented to you.

And we are done! You’ve successfully done some tinkering over a serial terminal. That wasn’t so hard. Was it? You can shutdown your device (halt the OS) like so:

# shutdown -p now
...
[   910.5814809] The operating system has halted.
[   910.5814809] Please press any key to reboot.

You can now disconnect the power supply from your Raspberry Spy. Then just send “C-a C-x” to picocom(1); after which, you should see:

...
Terminating...
Thanks for using picocom
#

Welcome to the world of serial terminals; hack your heart out!
____
1 The command lsblk -f should help you out here. Don’t wipe the wrong device by accident.
2 If you use another text editor, that’s fine. You really should learn ed(1) at some point though, especially if you want to get into embedded systems.
3 At least keep track of the files that you tweaked. If you use some sort of version-control-system, you get bonus points.
4 I don’t know why the manual doesn’t bother to explicitly mention that these are GNU-Emacs-style key sequences.
5 See the NetBSD sd(4) manpage for details.

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