EditorsAbout the SiteComes vs. MicrosoftUsing This Web SiteSite ArchivesCredibility IndexOOXMLOpenDocumentPatentsNovellNews DigestSite NewsRSS

04.27.09

Stuck Between a Rock (Windows) and a Hard Place (Ballnux)? Try GNU/Linux.

Posted in Deception, GNU/Linux, Microsoft, Novell, OpenSUSE, SLES/SLED, Ubuntu, Vista, Vista 7, Windows at 6:09 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Summary: Windows XP, Vista 7, and OpenSUSE lose to Ubuntu

FOR A WINDOWS user, there is no decent place to turn. On the one hand there is Vista, which is detested even by some of the most avid fans of Windows; then there is Windows XP, which continues to have problems, the latest example being the following intriguing report:

“XP SP3 Doesn’t Play Nice with Heavy I/O Operations on NTFS Volumes”

Windows XP fails to play nice with heavy I/O operations occurring on volumes formatted with the NTFS file system, Microsoft informed. According to the Redmond company, the issue is related to the “Compress drive to save disk space” option. The software giant did not offer an explanation of the problems, but indicated that both Service Pack 3 and SP2 for Windows XP were affected. Post-XP releases of the Windows client, including
Windows Vista and Windows 7 are not impacted by the issue.

Why is Vista 7 even named? It does not exist as a product. In fact, according to today’s report from SJVN, Microsoft’s artificial scarcity stunts for Vista 7 have not died out. He explains why:

It’s funny that some people actually think that anyone is “pirating” Windows 7 betas. It’s clear that Microsoft is deliberately leaking them to build up buzz around the new operating system. Don’t believe me? Then why does Microsoft give away free authentication keys that will let any copy of Windows 7 work? If the company didn’t want those copies of Windows 7 out there, it wouldn’t do that. This tactic is fairly subtle: By making people work — but not too hard — to get copies of Windows 7, Microsoft is leading them to believe that they’re onto something special.

Where to turn then? When XP is old and deficient, Vista is considered a train wreck, and Vista 7 is still alpha-grade vapourware, one can upgrade to GNU/Linux. But as the following new review probably suggests, SUSE is no ideal escape route from Windows and Microsoft.

Ubuntu 9.04 Review – Desktop Emphasis on the Jaunty Jackalope

[...]

This is the Distro. The Distro that has finally won me over from the SUSE camp. The swaying points were the theme, stability and speed.

To put it in better words, this distro takes over from openSUSE as my primary distro. At least, until SUSE 11.2.

This is an inspiring story which shows that Novell’s SUSE fails to capture an audience. Obedience to Novell and Microsoft is still low and ISV support will accordingly degrade (for SLE*).

microvellarax

Windows in the Emergency Room

Posted in Microsoft, Security, Windows at 5:47 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Hospital lobby

Summary: Reasons to keep Windows out of the hospital; botnets without solution within sight

FOR QUITE SOME TIME NOW we have been keeping track of the effect of Conficker on (Windows in) hospitals. Here is a not-so-shocking new discovery that the number of affected hospitals cannot be disclosed.

The Conficker worm infected several hundred machines and critical medical equipment in an undisclosed number of U.S. hospitals recently, a security expert said on Thursday in a panel at the RSA security conference.

Some named hospitals have already been struck by Conficker. For example we have:

Will this ever end? That’s highly doubtful. “The fight against botnets is largely ineffective,” exclaims the headline of this new article from Heise.

Stewart believes that the cunningly decentralised peer-to-peer structure of the Whaledac and Conficker botnets is the result of the earlier conspicuous switching off of some C&C servers.

It is very irresponsible to use a platform that is so routinely hijacked simply because it's designed to permit intrusion.

Novell race track

Another Little Part of Microsoft Dies Quietly

Posted in Finance, Microsoft at 5:22 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Ashtray

Summary: Microsoft embraces but quickly extinguishes features or services

A few days ago we wrote about last week's closures/cancellations at Microsoft. More such missteps carry on appearing and here is the latest:

Microsoft ditches Live Search product upload tool

[...]

The firm confirmed to users that the tool, which was used by retailers to get their products into Microsoft’s search database, had been discontinued late last week.

Following Microsoft’s exceptionally poor results [1, 2], SJVN’s column has inspired an article which states that “Microsoft is history” although it’s obviously an exaggeration.

PC WORLD’S Steven Vaughan-Nichols has claimed that Microsoft’s recent 32 per cent drop in earnings is the beginning of the end for the software giant.

For more details, check out this summary/roundup which is titled “Microsoft’s worst third quarter ever.”

Links 27/04/2009: OLPC Wins, K3b 2.0 is Near

Posted in News Roundup at 5:06 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Jaunty Jackalope: Are Alarm Bells Ringing in Redmond?

    Ubuntu’s Jaunty Jackalope has bounded onto desktops, and reaction in the Linux blogosphere is mostly thumbs up. There are some who wish the Ubuntu distros didn’t come in such quick succession, however, arguing that there’s not enough time to stabilize them and get into serious application development. Still, if it’s all part of a hellbent for leather effort to compete with Microsoft, it may just be working.

  • Tech Break: It’s Linux Time

    The bottom line: Windows and OS X aren’t the only operating systems out there. Take the summer to check out a version of Linux or two; pop in a CD or set up a virtualized install of your favorite distribution (Ubuntu is a good place to start) and play with it. You’ll be surprised how great a system you can get for free. As an added bonus, it’s one very legitimate reason to use that shiny new BitTorrent program you…uh…just downloaded. You watch all your movies from iTunes and Hulu, right?

  • Eight Reasons Your Next Computer Should Run Linux

    1. Freedom of Choice

    Linux distributions are available for several computer platforms, including most Macs and PC’s. Find the computer you like best and install Linux. It’s getting easier every day to find equipment from the OEM’s that is compatible with Linux. Don’t feel like doing the research or installing Linux yourself? You can find computers with Linux pre-installed from vendors such as System 76, Dell, and Hewlett Packard.
    2. Stability

    There’s a reason the some of the Internet’s biggest players, (like Google) base their infrastructure on Linux. Linux is known for rock solid stability. You won’t ever see the Blue Screen Of Death unless you install the BSOD Screensaver.

  • How to decide whether desktop Linux makes sense

    Eight questions to help you determine if now is the time to find a place for desktop Linux in your organization

  • IBM CFO: We Had 62 Unix Competitive Displacements In Q1

    Earlier this week, IBM reported declines in many parts of its hardware business. But in spite of the broad hardware downturn, CFO Mark Loughridge said IBM convinced 62 CIOs to rip and replace Unix systems in the quarter, and that Linux MIPS were up more than 50%.

  • Education

    • India, Sierra Leone place OLPC orders

      India has ordered 250,000 laptops from the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) organization, while a human rights organization will supply 5,000 OLPC machines to Sierra Leone.

      [...]

      News of the laptop project in Sierra Leone comes as research teams in Kenya, Nigeria and Zimbabwe release findings that the Asus Eee PC netbook is a better choice for African nations than the XO laptop. Asus is better suited to individual owners and users in rural Africa who need low-power PCs, researchers found.

      They ranked the Asus Eee first for the needs of Africa, followed by Intel’s Classmate, OLPC’s XO, the Inveno Computing Station and Ncomputing’s X300.

    • Lap up the right one

      Since HCL is bundling Ubuntu 8.10 as the operating system, this leaves fewer reasons to stick to Microsoft Windows.

    • FLOSS Weekly 66: OLE Nepal

      Bryan Berry has served as IT manager for US embassies in Tel Aviv, Hong Kong, and Kathmandu. He has been a linux user for six years, and has lived in Asia for the last seven years. He began work on the Open Learning Exchange Nepal project in 2006, and as of June 2007 gained the support of the Nepali government to begin a pilot program of the OLPC project. He is also co-editor of OLPCnews.com.

  • Skills

    • IT skills that see pay hikes in spite of the downturn

      Generally, noncertified skills in Linux, Apache, and Sybase saw an increase of between 25 to 28 percent, while professionals with uncertified skills in the areas of PHP, SAP and Unix saw their pay increase by more than 14 percent.

    • Linux Training

      This three-day, intensive introduction to Linux includes hands-on exercises covering these and other topics: Kernel modules, Userspace device drivers,The new PWM API, Real-time Linux, Interrupt handlers and more.

      This advanced workshop is ideal for embedded developers who are responsible for their application’s firmware design and development. It presumes a familiarity with basic C programming concepts and some prior embedded system programming experience. Motivated students without previous embedded experience are also encouraged to attend.

  • Kernel Space

    • File Systems, Disk Defragmentation and more.

      Let us say that very soon, people are going to start trusting Btrfs. We know that Btrfs’ primary focus is server side hosting. It comes equipped with its own defragmentation tools that run both online and offline. So why would I need support for anything else? XFS has been out for many years and has gained the trust of storage administrators worldwide as a stable, excellent performing and extremely scalable file system solution. XFS offers both online and offline defragmentation. AdvFS supports online defragmentation and recently I have even heard proposals for an Ext4-fs online defragmentation implementation.

    • Linus on Linux: The Linus Torvalds Interview Part 2

      Yes, I commit most every day, but my commit statistics are very skewed: 95+% of what I do is merges, and just a couple of percent is actual “code” commits, and quite frankly, even those pitiful few ones tend to be about pretty trivial stuff like reverting somebody elses code that caused problems.

  • Applications

  • KDE

    • K3b 2.0 Alpha Preview – First Release of the KDE4 Port Is Out

      I was pleased to hear a while ago that K3b got two new developers assigned by the Mandriva project and that work at the KDE4 port is going well now. Although K3b was inactive for a pretty long time (the last stable release was 1.0.5 for KDE3 on May 27, 2008), it looks like development goes at a fast pace and the first alpha of the KDE4 port was put up a little earlier this month.

  • Distributions

    • Linux Wizard – Thoughts about Linux marketing #2 : Mandriva and Grid-computing

      Partners like EADS, EDF, Nec, SAP, Red Flag and Mandriva are working together to build an ubiquitous grid computing system based on Linux. ISO can be download on the Mandriva mirrors, and RPMS for the Xtreem OS are available. Xtreem OS is based on Mandriva 2008.0, but it seems that a new version may be based on the Mandriva 2009.0

    • Xubuntu 9.04 vs Debian 5.0.1 Xfce

      Yes, it’s Ubuntu release week and yes, we’ll be looking at Ubuntu for our feature article. Instead of a review of what everyone already knows, this week I thought we’d take a look at how the newly released Xubuntu 9.04 compares to Debian Lenny with an Xfce desktop. Xfce is a desktop environment built using the GTK+ graphical libraries, similar to GNOME. Unlike GNOME however, its focus is on being lightweight. Creator Olivier Fourdan writes: “Xfce is a lightweight desktop environment for various *NIX systems. Designed for productivity, it loads and executes applications fast, while conserving system resources.” Xubuntu is based on Ubuntu, but instead of providing a GNOME desktop, they provide Xfce. They also include much of the functionality that its larger parent offers. Debian, on the other hand, is based on, well, itself and offers a multitude of desktop offerings, one of which is Xfce. How do the two compare?

      [...]

      Debian is certainly far from dead. The overall system feels much more stable than the Xubuntu 9.04 I installed, but the Xubuntu system provided more functionality for new users, like the ability to easily install proprietary drivers. Debian was also faster and more lightweight than Xubuntu and, as a result, ran much better on this older hardware. Compared to Debian, Xubuntu was slow and sluggish, even to the point of being frustrating. Debian, on the other hand, remained snappy and responsive. When it came to codecs, Debian played everything out of the box, while Xubuntu resorted to using their manager to install codecs as required. Debian is now superior to Xubuntu in this area. The one thing Debian didn’t have is the automated tool for installing proprietary drivers. Everything is there at the command level, just not in the user interface. Part of the reason Xubuntu takes longer to load and uses more RAM is that it includes extra utilities, like the proprietary driver manager. The other thing to keep in mind is that Xubuntu 9.04 comes with a much newer kernel and includes numerous booting speed improvements, while Debian does not.

    • Linux Mint 6 (Felicia) Review

      And don’t just run it in Live CD mode either. Give it an install on your system. If I were in the market for an alternative to Windows, Linux Mint would definitely be at the top of my list. I still hear some people say “Linux still isn’t ready for the desktop” and stuff like that sometimes.

      Well these people clearly haven’t used Linux Mint.

    • Ubuntu

      • What should become of Edubuntu?

        Some people suggested that it’s better to contribute to the upstream educational projects rather than Edubuntu directly. I think fixing upstream bugs and adding features is awesome, but having a pre-packaged solution for teachers is equally cool and just as important.

      • Quick look at Ubuntu 9.04

        This release of Ubuntu is no huge advance over the previous version, but the previous version was no huge leap over the version before. With Ubuntu, there is a steady improvement in usability, compatibility and features, and this is a safe and stable release, if a little uninspiring, however, turning Compiz on spices things up a little.

      • Ubuntu 9.04: Wow

        Now, it’s time you wow the general public. Right? You have what could easily stand as the most significant and improved release of any Linux distribution available. It’s time to make the fat lady over at Microsoft sing. Before the official release of Windows 7 is out and over shadows you with glitz, glamour, and shiny shrink-wrapped packaging you must do something with yourself. Put on a beautiful prom dress and show the crowd you really deserve to be prom queen. If you don’t, this brilliant release will not see the wide-spread installation it should.

      • Linux Distro Review : Ubuntu 9.04 64-bit with ext4.

        The one thing that amazed me was the speed, I am not talking just about the very much improved boot speed but about the speed the programs begun to start.
        Firefox with 10 tabs reopened (after addons installation) in just a few seconds ! all tabs where open like I never closed it – I have never seen this before !

      • Five Minutes of Ubuntu 9.04

        Performance is excellent.

        Plain, functional desktop with not a sign of visual effects (Compiz and such).

      • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 139

        Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #139 for the week April 19th – April 25th, 2009. In this issue we cover: Ubuntu 9.04 Released, Announcing Ubuntu 9.04 for ARM, Ubuntu Open Week Schedule, MOTU Council News, German LoCo team launches new portal, Ubuntu Live in Aalborg, Chicago Style Release Party, Rocked in Finger Lakes, Ubuntu-CL: FLiSoL, New Ubuntu US Teams Website, Limited edition Jaunty Jackalope T-shirts, Announcing Ubuntu Gaming Team, Spread Ubuntu to go live soon, Shuttleworth: Oracle’s Sun buy validates open source, Ubuntu Podcast #25: Dustin Kirkland Interview, Full Circle Magazine #24, and much, much more!

      • Reflections on ten releases of Ubuntu

        Such rapid growth has brought about great challenges in all of these areas, and provided plenty of opportunity for personal development. I’ve had the opportunity to work with the most talented and dedicated team of my career, a team which spans corporate, national and social boundaries. Together, we’ve broken new ground in realizing the potential of free software.

      • Ubuntu Linux As Slick As Windows or Mac, Reviewer Says

        Also promising is that Ubuntu is making it easier to find and download software that Ubuntu can’t legally install in its free version, such as Adobe Flash.

    • Mepis

      • Mepis 8

        I just recently downloaded and installed Mepis again. I’ll have to say, it has really improved from previous installs I’ve tried. Before it was based on Ubuntu and had the blot inherited from such a blotted upstream distro.

        Ubuntu has done some great things for the Linux Community, but they have fallen off the cart in my book, because they have copied M$ in trying to be all things to all people and because of that, have blotted their system to become almost unusable on smaller older boxes.

        [...]

        So I believe Mepis will rank higher than it has in the past for me. For now at least, it’s 2nd to my main OS Debian. And that says a lot when it can bump Distros like Open Suse.

      • SimplyMEPIS 8.0.06 Update is Available

        MEPIS LLC has released SimplyMEPIS 8.0.06, an update to the community edition of MEPIS 8.0. The ISO files for 32 and 64 bit processors are SimplyMEPIS-CD_8.0.06-rel_32.iso and SimplyMEPIS-CD_8.0.06-rel_64.iso.

    • New Distributions

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

  • SERCOS lll Master Software Driver Library Submitted as Open-Source

    SERCOS International (SI) has announced it will provide an open source software driver library for the SERCOS lll real-time Ethernet communication system master implementation. SERCOS III thus will be the first high performance real-time protocol which makes driver software available as source code, without any license fees and without any usage limitations.

  • IconATG Releases IT Professional Training to the Open Source Community

    IconATG is making their most popular IT professional training courses available to the open source community under the IconATG Open Source Training Project. This offering uniquely fills a need for self-study and skills development within the community. The course material is licensed under a Creative Commons license, which will enable people to quickly gain cutting-edge expertise and to contribute new techniques and improvements back to the community as a whole.

  • WebReach, Inc. Becomes Mirth Corporation

    New name signals expanded vision to speed healthcare interoperability following successful launch of Mirth Project, healthcare’s leading open source healthcare integration engine

  • Sun

    • Sun Links with SAFEA on Open Source Collaboration

      Sun Microsystems, Inc. and State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs of People’s Republic of China (SAFEA) announced it has signed an agreement to improve the quality and capabilities of China’s university administrators, teachers and future technologists by leveraging the power of open source technologies.

    • Partners Consulting To Implement Open Source Software Infrastructure From Sun Microsystems

      Partners Consulting Services, has announced they are all set to implement open source software infrastructure from Sun Microsystems (News – Alert) for a new platform that is expected to reduce development and infrastructure costs for their clients.

  • ‘Cloud’

    • Red Hat Sponsors Forum On Open Source In The Cloud

      It’s often seemed obvious to me that clouds and Linux go hand in hand. Amazon’s EC2 started out running workloads under Linux in a modified open source Xen file format. So why couldn’t the operation of the whole cloud be based on open source code?

  • Government

    • Analysis: Contractors should welcome open source

      Although open-source software services are not yet in the mainstream, many federal agencies have been demanding them from their contractors – and for good reason. As early as 2006, the Defense Department went on record stating that incorporating such technology would improve interoperability and increase efficiency and productivity by creating standard policies for the internal redistribution of code.

    • Open-source software moves into public sector

      The open-source software revolution is ready to go public.

      The programs that were once relegated to the niche fringes of the computer programing community and have more recently spread prolifically through the hard drives that power private business are now primed to make the jump into the public sector — and some would even argue they already have.

  • Open (But No Source Code)

    • Spin Analytical to market open-source centrifuge

      Spin Analytical Inc., a University of New Hampshire spinout that for the past two years has been incubating in the office of its CEO, Brett Austin, expects to deliver its first “open-source” ultracentrifuges in the third quarter of this year, enabling engineers to accelerate the development of centrifuge technologies.

Leftovers

  • Web Abuse (UK)

  • Copyrights

    • MPAA-RealDVD Trial Portends Legality of DVD Copying

      The Motion Picture Association of America and RealNetworks square off in a federal courtroom here Friday to determine the legitimacy of the Seattle-based tech company’s DVD copying software.

      [...]

      Hollywood is already reeling from open-source DVD decryption software that is free on the internet, and says it’s losing billions in sales because of BitTorrent tracking services like The Pirate Bay that allow users to locate decrypted movies and other online content for free.

    • IFPI Accidently Debunks Music Sales Claims for Canada?

      The latest statistics were promoted by the IFPI and a copy of the claims were published on the CBC. In these statistics as selected by the copyright industry itself suggests that physical music sales – namely CDs and vinyl sales – fell by 15%. Meanwhile, digital music sales grew by 24%.

    • Biden to MPAA: you’ll like Obama’s pick for copyright czar

      The Obama administration’s stance on copyright enforcement has already attracted an open letter in which a variety of public advocacy groups voiced concerns that there seemed to be a bias towards content owners in the initial round of appointments. Those worries are unlikely to go away any time soon, if this week’s events are any indication. The Motion Picture Association of America came to town, armed with lobbyists and figures that suggest it functions as a one-industry, nationwide job stimulus, and it heard exactly what it was looking for from Vice President Biden.

    • Pirate Bay IP Addresses Assigned to Prosecution Lawyers

      The Pirate Bay recently got a new range of IPs and to everyone’s surprise they are now linked to several movie and music industry lawyers involved in the TPB trial. According to the Pirate Bay’s Wikipedia entry the change was due to a hostile takeover, but most people know better.

    • Rapidshare Shares Uploader Info with Rights Holders

      In Germany, the file-hosting service Rapidshare has handed over the personal details of alleged copyright infringers to several major record labels. The information is used to pursue legal action against the Rapidshare users and at least one alleged uploader saw his house raided.

Digital Tipping Point: Clip of the Day

Natasha Humphries on globalization and job security with Free Open Source Software 10 (2004)

Ogg Theora

Digital Tipping Point is a Free software-like project where the raw videos are code. You can assist by participating.

The Revisionist Gates/Microsoft PR Campaign Hits the Press, Maybe Literature Too

Posted in Bill Gates, Deception, Microsoft at 4:43 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Coffee book session
‘Cooking’ the books

“If you can’t make it good, at least make it look good.”

Bill Gates, Microsoft

MICROSOFT’S revisionist agenda is a subject that we covered before [1, 2, 3], so there is no point doing it again. What we currently see, however, is a little more of the same now that The Huffington Post has published an article written by Bill Gates Senior. For those who know nothing about the man’s secret role in Microsoft, here are his BSA connections, here he is advancing Microsoft politically (including with his former colleague/employee Jack Abramoff), and here he is scooping up the money Microsoft paid SCO after it had sued Linux (vendors).

“…here are his BSA connections, here he is advancing Microsoft politically (including with his former colleague/employee Jack Abramoff), and here he is scooping up the money Microsoft paid SCO after it had sued Linux (vendors).”Regarding that latest Gates Sr. piece/placement from The Huffington Post, we’ve already received some feedback in the IRC channel. “He thinks Bill Gates Jr. is a good kid. I think he’s mad,” writes the Mad Hatter.

“More of the same, ‘we’re ordinary people‘ propaganda Microsoft is famous for. Bill Gates was giving parenting advice before he was married,” writes Twitter. “The Gates [family] have spent a life time of ruthless self interest. Nothing much has changed, including their self congratulations.”

This is part of a pattern that we point out occasionally, e.g. use of the husband of the Gates Foundation’s head (Patty Stonesifer) to plant Times articles which glorify the largest feeder of the ruthless pharmaceutical cartel (among other dubious businesses that kill people, including children). As Stonesifer once said, “The danger isn’t in what people do tell you — it’s in what they don’t.” She quit the Gates Foundation just over a year ago.

As a second item of interest, there’s this new book. It has not been formally published yet and its title is “The Cost of Bad Behavior: How Incivility Is Damaging Your Business and What to Do About It”

“The laugh is that one of the five companies they used as a resource for “most improved companies” is Microsoft,” says a reader to us, who quotes from the topic paragraphs of the relevant section:

For eleven consecutive years, Microsoft has been on Fortune’s list of the top hundred companies to work for. As a long-term employee stated proudly, “If you want to impact the world with software, there is no better place to be.” Microsoft boasts smart people and a rich, challenging work environment. The software king is extraordinarily generous to its employees and to society, offering an exceptional health insurance plan (zero premiums, no deductibles), extraordinary employee perks, and world-class philanthropy (highlighted, of course, through the personal generosity of the Gates family). In 2007, the Harris Interactive poll ranked Microsoft number one in corporate reputation, with additional enviable marks for leadership and financial results.

It’s unusual for a highly successful company to take a critical look at itself, but that’s just what Microsoft did in 2003. Leaders recognized a perception problem: Microsoft had become a company that people loved to hate. Customer data pointed toward arrogance. Microsoft was seen as uncivil. …

Now, I don’t need to tell you what bunk lies in every single one of these phrases, clauses, and dependent clauses,” says this reader of ours. He continues:

I find the idea that “it’s unusual for a highly successful company to take a critical look at itself” highly risable: highly successful companies (and sports teams and individual performers) do that every day. I also find it particularly telling that Microsoft’s incivility is positioned as a “perception problem”. Needless to say, the conclusion of the section is nothing short of glowing, delighted that subordinate employees can finish a sentence without fear that some executive will cut their tongue out. But what about being civil in free market competition? What’s the cost of that bad behavior? It’s uncountably large, though Microsoft do get dinged for the odd billion here and there.

Does Oracle Still Acquire to Injure MySQL?

Posted in Database, Fork, GNU/Linux, GPL, Oracle, SUN at 3:34 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Direct link

Summary: If Oracle tried this before, why would anything change?

IN ORDER to keep our stories sufficiently unique, we did not bother writing much about Oracle and Sun. Other publications did this to the point of fatiguing readers.

Having watched this deal closely for a week (and discussed it endlessly in IRC), one issue worth bringing up is Oracle’s path of destruction against MySQL. They bought companies/projects that MySQL depended on. Observers must not forget this. They essentially bought some trouble and disruption for a competitor, proving that ‘free’ (unregulated) markets hardly work. It’s a fantasy that permits (if not invites) corporate abuse and/or harassment.

So what can be concluded with respect to Oracle’s plans for MySQL? They really deserve the benefit of the doubt, but people who are closest to the project (like Monty) should know better than all of us. Unfortunately, they are pessimistic.

No matter if MySQL forked, neglected by Oracle or who knows what, the project is likely to suffer from what Oracle did. Who benefits? Oracle of course, despite being the owner of MySQL.

The matter of fact is that MySQL gets disrupted, but Sun took the first hit at it by losing key staff. As John Dvorak put it:

The elephant in the room is MySQL. Exactly why Sun ever wanted to “own” an open source database manager is beyond me, and apparently beyond the open source community that only tolerated the situation because it had to.

From a perspective in Information Week:

If the MySQL team decides to scatter because Oracle doesn’t look like the kind of place where they want to work, I don’t blame them. And I’ll blame Oracle for wrecking a perfectly good product.

From the community manager of OpenSUSE:

So what’s going to happen to all this R&D? “So far, Oracle has been fairly quiet about their intentions regarding Sun’s open-source projects,” OpenSUSE Community Manager and former Linux Foundation evangelist Joe “Zonker” Brockmeier of Novell wrote eWEEK via e-mail.

And finally, says the SFLC quite dramatically, “fork well: it could be the last, best hope for community.”

I have faced with much trepidation the news of Oracle’s looming purchase of Sun. Oracle has never shown any interest in community development, particularly in the database area. They are the largest proprietary database vendor on the planet, and they probably have very simple plans for MySQL: kill it.

That’s why I read with relief this post by Monty (co-founder of the MySQL project) this week, wherein Monty plans (and encourages others, too) to put their full force behind a MySQL “fork” that will be centered outside of Oracle.

Monty is undoubtedly correct when he says “I don’t think that anyone can own an open source project; the projects are defined by the de-facto project leaders and the developers that are working on the project.” and that “[w]ith Oracle now owning MySQL, I think that the need for an independent true Open Source entity for MySQL is even bigger than ever before.”

Could the company’s core people rebuild MySQL AB under a different banner outside Oracle? The MySQL trademark was sold to Sun and now it’s Oracle’s, but brand recognition can be re-obtained. Most of the code is GPLv2-licensed, but unfortunately not all of it because of extensions. This just comes to show why that business model which a few people call “open core” (or whatever) is utterly pointless and dangerous.

Oracle is not foolish though. If former employees of MySQL (some of whom have considerable capital because of the sale to Sun) regroup as an independent company and steal the engineers from Oracle, then Oracle loses. So Oracle won’t allow this to happen. But how hard will Oracle try to improve MySQL? And why does it constantly avoid bringing up the subject (until very recently)?

Why Vista 7 Could be the Least Secure Operating System Ever

Posted in Microsoft, Security, Vista 7, Windows at 3:09 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Hybridising a recipe for trouble

Windows XP7
Inheriting Windows XP’s problems

Summary: If Vista 7 runs XP, how does that improve security?

FOR those who were led to believe that Conficker is begone, here is a wake-up call from Reuters:

A malicious software program known as Conficker that many feared would wreak havoc on April 1 is slowly being activated, weeks after being dismissed as a false alarm, security experts said.

Conficker, also known as Downadup or Kido, is quietly turning thousands of personal computers into servers of e-mail spam and installing spyware, they said.

Conficker affected pretty much every version of Windows and none of this is going to change (see links at the bottom).

Vista 7 is not being released any time soon, but it has already been rendered hijackable several times in recent months [1, 2, 3, 4]. Nothing ever changes other than the message (marketing)

Can Microsoft finally offer value to customers? Well, if offering a product from 2001 counts as value, then maybe. As DaemonFC put it, “Do you ever wish you could run your XP software at half the speed after paying another few hundred bucks?” That’s exactly what Microsoft seems to be doing right now.

Microsoft Buttmonkey and Windows Enthusiast (Is there a difference?) Paul Thurott has posted on the latest “feature” of Windows 7, a full copy of XP in every garage!

Yes that’s right. Windows is now so incompatible with….Windows, that you need to run two full copies at once to get XP compatibility.

There is other coverage of this, but it mostly comes from people who promote Microsoft for a living, so it’s filled with spin.

So, here is Microsoft’s offer: “Run Windows XP or virtualise XP under another more expensive operating system that only consumes resources unnecessarily.” This surely confirms that program/driver compatibility will continue to be poor in Vista 7. It’s just bound to disappoint.

But here is the main point: by keeping Windows XP around Microsoft is begging for trouble. In the words of oiaohm, “Microsoft in windows 7 is now forced to virtualise XP. So all the viruses of XP will remain around.”

Yes, people will have two systems to keep up to date and hope that they can patch. How does that make Vista 7 any more secure than predecessors? It’s only an aggregation of vulnerabilities.

More on Conficker

IRC: #boycottnovell @ FreeNode: April 26th, 2009 – Part 2

Posted in IRC Logs at 2:13 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME Gedit

Enter the IRC channel now

Read the rest of this entry »

« Previous entries Next Page » Next Page »

RSS 64x64RSS Feed: subscribe to the RSS feed for regular updates

Home iconSite Wiki: You can improve this site by helping the extension of the site's content

Home iconSite Home: Background about the site and some key features in the front page

Chat iconIRC Channels: Come and chat with us in real time

New to This Site? Here Are Some Introductory Resources

No

Mono

ODF

Samba logo






We support

End software patents

GPLv3

GNU project

BLAG

EFF bloggers

Comcast is Blocktastic? SavetheInternet.com



Recent Posts