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05.24.11

IRC Proceedings: May 24th, 2011

Posted in IRC Logs at 8:36 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

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Enter the IRC channels now

Links 24/5/2011: Fedora 15 Reviews, CLAs Discussed

Posted in News Roundup at 8:16 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Desktop

    • Desktop Linux: Hardware that aims to break the final frontier

      I happened to chance upon a post which spoke about Desktop Linux being the final frontier for Linux as it has already conquered the server market. To break the barrier vendors need to bundle Linux or its derivatives with their hardware. It seems Ubuntu has now made them think along those lines and Ubuntu preloaded PC’s have started to trickle in. Lets have a look at some of them.

  • Kernel Space

    • The DRM Pull For The Gardenshed (Linux 3.0) Kernel

      While it’s not known yet what the next Linux kernel will be called, right now it’s looking like the next release could be the Linux 3.0 kernel. With that said, David Airlie has a pull request to go in before the merge window closes for the Linux 2.6.40/3.0 kernel. He’s sent in the DRM pull request for this next kernel as the Gardenshed-rc1 kernel.

      This pull request brings initial support for Intel Ivy Bridge (the next-generation 22nm successor to Sandy Bridge that’s launching before year’s end) and “hopeful” RC6 support. This Intel code is also working better for me with Sandy Bridge support overall after the last-minute SNB fallout in the Linux 2.6.39 kernel pertaining to semaphores.

    • Linux 3.0 Kernel May Remove Some Old Cruft

      The discussion surrounding Linus Torvalds’ proposal to end the Linux 2.6 kernel series and continue on as the Linux 3.0 kernel has continued on since it began less than 24 hours ago. The reaction has largely been positive and supportive of this proposed change. Of the few objections, some see no reason to mess around with the versioning, but now there may be a reason for this change: to drop the old cruft that’s been living in the kernel.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Ubuntu Unity, GNOME 3: The Video Driver March of Folly

        In all the articles this past month about GNOME 3 and Ubuntu’s Unity, video drivers have received only passing mention. Yet video drivers (or their lack) could not only determine each desktop’s success, but also be the area where each has the most influence on Linux and free and open source software (FOSS).

        Specifically, I’m referring to the fact that drivers with 3-D hardware acceleration are required by both GNOME 3 and Unity. Whether each development team decided on this requirement separately, or whether one decided that it must match the other in sophistication, will probably never be known. But the fact remains that two of the leading desktops now require what, for FOSS, is advanced — at times, even bleeding edge — technology.

      • How GNOME 3 is besting Ubuntu Unity

        Jack Wallen was jonsing for GNOME 3 and discovered the best route to this new desktop was Fedora 15 beta. Can you image how surprised Jack was to find out that GNOME 3 blows away Ubuntu Unity? Read on to find out more.

        In lieu of the release of Ubuntu 11.04 and the default Unity desktop, it seems GNOME 3 (aka GNOME Shell) has fallen out of the spotlight. Most GNOME-based distributions have been sticking with classic GNOME and, well, there’s Ubuntu. And since GNOME 3 doesn’t play well at all with Ubuntu 11.04, it’s in a bit of a situation. Unless you’re willing to give Fedora 15 beta a go.

        I decided I needed to do just that, since I am ever so quickly becoming disillusioned by Unity. Believe me, I wanted to like Unity — and I did, at first. It seemed very slick, efficient, and just what the stale desktop needed. But then, after a few weeks of use, I realized there were many annoyances. It was time for something completely different, and that something was GNOME 3.

  • Distributions

    • New Releases

      • 23 May 2011: GParted 0.8.1

        This release of GParted further improves motherboard BIOS RAID support and includes bug fixes, and language translation updates.

    • Red Hat Family

      • Fedora

        • No party for you. Tradition cancelled.

          As heart-breaking as it is to cancel a years old tradition (we started the tradition of gathering the community for a face-to face meeting in the very release day with Fedora 8 and continued it release after release, no matter what), this time there will be no Fedora 15 release party in Bucharest.

        • Fedora 15

          Here’s the announcement from Fedora Project Leader, Jared Smith.
          Several new features are available, many which I am excited about.

        • Announcing the release of Fedora 15 (Lovelock)

          Fedora is a leading edge, free and open source operating system that continues to deliver innovative features to many users, with a new release about every six months. We bring to you the latest and greatest release of Fedora ever, Fedora 15! Join us and share the joy of Free software and the community with friends and family. We have several major new features with special focus on desktops, developers, virtualization, security and system administration.

        • Announcing the release of Fedora 15 (Lovelock)
        • Fedora 15 Lovelock Linux Debuts GNOME 3

          Fedora Linux 15 is now available, providing users on the desktop with a full GNOME 3 experience including the GNOME Shell user interface.

          Fedora 15, codenamed ‘Lovelock’ also introduces new security, spin, networking and virtualization features to the community Linux project, sponsored by Red Hat.

          “GNOME Shell is a big change and I’d be doing people a disservice if I didn’t say that GNOME 3 and GNOME Shell is a fairly radical departure from the GNOME 2 experience,” Jared Smith, Fedora Project Leader told InternetNews.com. “That being said, a lot of people find the change refreshing.”

          [...]

          “Personally, I have found GNOME 3 to be quite usable,” Smith said.

        • Fedora 15 Released, Has GNOME 3, New Search Tool

          The Fedora Project proudly announced a few minutes ago (May 24th) the immediate availability for download of the final and stable version of the highly anticipated Fedora 15 operating system.

        • Fedora 15 Screenshots
    • Debian Family

      • The Evolution of the Personal Package Archive system

        When the Personal Package Archive (PPA) system was brought out of beta in November 2007, it was heralded as a game changer for Free Software developers within the Ubuntu community and beyond.

        The PPA system was designed to make it easier for developers to get their software packaged and available to users for testing, thereby speeding up project development and delivering higher quality software.

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Is the Linux Uber-Geek “Administrator” Alive and Kicking?

            Indeed, Linux is marching forward as the core platform driving solutions such as Chrome OS and Android that impose none of the historical administrative hurdles on users that some Linux distros used to impose. Graphical environments for interacting with Linux, ranging from GNOME to Unity, are reaching millions of users. For many “Linux users,” Linux–in the old “administration required” sense– doesn’t enter the equation anymore.

          • Has Canonical Convinced Linux Users to Pay for Applications?

            The Linux crowd has a reputation as a group that doesn’t like paying for things. That stereotype may or may not be fair, but either way, it hasn’t stopped Canonical from introducing more than a dozen for-purchase software packages to Ubuntu Desktop users over the last 10 months. Here’s a look at what the company has done, and what it says about end users in the open source channel.

            It might be hard to believe, now that the Software Center has assumed such a central role in Ubuntu for adding, removing and maintaining software applications, that back in the day — until 2009, to be exact — the Software Center didn’t exist at all.

          • Google Movies Blocked on Modified Versions of Android

            Google has decided to block the access to Google Movies for all devices running on any unofficial versions of the Android operating system, modified through the process known as Android root.

            This type of intervention provides users with administrative rights on the operating system installed on the phone, thus removing all the restrictions which protected the Android platform against any unauthorized interferences on system’s components.

          • Come for the Price, stay for the Freedom?

            It’s time for impossible to prove conjecture Tuesday! Today I’ll be looking at freedom and price. Those two great pillars of our movement from barbaric propriety and gouging monopolies into a bright future of open sharing and low-low prices.

            I read about the Future of Open Source Survey and according to it’s findings most respondents value ‘open source’ and will be deploying it. But more intriguingly this time around instead of valuing ‘open source’ for costs reasons, the value is more firmly placed in Freedom.

            [...]

            Once you’re using an open source platform, of course it’s much easier to calculate the benefits of investing in the improvement of the code (hiring/contracting developers) against simply buying a replacement off the shelf product. This is what makes advocating FOSS so interesting, you never know if the person you’re convincing to use Ubuntu will turn around and spend money on helping it grow later.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Kubuntu 11.04 Review

              Here is a look at everything that is offered with the stunning new release of Kubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal. With the Stability of Ubuntu and the powerful KDE software selection, this distribution is ideal for desktops and laptops. Try downloading the Plasma netbook or Plasma desktop editions for a workspace that will suit your every need. The latest version of the KDE desktop offers many features and improvements that make everyday tasks faster and easier to complete. Kubuntu has been among my favorite distributions for quite some time now, and this release definitely ranks near the top.

              [...]

              the awesome KDE software selection ensure that Kubuntu is always a worthy download.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Phones

      • New mobile Web Google Maps highlights sorry state of native iOS app

        Google released an update to the mobile Web version of Google Maps on Friday, adding many features previously included in the native app—well, the Android app, anyway. The added features bring Web Maps up to par with the native app Android users have had for some time, though the Web app is less slick on Android in comparison to the native app. The mobile Web version also makes many features available to iOS users that never made it to the native app, such as bicycling route overlays and directions.

      • Android

        • Where the real Android GPL violations are

          Recent comments about Android’s alleged violations of the GPL have been proven to be little more than smoke and mirrors, according to Free Software advocate Bradley M. Kuhn, but there are instances of Android GPL violations out there, Kuhn writes.

          This all started on May 11, when I posted an article that dove into the meaning of the Android operating system’s Apache Software License (ASL). That’s operating system, not the Android kernel. This was promoted by a May 9 statement from Google that the source code for the current version of Android, Honeycomb, will not be released until the next version of Android, Ice Cream Sandwich, is released.

          In my article I walked through how the ASL not only doesn’t specify when source code must be released but also how the ASL, which is a permissive, non-copyleft license, doesn’t even require source code to be released at all.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Zanby Collaboration Software Goes Open Source

    Zanby, a Minneapolis-based maker of online community software, recently announced at the Open Gov West conference in Portland, Ore. that it is going open-source. The company released the code for its enterprise groupware under a GPL3 license and launched a community to encourage software developers to build new projects and help improve the Zanby codebase.

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox 5 beta arrives for desktop and Android

        Mozilla has announced the availability of the first Firefox 5 beta release for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Android. The new desktop version includes a built-in release channel switcher and support for CSS animations. The new mobile version introduces support for the Do Not Track header and a number of other improvements.

        Mozilla is transitioning to a faster-paced development model with shorter cycles between major releases. The organization is aiming to deliver three more major updates this year, bringing the Firefox version number to 7 by the end of 2011. To accommodate the more iterative release management strategy, Mozilla has established a system of release “channels” through which new improvements will flow before arriving in a stable release. It’s similar to the approach already used successfully by Google for its Chrome Web browser.

  • SaaS

  • Databases

  • CLA

    • OpenOffice.org and contributor agreements

      As part of an interview in LWN, Mark Shuttleworth is quoted as wanting the community to view the use of contribution licensing agreements (CLAs) as a necessary prerequisite for open source growth and the refusal by others to donate their work under them as a barrier to commercial success. He implies that the use of a CLA by Sun for OpenOffice.org was a good thing. Mark is also quoted accusing The Document Foundation (TDF) of somehow destroying OpenOffice.org (OO.o) because of its decision to fork rather than contribute changes upstream under the CLA. But I’d suggest a different view of both matters.

    • Mark Shuttleworth on companies and free software

      I had the opportunity to sit down with Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu and Canonical, for an wide-ranging, hour-long conversation while at Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) in Budapest. In his opening talk, Shuttleworth said that he wanted to “make the case” for contributor agreements, which is something he had not been successful in doing previously. In order to do that, he outlined a rather different vision than he has described before of how to increase Linux and free software adoption, particularly on the desktop, in order to reach his goal of 200 million Ubuntu users in the next four years. While some readers may not agree with various parts of that vision, it is definitely worth understanding Shuttleworth’s thinking here.

    • A CLA By Any Other Name

      Some projects, like the GNU projects run by the Free Software Foundation (FSF), in some instances require an assignment of code submissions if they are to be included in the project. [See, Contributing to GCC as an example. There the FSF asks that contributors either assign their copyright or disclaim it (put the code in the public domain). In neither case does the contributor retain any rights under copyright in their contribution. Such an approach likely works for the FSF because they have been a trusted partner in assuring code stays free.

  • Business

  • Funding

  • Public Services/Government

    • U.S. Department of Defense Details Open Source Lessons Learned

      U.S. Department of Defense has published a report with lessons learned on the use of open technologies: "The 68-page report has the goal of helping the U.S. government to implement what they refer to as open technology development (OTD) for government software projects.

Leftovers

  • Canadian Broadcasters and BDUs: Can They Compete With "Free"?

    Earlier this month, Bell and Quebecor, two giants in the Canadian broadcasting and telecom landscape, became embroiled in a dispute over Sun News Network, the recently launched all-news network. At first glance, the dispute appeared to be little more than a typical commercial fight over how much Bell should pay to Quebecor to carry the Sun News Network on its satellite television package. When the parties were unable to reach agreement, Bell removed Sun News Network, leaving a placeholder message indicating "the channel has been taken down at the request of the owners of Sun News Network."

    While the dispute is now before the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission - Quebecor claims Bell is violating the legal requirement against "undue preferences"- more interesting is Bell’s claim about the value of Sun News Network signal.

    According to Mirko Bibic, senior vice-president of regulatory affairs at Bell Canada, the market value of Sun News Network is zero because Quebecor makes the signal available free over-the-air in Toronto and is currently streaming it free on the Internet. Given the free access, Bell maintains that the signal no longer has a market value.

  • Health/Nutrition

    • GPs will be paid extra to tell patients they are fat

      From next year, GPs will receive a payment for every obese patient they advise to lose weight - on top of money for keeping lists of those who weigh too much.

      The plans form part of a desperate bid to tackle soaring rates of obesity in Britain, with two out of three adults now classed as overweight or obese.

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • 3.2 million records on police database

      Police in Wales hold more personal records than there are people in the country, our figures show.

      Three of the nation’s four police forces hold 3.2 million individual records between them – with hundreds of thousands relating to innocent victims.

      Civil liberties groups called the “vast” scale of the databases “horrifying”. But the figures also show just how many people are touched by crime, from perpetrators to victims to those who call in an offence.

  • Cablegate

    • "WikiSecrets" Julian Assange Full Interview Footage

      The Frontline documentary will include footage of a number of individuals who have a collective, and very dirty personal vendetta, against the organization. These include David Leigh, Adrian Lamo, Daniel Domscheit-Berg, Eric Schmitt and Kim Zetter. While the program filmed other sources, such as Vaughan Smith who provided a counter-narrative, these more credible voices have been excluded from the program presented to the US public.

  • Finance

    • Here We Go Again: How to Tell a Bubble When you See One

      Until last Thursday, there was some cause for hope. True, the day before the New York Times had written a piece reporting on the growing prevalence of "acqhire" transactions. That's where a company (like Facebook) buys a company for millions of dollars, only to promptly shut it down. Why? Because it wants the employees — $500,000 to $1 million per engineer is the current going rate. That's not quite as high as it was during the Internet Bubble years, but the same companies are doing lots of big-ticket acquisitions as well. Whether or not these transactions pay off in new revenues, the dilution to existing stockholders will be the same.

      And then there are the valuations. Groupon, which sold its first half price pizza coupon only two and a half years ago, turned down a $6 billion acquisition offer from Google only a few months ago. By April, it was said to be valuing itself in the $15 — $20 billion range. But that was a whole month ago, so the number $25 billion is now in the air. And then there's Facebook. Goldman Sachs, everyone's pick for most savvy investment bank on the Street, announced an investment round in Facebook in January of this year at an eye-popping $50 billion valuation. Facebook had revenues last year south of $2 billion.

  • Censorship

    • UK government censors YouTube videos

      At the moment it is unclear what types of video are being selected by the government for blocking, however Google provides a website detailing how many requests each country’s government have made for the removal of data.

  • Privacy

    • Newly Proposed U.S. Bill Calls for Warrant to Access Cloud Data

      In a move that could open up a whole new debate on privacy issues surrounding cloud computing, U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy has introduced a bill in the Senate that would require authorities to get a court-ordered search warrant before gaining access to messages and other data stored on cloud platforms. Currently, access to such data is subject to restrictions set by the 25-year old Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA). The newly proposed bill, dubbed the ECPA Amendments Act, not only requires a search warrant for access to cloud data, but also requires officials to have probably cause to obtain one. This proposed legislation promises to have a big impact on cloud players, including the many open source cloud players.

    • Where is your data?

      I think it’s fair to say that we’re all comfortable with public content being served from public services that anyone can access. I think it’s also fair to say that given the choice, we would all choose low cost public services to store un-sensitive, non-critical or unbound by law and compliance data.

    • School toilet camera plan ‘under review’

      controversial CCTV policy in schools is under review after a meeting held last Friday.

    • Websites risk breaking 'cookie' law

      Under the European Commission's Privacy and Electronic Directive, due to come into force on Wednesday, British firms and organisations with websites based in Britain will have to ask for permission to store and retrieve information on users' computers - a process done by installing computer code known as a cookie.

      Businesses could face a maximum fine of £500,000 if they fall foul of the regulations. But there is concern that many may not be aware of the changes or what steps they need to take to ensure they do not breach the new regulations.

    • New government ID scheme?
    • Police hand over details of 30,000 people a month for costly ‘customer satisfaction’ surveys

      This story slipped in under the radar recently, but it is important that it gets more exposure. Freedom of Information requests recently revealed that police departments in Britain are routinely paying marketing companies huge fees to carry out ‘customer satisfaction’ surveys. The cost of these surveys is around £1,000,000 per year.

  • Civil Rights

    • Being Concerned With Free Speech Implications Of PROTECT IP Does Not Mean You Think You're Above The Law

      Wow. In the legacy entertainment industry's latest "you're either with us or against us" mentality, it appears that expressing concern about the free speech implications of bills like PROTECT IP means you're a horrible, horrible person. Both the MPAA and RIAA are quite upset about Eric Schmidt coming out against PROTECT IP and saying that the impact on free speech would be disastrous. Both responses are so sickeningly disingenuous, it really makes you wonder how out of touch they are.

    • Research team moves towards on-site DNA fingerprinting

      Crime-scene investigators could soon have the ability to perform DNA fingerprinting on site without the need for lengthy post-analysis in a lab.

      Currently, forensic swab samples obtained at a crime scene are sent off for analysis where a specific part of the sequence, containing blocks of repeating elements that vary between individuals, are amplified and then read out.

    • ICO launch Information Rights Strategy

      A merged strategy for data protection and freedom of information has been launched by the Information Commissioner's Office.

      The information regulator said it was committed to integrating their data protection and freedom of information responsibilities and that the new Information Rights Strategy was designed to "make this commitment a reality".

    • Coalition plans to enlist private firms to speed ID authentication

      Francis Maude, minister for the Cabinet Office, revealed last week that the coalition government plans to develop a national ID database to allow for easy access to online public services.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • New "ShaperProbe" tool detects ISP traffic shaping

      Two researchers at Georgia Tech can tell you exactly how American ISPs shape Internet traffic, and which ones do so. Bottom line: of the five largest Internet providers in the country, the three cable companies (Comcast, Time Warner, Cox) employ shaping while the telephone companies (AT&T, Verizon) do not—though that fact is less significant for the user experience than it might first sound.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • Digital Libaries May Include More Book, Music Copyrights Under EU Overhaul

        Digital libraries may be able to include more copyrighted works under European Union rules proposed today.

        The European Commission is seeking to bolster the EU-funded Internet library Europeana, a rival to the Internet book service operated by Google Inc. (GOOG), owner of the most popular Internet- search engine.

        Some so-called orphan works, including newspapers and video footage for which no one can be identified to authorize digital use, may be included in digital libraries after a “diligent search” can’t trace the author, the commission said.

      • Entrepreneur, the Magazine That Sues Entrepreneurs

        Entrepreneur Media Inc. sells the idea of the self-made little guy getting ahead. Based in Irvine, Calif., EMI, as the company is known, publishes Entrepreneur, a monthly magazine with a circulation of 607,000 and a colorful history. According to newspaper reports, the periodical's founder and former owner, Chase Revel, once tried robbing banks for a living. Today, EMI conducts seminars revealing "business success secrets" of a more mainstream nature. It markets instructional CDs and sells advertising to package deliverers, health insurers, and franchisers such as Wahoo's Fish Taco restaurants. In other words, EMI caters to all things entrepreneurial. Strangely, it also smashes the dreams of the self- starters it aims to serve.

        [...]

        An attorney with the corporate law firm Latham & Watkins informed Castro that EMI owns the U.S. trademark for the word “entrepreneur.” With 2,000 lawyers in 31 offices around the world, Latham polices EMI’s intellectual property aggressively. The firm even instructed Castro to surrender his domain name to EMI. “If you fail to abide by these demands,” the letter said, “Entrepreneur Media will have no choice but to take appropriate action to prevent continued use of an infringing mark and domain name.”

Clip of the Day

Tetris Cube Tutorial


Credit: TinyOgg

Software is Mathematics

Posted in Patents at 4:13 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Block diagram
Depiction of the framework for detection and classification of 3-D data such as faces or internal organs, as well as benchmarking

Summary: Personal take on why software is just symbiosis of maths

This post is a concise summary of something I have been working on (source code will be uploaded at a later date when I tidy everything up). The figure at the top shows a breakdown of our existing framework, which basically depicts a program as a set of black boxes. Each box merely performs mathematical operations on volumetric matrices. It’s maths. It can also be specified most precisely using equations (no need for explanation using code or pseudo-code). For the sake of simplicity, the block diagram contains only core components that are used irrespective of the approach tested. The file loaders, for example, are shown separately. They work very well and can elegantly load datasets based on a data selector. With the exception of test sets that are small (remnants of debugging), there are 6 families of data, some grouped in pairs, some grouped by training/target, some our lab’s data in isolation, others for FRGC data from NIST. There are also correct and incorrect matches in isolation. These simplify the plotting of ROC curves in a largely streamlined fashion. The goal is the program is to test new metrics that can be used to analyse anything elastic such as tissue. It has uses in cardiac analysis, brains, and even faces (I have dealt with each of these data types). For large quantiles of 3-D data, about 70 GB of face data gets used.

The nose-finding part may as well be treated as a component that provides orientation o a form of segmentation (it can be a face or even an internal organ which we wish to model and perform binary diagnosis on). Depending on the datasets, different methods are used. Commonly, FRGC data is better off interpreted by finding nearest point, excepting noise. For the lab’s data, it is preferable to choose the nearest point within a specified region (usually around the centre, no weighting/scoring based on location although that too would work). This can also be done using ICP, as described later (settings inherited from another box/module) or a Viola-Jones approach with face templates for training, although it is only partly implemented so far. Sphere intersection with plane, as per Mian et al. (with separate slider for radius), is another existing option, but it does not appear to outperform the simpler methods, which work most of the time given some reasonable boundaries (e.g. boundaries to dodge the hair region).

Having identified the tip of the nose correctly, we are cropping out what is left for rigid areas to be isolated. It is quite customisable. Various separation methods and boundary types like circle, ellipsoid, and rectangle have been tested, where circle is the most commonly used one that works in conjunction with binary masks. These come with many sliders and use measurements in X and Y to estimate real physical distances and then factorise pixel-space units, accordingly. There is also a slider for further manual tweaking. And still, it’s all maths.

There are some other bits of operation that are worth mentioning; left out from the diagram in order to reduce clutter are smoothers, hole removers, outlier eliminators, and rounding up of values, all of which are optional and very much depend on the data at hand and how it ought to be treated. For instance, FRGC data hardly requires any smoothing. Lab data has offsets that need to be handled systematically depending on the image number. In fact, both datasets do need a lot of branching/forking in the code as their handling and even their size varies (the program is built to handle any image side with any aspect ratio, but for sub-regions to be defined it uses absolute and not relative coordinate inputs).

Then we come to the key part, which actually does more to contribute toward similarity measures. ICP becomes very important in case the initial alignment of the noses is deemed incorrect or the faces are tilted. In practice, assuming the faces are forward-looking and bend neither to the sides or top/bottom, ICP is not supposed to change much. The methods already available are Mian’s early ICP method, Mian’s most recent ICP method, Raviv’s ICP implementation from 2008, and Raviv/Rosman ICP implementation from recent months or years. The program optionally applies translation and optionally it applies the rotation too. In many cases this does not seem necessary as ICP hardly modifies anything substantial.

The model part is not included in the diagram as there are many different things are can be done with a model. PCA, model-building, model assessment, file loaders for models (about 2 gigabytes for some), in addition to more basic measures on which assessment is applied, are basically all sorts of comparators which yield one value for each pair, then proceeding to the plotting of ROC curves (mostly automated following experimental design).

All the above is just mathematics. It can all be described using equations. To patent such stuff would be to claim a monopoly on equations, which means the monopoly covers a wide range (infinite even) of implementations. How can anybody defend the argument that software is not maths? Or that “innovative” software is somehow the exception? If many equations are already patented, how is one supposed to code safely? How can existing methods be enhanced without a violation?

Software Patents Spread Like a Plague Owing to US-based Multinationals

Posted in Australia, Europe, Microsoft, Patents at 3:04 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

World background

Summary: Amazon continues to pollute the world with its outrageous monopolies, including the patent on ’1-click’; Likewise pays for patents

THE USPTO is so utterly broken and those who benefit from it, including patent aggressor Amazon, spread the same broken patent culture to the other hemisphere. We tended to focus on what was done in New Zealand by the lobbyists of American multinationals and their overseas minions, but now we are told by the president of the FFII (EU) that:

Amazon One click shows that sw is patentable in AU: “As the specification clearly contained patentable subject matter” http://ur1.ca/49ic0

Here is the original report, which comes from patent lawyers in the UK:

This Kat, who enjoys the odd bit of online shopping, has been reading with interest the latest controversy over the Amazon ‘1-click’ ordering patent. Many readers will be aware that over the past decade there has been a long history of unsuccessful challenges to grants of the patent in the US, Canada and Europe. The most recent destination for battle has been Australia.

Amazon did this in Europe too, after it had absorbed many top-level executives from its neighbour, Microsoft (Amazon now pays Microsoft for Red Hat and the Linux inside Kindle).

Bezos gives lecture

This really needs to be stopped. Software patents are mostly being granted in the United States based on some of the latest news which includes [1, 2] (“Alarm Limit Calculation Patent Awarded to TiPS, Inc”), but when patents on mathematics go overseas, developers everywhere will lose their freedom to write code while customers all around the world will receive inferior and more expensive products. Check out the latest:

TiPS, Inc., developer of LogMate, the industry’s favorite user-oriented alarm management software, today announces patent approval of their industry-leading alarm activation point calculation.

How can “alarm management software” be patented? It is already copyrighted. Is it not enough?

People should really do more to abolish software patents. Given enough backlash, change does come about. After anger from program developers and users of their programs Apple had a major PR gaffe in its hands and contrary to its belief that software patents are a fine thing, Apple decided to step up and actually do something [1, 2, 3, 4]. It took Apple ‘only’ one week of backlash to do this.

In other news, Microsoft APIs booster Likewise [1, 2, 3, 4] has just had to pay for patents:

Likewise Software Inc. on Monday agreed to settle a suit brought by Quest Software Inc., accepting a Utah court’s injunction to not infringe a patent for server software technology.

This only helps verify that Microsoft APIs lead to patent problems.

Techrights Needs Input

Posted in Site News at 2:29 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Tribunal de justica building

Summary: A call for tips and suggestions regarding stories in Techrights

Some of the articles written in this site originate not from RSS feeds but from pointers that are given to us — privately/discreetly or publicly — by people who quietly follow this Web site. There are many such people — more than it may seem on the surface. Some of those who provide input are eyewitnesses of misconduct. We urge people who read this site to report to us (e.g. via IRC) things which need to be covered because only by pooling the minds and eyes of many people can we report on the threats to software freedom effectively. It really is a group effort.

Doubts About the Future of Open Source Under Attachmate

Posted in GNU/Linux, Microsoft, Novell, OpenSUSE, SLES/SLED at 2:28 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Axing FOSS at Novell

Axe in the forest

Summary: OpenSUSE still neglected by AttachMSFT, which is not too shocking given lack of commitment to Mono

BEING a site that specialises in Novell and SUSE (I myself was a SUSE user for a long time and also a contributor to the community), we will carry on tracking the company’s assets for a long time to come. The patent deal with Microsoft is set to expire in January, so that is likely to be interesting. Over the past couple of months we wrote about AttachMSFT and OpenSUSE (not the same as SUSE) [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9], noting that AttachMSFT refrains from expression its commitment to OpenSUSE by properly naming it. AttachMSFT keeps talking about SUSE and one blogger says this week that “[w]hat Nils Brauckmann didn’t say [is that] for SUSE to grow openSUSE must shrink”. For those who do not know, Brauckmann is the new head of SUSE [1, 2]. The blogger writes:

I have broken the last statement into 3 paragraphs to make things easier to understand.

The action taken by Attachmate so far implies they want to make SUSE a strong and successful competitor, splitting it from Novell, dropping Mono, as Nils stated they want to sharpen their focus on SUSE.

But how can SUSE be successful or maximize its revenue when its strongest competing product is openSUSE?

openSUSE is more than a community project, it is a strong and free alternative to SUSE Enterprise and for that reason those who are interpreting the last statement (I have broken into three) as saying SUSE will continue to support the openSUSE project with the same commitment as Novell could be in for a shock.

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, a longtime fan of SUSE and sympathiser of Novell (this is not intended to seem like an insult), is overly optimistic and so is Groklaw, which has an interest in SUSE/UNIX persisting at Novell, due to SCO litigation. Whether OpenSUSE will survive or not, we will probably know in the coming months. On a more positive note, Vaughan-Nichols has this article/column about “Windows business desktop dying”. Very good analysis. To quote:

Once upon a time, you couldn’t get fired for buying IBM. We all used to use Internet Explorer. And today, many of us still think that Windows is the only business desktop. But just as IBM and IE are no longer unassailable, I think the days of the Windows business desktop hegemony may be numbered.

No, I don’t think my beloved Linux is finally going to become the desktop of choice. What’s going to start to loosen the Windows desktop stranglehold is a combination of factors.

First, there’s the rise of tablet and smartphone business computing. IT may not like having to support iPads and Android phones, but guess what: Users don’t care. Business users in industries such as pharmaceuticals are grabbing iPads almost as fast as Beijing Apple Store shoppers.

Vaughan-Nichols is not alone with those eulogies. Salesforce, which was extorted by Microsoft using patents last year, has its CEO compare Microsoft to Zune, which almost became synonymous with failure.

Salesforce chief Marc Benioff squared off against Microsoft in an earnings call late last week that boiled Microsoft’s more recent failures to a single method. Calling it the “Zune strategy,” he argued that Microsoft kept repeating the strategy it took with its self-designed but largely unsuccessful MP3 player, expecting different results. Along with failing to topple Salesforce’s Sales Cloud with CRM Dynamics, Microsoft had tried to push Windows tablets and the Zune as iPad and iPod rivals without having anything special beyond the brand name and price.

The Zune strategy is “the concept that they can take a proprietary, undifferentiated offering at a lower price and somehow make an impact on a high-value, highly differentiated product that’s loved by customers,” Benioff said. “Customers continue to want visionary products that give them a competitive advantage, not the me-too Zune-type products locking them into these old, proprietary, desktop-driven platforms that are dying off.”

What else is dying while trying to adapt for “iPads and Android phones,” as mentioned by Vaughan-Nichols? Mono. Well, despite a new company forming, the team is not staying. It’ll shrink as some of the financing for the company comes from Miguel himself, which does not sound particularly promising. There has been almost no work about Mono and Moonlight since the announcement of Trojarin [1, 2] and one interview with the 'Microsoft press'. Based on the Mono ‘planet’, Geoff Norton is leaving the team. To quote: “It’s with a very heavy heart that I need to announce I won’t be joining Xamarin. Working on Mono for the past 7 years has been one of the most intensly rewarding experiences of my life, and I’m extremely sad that I will not be moving forward with them. All of the hackers there are some of the brightest and best that I’ve ever had the luxury of working with. I wish all the guys at Xamarin the best of luck with their future, and I am confident they’ll bring Mono to the next level.”

So much for the future of .NET, eh? AttachMSFT buries the project.

Amid Decision on €899,000,000 Fine, ITSSD Goes Batting for Microsoft

Posted in Europe, Microsoft, Patents, Standard at 2:01 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

[Note: written this morning (i.e. before the hearing)]

Lawrence Kogan

Summary: The lawyers/lobbyingmeisters come out in defence of Microsoft almost unsurprisingly, coinciding of course with a very important hearing about Microsoft’s abuses

THE FSFE says that it will speak to the European Court of Justice regarding Microsoft. From their new page:

Fresh action in the European Commission’s antitrust proceedings against Microsoft: On May 24, the European Court of Justice conducts a hearing on Microsoft’s appeal against the fine. FSFE has participated in the case for a decade and will intervene on the Commission’s behalf.

Carlo Piana will be there too and he announces this in Identi.ca/Twitter while “Microsoft tries to weasel out of big EU fine,” as one reader of ours put it. “This would be in connection with Microsoft’s action claiming that the 899 million euro fine the EU Commission ordered in 2008 was excessive,” explains Groklaw. “The Commission found that, prior to October of 2007 Microsoft charged unreasonable prices for access to indispensable interoperability information.” Here is what Piana wrote:

Ready to fly to Luxembourg. #FSFE and #samba in court for setting the record straight on #interoperability.

There is some funny stuff going on right now. The "interoperability" propaganda (with patents and RAND, not free standards) gets pushed by some mysterious groups and lobbyists whom we never saw before. “Glyn Moody questions a curious Guardian article about standards and discovers an insulting Microsoft think tank,” claims a reader of ours, pointing at this article. We are not sure if it’s Microsoft behind the spin, but it is rather predictable that Microsoft at least played a role (Microsoft is generally funding think tanks to lie). As Moody shows, the messenger has a very dodgy reputation. He writes: “Let’s see what else concerns the ITSSD. How about this?”

U.S. Navy Had a Whale of a Job Fending Off Green Lawfare in NRDC v. Winter Case

In a newly released Washington Legal Foundation working paper, international lawyer Lawrence Kogan describes the U.S. Navy’s challenge in convincing the U.S. Supreme Court to vacate a green injunction effectively preventing critical U.S. Naval sonar training exercises from taking place off the Southern California coast. The injunction had been issued on the grounds that the Navy’s failure to prepare a full environmental impact statement could trigger possible but scientifically unverifiable discomfort to beaked whales.

“The green group and California State pleadings the Supreme Court reviewed in Winter provide a bird’s eye view of continuing activist efforts to rewrite U.S. environmental regulatory law from the bench in pacifist Europe’s socialist image,” emphasizes Kogan.”

You see, it’s getting worse: those “pacifist” “socialist” Europeans are trying to protect the whales from pain – whatever next?

Well, how about this [.pdf]?

Congress Should Do its ‘Homework’ Before Adopting Costly Euro-Style Energy/Climate Change Rules

Crafted by unelected bureaucrats, environmental activists and socialist party ‘kingpins’ and supported by most European leaders, such policies have focused more on promoting sustainable development via consumer and business sacrifices than on securing desperately-needed regional energy supplies.

Yes, it’s those crafty socialist party ‘kingpins’ again – probably all cheese-eating surrender monkeys – aided and abetted by environmental activists, who have the audacity to promote “sustainable development via consumer and business sacrifices”: can you imagine it?

Yes, I think lots of caution is required here….

Did Microsoft liaise with ITSSD? Here it is lobbying for Microsoft interests at WIPO [PDF]. They even have a blogspot blog, just like Microsoft Florian.

Links 24/5/2011: More Linux Tablets (MeeGo and Android), LibreOffice Engineering Steering Committee

Posted in News Roundup at 1:07 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • The Linux Week in Review (May 23 – 30, 2011)

    Fedora 15: Lovelock Continues the Fedora Heritage of Innovation

  • Desktop

    • Xi3 Spins Desktop As Google-Based ChromiumPC

      At Google I/O earlier this month, Google introduced (briefly) a Samsung-labeled Chrome desktop box. But while it looked a lot like the Mac Mini, there still aren’t any true details to show people what it may be capable of. Google also stated that they’d continue to push Chromium for those who want a taste of Chrome on a non-sanctioned machine, and it looks like Xi3 is jumping on that notion to make a timely announcement.

    • Mini-PC offers Chrome OS, modular design
  • Server

    • FAUMachine: First Impressions

      For those of you who don’t already know about FAUmachine (FAU), it’s a virtual machine that allows you to install full operating systems and run them as if they were independent computers. FAUmachine is similar to VirtualBox, QEMU, and other full virtualization technologies. It is a project sponsored by the Friedrich Alexander University Computer Science Department in Germany (Erlangen-Nuremberg*). FAU is a computer simulator that is an independent virtual machine project. The CPU is based on the virtual CPU in QEMU.

    • Software AG acquires open source caching experts Terracotta

      Terracotta, home of open source projects such as the Ehcache Java cache and Quartz scheduler, has been acquired by Software AG. The acquisition will, says the German company, act as a foundation for its in-memory and cloud offerings, allowing it to run business processes which use in-memory cached data access at “up to a thousand times faster than database access”; it expects to offer the first combined products in the fourth quarter of 2011.

    • Software AG To Acquire Terracotta

      Software AG has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Terracotta. Terracotta provides in-memory technology for high performance applications and cloud services. The company also owns the de facto caching standard for enterprise Java used by over 1 million developers worldwide.

  • Kernel Space

    • Graphics Stack

      • MeeGo Tablet UX Can Already Run On Wayland?

        The MeeGo conference is running from tomorrow through Wednesday in San Francisco. This is the first conference for the Moblin-Maemo-mix since Nokia parted ways to team up with Microsoft and ship Windows Phone 7 on their future devices, but there’s interesting work still going on in the MeeGo world. In particular, of interest to many Phoronix readers will be the fact that it sounds like the adoption of the Wayland Display Server is going quite well within the MeeGo world. It appears that there’s already an experimental version of MeeGo Tablet UX working atop Wayland.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC)

      • KOffice evolves: first Calligra Suite snapshot released

        The Calligra project, part of the KDE community, has announced the release of the first snapshot for version 2.4 of the Calligra Suite, a set of productivity applications. According to the developers, since splitting with KOffice five months ago, they have improved their core libraries as well as the applications themselves, adding that their goal is to “provide the best application suite on all platforms based on open standards.”

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Advaicium: Adwaita Theme Ported To GTK2

        If you use GNOME 3 and Adwaita theme, GTK2 applications look different (as in ugly) than GTK3 apps. That’s why maximo1010 @ Ubuntuforums has ported Adwaita GTK3 theme to GTK2.

      • Nautilus Elementary Ambiance Theme + Orange Themed Clarity Icons = Looks Nice in Unity

        Even more Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal customization tips. We have seen some of the most beautiful themes for Ubuntu 11.04 Unity desktop already and one of the highlights of that list was Nautilus Elementary Ambiance Theme. We think we have just found out an icons theme that gels pretty well with Nautilus Elementary Ambiance Theme and it’s called Clarity.

  • Distributions

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Phones

      • Android

        • Is Android Really the ‘Open’ Platform?

          Rooting and jailbreaking are not illegal, but they usually will void your phone’s warranty. Typically, though, you can restore the original OS before taking a phone in for service, and the company would never know.

        • No Movie Rentals On Rooted Android: Does It Matter?

          According to reports Google is blocking the installation of its Android Movie Market on rooted Android devices. Google’s decision seemed to be driven by content providers who don’t want rooted phones to be able to copy or download their movies.

        • Miro 4.0 Runs On Android

          The Participatory Culture Foundation (PCF) has announced the launch of Miro 4, the open-source desktop media player (read more about Miro here).

          Miro 4.0 allows users to manage music including iTunes libraries, videos, playlists and apps in one place and to sync these digital libraries with Android devices.

    • Sub-notebooks/Tablets

      • Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 great for media consumption, says review

        Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1 is a remarkable media-chomping tablet with Android 3.0, a crisp, 10.1-inch touchscreen, 10-hour battery life, and a slim, lightweight design, says this eWEEK review. Despite the modest three-megapixel camera and lack of ports — or even an SD slot — the tablet is said to best the Motorola Xoom for straightforward media consumption purposes.

      • Asustek sets prices lower for US-bound Eee Pad Transformer tablet PCs

        Additionally, prices for Android 3.1-based tablet PCs to be launched by other vendors in the second half of the year may also be affected, with ASPs of Android 3.1 models likely to be dragged down by US$100, the sources commented.

      • Red Flag Announces MeeGo 1.2 Based Tablet OS

        Red Flag Software, the Linux major of China, is planning to release one of the first tablet operating systems based on the MeeGo open source software platform.

        The Red Flag Midinux Tablet Edition operating system will incorporate the MeeGo v1.2 common code base and a user experience built by Red Flag Software that uses the MeeGo user interface building blocks and demonstrates the flexibility MeeGo offers companies to differentiate their products. The tablet will be demonstrated at Computex in Taipei May 31 to June 4, 2011.

Free Software/Open Source

  • Creative Barcode Responds to the Hargreaves Report

    Digital Opportunity – a review of Intellectual Property and Growth, the 132 page report published on May 18, 2011, is the result of an intensive 6 month independent review lead by Ian Hargreaves, commissioned by PM David Cameron in November 2010.

    The basis for the review was a ministerial concern that in a digital age the intellectual property framework was not keeping pace with new innovation an

  • The Open Source Road Ahead: Individuals matter

    Jim Jagielski, Simon Phipps and Mark Radcliffe at OSBC unveiled OSI plan during the ”A New OSI for a New Decade: Rebooting the Open Source Initiative OSI” session (presentation). Some reports stressed the importance of organizations, but volunteers are welcome too!

  • Events

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Firefox 5: Track Me, Just Don’t Track Me

        The Mozilla Foundation launched a beta version of its fifth edition of the Firefox Web browser Monday — just eight weeks after it rolled out Firefox 4.

        This includes a mobile version for Android as well as versions for Windows, Mac and Linux desktops.

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • The body coordinates development activities and defines the technology evolution of LibreOffice

      The Document Foundation presents the members of the Engineering Steering Committee, the second body to be announced – after the Membership Committee – of those envisioned by the foundation bylaws. The ESC has come into being in early 2011, and is now officially in place to coordinate all development activities and set future technology directions.

    • LibreOffice Creators Announce The Engineering Steering Committee Members

      The Document Foundation, the organisation behind LibreOffice, has announced the members of the Engineering Steering Committee. This is the second body announced by TDF after the Membership Committee.

      The ESC has come into being in early 2011, and is now officially in place to coordinate all development activities and set future technology directions.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • May 2011 GNU Toolchain Update
    • GNU Parallel 20110522 (‘Pakistan’) released

      GNU Parallel 20115022 (‘Pakistan’) has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/parallel/

      This is a major release. So far GNU Parallel has been focused on replacing a single for-loop. The Pakistan release introduces ways to replace nested loops.

      If you are using the {1} {2} syntax for multiple input sources, then you need to read about –xapply as the function has changed.

  • Public Services/Government

    • U.S. Department of Defense Details Open Source Lessons Learned

      The 68-page report has the goal of helping the U.S. government to implement what they refer to as open technology development (OTD) for government software projects. As part of OTD, the report includes a number of specific recommendations for open source software usage. Some of those recommendations are somewhat of a surprise, considering that the U.S. military is often seen as an organization that is not likely to be very open about their software development practices.

  • Standards/Consortia

    • Cloudy with a Chance of Clarity: NIST Seeks Public Comment on Draft Guide to Cloud Computing

      Next time you feel like your head’s in the clouds, don’t fret: that’s where the action is. Advancements in information technology have made it possible to store virtually endless amounts of information in a system of “clouds.” Opening numerous possibilities, cloud computing is on par with the Internet in terms of its potential to change the face of computing and the way we live and do business.

Leftovers

  • IPv6 transition still a low priority for most organizations

    As the World IPv6 Day approaches, recent research reports show that a majority of organizations are still postponing migration to the IPv6 networking protocol. Despite the growing scarcity of IPv4 addresses, due in large part to the growth of mobile and embedded devices, a British Telecom Diamond IP survey says that only 35 percent of respondents considered IPv6 a “huge concern.”

  • How can you trust a cloud? Verify.

    Group developing audit specs that could build faith in cloud applications

  • Security

  • Finance

    • Matt Taibbi: Wall St. Has No Incentive Not To Commit Crimes (VIDEO)

      In a video interview with RT America, Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi, the author of Griftopia, says that as of now, and until the government more aggressively prosecutes financial fraud, Wall Street has a continued incentive to bend the rules in their favor. (Hat tip to Naked Capitalism.)

      Since the financial crisis, Taibbi has been one of Wall Street’s most outspoken critics. Earlier this month, Taibbi wrote “The People. vs. Goldman Sachs,” a sweeping investigation into the Senate report on Goldman Sachs that accused the investment bank of profiting by misleading investors.

    • The “Road To Recovery” Is A Dead End

      The high profile financial analyst and investment manager Marshall Auerback explains in this exclusive interview his views on: the IMF; the ongoing financial crisis; the commodities rally; the implications of the current oil price; the conflict in Libya/Middle East; the rigging of the precious metal markets; and last but not least this, ironically spoken, “bunch of cranks“ – the Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee, GATA.

    • Janet Yellen’s QE2 Promise Now Dying on the Vine, in California

      California reported its April jobs data on Friday. The LA Times repeated the figure, laid out in the report from EDD, that on a year-over-year basis the state had created 144,000 jobs. What The LA Times did not clarify is that these were non-farm payrolls. For the fuller picture of the Golden State’s job market, I track the total employment figure. In the same time period called out in media headlines, therefore, the number of employed persons actually fell by 22,000, from 15.960 million to 15.938 million. | see: California Employment in Millions (seasonally adjusted) 2000-2011.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • Look Out, Pearson; Murdoch Is Serious About Online Education

      It was an unusual topic for the News Corp (NSDQ: NWS) CEO. In November, News Corp hired New York City schools chancellor Joel Klein as an advisor, and bought 90 percent of ed-tech provider Wireless Generation for $360 million. In January, Klein got his own education division in News Corp and a $2 million salary.

      Judging from his keynote to the eG8, which was assembled by France’s president Sarkozy to hear tech business’ views to be fed to the French-hosted G8 summit, Murdoch is both passionate and excited about what he sees as both a duty and a business opportunity.

      This could encompass both e-books and learning materials and group learning platforms, and could be a gauntlet thrown down to one of the digital learning sector’s big beasts – Pearson.

  • Civil Rights

    • France’s G8 Focuses on Control and Restrictions to Online Freedoms

      A detailed analysis of exchanges between the French President and his former Minister of Foreign Affairs on G8 related matters appears in tomorrow’s edition of the French magazine Marianne. La Quadrature du Net has had access to sources that confirm the existence of a control-oriented policy, explicitly hostile to the support to the freedom of expression on the Internet, in blatant contrast with the farcical “eG8 forum” smokescreen. Governments must be made accountable for the positions they take on these issues when they speak behind close doors.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • Please Help Us Figure Out How Much The Public Has ‘Lost’ Due To Overprotective Anti-Copy Laws

        We recently posted about an ITC report that, among other things, estimated that US companies “lost” $48 billion due to “piracy” in China. This $48 billion number generated plenty of headlines, and since the report was requested by the Senate, you can bet that it will be used politically. The problem, however, was that the methodology was ridiculous. Rather than using any sort of objective measure, the ITC went out and asked 5,000 businesses who were in “IP-intensive fields” what they thought their “losses” were, and then extrapolated out.

      • ACTA

        • FFII calls upon European Parliament to resolve uncertainties regarding ACTA

          We are writing to express our concerns with ACTA (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement). Whether the Parliament will ratify or reject ACTA, it will be a landmark decision. Yet, ACTA is still surrounded by uncertainties. We call upon you to decisively resolve these uncertainties. We urge the Parliament to seek an opinion of the European Court of Justice on the compatibility of ACTA with the EU Treaties, and to commission independent assessments of the effects ACTA will have on access to medicine, diffusion of green technologies needed to fight climate change, fundamental rights within and outside the Union, innovation, small and medium sized companies and a fair balance of interests.

          Prior to ratifying the 1994 WTO TRIPS agreement (Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights), the Commission asked the European Court of Justice whether TRIPS complied with the Treaties. The Court decided that the Community was not competent to ratify the criminal measures.

Clip of the Day

The Passion of the MeeGo Community


Credit: TinyOgg

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