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04.28.10

Links 28/4/2010: Fedora 13 Previews, Android Beyond 50,000 Apps

Posted in News Roundup at 11:40 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • The Preferred Nomenclature
  • The Linux-Vendor Factors- Part of the FOSS adoption problems in Africa

    Unlike Windows, Linux is a heavily networked OS where one needs internet connection to do things like application installation. This very factor is one of the greatest deterrents to the use of Linux here. How do you get people to use it when they have no reliable and affordable internet connection?

  • Desktop

    • The Hobbyists OS

      Microsoft’s army of apologists like to spread the word that Linux is a “hobbyists OS”, so this post is a look at what that means and why it’s a label more suited to Windows. The attack is meant to draw attention to the fact that anyone can write code which appears in Linux, inferring the quality of the code is dubious. Basically, it can’t be good quality if people outside the corporation write it.

      They try to paint the picture that while Windows just works, Linux needs a lot of tinkering to get anything done. It’s pitched at both home users and businesses. For the home user it’s about “you have to learn all this stuff, and spend hours fixing it” while the businesses get the “you have your staff PC’s down for X hours so they can’t be productive, while also spending extra wages on skilled IT people to fix and configure things.” The implication is that “Windows is a better investment in man hours, productivity and cost, Linux costs you money.”

      How many man hours do you have to spend on Windows doing virus scans, spyware scans etc? How many man hours do you have to spend Googling to find how to remove infection because your chosen protection tools can detect it but can’t remove it? How can you assure your customers that their data is not compromised by some spyware your tools can’t detect? How can you be assured that the site supposedly giving a solution to a particular virus is not itself a phishing scam waiting to sell you some software if you put your credit card details in or a script laden site ready to dump a whole new payload of malware on your plate?

    • Microsoft welcomes the pirates and then sinks them? + Linux usage may be wrong?

      I’ll let you decide, however next time you hear that Linux is “unproven” or a “hobbyist” OS with a 1% market share, remind the person that this unproven hobbyist OS was not only responsible for the rather profitable Avatar film, but also seems to be responsible for considerably more activity than a 1% market share would imply. Of course on top of that you have government bodies (which we have covered here) switching to Linux, but then as the Microsoft faithful would say, it’s merely a 1% share… ;)

      Surprising then that on the majority of tech forums this 1% is always visible, they must be a very busy 1%.

    • 15 Stunning Linux Desktop Customizations – Must Watch!

      If you think Linux desktops are ugly, think again. Here is an awesome collection of 15 jaw dropping Linux desktop customizations made by users. I wouldn’t mind calling them works of art instead of just customizations. They are that good. A good number of them include clever conky modifications. I haven’t yet tried to emulate them in my desktop, but surely will, at least some of them. For now, just the screenshots and the source. Watch and enjoy!

    • Question: Why switch to Linux or a Mac?

      I’m no friend to Windows. I know the operating system too well to trust it. But, I did think that even though Windows is defective by design, you could keep it relatively safe by installing patches quickly and using anti-virus software religiously. I was wrong.

      [...]

      The greater problem though is that, even if Microsoft and the anti-virus companies spent ten-times the money and time on securing Windows they still couldn’t do it. When your foundation is built on sand instead of rock, there’s only so much any amount of patching can do to keep a house solid.

      No, if you really want a secure desktop you need either Linux or Mac OS X. Is either of these perfectly secure? No, no they’re not. But, they are much more secure than Windows can ever be.

    • A Digital Forensics Student’s Linux Workspace

      Our next entry for the “The $100.00 (USD) Coolest Linux Workspace Contest” was sent all the way from the Netherlands by a digital forensics student named Huseyin. He is also working as an intern at an IT-audit company and described Linux as the best OS to do research on. If ever chosen as the grand winner, he says he will use the $100 to buy another 1TB hard disk drive since the 3TB of HDDs that he already have are not enough –probably because of lots of legal evidences to store :-)

  • Graphics Stack

    • What Do You Want From NVIDIA’s Next Driver?

      One of the common complaints that’s also come up as of late with NVIDIA’s latest Linux drivers have been issues surrounding PowerMizer not working correctly, which is hopefully one of the fixes that will work its way into NVIDIA’s Release 256 for Linux / OpenSolaris / FreeBSD.

      In 2006 and 2007 there were security problems with the binary NVIDIA Linux driver and now there is apparently a new zero-day vulnerability within NVIDIA’s Linux stack, which we hope will be fixed by the NVIDIA 256.xx release.

    • Nvidia Will Unify Desktop, Laptop Drivers
    • X.Org Server 1.8.1 Gets Ready For May Release

      X.Org Server 1.9 is the key interest now among X developers working on the graphics and input stacks with its release coming as soon as August, but Peter Hutterer once again is taking over the role of maintaining the stable X.Org Server branch. With X.Org Server 1.7.7 being nearly out of the way, the first point release for X.Org Server 1.8 is being prepared for release.

  • Applications

  • Distributions

    • Why Should I use Unity Linux ?
    • CDlinux 0.9.6.1

      Full-featured desktop Linux distributions like PCLinuxOS and Linux Mint are quite useful, but there are times when a smaller and lighter distro can also be desirable. CDlinux is petite mini-distro that can be installed on a USB device or on a Windows C: partition.

      [...]

      Summary: A useful distro that provides a viable option for those in need of a portable version of Linux. The standard edition also works well as a rescue distro.

    • Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • PCLinuxOS 2010 Gnome Screenshots

        The PCLinuxOS 2010 Gnome theme is dark with black and grey colors throughout the boot menu, login, and desktop screens. I preferred the PCLinuxOS 2010 Gnome release over the KDE and other PCLinuxOS 2010 releases because of it’s difference in color. Although all quite different, the other editions did all stuck with the darker blue look. I like blue but ‘loved’ the darker colors on the Gnome edition.

    • Fedora

    • Ubuntu

      • Let’s Make Ubuntu a Trending Topic
      • Ubuntu’s Linux OS — Mac OS X’s Doppelganger?

        The desktop editions of Ubuntu will also be released on Thursday, sporting a new look (but not Gnome 3 — that will probably arrive with the Maverick Meerkat release six months down the line), new graphics card drivers and a number of consumer-oriented innovations. These include the MeMenu panel for easy access to messaging and social networking services, the new Gwibber microblogging client, and an online music store.

      • A global menu for Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Edition

        In the netbook edition for 10.10, we’re going to have a single menu bar for all applications, in the panel.

        Our focus on netbooks has driven much of the desktop design work at Canonical. There are a number of constraints and challenges that are particular to netbooks, and often constraints can be a source of insight and inspiration. In this case, wanting to make the most of vertical space has driven the decision to embrace the single menu approach.

      • Ubuntu 10.04: Where Ubuntu goes from here

        Canonical also announced that it has advanced several new hardware and software partnerships. The biggest news on the hardware side is that Dell will support the Ubuntu server and Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud as an option on its cloud-server PowerEdge-C line.

      • Canonical’s Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Desktop Edition Features Three Years of Support, Online Music Store, New Look and Social Network Integration
      • Discover the new features in Ubuntu 10.04, the Lucid Lynx

        Appearance

        Shiny! That’s how we define Ubuntu’s long hoped-for departure from the dusky brown, and it’s a good look too. In the past few years, all manners of people, those who use Ubuntu and even those who don’t, have expressed their views on the sometime dusty-sometime-dusky-always-brownish ‘Human’ theme. According to Mark Shuttleworth, we’re now in store for five more years of releases with this new theme, which has been christened ‘Light’.

      • Canonical focuses on apps support in Linux upgrade

        Canonical officials are emphasizing software vendor support in the release this week of upgrades to the company’s Ubuntu open source Linux platform.

        The company will make available on Thursday desktop and server versions of Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (Long-Term Support), which offers capabilities for cloud computing as well as consumer-oriented features. Version 10.04 will ship with hundreds of open source applications available at install.

      • Ubuntu – Leading Contender In Linux World?

        There are many Linux distributions out there in the world; some are free (as in beer), some are free (as in speech), some are commercial products (you pay $$$ for them), some are hybrids or combinations thereof. The point here being that there is no ONE Linux to rule them all. The Linux that rules them all is the one chosen by you to use as your primary operating system on your computer.

      • Ubuntu 10.04 Attracts New Software Partners

        First, the good news for Canonical: As a Long Term Support (LTS) release, Ubuntu 10.04 seems to be generating confidence among potential software partners. From Adobe to VMware, Canonical says a lengthy list of software companies and application providers plan to support Ubuntu 10.04.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Android

      • Android Market (Unofficially) Eclipses 50,000 Apps

        android market suggestions1 220×216 Android Market (Unofficially) Eclipses 50,000 AppsAccording to reports, the Android Market has surpassed the 50,000 app mark, demonstrating the rapid growth of the Android operating system.

        The updated total was highlighted by AndroLib, a third party app tracking website that reports there are a total of 50,031 approved binaries at the time of writing.

      • HDigit Dials In And Brings Us An Android-powered DAB Radio

        When Android was being built, many only visualized it as a phone operating system: for a long time, phones were the only things you could find Android running on. Since then, we’ve seen kitchen appliances, cars, netbooks, tablets, robots – you name it, and Android has probably already seen it.

Free Software/Open Source

  • The Financial Physics of Free Software

    In the Internet age, does software have value? Of course software is valuable in the sense that it provides service and is useful, but does software have monetary value?

  • Nokia launches first open source Symbian phone

    The first handset to use the Symbian operating system since it became open source has been announced by Nokia.

  • Mozilla

  • Oracle

    • Understanding Oracle’s ODF Plug-in Pricing: What it Means for OpenOffice.org

      What’s still troubling is that very little is coming out of Oracle in terms of what its plans are for OpenOffice.org itself. Updegrove’s primary concern is ODF, but I’m more interested in its primary working implementation. Dealing with Sun as the primary mover behind OO.org had its pros and cons, but at least you could get some kind of answers out of the company. Oracle is, so far, doling out very little information. I’ve tried to get comments out of a few former Sun folks at Oracle and very little is forthcoming. That doesn’t seem to bode particularly well for OpenOffice.org.

  • BSD

    • OpenSSH 5.5 brings minor improvements

      Version 5.5/5.5p1 of open source SSH (Secure Shell) implementation OpenSSH is primarily a bug fix version and improves logging of authentication using client certificates. The source code should now compile on platforms which do not support the dlopen function for loading dynamic libraries.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Episode 0×26: How Evil is Evil?

      Bradley and Karen discuss whether or not proprietary software is “evil”, mention the new documentary film about patents, and discuss briefly new non-profit filing requirements.

    • All boys dream of being knights, don’t they?

      According to the rationale, the Cross of Merit was awarded for my work for Free Software and Open Standards, starting from my being speaker of the GNU Project, including my very first speech, my work on the Brave GNU World, over driving the creation of Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE), to the work done around the Open Document Format (ODF) and the work for Open Standards in general with a variety of hats. The initial proposal originated in the Foreign Ministry from what I heard, which has been a champion for Free Software and Open Standards, especially the Open Document Format (ODF) for years, resulting in one of the most efficient and strategically sound IT environments of all German ministries.

      So this is the most important message: By awarding this Cross of Merit, the Federal Republic of Germany recognises the importance of both Free Software and Open Standards. After Matthias Ettrich was already awarded the Medal of Merit in November 2009 for his work on KDE, this sends another strong message of support for Free Software and Open Standards and for the importance of the work carried forward by associations such as the Free Software Foundation Europe. This work, by the way, is an ongoing process, and it needs your support. So if you can, please join the Fellowship right now.

  • Licensing

  • Open Access/Content

    • Share Exchange: A Community Center for

      The goal of the Share Exchange is to aggregate sharing tools in a central, persistent place in the community to catalyze a green local economy. If the successes of coworking and The Hub social enterprise community centers are any guide, the Share Exchange may be onto to something. The lesson of The Hub is that grounding a movement in a shared physical place adds tremendous value.

    • Open Access to Development Data: The World Bank’s New Open Data Initiative

      The World Bank announced this week a new open data initiative, which provides free and open access to the Bank’s health and development data, including 2,000 social, economic, financial, institutional, and environmental indicators. The World Development Indicators, the Bank’s most popular statistical resource, consist of over 900 indicators for 200 countries alone, including many that go back to 1960. The Bank has also opened up access to the Global Development Finance, Africa Development Indicators, Global Economic Monitor, and indicators from the Doing Business Report.

    • Web Site Is Building a Searchable Index of Open Courseware

      About 1,800 courses, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are indexed on OCW Search for starters, says the operator, Pierre Far. Polling on the Web site, which went online this week, will determine what courses to add next; those at Stanford University are in the lead, and Mr. Far plans to add them in the next few days.

    • The “fair use economy” is enormous, growing, and endangered by the relatively tiny entertainment industry

      The IT industry’s US lobby group has released a report calculating the size of the “fair use economy” in the US — all the businesses that rely on fair use, including web hosting companies, private schools, search engines and many others. The total for 2007 (the last year for which stats are available) is a whopping $4.7 trillion — one sixth of US GDP — with over 17 million people employed.

    • Conservatives promise to extend FOI Act

      The Conservatives have promised to extend the scope of the Freedom of Information Act within weeks of the general election.

  • Standards/Consortia

    • In Defense of Ogg’s Good Name

      I’d not originally intended to respond to open trolling. The continued urging of many individuals has convinced me it’s important to rebut in some public form. Earnest falsehoods left unchallenged risk being accepted as fact.

    • Why We Need an Open “Like” Standard

      Messina added that he’s “looking forward to what efforts like OpenLike might do to tip back the scales, and bring the potential and value of such simple and meaningful interactions to other social identity providers across the web.” Indeed, that’s something we should all have an interest in.

Leftovers

  • Transatlantic Parliament
  • Science

    • One Billion Euros to Unleash the Power of Information

      Now a diverse group of leading scientists has unveiled an extraordinary plan to meet these challenges through a project inspired by historic enterprises such as the Apollo Project. Their ambitious proposal aims to stimulate an urgent scientific effort of unprecedented scope focused on building a more powerful and accurate science of human systems and their interaction with the global environment. Their efforts will exploit the revolutionary scientific potential of modern computational, communication, and information technologies, backed up by theoretical analysis.

      [...]

      Global System Dynamics and Policy: Another aspect of the project will necessarily focus on the difficult issue of how information coming out of the crisis observatories or other data-intensive centres for social science can be made most helpful to decision makers.

  • Security/Aggression

    • Terrorism is no excuse

      The war on terror has been used by the UK Government as a battering ram to the rights of the citizens of this country. New laws have been passed, including two new terrorism acts (2000 and 2006), which have restricted free speech and the rights of demonstrators to protest, given the police new powers of stop and search, and let’s not forget the 28 days detention and control orders.

    • The “CSI effect”

      Television dramas that rely on forensic science to solve crimes are affecting the administration of justice

    • Why Alan Johnson is wrong about CCTV

      Alan Johnson has just sung out a press conference in praise of CCTV – even wheeling out a poor women who was attacked and whose attacker was caught on camera.

  • Finance

    • Euro keeps Greek rates stable, EU animation claims (DG ECFIN animation)
    • Stocks rebound at opening following sell-off

      Stocks have bounced back in early trading this morning, recovering some of the losses incurred in yesterday’s sell-off, as trader expect good news from Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke this afternoon and pressure builds on Germany to back a Greek bailout.

    • Goldman Sachs’ German Problem

      The man on the hot seat is Fabrice Tourre, the 31-year-old Goldman vice president who is the only individual civilly charged in the case, and his silence about IKB, a German bank that lost $150 million in the collateralized debt obligation Tourre structured, is deafening. It indicates the main vulnerability for Goldman from the SEC’s suit.

    • Goldman Sachs Abacus E-mails Show Hunt for ‘Easiest’ Asset Firm

      Newly disclosed Goldman Sachs Group Inc. internal e-mails cast light on how the investment bank devised collateralized debt obligations called Abacus, including one at the center of a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission fraud lawsuit.

      The e-mails show employees discussed which outside firms would be “easiest” to work with while creating Abacus CDOs to bet against the housing market.

    • Goldman Sachs Investors Sue Over Abacus Disclosures
    • Goldman Sachs Bet Against Its Own Deals, Senate’s Levin Says
    • Goldman Sachs Executives Grilled in Senate Hearing
    • A Few Questions for Goldman Sachs
    • Goldman Sachs faces fraud charges

      Goldman Sachs (GS.N) executives on Tuesday faced the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations to answer questions on the business practices of the investment bank, which is also battling a fraud suit brought by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

    • The Consensus on Big Banks Starts To Move

      When Jackson first challenged the Second Bank, many people thought his concerns about the bank’s powers were excessive. But then Biddle started to fight back, spending money freely to buy congressional affection (and even leading orators) and attempting to contract credit in order to demonstrate that Jackson was hurting America.

      At that point, people understood that Jackson was essentially right. The Second Bank had become so powerful that it could challenge elected executive authority and, if Biddle won, the consequences for democracy would be dire.

    • Goldman Sachs CDO Labeled ‘Shi**y Deal’ by Montag in E-Mail

      Thomas Montag, the former head of sales and trading in the Americas at Goldman Sachs Group Inc., called a set of mortgage-linked investments sold by his firm “one shi**y deal,” according to an excerpt from internal e-mails released by Senate lawmakers.

      The transaction was Timberwolf Ltd., a $1 billion collateralized debt obligation holding pieces of other CDOs, according to a statement from the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. The CDO also included optimistic side-bets on the performance of CDOs, derivatives in which the firm took the opposite pessimistic side in “many” cases, the panel said.

    • Here’s How Spitzer Might Handle Fabulous Goldman: Susan Antilla
    • Goldman Turns to New Lobbying Playbook for Washington Battle

      Goldman Sachs Group Inc., which for years saw no need to play a traditional Washington lobbying game, is deploying former lawmakers and crisis specialists as it tries to tamp down the political firestorm threatening its well- honed brand.

    • Goldman Sachs Lawyer Advises Long Pauses, Rambling Answers

      A lawyer reportedly helping Goldman Sachs executives prepare for a Senate hearing today revealed his usual strategy for congressional hearings in an interview last year.

    • Full Report: The Economic Elite Vs. The People of the United States of America

      The government unemployment rate is deceptive on several levels. It doesn’t count people who are “involuntary part-time workers,” meaning workers who are working part-time but want to find full-time work. It also doesn’t count “discouraged workers,” meaning long-term unemployed people who lost hope and don’t consistently look for work. As time goes by, more and more people stop consistently looking for work and are discounted from the unemployment figure. For instance, in January, 1.1 million workers were eliminated from the unemployment total because they were “officially” labeled “discouraged workers.” So instead of the number rising, we will hear deceptive reports about unemployment leveling off.

    • Real House Prices and the Unemployment Rate

      The unemployment rate peak in 2009 is likely, but not certain.

      In the early ’80s, real house prices declined until the unemployment rate peaked, and then increased sluggishly for a few years. Following the late 1980s housing bubble, real house prices declined for several years after the unemployment rate peaked.

    • Democrats taking a third run at banking rules

      Fresh off a confrontation with Goldman Sachs executives, Democrats are mounting another effort to police the freewheeling Wall Street ways that they say helped bring on the worst recession since the Great Depression.

    • Obama takes heartland economic tour to Mo., Ill.
    • Palin on Goldman

      Leave it to Sarah Palin to come up with the solution. This is from a post on her Facebook page. I advise everyone to read it, since it’s a highly amusing piece of propaganda…

    • Analysis: Deficit fix painful, inaction’s worse

      The costs of solving the federal deficit problem are more than many people want to pay – higher taxes on a wide swath of Americans and cuts in benefit programs that reach into millions of homes.

    • Larry Summers: “Mistakes Were Made,” But Not By Me

      President Obama’s chief economic adviser, Larry Summers, was interviewed on PBS late last week about the state of play on financial reform. In an odd, shifty-eyed discussion, Summers admits “mistakes were made,” but none by him.

  • Censorship/Privacy/Civil Rights

    • ‘Scrapping ID cards will cost jobs in Durham City’

      LIB Dem plans to scrap ID cards would cost jobs in Durham, the Home Secretary claimed yesterday.

    • The Zhuanghe Kneeling Protest Incident

      Liu Xiaoyuan’s blog recently described two instances of citizens kneeling before officials, asking for change. The first was “a woman who kneeled before the Municipal Party Committee Secretary of Nanping, Fujian, to communicate a grievance.” The result was that she was “taken into administrative detention.”

    • Data collected by Google cars

      Why is Google collecting this data?
      The data which we collect is used to improve Google’s location based services, as well as services provided by the Google Geo Location API. For example, users of Google Maps for Mobile can turn on “My Location” to identify their approximate location based on cell towers and WiFi access points which are visible to their device. Similarly, users of sites like Twitter can use location based services to add a geo location to give greater context to their messages.

      Can this data be used by third parties?
      Yes–but the only data which Google discloses to third parties through our Geo Location API is a triangulated geo code, which is an approximate location of the user’s device derived from all location data known about that point. At no point does Google publicly disclose MAC addresses from its database (in contrast with some other providers in Germany and elsewhere).

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Imitation Isn’t Just The Sincerest Form Of Flattery; It Can Be An Important Business Strategy

      We’ve pointed out this kind of “cargo cult copying” in the past as well. Copying is not nearly as “easy” as some make it out to be, because those doing the “copying” often are only copying the superficial aspects, without recognizing the underlying reasons why something works. It’s why IBM failed at copying Microsoft years ago. It’s why Microsoft failed at copying Google. They tried to directly imitate on the surface, rather than understanding the underlying aspects of what’s happening.

    • Saving Clay Shirky

      Unstructured P2P systems are not only capable of delivering this kind of volume, they have been doing so for over a decade, often under the radar of the established companies, which only sit up and notice when some of their stuff starts being shared across them.

      In a way, the fact that this could be overlooked is a neat summary of what’s going on here: the changes Shirky describes have already happened, but not everyone has noticed.

    • Copyrights

      • Council seeks backdoor deal on copyright extention

        Why the clandestine approach on the Council side? Why don’t they reference the correct dossier name and procedure? I assume you may find the answer in the delicate substance of the proposal. I remember I met an economist in Parliament who tried to get the results of his research to the attention of MEPs, and basically saw the dossier as a great scam.

        The dossier became widely known informally as the “Cliff Richard pension fund” because it was promoted by aging UK rock musicians, a kind of special gift to the music industry by the outgoing Commissioner. I haven’t monitored the dossier any further. In any case, outrageous policy making.

      • “Copyright on the Web: Looking for a Snap Answer to a Fundamental Conflict.”
      • The first mails HADOPI would leave without security software (updated)
      • Empty your library

        If you’ve read one of my books, thanks. I write them to be read, so without you, it would be a pointless exercise.

        I’m asking a favor: Would you give your copy (or lend, I’m fine either way) of Linchpin away?

        Go find someone you care about, hand them the book and insist they read it. I’d consider that a gift of the first order, and I hope they will too.

    • WIPO

      • New WIPO Development Agenda Group Seeks Transformation Of UN Agency

        It is traditional within WIPO to form negotiating groups, usually along geographic lines but also on basis of a common position. There has also long been a cross-regional group of developed nations – the so-called “Group B” – in which developed countries holding most of the world’s IP rights negotiates as a bloc.

      • Creative Commons statement at WIPO CDIP

        As mentioned already, Creative Commons strongly supports the work of this Committee. We are encouraged in particular by the work in Technology Transfer and in studying the public domain, and also welcome the work of the SCCR in “Limitations and Exceptions for Educational Activities”. We would like to point out that CC is creating a prototype tool for marking and tagging public domain works, which we expect to have that out by mid Summer 2010. Any work on tools to facilitate the ID of and access to PD content must interoperate and have buy-in from all stakeholders who possess information about and can facilitate the marking of such content.

      • RLSLOG Pulled Offline After Universal Music Complaint

        RLSLOG, one of the world’s most popular release news sites, has been pulled offline by its German hosting company following a takedown request from Universal Music. The site, which has never hosted any copyrighted material on its servers, is currently looking for a new home outside Germany.

    • ACTA

    • Digital Economy Bill

      • Wi-Fi broadband ‘loophole’ in Digital Economy

        Last week, it was reported that Nick Clegg had suggested that if the Liberal Democrats win the election they will repeal the digital economy bill.

      • UK election: ask your candidates if they’ll repeal the Digital Economy Act
      • BPI issue sunny news release, make themselves cry to stop us thinking it’s alright now

        Great news from the BPI: Despite the UK economy having been in recession last year, the UK music industry saw an increase in sales. In money terms:

        A strong fourth quarter and increased digital income streams offset the reduced sales of physical formats as the UK recorded music market reported a modest 1.4% annual increase in total trade income for 2009 of £928.8m, BPI’s annual survey of industry income revealed today.

        Brilliant news, eh? Champagne all round, barkeep and…

        Oh, hang on: if digital sales are growing so strongly, then that kind-of makes the arguments that without supertight new copyright laws, the music industry will vanish look like a bit of a fib. Quick, everyone, turn those grins upside-down…

Clip of the Day

NASA Connect – PW – Meteorology (1/10/1998)


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  10. Shelston IP Keeps Pressuring IP Australia to Allow Software Patents and Harm Software Development

    Shelston IP wants exactly the opposite of what's good for Australia; it just wants what's good for itself, yet it habitually pretends to speak for a productive industry (nothing could be further from the truth)



  11. Is Andy Ramer's Departure the End of Cantor Fitzgerald's Patent Trolls-Feeding Operations and Ambitions?

    The managing director of the 'IP' group at Cantor Fitzgerald is leaving, but it does not yet mean that patent trolls will be starved/deprived access to patents



  12. EPO Hoards Billions of Euros (Taken From the Public), Decreases Quality to Get More Money, Reduces Payments to Staff

    The EPO continues to collect money from everyone, distributes bogus/dubious patents that usher patent trolls into Europe (to cost European businesses billions in the long run), and staff of the EPO faces more cuts while EPO management swims in cash and perks



  13. Short: Calling Battistelli's Town (Where He Works) “Force for Innovation” to Justify the Funneling of EPO Funds to It

    How the EPO‘s management ‘explained’ (or sought to rationalise) to staff its opaque decision to send a multi-million, one-day ceremony to Battistelli’s own theatre only weeks before he leaves



  14. Short: EPO Bribes the Media and Then Brags About the Paid-for Outcome to Staff

    The EPO‘s systematic corruption of the media at the expense of EPO stakeholders — not to mention hiring of lawyers to bully media which exposes EPO corruption — in the EPO’s own words (amended by us)



  15. Short: EPO's “Working Party for Quality” is to Quality What the “Democratic People's Republic of Korea” is to Democracy

    To maintain the perception (illusion) that the EPO still cares about patent quality — and in order to disseminate this lie to EPO staff — a puff piece with the above heading/photograph was distributed to thousands of examiners in glossy paper form



  16. Short: This Spring's Message From the EPO's President (Corrected)

    A corrected preface from the Liar in Chief, the EPO's notoriously crooked and dishonest President



  17. Short: Highly Misleading and Unscientific Graphics From the EPO for an Illusion of Growth

    A look at the brainwash that EPO management is distributing to staff and what's wrong with it



  18. Short: EPO Explains to Examiners Why They Should and Apparently Can Grant Software Patents (in Spite of EPC)

    Whether it calls it "CII" or "ICT" or "Industry 4.0" or "4IR", the EPO's management continues to grant software patents and attempts to justify this to itself (and to staff)



  19. Links 21/4/2018: Linux 4.9.95, FFmpeg 4.0, OpenBSD Foundation 2018 Fundraising Campaign

    Links for the day



  20. As USPTO Director, Andrei Iancu Gives Three Months for Public Comments on 35 U.S.C. § 101 (Software Patenting Impacted)

    Weeks after starting his job as head of the US patent office, to our regret but not to our surprise, Iancu asks whether to limit examiners' ability to reject abstract patent applications citing 35 U.S.C. § 101 (relates to Alice and Mayo)



  21. In Keith Raniere v Microsoft Both Sides Are Evil But for Different Reasons

    Billing for patent lawyers reveals an abusive strategy from Microsoft, which responded to abusive patent litigation (something which Microsoft too has done for well over a decade)



  22. Links 20/4/2018: Atom 1.26, MySQL 8.0

    Links for the day



  23. Links 19/4/2018: Mesa 17.3.9 and 18.0.1, Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas, Elections for openSUSE Board

    Links for the day



  24. The Patent Microcosm, Patent Trolls and Their Pressure Groups Incite a USPTO Director Against the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) and Section 101/Alice

    As one might expect, the patent extremists continue their witch-hunt and constant manipulation of USPTO officials, whom they hope to compel to become patent extremists themselves (otherwise those officials are defamed, typically until they're fired or decide to resign)



  25. Microsoft's Lobbying for FRAND Pays Off as Microsoft-Connected Patent Troll Conversant (Formerly MOSAID) Goes After Android OEMs in Europe

    The FRAND (or SEP) lobby seems to have caused a lot of monopolistic patent lawsuits; this mostly affects Linux-powered platforms such as Android, Tizen and webOS and there are new legal actions from Microsoft-connected patent trolls



  26. To Understand Why People Say That Lawyers are Liars Look No Further Than Misleading Promotion of Software Patents

    Some of the latest misleading claims from the patent microcosm, which is only interested in lots and lots of patents (its bread and butter is monopolies after all) irrespective of their merit, quality, and desirability



  27. When News About the EPO is Dominated by Sponsored 'Reports' and Press Releases Because Publishers Are Afraid of (or Bribed by) the EPO

    The lack of curiosity and genuine journalism in Europe may mean that serious abuses (if not corruption) will go unreported



  28. The Boards of Appeal at the European Patent Organisation (EPO) Complain That They Are Understaffed, Not Just Lacking the Independence They Depend on

    The Boards of Appeal have released a report and once again they openly complain that they're unable to do their job properly, i.e. patent quality cannot be assured



  29. Links 18/4/2018: New Fedora 27 ISOs, Nextcloud Wins German Government Contract

    Links for the day



  30. Guest Post: Responding to Your Recent Posting “The European Patent Office Will Never Hold Its Destroyers Accountable”

    In France, where Battistelli does not enjoy diplomatic immunity, he can be held accountable like his "padrone" recently was


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