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09.21.19

IBM Cannot Become a True Friend of Free Software Because of Its Current Patent Policy

Posted in Free/Libre Software, IBM, OIN, Patents, Red Hat at 1:09 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

To make peace with the Free software movement IBM may need to re-balance or re-calibrate its priorities

A balance

Summary: IBM needs to quit bullying people/companies with software patents; that would help towards appeasement of IBM critics and sceptics

AT risk of sounding like a broken record, let’s make a point absolutely clear and be upfront about it. Our Openwashing Reports have often mentioned IBM as an habitual faker and culprit; IBM is, at its core, still a proprietary software company, unlike Red Hat. But IBM is bad for two more reasons: 1) it lobbies for software patents and 2) it shakes down companies with such patents. When it comes to patent policy and practice, IBM is hardly better than Microsoft; it just targets GNU/Linux a lot less (if at all); it gave us OIN.

Techrights would rather not spend much time or dedicate much space to IBM criticism because it’s hardly the foremost threat to Software Freedom; it’s mostly a threat to a sane patent policy/law.”It seems safe to believe or to think many Red Hat employees already know what IBM is and does (IBM’s patent shakedown is decades-old). The rest are in denial about it or choose to say nothing, even among themselves. Henrion brought up a recent court document [PDF] and stated that “IBM is a software patent bully,” quoting from the corresponding document: “Method for presenting advertising in an interactive service, Method for simultaneous display of multiple object categories, Method for a runtime user account creation operation within a SSO process in a federated computing…”

We discussed this over IRC on Thursday. The IRC logs will unfortunately not be ready for publication until the end of this year (we used to publish these daily, then weekly, now it’s 3 times a year in large lumps).

Another person wrote: “IBM published today a patent application on “software controlled ad-avatars (or bots)” for advertising in virtual worlds. Relatable bot profiles include “Jenny Teen,” “Joe Geek,” and “Travis Cowboy.” US 20190287119.”

There’s also a picture there.

Techrights would rather not spend much time or dedicate much space to IBM criticism because it’s hardly the foremost threat to Software Freedom; it’s mostly a threat to a sane patent policy/law. We hope that Red Hat can influence IBM positively (rather than the other way around).

When Patent ‘Professionals’ Sound Like Children Who Learned to Parrot Some Intentionally-Misleading Buzzwords, Myths and Lies

Posted in America, Europe, Law, Patents at 12:34 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Pencil/crayons

Summary: With buzzwords like “AI” and misleading terms like “IP” the litigation zealots are trying to convince themselves (and the public) that software is a physical thing and a “property” which needs “protecting” from “theft”; it doesn’t seem to bother these people that copyright law already covers software

HOW can a patent office seriously assert that it is serious about innovation when everyone who meets the officials comes from law firms and rarely has any scientific background? If this system’s inception truly dates back to need to advance science, shouldn’t these officials focus on actual scientists?

This may sound like a shallow observation, but it perfectly describes the pattern we’ve been seeing at the European Patent Office (EPO) under António Campinos and his predecessor Battistelli (neither of whom has any background in the sciences). Seeing how the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) wants to work around 35 U.S.C. § 101, we’re nowadays witnessing a similar trend in America too. A resurgence of software patents in Europe poses risk to US (case)law as well. We hope that American readers understand that. The EPO openly brags about objectives like spreading software patents to the whole world. We’ve covered this before.

Entryism and Cronyism

The litigation ‘industry’ appears to have convinced the world’s patent offices (or infiltrated these offices) to deviate and depart from the law in order to simply increase the pace of granting (patent-granting), disguising old things with a fresher coat of buzzwords and hype; this has been the case in Europe for a number of years and it’s now being imitated by the United States, whose administration comes from the litigation firms themselves. The issue occurs at two levels typically; one is the patent office, the other being the lawmakers (law firms pay them money to alter patent law to the detriment of science).

We’re troubled to see who’s shaping today’s laws in Europe, judging by who submits recommendations to the EPO and whose submissions the EPO amplifies the most. Mitscherlich PartmbB’s Sebastian Roth has just written about “European Opposition Proceedings” (Board of Appeal (EPO) decision T 1087/15) and his colleague Martin Koerberc wrote about “EPO Opposition & Appeal” — something that significantly increased in number in recent years (soared even) due to significant declines in patent quality. The EPO does not seem to mind all this; it profits from it. The adherence to law does not matter much, either. The EPO ignores courts anyway. It’s really, really bad.

Generally speaking, corruption at the EPO is the world’s eighth wonder. Wonderful to see nobody held accountable. Ever. One would assume that accountability exists in Europe (a relatively developed continent, constitutionally speaking), but the EPO is an island and nobody is able to justify its immunity, which is regularly abused. All the EPO wants is lots and lots of patents and no rights for staff. None at all.

There are many facets or aspects to the EPO’s abuses, but here we focus on patent scope rather than labour rights, immunity and so on.

‘Kids’ Learn About the Mighty “HEY HI”

Let’s start with WIPR’s article about AIPPI with its Echo Chamber Congress, where liars and lawyers prop up “HEY HI” (AI) hype in order to promote illegal patents that aren’t valid. “While the number of patent applications relating to artificial intelligence has soared in recent years,” it says, “there is still some confusion around the patentability of the technology, as lawyers discussed at the AIPPI World Congress.”

What they mean by “AI” is just some old algorithms spun as “AI” for the sake of bypassing rigid restrictions. The EPO welcomes such bypassing tactics; it compels examiners to fall for these.

“AI is not patentable,” Benjamin Henrion wrote in response to this, “as software is not patentable, under the EPC and under Alice. Till the patent offices ignore the courts and the law… [] When the French courts will say that AI is nothing more th[a]n an unpatentable computer program.”

This alludes to what happened in the past. The EPO just ignores all caselaw that does not suit patent maximalists. In other word, the EPO arrogantly breaks the law, ignoring even those who highlight the issue. Why is this being tolerated and how long for? Until the Office collapses? Until patent certainty is so low that there’s decrease in ‘demand’? The number of applications for European Patents is already decreasing. The EPO’s management very well knows that, so its response is to power the patent bar further and further. It does so even when it’s blatantly and obviously illegal. It’s like banks that ‘grant’ more and more ‘toxic loans’ just to fake growth. They don’t let themselves be too worried about the imminent or the inevitable collapse. That will be “someone else’s problem,” they must be telling themselves. In the case of banks the public typically foots the bill for all this corruption and greed, whereas in the case of patents the wrongly-accused parties (businesses and individuals) bear the cost.

“Our member states need an Office that can be the advocate of patents in Europe and promote the development of an effective patent system,” the EPO wrote last week. But the EPO is intentionally granting illegal patents that are proven, based on studies, to harm innovation. There is a body of scholarly work that they ignore and at the same time they offer bribes to academics willing to manufacture ‘studies’ which support EPO agenda. This is as unscientific as it gets. It’s something to be expected from oil companies, not a monopoly on Europe-wide patent grants. What makes this ever more obscene is that the EPO ceased to even hide this; it is openly advertising its sponsorship of self-serving ‘studies’. Not even oil companies are foolish enough to do this (one has to dig and inquire a little). Not too long ago the EPO manufactured some ‘greenwashing’ propaganda. which it spread as recently as a couple of days ago*.

Pretending Patents Are ‘Property’

Other than “HEY HI” there’s also the “AYE PEE” (IP) hype. There is no such thing as “AYE PEE”. Lumping together trade secrets, copyright, trademark and patent law assures a misleading and pointless discussion. Society should abandon lawyers’ propaganda terms and use more meaningful vocabulary instead.

The other day the EPO wrote: “Together with national patent offices and the @IPRHelpdesk, we’ll be sharing our expertise on how sound IP management can boost your business at these seminars…”

So-called ‘IP’ management…

The EPO retweeted another thing to that affect and wrote separately about “an opportunity to improve technology commercialisation with open-innovation strategies facilitated by IP.”

Here they go with ‘IP’ again; the EPO does only patents. Strictly so. Unlike UK-IPO, USPTO and so on.

Tosshan Ramgolam published on the same day something entitled “Introduction to the IP Education Series”.

When you say “IP” that already means that you are intentionally dishonest and not interested in education, only propaganda terms like “piracy”.

In the past couple of days the EPO also mentioned “SMEs” quite a lot (even by its own bad standards). Trying hard to distract from the harm caused to them by the EPO? Without a so-called ‘professional representative’ (i.e. very expensive law firm) the SME is lost in the haze**, as we’ve shown before, outspending many of its practical operations. Something like the UPC would make things orders of magnitude worse for SMEs.

Lies Told by Team UPC ‘Kids’

Then, retweeted by EPO was its Vice-President (from UK-IPO) saying: “Great opportunity to meet UK users of the @EPOorg at the @TheCIPA Congress.”

The EPO is in bed with Team UPC, looking to harm SMEs all around the world. CIPA is a predatory body of patent maximalists. Also retweeted by EPO was CIPA’s own tweet: “We’re delighted to welcome Steve Rowan, Vice-President of @EPOorg, to give the morning keynote at #CIPACongress2019″

Totally inappropriate for the EPO to be with Team UPC and CIPA as it’s showing what the EPO basically became — a tool of the litigation zealots.

No wonder the EPO continues to stubbornly advocate patents on just about everything. The relationship between CIPA and UK-IPO is also troubling and at times disturbing. It’s like letting makers of bombs have a say on foreign policy.

Speaking of Team UPC, here’s some new propaganda from the site that does, in fact, act like its think tank (for a number of years). To quote: “Speaking to Managing IP, Tim Moss, CEO of the UKIPO, discusses Brexit planning, the Unified Patent Court and expanding the office’s international reach…”

To better understand where they’re going with this read this other new article full of intentional lies. Those lies were told in this new event as if UPC is “just a matter of time” (i.e. the same old lies) when in fact it is dead and cannot go on without the UK. To quote the relevant part:

The Unified Patent Court (UPC) was discussed as a potential Brexit-related concern. With the UPC’s fate lingering in Germany’s Constitutional Court, audience members speculated on how the timing of the court’s decision might be affected by Brexit.

Responding to an audience member’s concern, Williams said any conversation about whether or not the UK – which has ratified the UPC Agreement – would be part of an operational UPC would depend on when Germany issues a decision.

“In a perfect world you will like us to have the discussion while we are in the EU; logically that is a more pleasant environment. If we exit in October … the conversation is in a more different atmosphere. We are sure of the benefits of the UK to be part of the UPC. My experience says if there is a political will you will find a legal solution.”

Nettleton added that from an industry perspective the UPC would be much stronger with UK involvement.

“It was a surprise to me that I heard the UK would still want to participate in the UPC after Brexit. But then again, after Brexit, nothing can surprise you,” he said.

This is sheer lunacy; notice how they spread the infamous lies. They’re like kids telling a lie, telling others what they want to believe. How can they get away with this?
_______
* As a new example of this, consider a new tweet that said: “Patent applications in the EPO’s databases contain significant amounts of information relating to sustainable technologies. Scientists can make use of this wealth of knowledge in their work on developing new technologies against #climatechange.” In reality, when the EPO grants monopolies on these things fewer people will be legally permitted to tackle climate change. But the EPO won’t let these inconvenient facts get in the way.

** Kluwer Patent Blog, citing a case dated 18 June 2019, says:

A request for re-establishment should be filed within two months of the date of removal of non-compliance. This date may be the date on which the applicant became aware of the missed due date, even if the professional representative did receive the EPO communications mentioning the failure to comply with the deadline.

09.20.19

The European Parliament Needs to Become More Outspoken About EPO Abuses

Posted in Europe, Patents at 11:30 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

“I’m happy we’re on the same very unanimous position,” said Elżbieta Bieńkowska.

Elżbieta Bieńkowska
Elżbieta Bieńkowska – Photo by Adam Nurkiewicz, CC BY-SA 3.0

Summary: There are few encouraging signs in Europe right now because the EPO’s disregard for patent law (striving to just grant as many patents as possible) earned it much-needed backlash from the European Parliament

AS we’ve mentioned the other day, the European Patent Office (EPO) belatedly faces some hostile fire — not the usual friendly fire — from the European Parliament (same grouping as the EC and EU, unlike the EPO itself). This is a much-needed, however belated, scrutiny. Yesterday EURACTIV wrote about it:

In a new episode of the longstanding legal saga on biotech inventions, the European Parliament delivered a reprimand to the European Patent Office (EPO) reaffirming that tomatoes, broccoli and other plants obtained by essentially biological processes must not be patentable.

The non-legislative resolution adopted in Strasbourg on Thursday (19 September) is scathing about the EPO, saying their internal decision-making rules “must not undermine democratic political control of European patent law and its interpretation and the legislator’s intent.”

The EPO, which is not an EU body, opened the possibility of granting patent protection to conventionally-bred plants in March 2015, after attempts to register tomatoes with reduced water content by the consumer goods giant Unilever and broccoli growing with a selective increase of the anticarcinogenic glucosinolates by the global agrochemical company Syngenta.

[...]

The European Parliament has now jumped on the legal controversy, calling on the Commission to reinstate legal certainty, as it is affecting innovation and competitiveness in the European plant-breeding and farming sectors.

“It is important to deliver a very clear political message on this,” said German Christian-democrat lawmaker Norbert Lins, chair of the Agriculture parliamentary committee which led the initiative of drafting the resolution.

“I’m happy we’re on the same very unanimous position,” said Industry Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska during the plenary debate on Monday, adding that the Commission will try to take a very active role to restore “legal certainty and common sense” on the matter.

Here’s another new article. “This article is brought to you in association with the European Parliament,” it says.

Fruit, vegetables or animals obtained from conventional breeding processes, such as crossing, must not become patentable, MEPs said in a non-legislative resolution on Thursday.

Patent-free access to biological plant material is essential to boost innovation and competitiveness of the European plant-breeding and farming sectors, to develop new varieties, improve food security and tackle climate change, MEPs stressed in the resolution. Furthermore, access to genetic resources must not be restricted, as this could lead to a situation where a few multinational companies have a monopoly on plant breeding material, to the detriment of EU farmers and consumers, many MEPs said in Monday’s plenary debate.

We welcome this move from the Parliament. It helps show that the EU isn’t just the “yes man” of the EPO; Bieńkowska is mentioned and her position on the EPO has been mostly the subject of scrutiny in prior years, e.g. [1, 2, 3, 4]. We strongly encourage European citizens to press their MEPs on this topic. There are many things at stake; for instance, remind Parliament that the EPO vainly ignores its position on software patenting as well. It’s part of an ugly pattern — one that certainly ought to end.

09.19.19

Links 19/9/2019: German Federal Ministry of the Interior Wants FOSS, Top Snaps Named

Posted in News Roundup at 4:06 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • GNU/Linux

    • German ministry hellbent on taking back control of ‘digital sovereignty’, cutting dependency on Microsoft

      The Federal Ministry of the Interior (Bundesministerium des Innern or BMI) in Germany says it will reduce reliance on specific IT suppliers, especially Microsoft, in order to strengthen its “digital sovereignty”.

      In an official statement, the Federal Minister of the Interior Horst Seehofer states that “in order to ensure our digital sovereignty, we want to reduce dependencies on individual IT providers. We are also considering alternative programs to replace certain software. This will be done in close coordination with other EU countries.”

      BMI commissioned a strategic market analysis from consultants PwC, resulting in a paper that was published last month. The paper examines the risks inherent in IT dependency on commercial software vendors, with a particular focus on Microsoft because of the heavy use of its products and the way they are interconnected, especially Microsoft Office, Windows, Windows Server and Office 365.

    • Desktop

      • Buying Huawei: A wolf in sheep’s clothing?

        Creating a rival for its key technology at the level Huawei’s is suggesting is unprecedented, yet other businesses have either had to give their intellectual property away or, taken a stance that is generally counter to good business: AT&T and its UNIX operating system in the 1970s is a good example. Google has famously done rather well by making its Android operating system (OS) Open Source, and Tesla, with founder Elon Musk stating he: “will not initiate patent lawsuits against anyone who, in good faith, wants to use our technology.”

        However, could this move by Huawei be little more than an attempt to protect its future profitability in a mobile market that is about to explode once again as 5G ushers in a new age of connectivity? And Huawei is about to release their own OS, which they hope will rival Android. There is more hope than substance, as users still won’t be able to use many of their favourite apps when the latest Huawei handsets are launched.

        Don’t forget, the current block on US firms selling technology to Huawei includes Apps from Google. Huawei smartphones might use the Open Source Android OS, but their Apps are banned from export due to the US’s arguments that this technology could be a national security issue. So, Huawei’s 5G handsets wouldn’t have YouTube or Gmail for instance. Is Mr. Zhengfei’s offer a backhanded way to get this ban lifted? As the Economist points out, 50% of Huawei sales came from selling its smartphones. All eyes are on how Huawei’s new Mate 30 performs in the marketplace.

    • Server

      • Linux Container Technology Explained (Contributed)

        State and local governments’ IT departments increasingly rely on DevOps practices and agile development methodologies to improve service delivery and to help maintain a culture of constant collaboration, iteration, and flexibility among all stakeholders and teams.

        However, when an IT department adopts agile and DevOps practices and methodologies, traditional IT problems still need to be solved. One long-standing problem is “environmental drift,” when the code and configurations for applications and their underlying infrastructure can vary between different environments. State and local IT teams often lack the tools necessary to mitigate the effects of environmental drift, which can hamper collaboration and agility efforts.

      • IBM

        • DevNation Live Bengaluru: Java microservices and how to become cloud-native

          Our first DevNation Live regional event was held in Bengaluru, India in July. This free technology event focused on open source innovations, with sessions presented by elite Red Hat technologists.

          Many of us are on a journey from traditional monolithic applications to a more distributed cloud-native microservices architecture. In this session, Burr Sutter discusses the key microservices architecture principles and explains how and why to evolve to this approach. You’ll learn how to become a new cloud-native developer and architect.

        • Red Hat UK ranked fourth in Best Workplaces In Tech 2019

          At Red Hat we love to celebrate our people and culture, and it is with great pleasure that we can share that Red Hat in the United Kingdom has been honoured in the Great Place to Work awards, ranking fourth in the UK’s Best Workplaces in Tech 2019, large company category.

          Great Place to Work identifies thriving successful workplaces through a rigorous methodology that includes its Trust Index survey, which looks at the employee experience, and its Culture Audit, which assesses leadership and people practices. Red Hat reached the number four spot thanks to its passion to deliver a great employee experience and to enable a more innovative and productive environment for all. Great Place to Work recognises Red Hat UK as somewhere employees trust the people they work for, have pride in the work they do and enjoy the people they work with.

        • Custom Grafana dashboards for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 4

          OpenShift administrators often face the same challenges as other system administrators: “I need a tool that will monitor the health of my system.” Yet, traditional monitoring tools often fall short in their visibility of an OpenShift cluster. Thus, a typical OpenShift monitoring stack includes Prometheus for systems as well as service monitoring, and Grafana for analyzing and visualizing metrics.

          Often, administrators are looking to write custom queries and create custom dashboards in Grafana. However, the Grafana instance that is provided with the monitoring stack, along with its dashboards, is read-only. Enter the community-powered Grafana operator provided by OperatorHub.

        • IBM will soon launch a 53-qubit quantum computer

          IBM continues to push its quantum computing efforts forward and today announced that it will soon make a 53-qubit quantum computer available to clients of its IBM Q Network. The new system, which is scheduled to go online in the middle of next month, will be the largest universal quantum computer available for external use yet.

          The new machine will be part of IBM’s new Quantum Computation Center in New York State, which the company also announced today. The new center, which is essentially a data center for IBM’s quantum machines, will also feature five 20-qubit machines, but that number will grow to 14 within the next month. IBM promises a 95% service availability for its quantum machines.

    • Audiocasts/Shows

    • Kernel Space

      • Linux 5.2.16

        I’m announcing the release of the 5.2.16 kernel.

        All users of the 5.2 kernel series must upgrade.

        The updated 5.2.y git tree can be found at:

        git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.2.y

        and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:

        https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s…

      • Linux 4.19.74
      • Linux 4.14.145
      • Linux Kernel 5.3

        Linux 5.3 was released over the weekend, which means it’s time for our usual “where does Collabora stand in this picture?” tour.

        As has been the case for several years now, Collabora keeps being an active contributor to the Linux project, with 77 commits authored by Collaborans merged in this release.

        On the media subsystem front, André Almeida and Helen Koike kept working on the Virtual Media Controller (VIMC) driver. The most notable change in this release being the addition of a VIMC entry to the media subsystem doc, centralizing all information about this virtual driver.

      • Graphics Stack

        • Intel’s Gallium3D OpenGL Driver Taps Another Optimization – ~32% For GFXBench

          Intel’s new OpenGL Linux driver, their Gallium3D-based “Iris” implementation that is aiming to be the default before year’s end, continues making striking progress.

          Just this past week when testing the very latest Mesa code for this Intel Gallium3D driver I was quite impressed with it near universally being faster than their existing “i965″ Mesa driver. For some OpenGL workloads, this Gallium3D driver is significantly faster than the driver it’s set to replace for Broadwell “Gen 8″ graphics and newer.

        • Mesa’s Disk Cache Code Now Better Caters To 4+ Core Systems

          Most Linux gamers these days should be running at least quad-core systems so Mesa 19.3 has been updated to reflect that reality with the number of CPU threads used by their disk cache.

        • Performance-Boosting DFSM Support Flipped On & Off For RADV Vulkan Driver

          Back in July of last year the RADV Vulkan driver enabled primitive binning and DFSM for this open-source Radeon Vulkan driver. Well, it thought it enabled DFSM support and paired with the binning did yield a minor performance benefit at the time for Raven Ridge APUs. But now it turns out the DFSM support wasn’t properly wired up and is now addressed but is currently introducing a performance regression.

          RADV developer Bas Nieuwenhuizen added the actual DFSM (Deterministic Finite State Machine) support and mirrors the behavior of the RadeonSI OpenGL driver. With the DFSM support he found that it doubles the fill-rate of one of his test samples from around 16 to 32 pixels/cycles for Raven Ridge.

        • The Valve-funded shader compiler ‘ACO’ is being queued up for inclusion in Mesa directly (updated: merged)

          Back in early July, Valve announced their work on a new AMD GPU shader compiler for Mesa named ACO and now they’re trying to get it pulled into Mesa directly.

          Their main aims with ACO were to get the “best-possible code generation for game shaders, and fastest-possible compilation speed” and to replace the currently used shader compiler from the massive LLVM project. It has certainly seemed promising, improving both shader compile time resulting in less stuttering and so helping to improve overall FPS and smoothness in Linux games when played on supported AMD GPUs.

        • Valve’s ACO Shader Compiler For The Mesa Radeon Vulkan Driver Just Landed

          It was just two days ago that Valve’s performance-focused “ACO” shader compiler was submitted for review to be included in Mesa for the “RADV” Radeon Vulkan driver. Just minutes ago that new shader compiler back-end was merged for Mesa 19.3.

          ACO, short for the AMD COmpiler, is the effort led by Valve at creating a more performant and optimized shader compiler for the Radeon Linux graphics driver. Besides trying to generate the fastest shaders, ACO also aims to provide speedy shader compilation too, as an alternative to the AMDGPU LLVM shader compiler back-end. Initially ACO is for the RADV Vulkan driver but it may be brought to the RadeonSI OpenGL driver in the future. At the moment ACO is in good shape for Volcanic Islands through Vega while the Navi shader support is in primitive form.

    • Benchmarks

      • Running The AMD “ABBA” Ryzen 3000 Boost Fix Under Linux With 140 Tests

        Last week AMD’s AGESA “ABBA” update began shipping with a fix to how the boost clock frequencies are handled in hopes of better achieving the rated boost frequencies for Ryzen 3000 series processors. I’ve been running some tests of an updated ASUS BIOS with this adjusted boost clock behavior to see how it performs under Linux with a Ryzen 9 3900X processor.

        The AGESA 1.0.0.3 ABBA update has an improved boost clock frequency algorithm along with changes to the idle state handling. This AGESA update should better position AMD Ryzen 3000 processors with the boost clock behavior expected by users with better hitting the maximum boost frequency and doing so more aggressively.

    • Instructionals/Technical

    • Wine or Emulation

      • WineHQ 4.16 Released, Install Using Official Repository in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

        Wine lets you run Windows software on other operating systems. With Wine, you can install and run these applications just like you would in Windows. Wine enables Linux, Mac, FreeBSD, and Solaris users to run Windows applications without a copy of Microsoft Windows. Wine is free software under constant development. Other platforms may benefit as well. The new release carries new features and bugs fixes.

    • Games

      • Valve have released two more experiments into Steam Labs

        Ready to be a test subject once again and possible find some new games to play? Valve have released another two tools enabling you to find something to keep you busy and keep boredom away.

        The first up is the Deep Dive, developed by Lars Doucet (Defender’s Quest), it’s an extension of the work they did on their own Diving Bell Prototype. It allows you to click through games and be presented by more based on what you’ve clicked, however it comes with a number of improvements over the prototype. It has a breadcrumb navigation with a Start Over button, it won’t loop over as it strips out what you’ve already seen, Microtrailers from another Steam Labs experiment on them all and a proper Search bar.

        Deep Dive, thankfully, is one that should actually respect your store preferences after we had a chat about it on Twitter (#1, #2). So if you’ve only ticked Linux in your Steam Preferences (see the bottom), it shouldn’t constantly throw Windows titles at you.

      • Fine Wine: An Interview With Codeweavers About Valve, Windows And The Future Of Gaming On Linux

        For a staggering 23 years, the developers at Codeweavers have undertaken the gargantuan task of enabling Windows software to run on Mac and Linux operating systems. Among other accomplishments, the company’s collective work and collaboration with Valve resulted in a massive leap forward in Linux gaming with Steam Proton. I recently sat down with Codeweavers CEO and Wine developer Andrew Eikum for an illuminating conversation about the challenges they face, working with Valve, and the future of gaming and software on Linux.

      • Linux commit suggests mainstream AMD Navi GPUs will launch before October 15

        Trivial and urgent. That’s probably not how AMD would like its upcoming Navi 12 GPUs to be referenced, but that’s how its open source guru, Marek Olsak, has termed the addition of the Navi PCI ID to the Mesa 3D Graphics Library in a recent commit. Trivial, presumably because adding the little bit of extra code of Navi 12’s PCI ID doesn’t take a lot of effort, but what of the ‘urgent’ tag? Are we looking at the very imminent arrival of the AMD Navi 12 graphics cards?

        [...]

        The next Mesa 3D Graphics Library release – 19.3.0-rc1 – isn’t scheduled until October 15 which kinda suggests that AMD’s open source crew wanted to get support into the 19.2 library preceding it, as compatible GPUs would presumably be available before version 19.3 drops.

      • A Total War Saga: TROY Seeing A Native Linux Port Next Year

        Creative Assembly revealed Total War Saga: TROY on Wednesday for release next year. Feral Interactive has announced they are porting this latest Total War game to macOS and Linux.

        Feral has done a good job punctually porting Creative Assembly’s Total War games to Linux/macOS and it will continue that way for Total War Saga: TROY.

      • Valve have already begun tweaking the new Steam Library Beta

        With the new Steam Library Beta now available for everyone to test, Valve have started tweaking it based on feedback.

      • Video recording and livestreaming app OBS Studio has a big new release out

        Some really great new features made it into this release like the ability to actually pause a recording. That will come in very handy, when you want to keep a single file but you know there’s times you don’t want in it. This can certainly help cut down on editing time for a lot of situations. You can also use a script to pause recordings when a specific scene is up, like when you’ve run to the toilet or something—handy! To get pausing to work though, you cannot share the encoder between recording and streaming.

      • Physics-based space shoot ‘em up Hyper Ultra Astronautics allows up to 16 players for total madness

        FRACTiLE Games just released Hyper Ultra Astronautics, a physics-based local multiplayer space shoot ‘em with Linux support.

      • The dev of Rings of Saturn thinks going cross-platform ‘paid off’

        Currently in Early Access on itch.io and Steam, the developer of the top-down hard sci-fi space sim ΔV: Rings of Saturn seems to think doing a Linux and Mac build was worth it.

        Before getting into the details of it, let’s have a reminder of what the game actually is. Developed by Kodera Software, a one-person studio from Poland, Rings of Saturn follows the unexpected discovery of valuable minerals within the rings of Saturn. This has sparked a thriving space excavation industry and you’re going out there to hopefully strike it rich. The developer said it’s “backed up with real physics and science” and the attention to detail is pretty amazing.

      • Total War Saga: TROY officially announced and it will be coming to Linux next year

        Good news for fans of strategy games today as Total War Saga: TROY has been officially announced by Creative Assembly and SEGA. It’s also getting a Linux port once again from Feral Interactive.

        Inspired by Homer’s Iliad, it focuses on the historical flashpoint of the Trojan War, evolving the series with new period-inspired features. Creative Assembly said you will be able to explore it from both the Greek and Trojan perspectives allowing you to peel back “the layers of myth and legend to reveal the realities that may have inspired them”. Taking place in the late Bronze Age, this will be the the furthest back in time the Total War franchise has gone with its setting.

        Right on the Steam store page, it very clearly states “A Total War Saga: TROY will be released for macOS and Linux shortly after Windows.”. Feral Interactive will be doing the port just like they did with previous Total War titles as confirmed on their official site. Exciting to see another top title officially coming to Linux—brilliant!

      • Squad-based zombie apocalypse strategic rogue-lite Deadly Days has officially released

        Deadly Days is a game I’ve played repeatedly over the course of it being in Early Access, it’s good fun and it’s officially out now with a big update.

        What to expect from it? You control a small squad, which you equip with various weapons to go through a series of randomly generated locations to loot for scrap and more equipment. You need to direct your survivors around each map and while they can act by themselves, you can also take a bit more direct control to aim their weapons. Additionally, you also have special abilities like dropping bombs, healing, speeding them up and so on.

    • Desktop Environments/WMs

      • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

        • Plasma 5.17 Beta Out for Testing

          Today KDE launches the beta release of Plasma 5.17.

          We’ve added a bunch of new features and improvements to KDE’s lightweight yet full featured desktop environment.

          Plasma’s updated web page gives more background on why you should use it on your computer.

          System Settings has gained new features to help you manage your fancy Thunderbolt hardware, plus Night Color is now on X11 and a bunch of pages got redesigned to help you get your configuration done easier. Our notifications continue to improve with a new icon and automatic do-not-disturb mode for presentations. Our Breeze GTK theme now provides a better appearance for the Chromium/Chrome web browsers and applies your color scheme to GTK and GNOME apps. The window manager KWin has received many HiDPI and multi-screen improvements, and now supports fractional scaling on Wayland.

        • KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta Rolls Out With Wayland Improvements, Overhauled Settings
    • Distributions

      • Firefox, Graphene, Krita update in Tumbleweed

        Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week.

        The snapshots furnished the update for KDE Applications 19.08.1 and updated several libraries including Intel’s Graphene library OS.

        Snapshot 20190917 delivered four packages. The Graphene package updated to 1.10.0 and now uses an ancillary library called (micro) µTest for its test suite, which makes possible to build and run the test suite without depending on GLib. Mozilla Firefox 69.0 provided Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP) with stronger privacy protections and added support for receiving multiple video codecs to makes it easier for WebRTC conferencing services to mix video from different clients. The other two package updates in the snapshot were icecream 1.3, which takes compile jobs from a build and distributes it among remote machines allowing a parallel build, and the HTTP client/server library for GNOME libsoup 2.66.3. The update of icecream 1.3 improved the speed of creating compiler tarballs. The snapshot is trending at a moderately stable rating of 87, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

      • Reviews

        • Arch Linux Review in 2019

          In constant development since 2002, Arch Linux isn’t new. It’s built up a large, loyal following of users who love Arch’s “Keep It Simple, Stupid” approach, where minimalism and choice reign supreme.

          No Arch Linux installation is the same, and that’s the appeal to Arch users. It isn’t the friendliest Linux distro for beginners, but if you’re looking to truly understand what a Linux distro can do, Arch Linux could be for you.

          At number 15 on the Distowatch popularity list over the past 12 months, Arch is also one of the most well-known Linux distros. Let’s find out why this minimalist distro continues to be popular.

      • Screenshots/Screencasts

      • Debian Family

        • FAI 5.8.7 and new ISO images using Debian 10

          The new FAI release 5.8.7 now supports apt keys in files called package_config/CLASS.gpg. Before we only supported .asc files. fai-mirror has a new option -V, which checks if variables are used in package_config/ and uses variable definitions from class/.var.

        • Praise Be CUPS Driverless Printing

          Last Tuesday, I finally got to start updating $work’s many desktop computers to Debian Buster. I use Puppet to manage them remotely, so major upgrades basically mean reinstalling machines from scratch and running Puppet.

          Over the years, the main upgrade hurdle has always been making our very large and very complicated printers work on Debian. Unsurprisingly, the blog posts I have written on that topic are very popular and get me a few ‘thank you’ emails per month.

          I’m very happy to say, thanks to CUPS Driverless Printing (CUPS 2.2.2+), all those trials and tribulations are finally over. Printing on Buster just works. Yes yes, even color booklets printed on 11×17 paper folded in 3 stapled in the middle.

        • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2019

          Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

        • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: Archiving 20 years of online content

          mailman2 is pretty great. You can get a dump of an email list pretty easily and mailman3′s web frontend, the lovely hyperkitty, is well, lovely. Importing a legacy mailman2 mbox went without a hitch thanks to the awesome hyperkitty_import importer. Kudos to the Debian Mailman Team for packaging this in Debian for us.

          But what about cramming a Yahoo! Group mailing list in hyperkitty? I wouldn’t recommend it. After way too many hours spent battling character encoding errors I just decided people that wanted to read obscure emails from 2003 would have to deal with broken accents and shit. But hey, it kinda works!

          Oh, and yes, archiving a Yahoo! Group with an old borken Perl script wasn’t an easy task. Hell, I kept getting blacklisted by Yahoo! for scraping too much data to their liking. I ended up patching together the results of multiple runs over a few weeks to get the full mbox and attachments.

          By the way, if anyone knows how to tell hyperkitty to stop at a certain year (i.e. not display links for 2019 when the list stopped in 2006), please ping me.

      • Canonical/Ubuntu Family

        • Vivaldi Web Browser 2.8 Released! How to Install it in Ubuntu

          Vivaldi web browser released the new stable version 2.8 today. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 18.04 and higher.

        • Try Screen Mirroring Android Using Wi-Fi on Ubuntu!

          In the previous article, I once discussed screen mirroring on Ubuntu using Scrcpy. I like Scrcpy because this application is very light and runs very well when Screen Mirroring. And in this article, I will try Screen Mirroring using Wi-fi(wifi).

          Screen Mirroring using wifi has several benefits. One of them is, we don’t need to connect the device with a cable. So, when we are presentation a demo of an application made for smartphones, we can move freely because we don’t use connecting cables when used for screen mirroring.

        • Popular snaps per distro

          From a distance, Linux is one big, confusing ball of passionate users and hardcore technical jargon. But as you zoom in, you can start seeing patterns – and differences. Indeed, the individual and vastly varied choice of a favorite distribution has played a major part in shaping the community conversation in the Linux space. But does this also reflect on the application usage patterns?

          We wanted to have a look at how users on different distributions consume snaps. So we crunched some numbers and checked the top five snaps for Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, CentOS, Arch Linux, and Manjaro users.

        • Ubuntu-maker Canonical shares top 5 snaps per Linux distribution

          All Linux users are the same, right? Oh, hell no! Linux users are a diverse bunch, with differing opinions, tastes, and personalities. In fact, that is probably a contributing factor to the fragmentation of the Linux community. Linux users have lots of options between distributions, desktop environments, and more — they are not stuck in a box like Windows 10 users.

          To highlight how different Linux users can be, Canonical has released some data about the installation of snaps, categorized by distro. It chose six of the most popular Linux-based operating systems for its analysis — Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, CentOS, Arch Linux, and Manjaro. It then shared the top five most popular snaps for each distribution.

        • Ubuntu on the new LinuxONE III

          A few months ago I visited the IBM offices in Poughkeepsie to sync up with colleagues, record an episode of Terminal Talk, and let’s be honest, visit some mainframes. A lot of assembly still happens in Poughkeepsie, and they have a big client center with mainframes on display, including several inside a datacenter that they give tours of. I was able to see a z14 in operation, as well as several IBM LinuxONE machines. Getting to tour datacenters is a lot of fun, and even though I wouldn’t have meaningful technical interactions with them, there’s something about seeing these massive machines that I work with every day in person that brings me a lot of joy.

          Now I have to go back! On September 12th, the newest mainframe was announced, the IBM z15 and accompanying Linux version, the IBM LinuxONE III. To celebrate, I joined my colleagues in the IBM Silicon Valley lab for a launch event watch party and, of course, cake.

    • Devices/Embedded

    • Free, Libre, and Open Source Software

      • Events

      • Web Browsers

        • Mozilla

          • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: September Edition

            Please note some of the information provided in this report may be subject to change as we are sometimes sharing information about projects that are still in early stages and are not final yet.

          • Will Kahn-Greene: Markus v2.0.0 released! Better metrics API for Python projects.

            Markus is a Python library for generating metrics.

          • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 304

            Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

          • Mozilla VR Blog: Virtual identities in Hubs

            Identity is a complicated concept—who are we really? Most of us have government IDs that define part of our identity, but that’s just a starting point. We present ourselves differently depending on context—who we are with our loved ones might not be the same as who we are at work, but both are legitimate representations of ourselves.

            Virtual spaces make this even harder. We might maintain many virtual identities with different degrees of overlap. Having control over our representation and identity online is a critical component of safety and privacy, and platforms should prioritize user agency.

            More importantly, autonomy and privacy are intrinsically intertwined. If everyone saw my google searches, I would probably change what I search for. If I knew my employer could monitor my interactions when I’m not at work, I would behave differently. Privacy isn’t just about protecting information about myself, it’s about allowing me to express myself.

      • Pseudo-Open Source (Openwashing)

      • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

        • Statement on the RMS situation

          On Monday September 16th, Richard Stallman, long-time president and founder of the FSF, has resigned from both his position at the FSF, and the MIT.

          There’s a plethora of reporting around that – if you’re short on time, then I recommend reading Thomas Bushnell’s rather excellent medium piece in full.

          Many things can be said about this event, but immediately coming to defend RMS as a principled old man, who was the victim of a witch hunt, is not it. I fundamentally disagree with Michael here, and like to point out (though its obvious), that his point of view is not shared nor endorsed by The Document Foundation, albeit aggregated on their planet.

        • Remove Richard Stallman: Appendix A

          My original post, “Remove Richard Stallman”, has received over 180,000 views at the time that I am writing this. Since then, I’ve spoken with a few reporters, and even more information has been released that I thought would be useful to add, but too much to fit on that initial post. I leaked the full email thread, with names and contact information redacted, to Vice.

      • Programming/Development

        • Get Out, Git! – Building SaaS #33

          In this episode, I removed the Git clone from the server. This is some of the final cleanup to streamline the deployment process.

          Before we could remove the clone completely, we had to decouple the final remaining connections that still depended on the repository clone.

        • An introduction to audio processing and machine learning using Python

          At a high level, any machine learning problem can be divided into three types of tasks: data tasks (data collection, data cleaning, and feature formation), training (building machine learning models using data features), and evaluation (assessing the model). Features, defined as “individual measurable propert[ies] or characteristic[s] of a phenomenon being observed,” are very useful because they help a machine understand the data and classify it into categories or predict a value.

        • Excellent Free Books to Learn Lisp

          Lisp (derives from “LISt Processing”) is one of the oldest programming languages. It was invented in 1958, with the language being conceived by John McCarthy and is based on his paper “Recursive Functions of Symbolic Expressions and Their Computation by Machine”. Over the years, Lisp has evolved into a family of programming languages. The most commonly used general-purpose dialects are Common Lisp and Scheme. Other dialects include Franz Lisp, Interlisp, Portable Standard Lisp, XLISP and Zetalisp.

          The majority of Lisp implementations offer a lot more than just a programming language. They include an entire environment such as debuggers, inspectors, tracing, and other tools to add the Lisp developer. Lisp is a practical, expression-oriented, interactive programming language which uses linked lists as one of its major data structures. A Lisp list is written with its elements separated by whitespace, and surrounded by parentheses. Lisp source code is itself comprised of lists.

          The language has many unique features that make it excellent to study programming constructs and data structures. Many regard Lisp as an extremely natural language to code complex symbolic reasoning programs. Lisp is popular in the fields of artificial intelligence and symbolic algebra.

        • Easy-to-use tools are key to CI/CD success says 2019 State of DevOps Report

          The most effective strategies for scaling DevOps and fostering productivity include easy-to-use tools and solutions that create community, according to the 2019 Accelerate State of DevOps Report.

          This year’s report, written by Dr. Nicole Forsgren, Dr. Dustin Smith, Jez Humble, and Jessie Frazelle, represents six years of research and data from more than 31,000 professionals and aims to better understand how the technical and cultural practices associated with DevOps affect team and organizational performance. It also explores ways to help improve performance and productivity and even reduce burnout.

  • Leftovers

    • Slouching Toward “Bethlehem”

      Hive-mindedness seems to be growing — at the same time that bees are heading towards kaputzville. DARPA’s got a fix for the bees, they say. Then again, (D)ARPA gave us the Internet, which is where the hivemind is located. On the other hand, Al Gore ‘claims’ to have invented the Internet. Some people say he invented Climate Change, too. Riddle me this: If a guy can be that clever, then how come he can’t win his home state in 2000, without the need to blame Nader? And how come Watergate felon Charles “Dirty Tricks” Colson can be given back his voting rights by Jeb, but not all those Black voters? Is there a koan in a haystack locked up in all this? Or is it all rhetorical?

    • Health/Nutrition

    • Security (Confidentiality/Integrity/Availability)

      • Security Researchers Whose ‘Penetration Test’ Involved Breaking And Entering Now Facing Criminal Charges

        Turning security researchers into criminals is so popular we have a tag for it here at Techdirt. A security hole is found or a breach pointed out, and the first thing far too many entities do in response is turn the messenger over to law enforcement while muttering unintelligible things about “hacking.”

      • Security updates for Thursday

        Security updates have been issued by CentOS (exiv2, firefox, ghostscript, http-parser, httpd, kdelibs and kde-settings, kernel, pango, qemu-kvm, and thunderbird), Debian (ibus), Fedora (kernel, kernel-headers, python34, qbittorrent, and samba), openSUSE (chromium), Oracle (go-toolset:ol8), Red Hat (kernel, nginx:1.14, patch, ruby, skydive, systemd, and thunderbird), Scientific Linux (thunderbird), SUSE (libreoffice, openssl-1_1, python-urllib3, and python-Werkzeug), and Ubuntu (tomcat9 and wpa, wpasupplicant).

      • Irdeto Warns Healthcare IoT Is Under Heavy Attack

        The world of IoT is no stranger to attacks, with security being a number one priority for keeping the world of interconnected devices safe. One area where security is most crucial is healthcare, where successful attacks can result in loss of life. It wasn’t too long ago that ransomware was making the rounds, shutting down entire hospital networks and putting patients at risk. Irdeto made a press release that put forward the case for better security for healthcare IoT. They quoted some statistics that put some insight into how healthcare comes under attack from malicious agents.

      • Why it’s time to embrace top-down cybersecurity practices

        Cybersecurity is no longer just the domain of the IT staff putting in firewalls and backing up servers. It takes a commitment from the top and a budget to match. The stakes are high when it comes to keeping your customers’ information safe.

        The average cost of a data breach in 2018 was $148 for each compromised record. That equals an average cost of $3.86 million per breach. Because it takes organizations more than six months—196 days on average—to detect breaches, a lot of remediation must happen after discovery.

        With compliance regulations in most industries tightening and stricter security rules, such as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) becoming law, breaches can lead to large fines as well as loss of reputation.

      • SIM Application Toolkit: Avoid Being Exploited

        Technologies are often created with good intent, to make our life easier, to solve problems in a convenient way. The Management Engine in Intel’s CPUs, for instance, was intended to make the life of admins easier. It allowed for remote access on a very low level, so they could even do complete remote reinstalls of a machine. And if you have to manage a large fleet of machines, distributed within a larger enterprise, this can save huge amounts of effort, time–and thus money.

        [...]

        Its name already points to the origin: the SIM card. It is the tiny chip card you insert into your phone, to get access to the cellular network of an operator. The SIM card used to be a fairly simple device, which you can imagine as the key to unlock the access to the network: i.e., it stores a secret (a cryptographic key) along with an ID (the IMSI) and some details about the issuing operator, etc. This data set grants you access to the operator’s network.

        But phones [also called handset, or ‘terminal equipment’ (TE), in mobile terms] have become more and more powerful. And setting up these cards has become more and more complicated; you need an SMS center number, details for the MMS server, mailbox dial-in number… and a lot more. All this needs to be properly set up in the mobile, to make full use of both the mobile and the network. To make this even more complicated, these details (and the way to set them up) are different from operator to operator. The process for this initial setup is (also) called provisioning. It was to make this (and other things) as convenient and least painful as possible for users that SAT was invented.

        The name SAT tells us not only that it is SIM-related, but also that it contains the term application: SIM cards can, and today they usually do, indeed contain small applications or applets. They are small computers on their own, they run code, and they can indeed be programmed. Most are based on the JavaCard standard and can be programmed with small Java applets. The SAT defines a standard way to interface the SAT applets with the modem and the phone.

    • Defence/Aggression

      • Can America Break Its Gun Addiction?

        After mass shootings in Southaven, Mississippi; Dayton, Ohio; and Midland, El Paso and Odessa, Texas, public demand for sensible gun reform once more soared. And once more, Republican politicians, led by President Donald Trump, were intimidated into inaction by the gun lobby…

      • The Emperor’s New-Old Nuclear Clothes

        How is it still possible to write a lengthy article about the military/strategic dynamic among the triad of Israel, Iran, and the United States while making zero mention of Israel’s robust nuclear-weapons capability? New York Times staffers Ronen Bergman and Mark Mazzetti, and their editors at the Times magazine clearly think this is quite okay.

      • The Call of Blood Money

        Because we inhabit a repugnant, rapacious culture, some repugnant, rapacious creeps thought it’d be cool to make clothes celebrating our national sport of killing children en masse. Thus has Bstroy, makers of “neo-native, post-apocalypse streetwear,” unveiled what really shouldn’t be in the same sentence: “school shooting-themed hoodies…”

      • Will Americans Let Trump Start World War III for Saudi Arabia and Israel?
      • WATCH: With Gun Control Measures Held Up In Congress, ‘Gut Punch’ PSA Shows Children Trying to Survive School Shooting

        “When kids go back to school, they have plenty to worry about. They shouldn’t also have to wonder if they’re going to make it home.”

      • Disputing Trump Claims, Japan Says No Evidence Iran Was Behind Saudi Attack

        “We are not aware of any information that points to Iran,” said Japanese defense minister Taro Kono.

      • Facebook Still Auto-Generates Islamic State, al-Qaida Pages

        In the face of criticism that Facebook is not doing enough to combat extremist messaging, the company likes to say that its automated systems remove the vast majority of prohibited content glorifying the Islamic State group and al-Qaida before it’s reported.

      • Americans Want Action on Climate; Not War Over Oil With Iran

        As I write, the U.S. is inching its way towards possible war with Iran after the weekend drone strikes in Saudi Arabia on the strategic oil facilities owned by the state oil company, Saudi Aramco.

      • The Uncertain and Dangerous Interregnum: World Peace and the Post-Cold War Era

        The post-Cold War era is over. We are living in the interregnum between disorders, marked by uncertainties and dangers, as well as opportunities. Some see the confrontations of the moment as a new Cold War.

      • Why on Earth Would the US Go to War with Iran over an Attack on Saudi Oil Refineries?

        President Bone Spur, backed by his war-mongering Secretary of State Mike “Armageddon” Pompeo, tweeted yesterday that the US military is “locked and loaded,” ready to attack (bomb) Iran if it can be proven that Iran was behind a drone bomb attack on Saudi Arabia’s oil refineries.

      • Conflict With Iran Portends World War III

        Mark Twain once commented, “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme.”  The U.S. conflict with Iran sounds a lot like a rhyme with World War I. The portent would be World War III. The parallels are not trivial. They are haunting, and should be sobering.

      • Once Again in Afghanistan, the U.S. Proves It Can’t Be Trusted

        The first draft of this column came not to bury but to praise Donald Trump. I planned to applaud the president’s peace initiative with the Taliban, his strategy of ignoring the corrupt and discredited puppet regime Bush installed in Kabul and his desire to withdraw American troops from Afghanistan. This was a move I have been almost alone in promoting since the U.S. idiotically invaded the country in 2001 and I congratulate Trump for having the courage to unwind Bush and Obama’s mistakes. The Afghan people should be allowed to shape their future free of imperialist interference.

      • Support the Climate Strike, Not a Military Strike

        The propaganda campaign has begun. The New York Times dutifully published photos of an attack on ARAMCO oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia. Accompanying the photos are descriptions provided by the warmongers in Washington, DC. Naturally, the photos don’t look like much of anything. This gives those describing them the leeway to provide a narrative fitting into their agenda of isolating and eventually attacking Iran, despite no real evidence that Iran was involved beyond perhaps some financial assistance to the forces claiming credit for the Saudi attack. In other words, the Houthi rebels claimed responsibility, Iran denied any knowledge, and Washington, Riyadh and presumably Tel Aviv ramped up their rhetoric against Tehran. Meanwhile, the US media repeats and amplifies the unsubstantiated charges from US war cheerleader Michael Pompeo that Iran launched the attack. Wannabe warriors in the Pentagon and Congress rub their hands together in anticipation of a glorious victory for the homeland’s forces. Meanwhile, ARAMCO debates whether or not to delay its much-anticipated initial public offering (IPO) given the circumstances. At the same time, traders in oil futures look forward to a substantial increase in earnings because of the attack. Now that I think about it, maybe those wannabe warriors are actually rubbing their hands together hoping for a glorious increase in their portfolios; specifically, in the energy and defense sectors.

    • Transparency/Investigative Reporting

    • Environment

    • Finance

    • AstroTurf/Lobbying/Politics

      • 2020: Democratic Establishment vs. Democratic Socialists

        Democratic Socialism has grown in popularity over the past few years, fueled by Bernie Sanders’s 2016 presidential campaign and continued grassroots waves of support. The country has seen a surge of political candidates across all levels of government running on platforms that embrace democratic socialism.

      • Creating a Society of Hope and Inclusion: Speech to the TUC

        This is the text of Jeremy Corbyn’s speech to the Trades Union Congress on September 10, 2019.

      • Putin agrees to consider election reforms, after rocky campaigns in Moscow

        In a meeting with Communist Party leader Gennady Zyuganov on Tuesday, Vladimir Putin agreed to consider reforms to Russia’s election laws. The president said officials need to look at how the political system’s “existing tools operate in real life,” in order to determine where improvements are needed “for the benefit of Russia’s people.”

      • Senator Hawley Responds To Techdirt With A Bunch Of Nonsense And Lies About His Own Bill That He Doesn’t Seem To Understand

        Hoo boy. We’ve criticized a bunch of Senator Josh Hawley’s nonsense over the past few months. After all, he’s the elite cosmopolitan “get big government out of business” Senator who is railing against elite cosmopolitans, while demanding that government get deeply involved in regulating companies. Well, not all companies. Just tech companies. It’s almost as if Hawley is deliberately picking on companies that he thinks don’t like his insane brand of politics. Anyway, while Hawley has introduced a slew of nonsensical bills targeting internet companies, the most laughable was the one that literally lays out what features certain websites can and cannot use. As we wrote in our post about it, Hawley seems to want to appoint himself the product manager of the internet.

    • Censorship/Free Speech

    • Privacy/Surveillance

      • Big Tech’s Disingenuous Push for a Federal Privacy Law

        This week, the Internet Association launched a campaign asking the federal government to pass a new privacy law.

        The Internet Association (IA) is a trade group funded by some of the largest tech companies in the world, including Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon, and Uber. Many of its members keep their lights on by tracking users and monetizing their personal data. So why do they want a federal consumer privacy law?

      • Thanks For Helping Us Defend the California Consumer Privacy Act

        The California Consumer Privacy Act will go into effect on January 1, 2020—having fended off a year of targeted efforts by technology giants who wanted to gut the bill. Most recently, industry tried to weaken its important privacy protections in the last days of the legislative session.

        Californians made history last year when, after 600,000 people signed petitions in support of a ballot initiative, the California State Legislature answered their constituents’ call for a new data privacy law. It’s been a long fight to defend the CCPA against a raft of amendments that would have weakened this law and the protections it enshrines for Californians. Big technology companies backed a number of bills that each would have weakened the CCPA’s protections. Taken together, this package would have significantly undermined this historic law.

      • University Of Alabama Is Using A Location-Tracking App To Punish Students For Leaving Football Games Early

        One of the most successful college football programs in history is coached by one of the most insecure men in America, apparently. This combination of success and neediness has resulted in one of the weirdest forms of location tracking in government history. (via Slashdot)

      • DOJ Decides To Help Publicize Snowden’s Memoir By Suing Him For Failing To Run His Book By The CIA And NSA First

        As you’ve probably heard, Ed Snowden just came out with his memoir, entitled Permanent Record. I haven’t yet had a chance to read it, but it looks fascinating. Snowden obviously can’t do the usual book tour for this kind of thing, but he has been doing a fresh round of very interesting interviews about his current situation — including saying that he’d be willing to come home to the US and stand trial if only the US actually allowed a public interest defense for Espionage Act claims. As we’ve pointed out for years, one of the (many) problems with the Espionage Act is that it literally does not allow a defendant to explain why they leaked certain information, and assumes that it is equally nefarious to sell secrets to foreign enemies as it is to blow the whistle by informing the press of unconstitutional surveillance.

      • US Government Mass Surveillance Isn’t ‘Secret’

        Today marks 11 years since the Electronic Frontier Foundation filed a federal lawsuit against mass surveillance in the United States. When it eventually concludes, this case will determine whether people in the US ever get a judgment on the constitutionality of mass surveillance.

    • Civil Rights/Policing

Buying the Voices of ‘Linux’ People to Repeat Microsoft’s Talking Points While Removing Our Icons and Leaders (Calling Them Sexist)

Posted in FSF, GNU/Linux, Microsoft at 12:29 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

This has become a political game or warfare, not a technical competition

Decapitated leadership in Wikipedia
Reference: Decapitation strike

Summary: The dirty games leveraged by several companies including Microsoft target charismatic people who are essential for morale and leadership; these tactics aren’t particularly novel

FORGET everything you knew or once thought you knew about GNU/Linux. Microsoft nowadays distorts the meaning of these brands; similarly, as we show in our weekly Openwashing Reports, the words Open and Source (or Source Source) get distorted; never mind the original terms, notably Free software (we prefer to speak of Software Freedom as this removes the ambiguity associated with zero cost or low price).

“In recent years the Microsoft ‘knives’ came out; but they kept telling us lies such as “Microsoft loves Linux”; while buying strategic proprietary pieces to entrap us like sheep.”We don’t want to obsess or to dwell on the Stallman news [1, 2]; there’s a rather depressing element to it. We must try to move on. I’ve spent 2 days writing about it in Social Control Media and at the bottom of this post I’ll mention that very quickly (it’s not really the purpose of this article).

In recent years the Microsoft ‘knives’ came out; but they kept telling us lies such as “Microsoft loves Linux”; while buying strategic proprietary pieces to entrap us like sheep. It seems to have worked as long as their PR department found some misguided people to cheer for WSL. Remember that WSL (or WSL2) is not “Linux”; it’s more like a blob in Microsoft’s proprietary repository. It’s just something like VirtualBox with GNU/Linux in it (a container if not VM). Microsoft does not directly control VMs, so it wants Vista 10 ‘serfs’ to only ever explore its “store” and for GNU/Linux developers to abide by Microsoft’s own rules, perhaps even APIs. It’s about control — a prerequisite in EEE tactics.

Now I come to the hardest part.

It’s about SJVN.

“It’s about control — a prerequisite in EEE tactics.”Historically SJVN was supportive and at times protective of us. I am very grateful to him.

Techrights readers, however, turn sour over time. They don’t trust him. Microsoft talking points continue to come from SJVN (my wife calls him a “defector”, insisting “he’s one of them” now) and an important associate of ours says “this will probably be the last SJVN link [I] point to. They have him.”

I got E-mails telling me that SJVN had defected to Microsoft camp

Based on his writings, not actual evidence. His latest piece for IDG cheers for Microsoft leveraging Linux as ‘its own’:

Why would Microsoft do this? Well, have you been paying attention to Windows lately? It has been one foul-up after another. Just in the last few months there was the registry backup fail and numerous and regular machine-hobbling Windows updates. In fact, updates have grown so sloppy you have to seriously wonder whether it’s safer to stay open to attacks or “upgrade” your system with a dodgy patch.

[...]

Crazy? Well, so was the idea that a Microsoft CEO would get up and say, “Microsoft loves Linux.” So was the very thought that the most used operating system on Microsoft Azure would be Linux, not Windows Server. And who would have ever thought Microsoft would open up its profitable patent portfolio to open-source and Linux developers — for free?

As I’m fond of saying, whenever people refuse to believe that Microsoft is now open-source-friendly: “This is not your dad’s Microsoft.”

Will Microsoft release a Linux-based Windows? I don’t know. What I do know is that it has been taking the necessary steps to make such a desktop operating system possible. And unlike with the Microsoft of old, surprises do happen.

No, SJVN, Microsoft is the same old dirty company. They still blackmail and bribe officials.

“Historically SJVN was supportive and at times protective of us. I am very grateful to him.”The last straw was, to me at least, not the above. It was this from SJVN. Typical ZDNet right there on display; when not into the monopolist’s Kool-Aid/Microsoft propaganda SJVN resorts to defamation of Stallman (RMS). “Shame on you,” I told him when I first saw it. “You too have just defamed RMS. Right from the headline. You now show your true colours…”

This week, after many people had already pointed out defamatory RMS coverage, some — including SJVN himself — still repeated these defamatory statements. Stallman called Epstein a “serial rapist” while Bill Gates was hanging out with him (Gates even met him when he knew about crimes against youngsters). According to SJVN, however, RMS was “defending Jeffrey Epstein behavior” (their headline!).

This defamatory CBS-owned tabloid is controlled by Microsoft funds (partly) and if this headline was chosen by the editor rather than SJVN, then it’s time for SJVN to step down. They recently censored his headline if not part of his article about Microsoft Office. He lacks journalistic freedom there. I choose to believe his bosses are to blame. I choose to believe that SJVN did not ‘sell out’ and lost his integrity. RMS had called Epstein “serial rapist” repeatedly, so why did SJVN go with the headline asserting RMS was “defending Jeffrey Epstein behavior”. OK… I get it. I think I get it. Facts don’t matter. Who cares, right?

“…Microsoft is the same old dirty company. They still blackmail and bribe officials.”Remember: RMS is said to be “demented” for defending a dead friend.

Bill Gates isn’t “demented” for hanging out with a serial pedophile (even knowing he was that)?

Writers who slander RMS (intentional lies) are not “demented”?

Try putting these things in perspective.

Maybe I’m naive to still view SJVN as a victim. A victim of bad editors and publishers…

Maybe I too am… “demented”.

Readers of ours also complain about Swapnil, whom the Linux Foundation put in charge of Linux.com. Microsoft is boosting Swapnil, who writes puff pieces and lies for Microsoft. Here’s the tweet “ICYMI: Microsoft Brings exFAT Support To Linux”; it’s from Microsoft and it’s boosting Swapnil; he proudly retweeted this.

“Swapnil has been a prime example of sellouts; over the past few months he has acted like little more than an openwashing agent of the ‘Linux’ Foundation.”Who does this man serve? From the looks of it, based on this example from earlier this week, Linux.com has been repurposed to boost the YouTube channel of its sole editor, Swapnil. The person who flatters Microsoft and whom Microsoft links to…

Swapnil has been a prime example of sellouts; over the past few months he has acted like little more than an openwashing agent of the ‘Linux’ Foundation. He’s constantly boosting Greg K-H as well. This person

Theodore Ts’o and Andrew Morton have been in Linux almost longer than anyone else, except Linus Torvalds. Last we checked, both work for Google and Ts’o is targeted so as to keep Greg K-H (a Microsoft buddy, unlike Ts’o, a vocal sceptic of Microsoft) not the “fallback” or “deputy” of Torvalds. The same person who has been attacking a lot of FOSS luminaries also labeled Ts’o “rape apologist”, based on distortion of a very old message he posted to a public mailing list. Sounds familiar? Yes, Stallman (see this almost-complete archive of the stories that led to the ‘end’ of RMS).

Last week I told Stallman that “it seems like media tries to shift attention away from Bill Gates’ MIT scandal by talking about you…”

“It does not surprise me,” he responded. “Gates has more influence.”

“By “runs” the person means girls trying to make ‘moves’ on Torvalds, putting him in a position that can end his career and shatter his reputation.”“I think I will post the Microsoft talk article today or tomorrow,” he added. He had told me that this ongoing work would be finished, but then came the next scandal or incident (MIT).

Mr. Torvalds, please be careful as you might be next. As ESR was told some years ago, “Linus is never alone at any conference. This is not because he lets fame go to his head and likes having a posse around. They have made multiple runs at him.”

By “runs” the person means girls trying to make ‘moves’ on Torvalds, putting him in a position that can end his career and shatter his reputation.

“I will not change that because of the vilification campaign. The broader issues have not changed.Richard Stallman, earlier today

“This is appearing more likely to be the case of Microsoft or other corporate interests (but mainly Microsoft) needing to sever the head before they consume the carcass.”ChuangTzu

When the EPO Sees Itself as Above European Law, Grants Patents in Defiance of the EPC (Its Founding Document) and Violates Staff’s Labour Rights/Protections (International Law)

Posted in Europe, Law, Patents at 10:42 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Skeleton

Summary: The absurd state of affairs at the EPO has reached the point where laws at every level are being violated and even judges are being threatened or vainly ignored; the EU is belatedly trying to tackle these issues, which have actually cost its credibility a great deal and threaten the perception of Rule of Law at multiple levels

THE WAY things are going, the European Patent Office (EPO) does everything it takes for its critics to be proven correct. The current president was appointed by nepotism (Battistelli), he refuses to undo illegal rules, and moreover he’s meeting disgraced officials to undermine the EPC (like 35 U.S.C. § 101 in the US for some parts of it) whilst actively promoting software patents in Europe. They’re not even shy to show their disdain/hatred of the law and rather fundamental rules. What motivates them to do all that self-harming stuff? Do they not genuinely care about the future of Europe, including the Office? They’re supposed to at least listen to the staff and the general public, not impose their will on both. This shouldn’t be a hard concept to grasp. Power comes from consent typically; otherwise brutality becomes necessary and things get rather ugly very fast.

“Power comes from consent typically; otherwise brutality becomes necessary and things get rather ugly very fast.”We’ve been tracking EPO abuses for quite some time; hardly anything is improving, only suppressed. Discussion in the media is nowadays nearly dead. Not because anything was tackled/resolved; unless the EPO thinks that the sole issue it had was ‘hostile’ media.

Months ago we wrote about “Collaborative Quality Improvements” (CQI) — a programme whose net goal would be further reductions in patent quality. How low can it go? Earlier this week the EPO wrote: “Today we are hosting a conference on #3Dprinting. EPO examiners across all sectors are preparing to face challenges this emerging tech brings.”

Surely the EPO understands that the patents it grants are a barrier and affront to 3-D printing i.e. they slow down innovation and have already held back this domain for decades (famously so; UAVs also).

Distracting from the real news, which is the EPO's "fascist bills", the EPO still writes about the latest ‘state visit’ in Munich — one in which the Romania-born Andrei Iancu was present to promote patent maximalism on behalf of American corporations. Iancu and the EPO are management-leaning bureaucrats — two names one associates with attacks on justice and judges for the sake of corporate profits. The USPTO wrote: “Our productive conversations will lead to even more collaboration between our two offices. We value our close friendship with the EPO and look forward to further strengthening our relationship in ways that will benefit our stakeholders in the U.S. and Europe.” ~ Director Iancu.”

The EPO retweeted this.

We’ve meanwhile found this new press release about a patent front group for software patents (IPO), which has “Keynote speakers include Antonio Campinos, President, European Patent Office; The Honorable Andrei Iancu…”

That the EPO continues to openly associate with lobbyists of aggressors from the US (that’s what IPO is) doesn’t shock is. It’s not surprising us anymore. Nor does the fact that last week they mentioned the UPC, probably for the first time in a very long while (many months). They’re not totally giving up just yet. A couple of days ago Mondaq published this self-promotional piece for Markus Gampp LL.M. (DLA Piper), who said: “Nonetheless, Brexit does not necessarily mean the end for the UPC and the entire reform project.”

It does. In its current form it’s dead. Finished. Needs restarting the process (if ever). And here are all the relevant paragraphs:

However, the UK leaving the EU will likely have substantial impact on the biggest reform in the history of European patent law: the long-awaited introduction of the European patent with unitary effect and the Unified Patent Court (UPC). This system would enable a patentee to enforce their patent across Europe with just one action before the UPC. All decisions taken by the UPC, including injunctions, damages and decisions on the validity of a patent would have pan-European effect.

The UK was to play a vital role in this ambitious project, inter alia by hosting a branch of the court’s central division in London. As the underlying agreements currently stand, as a non-EU member the UK can not participate in the UPC. The new system can only enter into force upon ratification by 13 member states, including the UK and Germany. The German ratification is currently on hold pending resolution of a constitutional challenge against the national legislation implementing the UPC. While some have advocated this possibility, it appears highly doubtful whether the UK could participate in the UPC system as a non-EU member when it comes into force.

Nonetheless, Brexit does not necessarily mean the end for the UPC and the entire reform project. There are ways (eg through bilateral agreements) by which the UK may conceivably still participate. However, this could potentially take years to implement, causing a significant delay.

No legal system can be entrusted/empowered under the EPO. Evidence is everywhere.

Brian Cordery (Bristows) has meanwhile invoked another event of patent maximalists, AIPPI. He’s now pushing patents on life in Kluwer Patent Blog. The usual greedy, dishonest Team UPC taking points; “Echoing a point made by Sir Robin Jacob in his address at the Opening Ceremony,” he wrote, “the message was clear from the outset: when it comes to the form of claims in antibody patents, the US is the odd one out.”

It’s a race to the bottom for them.

Europe has come to the point of embracing patent quality even lower than that of the United States. How? By deliberately violating the EPC. The judges, who no longer have any autonomy, typically let it be. They can get ousted otherwise.

Some people who pay to promote their promotional sales pitch tell us that the “Technical Boards of Appeal as well as the Legal Board are independent” (no, Weickmann & Weickmann’s Christian Heubeck should know this is no longer the case). Here’s the whole paragraph in question, published just days ago:

The Boards of Appeal of the European Patent Office, i.e. the judicial panel of the second instance of the EPO, examine appeals from the decisions of the Receiving Section, the Examining and Opposition Divisions of the European Patent Office. The Technical Boards of Appeal as well as the Legal Board are independent and are bound only by the European Patent Convention (EPC). The procedure before the Boards of Appeal is outlined in the Rules of Procedure of the Boards of Appeal.

This is totally false; it’s nonsense because everyone including examiners and the Boards themselves know that independent judges are no more; it’s not the fault of the judges either. It’s the fault of the Office and the Council, which work collaboratively to crush the EPC. This is why the EPO is so absurd; it does follow even its own rules. This isn’t a particularly new problem.

Consider our various new articles about Stallman being pushed out [1, 2] for having said tactless things that were then distorted and spun by hostile media. As Benjamin Henrion has just put it (upon the news about Stallman): “Stallman an opened our eyes that the European Patent Office (EPO) was a “corrupt and malicious organization which should not exist”. Intergovernmental organizations like FIFA are designed to be captured and corrupted” [] Stallman: “But if the European Patent Office stands in your way, get rid of it too” [] Maybe one day we get someone who realize the EPO construction was not respecting the ‘rule of law’ principle…”

He then highlighted this new page about the EPO rejecting orders from our representatives in the EU: [via]

Barrier-free access to plant material is essential for the innovative capacity of the European plant-breeding sector and farmers, as well as for the genetic variety of our crops and the health of EU citizens.

In 2015, the Enlarged Board of Appeal of the European Patent Office (EPO) ruled that products obtained from essentially biological processes, such as plants, seeds, native traits and genes, are patentable. On the basis of this decision, a broccoli and a tomato variety were effectively patented (Cases G2/12 (tomatoes) and G2/13 (broccoli)).

In response, the European Parliament adopted a resolution[1] on 17 December 2015 calling for clarification of patent law for plants. In its Notice of 8 November 2016, the Commission stated that it was never the intention to grant patents on natural traits that are introduced into plants by means of essentially biological processes such as crossing and selection. All Member States supported this reading and the Board of Directors of the EPO eventually amended its policy so as not to grant patents on products from essentially biological processes.

Unfortunately, the Technical Board of Appeal of the EPO rejected this decision on 18 December 2018, arguing that the European Patent Convention takes precedence over the EPO’s implementing rules and that patents on plants may therefore be granted.

At this stage, the President of the EPO has requested a final judgement from the Enlarged Board of Appeal to conclude the issue. Third parties are entitled to submit written statements on the matter to the Enlarged Board before 1 October 2019.

Does the Commission intend to submit a written statement to the Enlarged Board of Appeal of the EPO in order to protect the innovative capacity of the European plant-breeding sector and the general public interest?

What action does the Commission envisage taking to ensure that products resulting from natural processes are not patentable?

Here’s more on that in other new pages. At least some politicians are paying attention to the way a corrupt EPO management ignores European Parliament and grants these illegal patents anyway, helped by judges who are threatened by Office management (in direct defiance of the EPC).

“EPs will quiz the EU Commission on Monday on how to ensure that products obtained from essentially biological processes, such as crossing, cannot be patented,” says this new page: [via]

The European Patent Office’s (EPO) Enlarged Board of Appeal decided in March 2015 in the tomato (G0002/12) and broccoli (G0002/13) cases that products obtained from essentially biological processes, such as crossing, can obtain patent protection. The European Parliament responded in December 2015 with a non-binding resolution demanding that EU rules be clarified and reiterating its objection, from May 2012, to patentability of products derived from conventional breeding.

After the European Commission intervened in November 2016, the EPO amended its policy so as not to grant patents on products obtained from essentially biological breeding processes. However, the EPO’s Technical Board of Appeal rejected this decision in December 2018, arguing that the European Patent Convention takes precedence over EPO’s implementing rules.

We certainly hope that all (or at least most) EPO examiners agree with us that patent maximalism at the EPO helps neither examiners nor the Office. It merely discredits the whole institution and harms science for the sake of profits (companies like Bayer/Monsanto). People who protest in front of the EPO and demonstrate against the EU (in forms like a rebellious Brexit referendum) are motivated/emboldened by utterly disgraceful behaviour such as this. We deserve better than this. We don’t need patent lunacy (patents on life and nature) and patent trolls. We don’t need the UPC either. We need to think what would best serve Europe’s place in science and technology (worldwide). Not law firms’ interests.

Links 19/9/2019: Samba 4.11.0 and Kubernetes 1.16

Posted in News Roundup at 4:49 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • GNU/Linux

    • Desktop

      • Huawei has started shipping Matebooks with Linux

        Although in recent months, the news published about Huawei has not been about how good their products are or how good their sales are, but about Trump’s decision to ban the company from using future versions of American products, like Android. Today we bring you a very positive one. Huawei has started selling computers with Linux operating system.

        For now, Huawei is selling its Linux computers only for the Asian market, that is, in China, the manufacturer’s country of origin. but it is likely to expand worldwide.

    • Server

      • Linux on the mainframe: Then and now

        of 1999, which is when IBM got onboard with Linux on the mainframe (IBM Z).

        These patches weren’t part of the mainline Linux kernel yet, but they did get Linux running on z/VM (Virtual Machine for IBM Z), for anyone who was interested. Several efforts followed, including the first Linux distro—put together out of Marist College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and Think Blue Linux by Millenux in Germany. The first real commercial distribution came from SUSE on October 31, 2000; this is notable in SUSE history because the first edition of what is now known as SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLES) is that S/390 port. Drawing again from Wikipedia, the SUSE Enterprise Linux page explains…

      • A Look into the Technical Details of Kubernetes 1.16

        Custom Resource Definitions (CRDs) were introduced into upstream Kubernetes by Red Hat engineers in version 1.7. From the beginning, they were designed as a future-proof implementation of what was previously prototyped as ThirdPartyResources. The road of CRDs has focused on the original goal of making custom resources production ready, bringing it to be a generally available feature in Kubernetes, highlighted with the promotion of the API to v1 in 1.16.

        CRDs have become a cornerstone of API extensions in the Kubernetes ecosystem, and is the basis of innovation and a core building block of OpenShift 4. Red Hat has continued pushing CRDs forward ever since, as one of the main drivers in the community behind the features and stability improvements, which finally lead to the v1 API. This progress made OpenShift 4 possible.

        Let’s take a deeper look at what will change in the v1 API of Custom Resource Definitions (in the apiextensions.k8s.io/v1 API group). The main theme is around consistency of data stored in CustomResources:

      • Kubernetes 1.16: Custom Resources, Overhauled Metrics, and Volume Extensions

        We’re pleased to announce the delivery of Kubernetes 1.16, our third release of 2019! Kubernetes 1.16 consists of 31 enhancements: 8 enhancements moving to stable, 8 enhancements in beta, and 15 enhancements in alpha.

      • Project Quarks: Native Cloud Foundry for Kubernetes

        At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Vlad Iovanov of SUSE gave a keynote demo of Project Quarks, the project that integrates Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes, by packaging the Cloud Foundry Application Runtime as containers instead of virtual machines. Vlad explains the current capabilities of Quarks, with a look at its future as a Kubernetes Operator. It’s a fairly technical topic, but Vlad uses creative diagrams and an understandable demo to show the power of Quarks.

        Cloud Foundry Foundation has posted all recorded talks from CF Summit EU on YouTube. Check them out if you want to learn more about what is happening in the Cloud Foundry world! I’ll be posting more SUSE Cloud Application Platform talks here over the coming days. Watch Vlad’s talk below:

      • IBM

        • Hello Kubernetes 1.16: Custom Resource Definitions ease the creation and long term management of APIs

          Kubernetes 1.16 is expected to arrive this week, and with it comes a host of new changes that help ease management for users of this container orchestration platform. For users of Kubernetes, and of Red Hat OpenShift, this release signals the arrival of the general availability for Custom Resource Definitions (CRDs).

          When building open source software, duties and tasks must be distributed among large numbers of contributors, some of whom may even be in direct competition with one another. While this may sound like a risky, Machiavellian scenario, in practice, there’s far less rivalry. Instead, the whole project becomes a collaborative board game with individual high scores.

          Those high scores ebb and flow as teams take charge of features, lead them to completion and exchange leadership roles over the course of the development of the project. We say all that to say this: Kubernetes 1.16 saw a great deal of work and guidance across the ecosystem, as well as from Red Hat and Google (top upstream corporate contributors). All vendors and the community at large can benefit from the updates made in this release, especially with the prime time for CRDs, which are a main extension point for building cloud native applications on Kubernetes.

        • Announcing Kanidm – A new IDM project

          Today I’m starting to talk about my new project – Kanidm. Kanidm is an IDM project designed to be correct, simple and scalable. As an IDM project we should be able to store the identities and groups of people, authenticate them securely to various other infrastructure components and services, and much more.

          You can find the source for kanidm on github.

          For more details about what the project is planning to achieve, and what we have already implemented please see the github.

        • CentOS Linux 7.7 Officially Released, Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7

          While the project is still working on the CentOS 8.x series, which will be based on the recently released Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 operating system series and will be released next month, the CentOS 7.x series has been updated to version 1908, an incremental update based on the source code of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7.

          Highlights of the CentOS Linux 7.7 (1908) release include the Python 3.6 interpreter by default, BIND 9.11 as default Domain Name System software, and Chrony 3.4 as default Network Time Protocol implementation, improved security profiles in Anaconda, improved bug reporting, as well as all the important security and package updates from upstream.

        • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and CentOS 6 Receive Important Kernel Security Update

          Marked by the Red Hat Product Security team as having a security impact of “Important,” the new Linux kernel security update is here to patch a memory corruption (CVE-2018-9568) that occurred due to incorrect socket cloning and a NULL pointer dereference (CVE-2019-11810) discovered in drivers/scsi/megaraid/megaraid_sas_base.c, which could lead to a denial of service.

          Also fixed in this update are two bugs affecting the performance of the Linux kernel on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 6 systems, namely a fragmented packets timing out issue and the backport TCP follow-up for small buffers. These two bugs can be corrected if you install the new kernel versions for your operating system.

    • Audiocasts/Shows

      • 09/18/2019 | Linux Headlines

        Google’s Stadia good news, VM encryption comes to an OpenStack near you, and details on Ubuntu 19.10′s 32-bit support.

        Plus significant changes for Chef’s certification program, and more.

      • mintCast 317.5 – Peer into the Void

        This week, in our Innards section, we interview Toyam Cox, maintainer for Void Linux.

      • Linux 5.3, GNOME 3.34, Manjaro, Destination Linux Network, Mumble, Telegram | This Week in Linux 81

        On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got the 5.3 release of the Linux Kernel. GNOME recently released their latest version of the GNOME Shell with GNOME 3.34. Manjaro is leveling up by creating a new business around their distro.

      • Positive in the Freedom Dimension | LINUX Unplugged 319

        Richard Stallman has resigned as president and director of the Free Software Foundation, and that’s just one of the major shifts this week.

        Also what makes Manjaro unique? We chat with one of the founders and find out why it’s much more than a desktop environment.

        Special Guests: Alex Kretzschmar, Bernhard Landauer, Brent Gervais, and Neal Gompa.

      • FLOSS Weekly 547: OggCamp

        OggCamp is an unconference celebrating Free Culture, Free and Open Source Software, hardware hacking, digital rights, and all manner of collaborative cultural activities and is committed to creating a conference that is as inclusive as possible.

      • Talk Python to Me: #230 Python in digital humanities research

        You’ve often heard me talk about Python as a superpower. It can amplify whatever you’re interested in or what you have specialized in for your career. This episode is an amazing example of this. You’ll meet Cornelis van Lit. He is a scholar of medieval Islamic philosophy and woks at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. What he is doing with Python is pretty amazing.

      • Cultivating The Python Community In Argentina

        The Python community in Argentina is large and active, thanks largely to the motivated individuals who manage and organize it. In this episode Facundo Batista explains how he helped to found the Python user group for Argentina and the work that he does to make it accessible and welcoming. He discusses the challenges of encompassing such a large and distributed group, the types of events, resources, and projects that they build, and his own efforts to make information free and available. He is an impressive individual with a substantial list of accomplishments, as well as exhibiting the best of what the global Python community has to offer.

      • Episode #148: The ASGI revolution is upon us!
      • Noodlings | Commander X16, BDLL and openSUSE News

        The mission of the computer. Similar to the Commodore 64 but made with off the shelf components. As far as the architecture goes, it is actually closer to the VIC-20 on board design but far, far more capable. I am rarely excited about new things, I like my old computers and really existing technology. I tend to drag my heels at the very thought of getting something new. This, for whatever reason gets me excited and I can’t exactly put my finger on it.

        This all started out as a kind of pondering in 2018 and in February 2019 with a video from David Murray, the 8-bit Guy’s Dream Computer. the discussion started by the 8-bit Guy

        The initial design started with the Gameduino for the video chip which had some technical hurdles and was based on an obsolete, as in, no longer supported, chip that doesn’t have a large pool of developers and hackers working on it.

        After some discussions and planning, it was decided to base it largely off of the VIC-20 as most of the chips are still available today and it is a known working design. Some of the changes would be a faster processor, better video and better sound components.

    • Kernel Space

      • Linux 5.3 releases with support for AMD Navi GPUs, Zhaoxin x86 CPUs and power usage improvements

        Two days ago, Linus Torvalds, the principal developer of the Linux kernel announced the release of Linux 5.3 on the Linux Kernel Mailing List (lkml). This major release brings new support for AMD Navi GPUs, the umwait x86 instructions, and Intel speed select. Linux 5.3 also presents a new pidfd_open(2) system call and 16 millions new IPv4 addresses in the 0.0.0.0/8 range. There are also many new drivers and improvements in this release.

        The previous version, Linux 5.2 was released more than two months ago. It included Sound Open Firmware project, new mount API, improved pressure stall information and more.

      • Linux 5.4 Power Management Updates Sent In But Without AMD CPPC Changes

        The Linux 5.4 power management changes have been submitted for this next version of the Linux kernel.

        This time around the power management work isn’t particularly exciting with no breakthroughs for the Intel P-State driver, no major changes to the other prominent CPUFreq drivers/governors, and no AMD CPPC support for their new processors.

      • Linux 5.4 Preps For Intel Tiger Lake, Elkhart Lake & Lightning Mountain + Killing MPX

        The Linux 5.4 x86/cpu changes are as busy as always on the Intel side.

        The Linux 5.4 x86/cpu code changes include cleaning up the Intel CPU naming conventions within definitions in the code. The changes now provide a standardized convention for dealing with Intel CPU core names and their variations within the kernel code rather than the naming convention mess that had come about over the years. This doesn’t impact end-users, but cleans up the kernel code to be less confusing.

      • Microsoft exFAT File-System Mailed In For Linux 5.4 Along With Promoted EROFS & Greybus

        Greg Kroah-Hartman began volleying his Linux 5.4 kernel pull requests today of the subsystems he oversees. The most significant of this morning’s pull requests are the staging area changes that include the Microsoft exFAT file-system support.

        As we’ve been expecting, Linux 5.4 is bringing exFAT support after last month’s surprise announcement by Microsoft publishing the exFAT specification and giving it an open-source blessing for integrating the file-system support at long last into the Linux kernel.

      • Improved Fscrypt Sent In For Linux 5.4 To Offer Better Native File Encryption Handling

        In addition to submitting the FS-VERITY file authentication code for Linux 5.4, Google’s Eric Biggers has sent out his big update to the fscrypt file encryption framework for this next kernel revision.

        Fscrypt as a reminder is a kernel framework providing native file encryption support to file-systems. Currently Fscrypt is used by EXT4, F2FS, and UBIFS while being used by Google for at least new Android use-cases. Fscrypt has been around for several kernel cycles now but for Linux 5.4 is seeing its first big update.

      • Topics from the Open Printing microconference

        On day two of the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference, two of the principals behind the Open Printing project led the very first Open Printing microconference. Project leader Till Kamppeter and program manager Aveek Basu described the current state of printing on Linux and some of the plans for the future, including supporting scanning for multi-function devices. The picture they painted was rosy, at least for printing, which may not quite match the experience of many Linux users. As with many projects, though, Open Printing is starved for contributors—something that was reflected in the sparse attendance at the microconference.

        Basu began by pointing out that some attendees had likely printed their boarding passes from Linux, which highlights the importance of printing for Linux. People use it for bank documents, transport tickets, and more. He has been at Lexmark for 11 years, working on printing for Linux, macOS, and other Unix-based systems. Kamppeter said that he has been the Open Printing leader since 2001. The idea of the project is to do everything possible to make printing “just work” with Linux and other operating systems; the goal is “plug and print”.

      • What happens to kernel staging-tree code

        The staging tree was added to the kernel in 2008 for the 2.6.28 development cycle as a way to ease the process of getting substandard device drivers into shape and merged into the mainline. It has been followed by controversy for just about as long. The recent disagreements over the EROFS and exFAT filesystems have reignited many of the arguments over whether the staging tree is beneficial to the kernel community or not. LWN cannot answer that question, but we can look into what has transpired in the staging tree in its first eleven years to see if there are any conclusions to be drawn there.

        The core idea behind the staging tree is that it is open to code that does not live up to the normal standards for inclusion into the kernel. Once a driver is added there, it is available to anybody who is brave enough to try to make use of it, but the real purpose is to allow developers to improve the code to the point that it is ready to go into the kernel proper. It serves as an easy place for new developers to try out simple changes and, when it works well, it helps the kernel to gain hardware support that might otherwise languish out-of-tree indefinitely.

      • The USB debugging arsenal

        At the 2019 Embedded Linux Conference North America, which was held in San Diego in August, Krzysztof Opasiak gave a presentation on demystifying the ways to monitor—and even change—USB traffic on a Linux system. He started with the basics of the USB protocol and worked up into software and hardware tools to observe, modify, and fuzz the messages that get sent. Those tools are part of the arsenal that is available to those interested in looking deeply into USB.

        Opasiak works in Poland for what he called a “small Korean company” (Samsung). He noted that it is not that easy to sniff USB traffic and that the ways to do so are not well known. But “there are no dragons”; nothing bad will happen if you do so. In some ways, USB is like the internet and some of the same tools can be used for both.

      • 5.3 Kernel development cycle statistics

        It’s that time of the development cycle again: work on the 5.3 kernel is winding down with an expected final release date of September 15. Read on for LWN’s traditional look at where the code in 5.3 came from in this relatively busy development cycle.
        As of this writing, 14,435 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for 5.3; these changes were contributed by 1,846 developers

      • Linux Foundation

        • Broad Deployment Of Cloud Foundry Almost Double In Just 2 Years

          As businesses embark on their digital transformation journey, developers are driving innovation across cloud native environments for building into the future. According to a recently released report by Cloud Foundry Foundation, 45 percent of user respondents describe their Cloud Foundry use as “broad” compared to 30 percent in 2018 and 24 percent in 2017. The report also revealed that 39 percent of developers are deploying applications in less than one day.

          What points out towards a healthy and growing community of developers is the fact that almost one in five respondents started using Cloud Foundry in just the last 12 months.

        • The Linux Foundation to Host Open Source Project for Drone Aviation Interoperability

          The Linux Foundation today announced it will host the InterUSS Platform Open Source Project to enable trusted, secure and scalable interoperability between UAS Service Suppliers (USSs) that advances safe, equitable and efficient drone operations. Initial contributors include both industry and regulatory organizations Wing, AirMap, Uber and the Swiss Federal Office of Civil Aviation (FOCA).

          Similar to the evolution of cities, our skies are becoming busier with traffic. In an effort to unleash innovation and ensure safety, aviation regulators around the world are implementing UAS Traffic Management (UTM, also referred to as U-Space) to support rapidly increasing and highly diverse drone operations. Under UTM, a set of USSs (also known as U-Space Service Providers orUSPs) assist drone operators to conduct safe and compliant operations. USSs can provide service in overlapping airspace and share data when required to support services such as a strategic deconfliction of flight plans and remote identification and industry is developing standards for this data sharing through organizations such as ASTM International. The InterUSS Project provides a forum for collaboration and development of standards-compliant, open source implementations that facilitate communication in the UTM/U-Space environment.

      • CPU/GPU/Graphics Stack

        • AMD EPYC 7H12 Announced As New 280 Watt Processor For High Performance Computing

          From Rome, Italy this afternoon AMD not only announced more than 100 world records have been broken with their new EPYC “Rome” processors, but there is also a new SKU! Meet the EPYC 7H12.

          The EPYC 7H12 doesn’t quite follow the naming convention of the rest of the EPYC Rome line-up announced back in August as it’s a special part. The EPYC 7H12 is more akin to Intel’s Cascadelake-AP line-up but with more broad availability and just a higher clocked / higher power part as opposed to tacking on extra dies. But it carries the same focus on delivering maximum HPC performance.

        • Nvidia Open Sources Its Deep Learning Compiler

          System architects and software teams now have the complete source for the fully open software and hardware inference platform.

        • NVIDIA Bringing Up Open-Source Volta GPU Support For Their Xavier SoC

          While NVIDIA doesn’t contribute much open-source Linux driver code as it concerns their desktop GPUs (though they have been ramping up documentation), when it comes to Tegra/embedded is where they have contributed improvements and new hardware support to Nouveau and associated driver code in the past several years. NVIDIA’s open-source Tegra/embedded contributions come as a result of customer demand/requirements. Their latest work is preparing to finally bring-up the “GV11B” Volta graphics found within last year’s Tegra Xavier SoC.

        • Valve’s ACO Shader Compiler Under Review For The Mesa Radeon Vulkan Driver

          The RADV “ACO” shader compiler announced by Valve back in July for the fastest compilation speeds and best possible code generation may soon be hitting mainline Mesa for the open-source AMD Linux graphics stack.

          The ACO shader compiler as an alternative to the existing AMDGPU LLVM shader compiler back-end has shown quite promising results for Linux games. ACO has become more featureful over time and is now largely at feature parity to the existing shader compilation support while generally offering some performance advantages, thanks to the effort and funding by Valve.

    • Benchmarks

      • FreeBSD 12 & DragonFlyBSD 5.6 Running Well On The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X + MSI X570 GODLIKE

        For those wondering how well FreeBSD and DragonFlyBSD are handling AMD’s new Ryzen 3000 series desktop processors, here are some benchmarks on a Ryzen 7 3700X with MSI MEG X570 GODLIKE where both of these popular BSD operating systems were working out-of-the-box. For some fun mid-week benchmarking, here are those results of FreeBSD 12.0 and DragonFlyBSD 5.6.2 up against openSUSE Tumbleweed and Ubuntu 19.04.

        Back in July I looked at FreeBSD 12 on the Ryzen 9 3900X but at that time at least DragonFlyBSD had troubles booting on that system. When trying out the Ryzen 7 3700X + MSI GODLIKE X570 motherboard on the latest BIOS, everything “just worked” without any compatibility issues for either of these BSDs.

    • Applications

      • Best Essential Apps for Linux 2019

        You might be a beginner looking to explore Linux and you are at a loss of what Apps you should essentially be using. So what are the best essential Apps for Linux? In this guide, we have put together a list of what we would consider as the most necessary applications that you should have in your Linux system to have a wholesome experience.

      • Samba 4.11.0 Available for Download
        Samba 4.11 has changed how the AD database is stored on disk. AD users should
        not really be affected by this change when upgrading to 4.11. However, AD
        users should be extremely careful if they need to downgrade from Samba 4.11 to
        an older release.
        
        Samba 4.11 maintains database compatibility with older Samba releases. The
        database will automatically get rewritten in the new 4.11 format when you
        first start the upgraded samba executable.
        
        However, when downgrading from 4.11 you will need to manually downgrade the AD
        database yourself. Note that you will need to do this step before you install
        the downgraded Samba packages. For more details, see:
        
        https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Downgrading_an_Active_Directory_DC
        
        When either upgrading or downgrading, users should also avoid making any
        database modifications between installing the new Samba packages and starting
        the samba executable.
        
      • Samba 4.11 Released With Much Better Scalability While Disabling SMB1 By Default

        Samba 4.11 is out as the latest big feature update to this SMB/CIFS/AD implementation for offering better Windows interoperability with Linux and other platforms. The changes in Samba 4.11 are aplenty that we are a bit surprised it wasn’t called Samba 5.0.

        Perhaps most exciting is Samba 4.11 having big scalability improvements to the point that it should be able to scale to 100,000+ users.

    • Instructionals/Technical

    • Games

      • AMD Linux Driver’s LRU Bulk Moves Can Be A Big Help For Demanding Linux Games

        Sadly not currently queued as a fix for the Linux 5.4 kernel, re-enabling the LRU bulk moves functionality can be a significant boost for helping with the Radeon graphics driver performance for Linux gaming.

        As written about last week, there’s been some signs of soon re-enabling the performance-boosting “bulk moves” functionality. The LRU bulk moves functionality was disabled in the AMDGPU driver back during Linux 4.20 but since Linux 5.1 it’s believed all the bugs have been ironed out for this functionality to migrate PD/PT buffers to the least recently used list in a bulk operation.

      • This Is the Police spin-off strategy game Rebel Cops has released with Linux support

        Focusing exclusively on the turn-based combat found in This Is the Police 2, the new spin-off game Rebel Cops is officially out now with Linux support. Note: Copy provided by GOG.

        A new criminal power which has set foot in town and the community leaders, politicians and local police have basically surrendered and so it seemed like all hope was lost. That was, until you and you crew stepped in. You lead a rough and ready group of renegade cops who refuse to give in.

      • The latest update to the city-builder god game The Universim adds riots, Twitch integration and some automation

        Crytivo continue expanding their city-builder The Universim, with the Pitchfork Patch now out and it’s quite a big one.

        Added in this patch is a new Riots feature. If you fail them, they will respond. So if global happiness drops too low or there’s too much crime you might see your nuggets run around rioting. Fires might be caused, damage to structures and more. They can be dealt with a few ways like letting them burn out, arresting them or using some god powers.

        The Stone Age Town Hall has been added in, allowing a little more automation. This building allows Elders to sort out the essential needs of your nuggets (like food and water), it will also auto-assign workers to buildings and more allowing you to sit back and appreciate watching everything grow.

      • A95X Max Plus S922X TV Box Targets Gaming with Wii-like Motion Sensing Remote & Bluetooth Gamepad

        Unless a new processor is out, we don’t cover most TV boxes as they mostly provide the same features with little differentiation between products.

      • Area 86, an amusing physics-based escape room puzzler is coming to Linux

        Area 86 takes the idea of an escape room game and turns it into a physics-based puzzler and it’s coming to Linux next month.

        Linux support is already in and live, as the developer actually sent a preview copy to our GamingOnLinux Curator on Steam. Inspired by the likes of Human: Fall Flat, Overcooked and Portal it tasks you with helping a little robot escape a series of rooms and it’s actually quite amusing.

      • Prison Architect updated with more free content, needs a fix for it running on Linux

        Now that Paradox own the rights to Prison Architect and Double Eleven are in charge of development, they’re continuing the free updates.

        The Slammer update was released yesterday and one of the major changes is an overhaul to Deployment. The presentation of visuals of the interface were improved so you can see your prison, you can assign Armed Guards and Dog Handlers to patrols and zones, you can have 2 different intersecting patrol routes plus routes and zones can be prioritized.

      • Paradox have released a big free update for Europa Universalis IV, fix included for Linux

        Paradox Development Studio have released another big free content update to the empire building game Europa Universalis IV.

      • Receiver, the experimental FPS from Wolfire Games had a big update recently (updated)

        Receiver is a name I’ve not heard in a long time, the indie FPS released back in 2013 by Wolfire Games and it’s just seen a big update.

        There’s no new enemies or levels in this update, instead Wolfire focused on the tech that runs the game. In this case it’s the Unity game engine and they gave it quite a big update. It also adds in some graphical prettiness and other bits like that.

      • Backspace Bouken, the dungeon crawler that needs you to type out encounters has a fresh demo out

        RNG Party Games recently put out a freshly baked demo version of the typing dungeon crawler Backspace Bouken. It’s a really sweet idea and thoroughly flips classic dungeon crawling on its head.

      • Might and Delight just announced Book of Travels, a unique new RPG that will support Linux

        Might and Delight (Meadow, Shelter) announced something very interesting just recently called Book of Travels. It’s what they say is a TMO (Tiny Multiplayer Online) game and it looks pretty awesome.

        It sounds like nothing else, this could be one of the most unique RPGs I’ve seen in a very long time. With an art style that looks like it has been painted, with a land that’s inspired by old-world fairytales, Eastern mythologies and early industrial eras. I’m most curious to see how they’re handling the online side though. Their current explanation doesn’t help much, just that “other players are few, but your paths will cross – it’s up to you to choose to travel together or go it alone”. There’s no Guilds or other social stuff, to make “your temporary fellowships unique and memorable”.

      • Beautiful sci-fi point and click adventure ENCODYA is fully funded and heading to Linux

        ENCODYA is a very impressive sci-fi point and click adventure with a fantastic style and the good news is the recent Kickstarter campaign was very much a success.

        Ending yesterday with €46,543 from 603 backers. Curiously, for that amount of funding that’s quite a small amount of supporters. Looking at the tiers, they had three people sign up to the €5,000 level to be classed as a “co-producer” giving them a few bonuses like a logo during the start and end screen. Pretty amazing really to see a few people give such a huge amount of support to an indie game.

      • The delightfully weird adventure Little Misfortune has released

        From the creator of Fran Bow and sharing the same world comes another strange creepy adventure with Little Misfortune, out today with Linux support.

      • Steam Play’s Proton 4.11-5 Released With Fixes & Optimizations

        Barely a week since the release of Proton 4.11-4, Valve’s stellar Linux crew in cooperation with CodeWeavers have issued Proton 4.11-5 as the latest update to this Wine 4.11 downstream that powers Steam Play for running Windows games on Linux.

        Fixes in Proton 4.11-5 include a crash with certain input devices and a regression of the previous release and a fix for games running in virtual desktops as well as for games with semi-transparent windows.

      • Steam Play gets a small update with Proton 4.11-5 now available

        CodeWeavers and Valve have updated Steam Play once again, this time it’s quite a small release to fix up some issues.

    • Desktop Environments/WMs

      • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

        • Introducing KDToolBox

          At KDAB we invest a significant amount of efforts in research and development. We are always looking for new tooling, libraries and utilities that can make our job easier and improve the C++ and Qt ecosystems. Ultimately, the gained knowledge and skills make our customers happier.

          As part of this process we develop lots of code, usually starting as small experiments and/or proof-of-concept. Some of those experiments mature and become fully fledged solutions, such as our famous GammaRay, the introspection tool for Qt applications; hotspot, the GUI to Linux perf; and heaptrack, a heap memory profiler.

        • Qt Quick on Vulkan, Metal, and Direct3D – Part 2

          Let’s continue where we left off in the first post. We saw an example of a Qt Quick application running on Linux on top of OpenGL and Vulkan. We also saw a Vulkan frame capture in RenderDoc, which is not just an invaluable tool during Qt development work, but can also be useful to anyone who wants to dig deeper and understand better how Qt Quick renders a frame (or for that matter troubleshoot problems in an application’s rendering). Now in this post we are going to focus on what Qt 5.14 offers for macOS and Windows.

      • GNOME Desktop/GTK

        • Epiphany Technology Preview Users: Action Required

          Epiphany Technology Preview has moved from https://sdk.gnome.org to https://nightly.gnome.org. The old Epiphany Technology Preview is now end-of-life. Action is required to update. If you installed Epiphany Technology Preview prior to a couple minutes ago, uninstall it using GNOME Software and then reinstall using this new flatpakref.

    • Distributions

      • Linux Distribution Comparison

        There are currently nearly 300 active Linux distributions, which makes choosing just one somewhat difficult, especially if you would rather make your own informed decision instead of relying on the recommendation of someone else. The good news is that the number of major Linux distributions, which stand out in a significant way and are more than simple reskins of existing distributions, is much smaller.
        If we were to represent the world of Linux distribution as a map, the 10 distributions listed in this article would be the continents of the world, while other distributions would be islands of various sizes. Just like there is no “best” continent in the real world, the same holds true in the world of Linux distributions.

        Each Linux distribution is designed with a different use case in mind, and the same distribution can be perfect for one user and unusable for another one. That’s why the distributions in this article aren’t listed in any particular order and are numbered just for the sake of convenience.

      • Autonomous Linux Is Like Putting Linux On Autopilot

        Developers should not waste their time in plumbing or maintaining their Linux systems.

      • Wim Coekaerts Interview At Oracle OpenWorld

        At the Oracle OpenWorld event, we sat down with Wim Coekaerts – Senior Vice President, Software Development at Oracle – who has been leading Linux work at Oracle.

      • ManageEngine Announces New Support For Oracle Cloud

        Applications Manager helps IT admins gain a 360-degree view into the performance of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure and Oracle VM.

      • Oracle Autonomous Linux – ‘world’s first’ autonomous OS announced

        Oracle has announced its world’s first autonomous operating system which provisions itself, scales itself, tunes itself and patches itself while running. Autonomous Linux powers Oracle Cloud and Oracle Engineered Systems as it is based on Oracle Linux.

        “Autonomy is the defining technology of a second-generation cloud,” Oracle co-founder and CTO Larry Ellison contended in his keynote while addressing at the Oracle OpenWorld conference in San Francisco. He further added any Red Hat application would run unchanged on Oracle Autonomous Linux.

      • Oracle Autonomous Linux: A Self Updating, Self Patching Linux Distribution for Cloud Computing

        Automation is the growing trend in the IT industry. The aim is to remove the manual interference from the repetitive tasks. Oracle has taken another step into the automation world by launching Oracle Autonomous Linux that is surely going to benefit the IoT and CLoud Computing industry.

        [...]

        The biggest feature that Oracle Autonomous Linux is reduced maintenance costs. According to Oracle’s site, Autonomous Linux “uses advanced machine learning and autonomous capabilities to deliver unprecedented cost savings, security, and availability and frees up critical IT resources to tackle more strategic initiatives”.

        Autonomous Linux can install updates and patches without human interference. These automatic updates include patches for the “Linux kernel and key user space libraries”. “This requires no downtime along with protection from both external attacks and malicious internal users.” They can also take place while the system is running to reduce downtime. Autonomous Linux also handles scaling automatically to ensure that all computing needs are handled.

        Ellison highlighted how the new autonomous would improve security. He mentioned in particular how Capitol One data breach occurred because of a bad configuration. He said “One simple rule to prevent data theft: Put your data in an autonomous system. No human error, no data loss. That’s the big difference between us and AWS.”

      • New Releases

        • The [EndeavourOS] September release has arrived

          The ISO contains:

          Linux kernel 5.2.14
          Mesa 19.1.6
          Systemd 243.0
          Firefox 69 (Quantum)
          Arc-x-icons, a more complete and updated version than the Arc icon set used previously.
          The new EndeavourOS welcome launcher on both the live environment as on the installed system. It’s a one-click menu to the wiki for the basic system commands and setting up your hardware.
          Our Nvidia-installer is now installed by default which now also installs the dkms drivers.
          Gtop system monitor, a nice terminal-based system load monitor that launches from the panel.

      • Screenshots/Screencasts

      • Fedora Family

        • Fedora Linux 31 Enters Beta, Says Goodbye to 32-Bit Systems

          Fedora 31 has been in development since early this summer and the beta version is now available to download for those who want to get an early taste of what’s coming in the final release later this fall. The most important change in the Fedora 31 release is the fact that there won’t be any 32-bit (i386) ISO images released, nor software repositories.

          “We recognize that this means newer Fedora releases will no longer work on some older hardware, but the fact is there just hasn’t been enough contributor interest in maintaining i686, and we can provide greater benefit for the majority of our users by focusing on modern architectures,” said Matthew Miller, Fedora Project Leader.

        • Renewing the Modularity objective

          Now that Modularity is available for all Fedora variants, it’s time to address issues discovered and improve the experience for packagers and users. The Modularity team identified a number of projects that will improve the usefulness of Modularity and the experience of creating modules for packagers. We are proposing a renewed objective to the Fedora Council.

      • Debian Family

        • Debian May Need To Re-Evaluate Its Interest In “Init System Diversity”

          Debian Project Leader Sam Hartman has shared his August 2019 notes where he outlines the frustrations and issues that have come up as a result of init system diversity with some developers still aiming to viably support systemd alternatives within Debian.

          Stemming from elogind being blocked from transitioning to testing and the lack of clarity into that, Hartman was pulled in to try to help mediate the matter and get to the bottom of the situation with a lack of cooperation between the elogind and systemd maintainers for Debian as well as the release team. Elogind is used by some distributions as an implementation of systemd’s logind, well, outside of systemd as a standalone daemon. Elogind is one of the pieces to the puzzle for trying to maintain a modern, systemd-free Linux distribution.

      • Canonical/Ubuntu Family

        • Kubernetes 1.16 available from Canonical

          Canonical announces full enterprise support for Kubernetes 1.16, with support covering Charmed Kubernetes, MicroK8s and kubeadm.

          MicroK8s will be updated with Kubernetes 1.16 enabling users access to the latest upstream release with a single-line command in under 60 seconds. In addition, MicroK8s gets new add-ons with one line installs of Helm and Cilium as well as enhancements, upgrades and bug fixes. Cilium adds enhanced networking features including Kubernetes Network Policy support. With MicroK8s 1.16, users can develop and deploy enterprise grade Kubernetes on any Linux desktop, server or VM across 42 Linux distros.

          Canonical’s Charmed Kubernetes 1.16 will come with exciting changes like support for Kata Containers, AWS IAM, SSL passthrough and more. Using Kata Containers, insecure or untrusted pods can be run safely in isolation without disrupting trusted pods in deployments. Identity Access Management on AWS can be used to login to your Charmed Kubernetes cluster. Users get more control over their deployments while benefitting from reduced complexity due to improved LXD support and enhanced Prometheus and OpenStack integration.

          “At Canonical, we enable enterprises by reducing the complexity of their Kubernetes deployments. We are actively involved in the Kubernetes community to ensure we listen to, and support our users’ and partners’ needs. Staying on top of security flaws, community issues and features to improve Kubernetes is critical to us. We keep the Ubuntu ecosystem updated with the latest Kubernetes, as soon as it becomes available upstream,” commented Ammar Naqvi, Product Manager at Canonical.

        • Ubuntu 19.10 Release Schedule and Expected Features

          This is a continually updated article to inform you about Ubuntu 19.10 release date, features and other important things associated with it.

          The development for Ubuntu 19.10 is nearing its end and it’s time to look at what new features and improvement this new release brings.

          Ubuntu 19.10 is an important release because it will set the course of development for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (long term support). I have always felt that the LTS version release takes a lot of features from its predecessor.

          In other words, Ubuntu 19.10 will be a glimpse of the features you would be getting in Ubuntu 20.04.

        • Announcing the new IBM LinuxONE III with Ubuntu

          Enterprises today need the most secure, and flexible system to support their initiatives, and for that system to grow and evolve for tomorrow. The latest LinuxONE system was designed to support mission-critical initiatives and allow enterprises to be innovative as they design and scale their environment. LinuxONE III provides features for advanced data protection and privacy, enterprise resiliency and scalability, and cloud enablement and integration.

          Reliability and continuity are critical to the success of any business. With this release, they’ll benefit from up to 10:1 consolidation for key workloads, and up to 190 cores and 40TB of memory. And with 99.999%* availability and up to 7.4x better resilience, enterprises can confidently run and scale their business-critical workloads. The new LinuxONE III provides the highest levels of availability and scalability, so business-critical workloads run flawlessly, recover quickly, and grow seamlessly.

    • Devices/Embedded

    • Free, Libre, and Open Source Software

      • Why Open Source continues to be the foundation for modern IT

        Open source technology is no longer an outlier in the modern world, it’s the foundation for development and collaboration.

        Sitting at the base of the open source movement is the Linux Foundation, which despite having the name Linux in its title, is about much more than just Linux and today is comprised of multiple foundations, each seeking to advance open source technology and development processes. At the recent Open Source Summit North America event held in San Diego, the width and breadth of open source was discussed ranging from gaming to networking, to the movie business ,to initiatives that can literally help save humanity.

        “The cool thing is that no matter whether it’s networking, Linux kernel projects, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation projects like Kubernetes, or the film industry with the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF), you know open source is really pushing innovation beyond software and into all sorts of different areas,” Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation said during his keynote address.

      • Events

        • CF Summit Panel Discussion: Cloud Foundry Test Kitchen

          At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Jeff Hobbs of SUSE participated in a re-named “Will it Blend?” panel discussion, talking about whether Kubernetes is the future of Cloud Foundry and how other technologies could potentially be integrated. It seems that Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry did indeed blend and the future is looking bright!

          Cloud Foundry Foundation has posted all recorded talks from CF Summit EU on YouTube. Check them out if you want to learn more about what is happening in the Cloud Foundry world! I’ll be posting more SUSE Cloud Application Platform talks here over the coming days. Watch Vlad’s talk below…

        • FOSDEMs bespoke video hardware and software.

          You can see the white hdmi cable running from the lime2 hdmi out to the monitor. This old monitor is my test “projector”, the fact that it is 4:3 makes it a good test subject.

          You can also see a black cable from the capture board to another blue board with a red led. This is a banana-pi M1 as this is the current SBC being used in the FOSDEM video boxes, and i had one lying around anyway, doing nothing. It spews out a test image.

          What you are seeing here is live captured data at 1280×720@60Hz, displayed on the monitor, and in the background of the status LCD, with a 1 to 2 frame delay.

        • Ubucon Europe 2019: Ubucon talks schedule is live!

          It is now 3 weeks before Ubucon starts, and what better way to remind everyone that we are ready to go by showing our full schedule!

          Don’t forget to register to our pre-ubucon cultural events if you want to know a little bit more of Sintra, and don’t forget as well to register for the event if you would like to receive some swag!

          All of this would not be possible without the support of our sponsors and the participation of volunteers and speakers for which we are very grateful.

        • Qt Contributors’ Summit 2019

          The Qt Contributors’ Summit is an annual event open to anyone who has contributed toward the Qt project in the past year. Contributions can include code, helping on the forum, maintaining the wiki, or any other form of moving the Qt project forward.

          After visiting beautiful Oslo in June last year, we invite you this year to the premises of The Qt Company in Berlin-Adlershof. And because of Qt 6 on the horizon, we have extended the event to three days! The first day will be all about sharing a common vision, while the following two days will be organized as an Unconference. We will have plenty of space to allow you to meet, collaborate, and get stuff done.

        • Alluxio Announces First ‘Data Orchestration Summit’ [Ed: Corporate 'summit' with lots of openwashing]

          This event also brings together creators of open source technologies and leaders in cloud to discuss the latest solutions to today’s biggest data problems.

      • Web Browsers

        • Mozilla

          • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Upcoming docs.rs changes

            On September 30th breaking changes will be deployed to the docs.rs build environment. docs.rs is a free service building and hosting documentation for all the crates published on crates.io. It’s open source, maintained by the Rustdoc team and operated by the Infrastructure team.

          • Flatulence, Crystals, and Happy Little Accidents

            The recording of my Rust Conf talk on algorithmic art and pen plotters is up on YouTube!

            [...]

            I really enjoyed giving this talk, and I think it went well. I want more creative coding, joy, surprise, and silliness in the Rust community. This talk is a small attempt at contributing to that, and I hope folks left inspired.

          • You’ll get a new Firefox each month in 2020 as Mozilla speeds up releases

            Mozilla will turn the Firefox crank faster in 2020, releasing a new version of its web browser every four weeks instead of every six. If you’re using the browser, the change should deliver new features to you faster since there will be less waiting between when developers build them and when they arrive.

            “In recent quarters, we’ve had many requests to take features to market sooner. Feature teams are increasingly working in sprints that align better with shorter release cycles. Considering these factors, it is time we changed our release cadence,” Firefox team members Ritu Kothari and Yan Or said in a blog post Tuesday. “Shorter release cycles provide greater flexibility to support product planning and priority changes due to business or market requirements.”

      • Event Talks

        • How Chrome OS works upstream

          Google has a long and interesting history contributing to the upstream Linux kernel. With Chrome OS, Google has tried to learn from some of the mistakes of its past and is now working with the upstream Linux kernel as much as it can. In a session at the 2019 Open Source Summit North America, Google software engineer Doug Anderson detailed how and why Chrome OS developers work upstream. It is an effort intended to help the Linux community as well as Google.

          The Chrome OS kernel is at the core of Google’s Chromebook devices, and is based on a Linux long-term support (LTS) kernel. Anderson explained that Google picks an LTS kernel every year and all devices produced in that year will use the selected kernel. At least once during a device’s lifetime, Google expects to be able to “uprev” (switch to a newer kernel version). Anderson emphasized that if Google didn’t upstream its own patches from the Chrome OS kernel, it would make the uprev process substantially more difficult.

          Simply saying that you’ll work upstream and actually working upstream can be two different things. The process by which Chrome OS developers get their patches upstream is similar to how any other patches land in the mainline Linux kernel. What is a bit interesting is the organizational structure and process of how Google has tasked Chrome OS developers to work with upstream. Anderson explained that developers need to submit patches to the kernel mailing list and then be a little patient, giving some time for upstream to respond. A key challenge, however, is when there is no response from upstream. “When developing an upstream-first culture, the biggest problem anyone can face is silence,” Anderson said.

          Anderson emphasized that when submitting a patch to the mailing list, what a developer is looking for is some kind of feedback; whether it’s good or bad doesn’t matter, but it does matter that someone cares enough to review it. What the Chrome OS team does in the event that there is no community review is it will have other Chrome OS engineers publicly review the patch. The risk and worry of having Chrome OS engineers comment on Chrome OS patches is that the whole process might look a little scripted and there could be the perception of some bias as well. Anderson noted that it is important that only honest feedback and review is given for a patch.

        • Open Source Builds Trust & Credibility | Karyl Fowler

          Karyl Fowler is co-founder and CEO of Transmute, a company that’s building open source and decentralized identity management. We sat down with Fowler at the Oracle OpenWorld conference to talk about the work Transmute is doing.

        • What Is Infrastructure As Code?

          Rob Hirschfeld, Founder, and CEO of RackN breaks Infrastructure As Code (IaC) into six core concepts so users have a better understanding of it.

        • Everything You Need To Know About Redis Labs

          At the Oracle OpenWorld conference, we sat down with Kyle Davis – Head of Developer Advocacy at Redis Labs – to better understand what the company does.

      • Pseudo-Open Source (Openwashing)

      • Funding

        • GitLab Inhales $268M Series E, Valuation Hits $2.75B

          GitLab raised a substantial $268 million in a Series E funding round that was more than doubled what the firm had raised across all of its previous funding rounds and pushed its valuation to $2.75 billion. It also bolsters the company’s coffers as it battles in an increasingly competitive DevOps space.

          GitLab CEO Sid Sijbrandij said in an email to SDxCentral that the new Series E funds will help the company continue to move on its goal of providing a single application to support quicker delivery of software. It claims more than 100,000 organizations use its platform.

          “These funds will help us to keep up with that pace and add to that with our company engineers,” Sijbrandij explained. “We need to make sure every part of GitLab is great and that CIOs and CTOs who supply the tools for their teams know that if they bet on GitLab that we’ll stand up to their expectations.”

      • BSD

      • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

        • Richard Stallman and the Fall of the Clueless Nerd
        • Open letter to the Free Software Foundation Board of Directors

          The free software movement draws strength from an environment that is collaborative, inclusive and respectful. Diverse groups of people from all walks of life and nationalities come together and use their strengths and life experiences to contribute, share ideas, challenge the status quo, and improve technology for all. Everyone, including those who have been underrepresented and marginalized in technology, should be able to freely participate to produce useful software including in open source communities.

          Red Hat urges the FSF board to seize the opportunity during its current leadership succession by appointing a president and members of its board that are more diverse, including from a national, racial and gender perspective.

        • GNU lightning 2.1.3 released!
          GNU lightning is a library to aid in making portable programs 
          that compile assembly code at run time. 
          Development: 
          
          http://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/lightning.git
          
          Download release: 
          ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/lightning/lightning-2.1.3.tar.gz 
            2.1.3 main features are the new RISC-V port, currently supporting 
          only Linux 64 bit, and a major rewrite of the register live and 
          unknown state logic, so that a long standing issue with a live 
          register not accessed for several consecutive blocks could be 
          incorrectly assumed dead. 
          The matrix of built and tested environments is: 
          aarch64	 Linux (Linaro, Foundation_v8pkg) 
          alpha	 Linux (QEMU) 
          armv7l	 Linux (QEMU) 
          armv7hl	 Linux (QEMU) 
          hppa	 Linux (32 bit, QEMU) 
          i686	 Linux and Cygwin 
          ia64	 Linux 
          mips	 Linux (32 bit) 
          powerpc32	Linux 
          powerpc64	Linux and AIX 
          powerpc64le	Linux 
          riscv	 Linux (64 bit, QEMU) 
          s390	 Linux (Hercules) 
          s390x	 Linux (Hercules) 
          sparc	 Linux (QEMU) 
          sparc64	 Linux (QEMU) 
          x32	 Linux (QEMU) 
          x86_64	 Linux and Cygwin 
          
          
        • Top computer scientist quits MIT

          Computer scientist and GNU creator, Richard Stallman, has resigned from his position at MIT over comments he made about the Jeffrey Epstein scandal.

          On his personal website, Stallman said that he was resigning “due to pressure on MIT and me over a series of misunderstandings and mischaracterisations”.

          Stallman also stepped down as president of the Free Software Foundation, an organisation he founded in 1985.

          The sudden resignation was on the back of remarks Stallman made about sexual assault allegations involving the late artificial intelligence researcher, Marvin Minsky.

          Minsky had been embroiled in the Jeffrey Epstein scandal after a woman alleged that, at the age of 17, Epstein ordered her to have sex with various men, including Minsky.

          In a leaked email chain, Stallman defended Minsky.

        • Computer scientist Richard Stallman resigns from MIT after comments about Epstein scandal
        • Another Epstein-Related Resignation

          Stallman, a visiting professor in Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s esteemed computer science and artificial intelligence laboratory, or CSAIL, announced in a brief post to his website this week that he’s stepping down immediately “due to pressure on MIT and me over a series of misunderstandings and mischaracterizations.”
          He wrote in a slightly longer email to CSAIL that has since been circulated online that “misleading media” coverage “totally mischaracterized my statements.” Headlines say “that I defended Epstein,” Stallman wrote, but “nothing could be further from the truth. I’ve called him a ‘serial rapist’ and said he deserved to be imprisoned.”
          Yet many who read Stallman’s recent comments about the case on the CSAIL Listserv said he came across loud and clear, and that was the problem.

        • Stallman steps down MIT, FSF posts

          Famed computer scientist and activist Richard Stallman has resigned from his positions at Free Software Foundation and Massachusetts Institute of Technology over the recent comments he made concerning Jeffrey Epstein’s victims.
          Stallman, also the founder of free and open-source software movement and Free Software Foundation, resigned as the president of the FSF as well as from its board of directors.He is best known for initiation of the GNU operating system in 1983, as well as for his work campaigning for the use of free software.
          Last week it emerged that Stallman had cast doubt upon the reports that Artificial Intelligence pioneer Marvin Minsky had sexually assaulted one of Jeffrey Epstein’s victims. In an email dump sent to the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, CSAIL, mailing list that was published by Motherboard, Stallman said that ‘the most plausible scenario’ was that Epstein’s victim ‘presented herself to Marvin Minsky as entirely willing.’

        • Richard Stallman resigns from FSF, MIT after defending child rape [Ed: Why am I not surprised that Thom Holwerda is defaming RMS?]
        • Free Software Pioneer Quits MIT Over His Comments On Epstein Sex Trafficking Case

          Free software pioneer and renowned computer scientist Richard Stallman resigned from his post at MIT following recent comments about one of Jeffrey Epstein.

        • MIT scientist Richard Stallman resigns in the wake of his Jeffrey Epstein remarks

          A prominent computer scientist at MIT’s Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Laboratory has resigned following recent remarks he made debating a former professor’s alleged involvement in Jeffrey Epstein’s sex ring.

          Richard Stallman, a MacArthur genius grant recipient and Internet Hall of Fame inductee, wrote in an email to the MIT community Monday that he was “resigning effective immediately” from his position as visiting scientist at CSAIL.

          “I am doing this due to pressure on MIT and me over a series of misunderstandings and mischaracterizations,” Stallman said.

        • Software Activist Richard Stallman Resigns from MIT over Defense of Jeffrey Epstein

          In an email, Stallman argued that Virginia Giuffre, one of Epstein’s trafficking victims, consented to sex with the late MIT Professor Marvin Minsky. She “presented herself to him as entirely willing,” Stallman wrote, “I’ve concluded from various examples of accusation inflation that it is absolutely wrong to use the term ‘sexual assault’ in an accusation.”

        • Richard Stallman resigns from Free Software Foundation and MIT CSAIL

          The founder and president of the Free Software Foundation Richard Stallman has resigned in the wake of comments he made about accused sex offender Jeffrey Epstein and his victims. He is also removing himself from the foundation’s board of directors effective immediately.

          In addition, Stallman will no longer be a visiting scientist at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL).

          Stallman wrote on his website: “I am resigning effective immediately from my position in CSAIL at MIT. I am doing this due to pressure on MIT and me over a series of misunderstandings and mischaracterizations.”

          Stallman’s remarks were written after he saw an MIT event protesting Epstein on Facebook.

          In an email published by MIT alum Selam Jie Gano, Stallman wrote: “We can imagine many scenarios, but the most plausible scenario is that she presented herself to him as entirely willing. Assuming she was being coerced by Epstein, he would have had every reason to tell her to conceal that from most of his associates.”

        • Richard Stallman resigns from MIT after comments about Jeffrey Epstein

          “To the MIT community, I am resigning effective immediately from my position in CSAIL at MIT. I am doing this due to pressure on MIT and me over a series of misunderstandings and mischaracterizations.”

        • MIT scientist Richard Stallman resigns over Epstein remarks

          “I am resigning effective immediately from my position in CSAIL at MIT. I am doing this due to pressure on MIT and me over a series of misunderstandings and mischaracterizations,” he wrote in the email and then signed off with his name.

          In the leaked emails published last week by Vice, Stallman suggested that mathematician Marvin Minsky was wrongly accused of sexual assault by Epstein accuser Virginia Giuffre.

          “The word ‘assaulting’ presumes that he applied force or violence, in some unspecified way, but the article itself says no such thing. Only that they had sex,” Stallman allegedly wrote, referring to an article about Epstein accuser Virginia Giuffre’s testimony that she was forced to have sex with Minsky.

        • Richard Stallman resigns from MIT after facing backlash over Minsky comments

          Virginia Giuffre previously accused Jeffrey Epstein, the late financier, of directing her to have sex with AI pioneer and MIT professor Marvin Minsky. In Stallman’s original email, he wrote, “All I know she [Giuffre] said about Minsky is that Epstein directed her to have sex with Minsky. That does not say whether Minsky knew that she was coerced.“

          Stallman continued, “We can imagine many scenarios, but the most plausible scenario is that she presented herself to him as entirely willing.” Stallman also questioned whether or not Minsky’s behavior should be characterized as “sexual assault,” which he described as a “slippery” term.

          Following this email, Selam Jie Gano ’18 called for Stallman’s removal in a blog post published Sept. 12. “I know, now, that if prominent technology institutions won’t start firing their problematic men left right and center, we will do nothing. Ever,” Gano wrote. “Long before this incident, Stallman was contributing to an uncomfortable environment for women at MIT in a very real and visceral way.”

        • A reflection on the departure of RMS

          So Richard Stallman has resigned from his guest position at MIT and as President of the Free Software Foundation. You can easily find out all you need to know about the background from a web search and some news articles. I recommend in particular Selam G’s original articles on this topic for background, and for an excellent institutional version, the statement from the Software Freedom Conservancy.
          But I’ll give you a personal take. By my reckoning, I worked for RMS longer than any other programmer.
          1) There has been some bad reporting, and that’s a problem. While I have not waded through the entire email thread Selam G. has posted, my reaction was that RMS did not defend Epstein, and did not say that the victim in this case was acting voluntarily. But it’s not the most important problem. It’s not remotely close to being the most important problem.
          2) This was an own-goal for RMS. He has had plenty of opportunities to learn how to stfu when that’s necessary. He’s responsible for relying too much on people’s careful reading of his note, but even that’s not the problem.
          He thought that Marvin Minsky was being unfairly accused. Minsky was his friend for many many years, and I think he carries a lot of affection and loyalty for his memory. But Minsky is also dead, and there’s plenty of time to discuss at leisure whatever questions there may be about his culpability.

        • Standing on the shoulders of giants

          This changed everything, and it led to the birth of ever greater backgammon neural networks that could provide world-class competition as well as world-class analysis. The first great program to follow and raise the standard was Jellyfish, after which came Snowie, and even a magnificent open-source project: GNU Backgammon, which to this day is the second strongest backgammon software available. It too can be found at its source site. For documentation, refer to my online manual, “All About GNU”.

      • Programming/Development

        • Oracle Releases Java 13 with Remarkable New Features

          Oracle – the software giant has released Java SE and JDK 13 along with the promise to introduce more new features in the future within the six-month cycle.

          The Java 13’s binaries are now available for download with improvements in security, performance, stability, and two new additional preview features ‘Switch Expressions’ and ‘Text Blocks’, specifically designed to boost developers’ productivity level. This gives the hope that the battle of Java vs Python will be won by the former.

          Remarking on the new release, Oracle said: “Oracle JDK 13 increases developer productivity by improving the performance, stability and security of the Java SE Platform and the JDK,”.

          [...]

          Speaking of the Java 13 release, it is licensed under the GNU General Public License v2 along with the Classpath Exception (GPLv2+CPE).

          The director of Oracle’s Java SE Product Management, Sharat Chander stated “Oracle offers Java 13 for enterprises and developers. JDK 13 will receive a minimum of two updates, per the Oracle CPU schedule, before being followed by Oracle JDK 14, which is due out in March 2020, with early access builds already available.”

          Let’s look into the new features that JDK 13 comes packed with.

        • 8 Python GUI Frameworks For Developers

          Graphical User Interfaces make human-machine interactions easier as well as intuitive. It plays a crucial role as the world is shifting.

        • What’s In A Name? Tales Of Python, Perl, And The GIMP

          In the older days of open source software, major projects tended to have their Benevolent Dictators For Life who made all the final decisions, and some mature projects still operate that way. Guido van Rossum famously called his language “Python” because he liked the British comics of the same name. That’s the sort of thing that only a single developer can get away with.

          However, in these modern times of GitHub, GitLab, and other collaboration platforms, community-driven decision making has become a more and more common phenomenon, shifting software development towards democracy. People begin to think of themselves as “Python programmers” or “GIMP users” and the name of the project fuses irrevocably with their identity.

          What happens when software projects fork, develop apart, or otherwise change significantly? Obviously, to prevent confusion, they get a new name, and all of those “Perl Monks” need to become “Raku Monks”. Needless to say, what should be a trivial detail — what we’ve all decided to call this pile of ones and zeros or language constructs — can become a big deal. Don’t believe us? Here are the stories of renaming Python, Perl, and the GIMP.

        • How to teach (yourself) computer programming

          Many fellow students are likely in the same boat, the only difference being that the vast majority not only that don’t list computer science as one of their passions (but more as one of their reasons for not wanting to live anymore), but they get a very distorted view of what computer science and programming actually is.

          Said CS classes tend to be kind of a joke, not only because of the curriculum. The main reason why they are bad and boring is the way they are taught. I am going to address my main frustrations on this matter together with proposed solutions and a guide for those who want to start learning alone.

        • [Old] Perl Is Still The Goddess For Text Manipulation

          You heard me. Freedom is the word here with Perl.

          When I’m coding freely at home on my fun data science project, I rely on it to clean up my data.

          In the real world, data is often collected with loads of variations. Unless you are using someone’s “clean” dataset, you better learn to clean that data real fast.

          Yes, Perl is fast. It’s lightening fast.

        • Python alternative to Docker

          Deploying a Python app to a server is surprisingly hard. Without blinking, you’ll be dealing with virtual environments and a host of other complications.

          The landscape of deployment methods is huge. What if I told you that there is a way to build your app into a single file and it isn’t a Docker container?

          In this article, we’re going to look at common ways of deploying Python apps. We’ll explore the touted benefits of Docker containers to understand why containers are so popular for web apps. Finally, we’ll look at an alternative to Docker that may be a lot simpler for your Python web app and compare and contrast this alternative against Docker.

        • How to Convert a Python String to int

          Integers are whole numbers. In other words, they have no fractional component. Two data types you can use to store an integer in Python are int and str. These types offer flexibility for working with integers in different circumstances. In this tutorial, you’ll learn how you can convert a Python string to an int. You’ll also learn how to convert an int to a string.

        • Free Coaching For PyGotham Speakers

          I help organize PyGotham, NYC’s annual conference about the Python programming language. For the third year in a row, we’re giving our speakers free sessions with a professional speaking coach, opera singer Melissa Collom. In the past we’ve limited coaching to first-time speakers, but we’re now able to coach everyone.

        • 8 Excellent C++ Natural Language Processing Tools

          Natural language processing (NLP) is a set of techniques for using computers to detect in human language the kinds of things that humans detect automatically.

          Natural language processing (NLP) is an exciting field of computer science, artificial intelligence, and computational linguistics concerned with the interactions between computers and human (natural) languages. It includes word and sentence tokenization, text classification and sentiment analysis, spelling correction, information extraction, parsing, meaning extraction, and question answering.

  • Leftovers

    • Health/Nutrition

    • Security (Confidentiality/Integrity/Availability)

      • Canonical Outs New Linux Kernel Security Update for All Supported Ubuntu OSes

        Canonical released today a new Linux kernel security update for all supported Ubuntu releases to address three vulnerabilities across all supported architectures.

        The new Linux kernel security update addresses three vulnerabilities affecting the Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 14.04 ESM (Trusty Tahr), and Ubuntu 12.04 ESM (Precise Pangolin) operating systems.

        The first security issue addressed in this update is a a buffer overflow (CVE-2019-14835) discovered by Peter Pi in Linux kernel’s virtio network backend (vhost_net) implementation, which could allow an attacker in the guest system to either execute arbitrary code in the host OS or crash the host operating system by causing a denial of service.

      • How to break out of a hypervisor: Abuse Qemu-KVM on-Linux pre-5.3 – or VMware with an AMD driver

        pair of newly disclosed security flaws could allow malicious virtual machine guests to break out of their hypervisor’s walled gardens and execute malicious code on the host box.

        Both CVE-2019-14835 and CVE-2019-5049 are not particularly easy to exploit as they require specific types of hardware or events to occur. However, if successful, either could allow a miscreant to run malware on the host from a VM instance.

        CVE-2019-14835 was discovered and reported by Peter Pi, a member of the Tencent Blade Team. It is found in the Linux kernel versions 2.6.34 up to version 5.3, where it is patched.

      • Security updates for Wednesday

        Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox and kernel), Debian (thunderbird), Fedora (curl), openSUSE (curl and python-Werkzeug), Oracle (kernel and thunderbird), Red Hat (rh-nginx114-nginx), SUSE (curl, ibus, MozillaFirefox, firefox-glib2, firefox-gtk3, openldap2, openssl, openssl1, python-urllib3, and util-linux and shadow), and Ubuntu (linux, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-lts-trusty, linux-lts-xenial, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, and wpa).

      • SGX and security modules

        Software Guard Extensions (SGX) is a set of security-related instructions for Intel processors; it allows the creation of private regions of memory, called “enclaves”. The aim of this feature is to work like an inverted sandbox: instead of protecting the system from malicious code, it protects an application from a compromised kernel hypervisor, or other application. Linux support for SGX has existed out-of-tree for years, and the effort of upstreaming it has reached an impressive version 22 of the patch set. During the upstreaming discussion, the kernel developers discovered that the proposed SGX API did not play nicely with existing security mechanisms, including Linux security modules (LSMs).

      • GitHub acquires Semmle to help developers spot security vulnerabilities [Ed: Company in NSA PRISM pretends to care about security (and also, Microsoft now uses GitHub to change people's code without asking the developers)]

        Software hosting service GitHub has acquired Semmle, a code analysis platform that helps developers discover security vulnerabilities in large codebases.

      • GitHub Buys Semmle To Improve Open-Source Code Security

        GitHub, the Microsoft-owned open-source code repository, has acquired a startup called Semmle that specializes in helping developers analyze code for vulnerabilities.

        Nat Friedman, CEO of GitHub, announced the acquisition in a Wednesday blog post, calling it a “big step in securing the open-source supply chain.”

        Financial terms of the acquisition were not disclosed.

    • Defence/Aggression

    • Transparency/Investigative Reporting

    • Environment

      • How extreme weather threatens people with disabilitiesk

        This story originally appeared in Yale Climate Connections. It is republished here as part of the Climate News Network’s partnership with Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.

      • The Words of Water: Why Environmentalists Are Losing the Water Wars
      • For Communities in South Africa, Climate Change is Now

        Sylvia remembers the first time a government official came to speak to her community in Lephalale, in the Limpopo province, about the construction of a new coal power plant. Like many other community members, she hoped that the plant would bring much-needed jobs and prosperity to her family.  

      • Lessmeat for rich can cut heat and hunger

        Eating less meat can help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But if everyone tries it, starvation will continue to climb.

      • The Danger of Inspiration in a Time of Ecological Crisis

        Naomi Klein’s new book, On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal, has one crippling flaw—it’s inspiring. At this moment in history, inspiring talk about solutions to multiple, cascading ecological crises is dangerous.

      • ‘Young People Are Correct to Be Outraged’: Seattle City Council Urges Public Schools to Let Students Join Global Climate Strike

        “Seattle Public Schools should stand with the global climate justice movement and excuse students so they can participate in the global climate strike.”

      • ‘A Goddamn Terrifying Time to Be Alive’: Naomi Klein Explains Why a Global Green New Deal Comes First and Being Hopeful Comes After

        “How do we earn the hope that we could actually do this?” asks author of new book. “That’s the only discussion that matters.”

      • Expanding Carbon Offsets Will Not Solve the Climate Crisis or Protect Tropical Forests

        Wildfires raging across Brazil, Northern Europe and sub-Saharan Africa have focused attention on the importance of forests in capturing carbon emissions and preserving biodiversity. However, a flawed plan set for consideration later this month by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), would only increase the threat to these precious forests.

      • ‘Terrifying’ New Climate Models Warn of 6-7°C of Warming by 2100 If Emissions Not Slashed

        “Global greenhouse gas emissions need to decline today rather than tomorrow, and global CO2 emissions should be brought to net zero.”

      • Naomi Klein: The Green New Deal is the Last Best Hope to Save the Planet

        Canadian author, social activist and filmmaker Naomi Klein is done with “tinkering and denial” as solutions to climate change. As she explains in her new book, “On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal,” America, and the world, is way past the point where a single policy, or even market-based solutions, can cut carbon emissions, increase production of renewable energy, repair broken ecosystems and generally prevent the kinds of climate catastrophe that will hurt the earth and the humans on it.

      • Applauding Progressive Challenger for Championing Green New Deal and Medicare for All, Ocasio-Cortez Endorses Marie Newman

        “The momentum is growing to make the Democratic Party fight for solutions as big as the problems we face and create a party for voters, not corporate donors.”

      • ‘There Is an Awakening Going On’: Greta Thunberg Honored With Amnesty’s Top Award Days Before Global Climate Strikes

        “What I’m telling you to do now is to act. Because no one is too small to make a difference. I’m urging all of you to take part in the global climate strikes on September 20th and September 27th.”

      • The Danger of Inspiration: A Review of On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal

        Naomi Klein’s new book, On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal, has one crippling flaw—it’s inspiring. At this moment in history, inspiring talk about solutions to multiple, cascading ecological crises is dangerous.

      • Indonesia’s bold plan: Moving its capital to an island paradise [iophk: transmigration]

        It won’t stay pristine for long. The government wants to move fast, starting construction within two years and — in about five years —roughly 1.5 million bureaucrats will move to the new capital, making it far and away the island’s most populated city.

      • Trump revokes California’s right to set stricter car emissions standards

        President Donald Trump announced Wednesday that his administration is revoking California’s authority to set auto mileage standards stricter than those issued by federal regulators, a move critics said would result in more planet-warming pollution.

      • 16-year-old Greta Thunberg met with Obama and chided senators, saying they’re not trying hard enough to fight climate change

        During Obama’s tenure, he pledged to reduce the US’ greenhouse gas emissions by 26% to 28% by 2025 under the Paris Climate Accord, and his administration put in place several climate regulations including curbs on coal and a 2013 plan to cut carbon pollution and encourage clean energy. President Trump has since withdrawn from the Paris agreement and revoked Obama’s plan via executive order in March 2017.

        Thunberg also met with lawmakers on Capitol Hill, and told the Senate Climate Change Task Force on Tuesday that congress was not doing enough to help combat climate change.

      • Trump Cancels California’s Auto Pollution Rules

        The state that made smog famous is losing its half-century-old authority to set air pollution rules.

        President Donald Trump announced Wednesday on Twitter that the Environmental Protection Agency was withdrawing California’s authority to issue stricter vehicle efficiency rules than the federal government.

        The move was the latest in the administration’s efforts to loosen regulations aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

        Thirteen states and the District of Columbia follow California’s standards. Together, they account for a third of auto sales in the United States.

      • Arsenic and Lead in Tap Water: What Trump’s Deregulation Crusade Really Means for Mining Communities

        Since 2009, public health researchers at West Virginia University and elsewhere have published over a dozen studies showing significantly higher rates of cardiovascular disease, lung and other types of cancer, birth defects, and overall mortality in counties with mountaintop removal compared to other Appalachian counties, even after they controlled for factors such as poverty, smoking, obesity, education, race, and rural disadvantages.

        Soon after throwing out the Steam Protection rule, the Trump administration quashed further study into mountaintop removal mining’s health risks by abruptly canceling funding for a National Academy of Sciences study that had already been halfway completed.

        We found that hundreds of families living near such mines found toxic metals such as lead and arsenic in their tap water, consistent with mining pollution. One family we visited showed us the brown stinking water that began to run from her faucet after the mining began. “I’m worried about my babies,” the mother said. “Is it safe to bathe them?”

      • Climate crisis

        However, the battle against climate change cannot be fought with ideas and targets alone. It also requires an attitudinal shift among the leadership and the public. While there needs to be a consensus on a robust and updated policy on climate change, it will eventually be the behaviour and habits of the people — across all economic groups — that will play a critical role in fighting to reverse the impacts of climate change. This responsibility towards the environment has been termed ‘eco-consciousness’ — behaviour or attitude showing concern for the environment.

      • Join the Global Climate Strike 20-27 September

        On September 20th and 27th, millions of people will take to the streets worldwide to demand urgent climate action. Our staff and volunteers who attend the Climate Strikes will have Tor’s full support. Different groups in different parts of the world are mobilising on September 20th or 27th (or both). The Climate Strike website has a list of local strike dates and locations.

        Tor will also be joining the Digital Climate Strike. From today until September 27th, we will raise awareness of the strikes by displaying a Climate Strike banner on our website.

      • Greta Thunberg Tells Congress: ‘We Don’t Want to Be Heard, We Want the science to Be Heard’⁠—Gets Applause

        But Thunberg was not interested in being called a “superhero”—instead, she called for more action, telling lawmakers they need to listen to the science.

        “Please save your praise, we don’t want it,” she said. “Don’t invite us here to just tell us how inspiring we are without actually doing anything about it because it doesn’t lead to anything.

        “If you want advice for what you should do, invite scientists, ask scientists for their expertise. We don’t want to be heard. We want the science to be heard,” [...]

      • Not Everyone Should Stop Eating Meat to Fight Climate Change

        Eating less meat is not the way everyone should aim to tackle the climate crisis, a new study says. It is an essential step for many of us, the researchers argue, but in a world racked by malnutrition and hunger it can be only part of the answer to rising temperatures.

      • Naomi Klein: We Have Far Less Time Than We Think

        Canadian author, social activist and filmmaker Naomi Klein is done with “tinkering and denial” as solutions to climate change. As she explains in her new book, “On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal,” America, and the world, is way past the point where a single policy, or even market-based solutions, can cut carbon emissions, increase production of renewable energy, repair broken ecosystems and generally prevent the kinds of climate catastrophe that will hurt the earth and the humans on it.

      • Land Without Bread: the Green New Deal Forsakes America’s Countryside

        Days after the heart-stopping Notre-Dame Cathedral fire in April, Swedish schoolgirl Greta Thunberg trained her eyes on the United Kingdom’s parliament and chastised its meager response to climate change. “I want you to panic,” the baby-faced sixteen-year-old quietly instructed the adults in the room. “Avoiding climate breakdown will require cathedral thinking. We must lay the foundation while we may not know exactly how to build the ceiling.” For those who don’t get the reference, Notre-Dame’s cornerstone was laid in 1163. The magnificent Gothic structure was not completed until 1345, a work of cross-generational faith, common purpose, and, undoubtedly, obedience. This was, after all, the Middle Ages.

      • Climate models predict bigger heat rise ahead

        Scientists using new climate models say a bigger heat rise than expected is possible by the end of the century.

      • Carbon emitters face higher legal risks
      • How the Rise of Populism is Fuelling Climate Science Denial Across Europe

        This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.  

      • Energy

      • Wildlife/Nature

    • Finance

    • AstroTurf/Lobbying/Politics

    • Privacy/Surveillance

      • Now is the time to defend the final haven for privacy: your brain

        One of the principal concerns of privacy is to prevent others – typically governments or companies – from monitoring what we think. They have to do that indirectly, by spying on what we say or write, and inferring what is going through our minds from that data. We assume that our actual thoughts are immune from surveillance. That is true today, but may not be tomorrow. Work is underway in research and corporate laboratories to come up with ways of reading directly what we are thinking. The question is: what happens to privacy once that is possible?

      • Massive Novaestrat data leak effects over 20 million in Ecuador

        A report by ZDNet, with help from vpnMentor’s Noam Rotem and Ran Locar, have uncovered what’s likely the largest data leak in the history of Ecuador. This leak contains roughly 20.8 million user records. Ecuador has a population of 16.6 million so it’s safe to say this leak has impacted a vast majority of the Ecuadorian population. The number of user records is larger than the number of Ecuadorians because it includes records of those that have passed away. ZDNet confirmed the presence of Ecuador’s President’s as well as Julian Assange’s records in the leak. The leak came from a company called Novaestrat by way of a mis-configured Elastisearch server.

      • Lion Air Investigating [Breach] That Compromised Passenger Data

        PT Lion Mentari Airlines, Indonesia’s biggest private carrier, is investigating a breach that led to personal data of its Malaysian unit’s passengers being leaked online.

        Malindo Airways’s passenger information, which is hosted on cloud-based services, may have been compromised, the carrier said in a statement. Malindo is working with its data service provider Amazon Web Services Inc. and e-commerce partner GoQuo to look into the breach.

      • American veterans targeted online by foreign entities: study

        A study published Tuesday found that foreign entities have been targeting American veterans, service members and their families through social media disinformation campaigns and identity theft with the goal of “disrupting American democracy.”

      • US veterans and service members targeted by foreign entities online, report finds

        US veterans, current service members and their families are being targeted online with malware and by foreign entities and influence campaigns, and the government isn’t doing enough to stop it, a new report says.

        The study by Vietnam Veterans of America, a non-profit that advocates for and serves the needs of all veterans, documents a myriad number of ways veterans are impersonated and targeted online — particularly on Facebook. In at least one instance, they’ve been targeted by influence campaigns from foreign governments.

      • Exclusive: Edward Snowden’s First Adventures in Cyberspace

        Many of the first 2,000 or so nights of my life ended in civil disobedience: crying, begging, bargaining, until—on night 2,193, the night I turned six years old—I discovered direct action. The authorities weren’t interested in calls for reform, and I wasn’t born yesterday. I had just had one of the best days of my young life, complete with friends, a party, and even gifts, and I wasn’t about to let it end just because everyone else had to go home. So I went about covertly resetting all the clocks in the house by several hours. The microwave’s clock was easier than the stove’s to roll back, if only because it was easier to reach.

        When the authorities—in their unlimited ignorance—failed to notice, I was mad with power, galloping laps around the living room. I, the master of time, would never again be sent to bed, was free. And so it was that I fell asleep on the floor, having finally seen the sunset on June 21, the summer solstice, the longest day of the year. When I awoke, the clocks in the house once again matched my father’s watch.

    • Freedom of Information/Freedom of the Press

      • Eritrea Should End 18 Years of Darkness

        Eighteen years ago today, the Eritrean government began its chilling clampdown on those it perceived as critics, decimating the country’s budding independent press in the process. Eighteen years later, as Eritrea ends its diplomatic isolation, little has changed for its citizens.

    • Civil Rights/Policing

      • Political Fundraiser Pleads Guilty To Fraud

        In one of the first Justice Department cases of its kind, Maryland political consultant Kelley Rogers pleaded guilty to wire fraud on Tuesday for operating multiple fraudulent political action committees that raised money from donors for conservative causes but kept much of the funds for Rogers and his associates.

        Rogers’ arrest and indictment took place shortly after Politico and ProPublica investigated one of Rogers’ PACs, Conservative Majority Fund, which since 2012 has raised close to $10 million — mostly from small-dollar donors, many of them elderly — while giving out just $48,400 to politicians.

      • Lebanon: Judiciary Ignoring 2017 Anti-Torture Law

        Lebanese judicial authorities failed to investigate serious torture allegations made by Hassan al-Dika prior to his death in custody, Human Rights Watch said today, on the two-year anniversary of the passage of an anti-torture law.

      • Cameroonian Lawyers Say ‘Enough is Enough’

        Cameroonian lawyers are on strike this week, protesting law enforcement agencies’ interference in their work and violations of defendants’ rights.

      • Tajikistan: Barriers to Aid for Domestic Violence Victims

        Tajikistan’s government takes little action to investigate or prosecute domestic violence cases and is doing far too little to help survivor. Despite progress in some areas, Tajik law does not criminalize domestic violence, and women who experience abuse lack adequate protection and access to shelter and other services.

      • A Moscow man went for a run hours before a protest. Police arrested him and broke his leg. We identified the officer who did it.

        On July 27, three hours before protesters swept Moscow’s Tverskaya Street to demand fair elections, Constantine Konovalov was going on a run when he was unexpectedly arrested. Police officers knocked the professional designer onto the curb of a sidewalk, and one officer stepped onto his calves in such a way that Konovalov broke his right leg. At Moscow’s Hospital Number 67, the young man was diagnosed with a “closed internal tibial spine fracture.”

      • The Christian Right Is Helping Drive Liberals Away From Religion

        Researchers haven’t found a comprehensive explanation for why the number of religiously unaffiliated Americans has increased over the past few years — the shift is too large and too complex. But a recent swell of social science research suggests that even if politics wasn’t the sole culprit, it was an important contributor. “Politics can drive whether you identify with a faith, how strongly you identify with that faith, and how religious you are,” said Michele Margolis, a political science professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the author of “From Politics to the Pews: How Partisanship and the Political Environment Shape Religious Identity.” “And some people on the left are falling away from religion because they see it as so wrapped up with Republican politics.”

      • Disturbing New PSA Shows How School Shootings Have Become Normalized

        Last year was the deadliest year for school shootings on record, with the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, 10 people killed by gunfire at a Santa Fe, Texas, high school, and too many other school shootings that have already been forgotten. This fall, students returned to school under a shadow of anxiety and fear. To address this new normal, Sandy Hook Promise (SHP) — a nonprofit organization founded and led by family members whose loved ones were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012 — released a “back-to-school school shootings prevention” PSA.

      • Admitting the Terrorism Watchlist Was Unconstitutional is Important, But Not Nearly Enough

        In Wednesday, September 4th, Judge Anthony Trenga of the U.S District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia ruled that the Terrorist Screening Database —colloquially referred to as the “Watchlist”—was unconstitutional. The case was brought forward by the Council on American Islamic Relations on behalf of 23 Muslim American plaintiffs. | By Maha Hilal

      • You Say You Want a Revolution: a Prison Letter to Yoko Ono
      • Dozens of Russian Orthodox priests sign open letter in support of arrested and imprisoned protesters

        Dozens of Russian Orthodox Church clergy have released an open letter defending election protesters who have been arrested or sentenced to prison time in the so-called “Moscow case.” The letter, which was published on the outlet Pravoslavie i mir (Orthodoxy and the World), had 42 signatories at the time of this writing.

      • This election protester might face years in prison for throwing a plastic water bottle toward police officers

        Moscow’s Meshchansky Court has begun hearing the case against 26-year-old computer programmer Aidar Gubaidulin. He stands accused of attempted violence against a police officer: During Moscow’s July 27 protest, the programmer threw a plastic water bottle in the direction of a group of officers and National Guard troops who were beating other demonstrators. The bottle missed the officers, but Gubaidullin is nonetheless being held in a pretrial detention center, and he may receive a lengthy prison sentence. Meduza spoke with Aidar Gubaidullin’s brother, Ildar, about the case.

      • Jordan: Hundreds Displaced Based on Family Ties

        Jordanian authorities have forced about 200 people to leave their home governorate because of their extended family ties to an accused murderer, Human Rights Watch said today.

      • UN Chief Should Denounce China’s Abuses in Xinjiang

        United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres should join the growing number of those speaking out publicly against China’s mass detention of over one million Uyghurs and other Turkic Muslims in Xinjiang, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, FIDH – International Federation for Human Rights, International Commission of Jurists, and World Uyghur Congress, said in a letter to the secretary-general released on September 17, 2019.

      • US: New Food Inspection Rule Puts Workers in Danger

        A Trump administration final regulation announced on September 17, 2019 to allow increased slaughter line speeds in hog processing plants in the United States threatens to put workers in grave danger of serious injuries, Human Rights Watch said today.

      • UN: Address Egypt’s Assault on Rights

        The United Nations Human Rights Council should use the upcoming review of Egypt’s human rights records to address unprecedented levels of repression, 17 organizations including Human Rights Watch said today in an open letter to the council’s member countries.

    • Internet Policy/Net Neutrality

      • Colorado Town Offers 1 Gbps For $60 After Years Of Battling Comcast

        A new community broadband network went live in Fort Collins, Colorado recently offering locals there gigabit fiber speeds for $60 a month with no caps, restrictions, or hidden fees. The network launch comes years after telecom giants like Comcast worked tirelessly to crush the effort. Voters approved the effort as part of a November 2017 ballot initiative, despite the telecom industry spending nearly $1 million on misleading ads to try and derail the effort. A study (pdf) by the Institute for Local Reliance estimated that actual competition in the town was likely to cost Comcast between $5.4 million and $22.8 million each year.

      • Space X May Soon Give The US Broadband Sector A Much Needed Kick In The Ass

        Could Space X finally give the busted US telecom sector a much needed kick in the ass? Since 2017, Musk’s Space X has been promising that it would launch 800 low orbit satellites capable of delivering cheaper, lower latency broadband to large swaths of the United States by 2020 or 2021. By and large Musk and company appear to have been successful sticking to that promise, insisting recently that this proposed timeline was “pretty much on target.” That said, Musk had to fire some folks to ensure that the project was meeting its goals, which itself suggests they may not have been.

    • Monopolies

      • Does The Public Care About Tech Backlash? And Does That Matter?

        The NY Times recently had a piece by Rob Walker noting that there is no tech backlash, despite many people believing there is one. Unfortunately, I think the article overstates its case, and misses the more important, more nuanced point. I do think that the public narrative — driven by many in the media and many politicians and bureaucrats — is that there’s a giant “techlash” out there as people are fed up with how various tech companies act. I think that Walker’s point is correct that the public is still using the big internet companies in larger and larger numbers. But I’m not sure it quite says what he seems to suggest it means.

      • France, Germany blast Facebook’s Libra, back public cryptocurrency

        The 19-country euro zone bloc is united in pursuing a tough regulatory approach should Libra seek authorizations to operate in Europe, officials said at the meeting.

        It is also considering a common set of rules for virtual currencies, which are currently largely unregulated.

      • Lyft Allegedly Kept a Driver on the Platform Who Held a Passenger at Gunpoint While Two Other Men Raped Her

        At least 26 Lyft users have sued Lyft since August 1 for failing to protect them against sexual violence on the platform, and “stone walling” law enforcement from investigating cases. The women say Lyft ignored their pleas for help and does not inform passengers whether drivers who harm them remain on the app.

      • Why France and Germany fear Facebook’s cryptocurrency – and plan to block it

        “As already expressed during the meeting of G7 Finance Ministers and Central Bank’s Governors in Chantilly in July, France and Germany consider that the Libra project, as set out in Facebook’s blueprint, fails to convince that those risks will be properly addressed,” the joint statement read. “We believe that no private entity can claim monetary power, which is inherent to the sovereignty of Nations.”

        At the G7 meeting, the 19-country euro zone bloc indicated it is united in pursuing a tough regulatory approach should Libra seek authorizations to operate in Europe.

      • Trademarks

        • Monster Energy Opposes Teenager’s Trademark Application Over Logos Not At All Similar

          Monster Energy. The company’s name is enough to set the average Techdirt reader’s eyes rolling. The company that makes sugar-heavy energy drinks has become essentially a caricature of an overly aggressive trademark enforcer. This habit is somewhat surprising, given just how often the company loses lawsuits and oppositions, which one would think would be a deterrent for future behavior. Instead, it almost seems as though every loss only spurs Monster Energy on.

      • Copyrights

        • Xtream Codes IPTV System Targeted in Massive Police Operation (Updated)

          Police in Italy have announced a huge anti-piracy operation against the company operating popular IPTV service management system Xtream Codes. Searches are reportedly underway in several countries including Italy, the Netherlands, France and Bulgaria, in a claimed effort to dismantle the company’s entire infrastructure.

        • EasyDNS Threatened With Criminal Complaint over ‘Pirating’ Customer

          A German law firm has threatened to file a criminal complaint against domain name registrar easyDNS. The Canadian registrar refuses to hand over personal details of an allegedly copyright infringing customer without a valid court order, nor is it planning to pay the proposed €1,481 in damages and fees demanded by the law firm.

        • Millennium Films Goes After Verystream, Streamango, and Others

          Millennium Films is utilizing the US court system to put pressure on sites, services and apps that are linked to piracy. After the shutdown of the popular CotoMovies app, the company has now switched its attention to several sites that were ‘linked’ to the app, including Verystream and Streamango.

        • Australian Aboriginal Flag Mess Is Getting Worse — All Thanks To Copyright

          One of the longer-running sagas here on Techdirt concerns the disgraceful situation regarding the flag of Australia’s Aboriginal peoples. Mike first wrote about this in 2010, and again in June of this year. The problem is that what is now widely regarded as the flag of Australia’s First Nations was designed fairly recently by a private individual, not a group representing those peoples, or some official Australian government body. The designer, Harold Thomas, signed a licensing deal with a clothing company, Wam Clothing, which imposes hefty fees for the use of the design, even on non-profit health organizations giving away items that bear the flag:

Update on Koch v EPO: Internal Appeals Committee (IAC) Composition Still Likely Illegal

Posted in Europe, Patents at 4:25 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Confer background on Koch v EPO [1, 2, 3, 4]

Summary: An important EPO case, concerning a dismissed staff representative, shows what ILO-AT and the EPO’s Internal Appeals Committee boil down to

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