06.26.22

Gemini version available ♊︎

Links 26/06/2022: Shotcut 22.06 and More Netflix Layoffs

Posted in News Roundup at 5:05 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • GNU/Linux

    • Desktop/Laptop

      • Jay Little[Reposted] Jay Little – Software Obsessionist – Proof of Life: I Still Have Something to Say

        Well what can I say? If you are in any way involved with the Linux community, then you already know what this is. For the rest of you, click here. Long story short: The Dev One is Hewlett’s Packard’s way of dipping their toe into the Linux hardware enthusiast market.

        [...]

        So you can probably guess what happened next. I bought one. Duh. I have had it over a week. My Tuxedo Pulse 15 Gen 1 keyboard was really getting bad, which is a shame because beyond that, I really loved that laptop. The keyboard on the Dev One appears to be far superior, along with the trackpad. I’m literally typing this very blog post on the keyboard.

        In fact the only downside of the Dev One is the shitty Realtek wireless card it ships with. If you buy one of these, I strongly suggest you crack it open and switch out the wifi card for an Intel AX200 or AX201. It is 100% worth it, especially as the machine does not come with an ethernet port. Despite the 5850U processor in the Dev One having a TDP that is 1/3rd of the TDP of the 4800H in the Pulse laptop, performance is about the same. Battery life is worse, but the Pulse has a 90+ watt hour battery whereas the HP has a 53 watt hour battery. Nevertheless I can get 6 to 8 hours on it with no problem, which is more than enough for me.

    • Audiocasts/Shows

    • Applications

      • 9to5LinuxShotcut 22.06 Video Editor Brings Glaxnimate Support, Keyframes Expansion, and More – 9to5Linux

        Two months have passed since the release of Shotcut 22.04, and now users of this powerful video editor have a new update to enjoy. Shotcut 22.06 is here with a big new feature, namely the integration of the Glaxnimate 2D vector drawing and animation program.

        In the new Shotcut release, Glaxnimate is bundled within the video editor and lets you apply complex masks to your video clip via the new Mask: Draw (Glaxnimate) video filter. On top of that, there’s also a preview in the Shotcut timeline within Glaxnimate.

      • New Version 22.06: Glaxnimate
    • Instructionals/Technical

      • uni TorontoEven for us, SSD write volume limits can matter

        Famously, one difference between HDDs and SSDs is that SSDs have limits on how much data you can write to them and HDDs mostly don’t (which means that SSDs have a definite lifetime). These limits are a matter both of actual failure and of warranty coverage, with the warranty coverage limit generally being lower. We don’t normally think about about this, though, because we’re not a write-intensive place. Sometimes there are surprises, such as high write volume on our MTAs or more write volume than I expected on my desktops, but even then the absolute numbers tend to be low and not anywhere near the write endurance ratings of our SSDs.

      • CSS TricksQuick Reminder that Details/Summary is the Easiest Way Ever to Make an Accordion

        Gosh bless the <details> element. Toss some content inside it and you have an accessible expand-for-more interaction with just about zero work.

      • Its FOSSDownload YouTube Videos with VLC (Because, Why Not?)

        VLC is one of the most popular video players for Linux and other platforms.

        It’s not just a video player. It provides a number of multimedia and network-related features among other things. You’ll be surprised to learn what VLC is capable of.

        I’ll demonstrate a simple VLC feature and that is to download YouTube videos with it.

        Yes. You can play YouTube videos in VLC and download them too. Let me show you how.

      • eBPF – Understanding How It Works

        In a lot of scenarios, eBPF is not used directly but indirectly via projects like Cilium, bcc, or bpftrace which provide an abstraction on top of eBPF and do not require to write programs directly but instead offer the ability to specify intent-based definitions which are then implemented with eBPF.

      • ID RootHow To Install Docker on AlmaLinux 9 – idroot

        In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Docker on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, Docker is basically a container engine that uses the Linux Kernel in order to create the containers on top of an operating system. Docker provides a portable environment for both development and production environments. You can create a container from one set of files that works anywhere else without having to worry about dependencies being different on each new server.

        This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the Docker CE on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

      • Make Use OfHow to Use tree to Show a Directory Tree in the Linux Terminal

        With the tree command on Linux, you can view your entire filesystem in a hierarchical tree-like representation. Here’s how to do it.

        While you may use ls in the Linux terminal to display directories, what if there was a tool that could show the directory listings hierarchically, like a tree? Fortunately, such a program does exist, and it’s called “tree.”

      • Backup all starred repositories from Github
  • Distributions and Operating Systems

  • Free, Libre, and Open Source Software

    • Programming/Development

      • Hubert FiguièreRelease day – Hubert Figuière

        It’s release day, sorta. Both libopenraw and Exempi got a new release within two days. Here is what’s up.

      • SICPMore detail on software requirements

        My talk at AppDevCon discussed the Requirements Trifecta but turned it into a Quadrinella: you need leadership vision, market feedback, and technical reality to all line up as listed in the trifecta, but I’ve since added a fourth component. You also need to be able to tell the people who might be interested in paying for this thing that you have it and it might be worth paying for. If you don’t have that then, if anybody has heard of you at all, it will be as a company that went out of business with a product “five years ahead of its time”: you were able to build it, it did something people could benefit from, in an innovative way, but nobody realised that they needed it.

      • Matt RickardSequencing

        Sequencing is doing things in the right order. At a macro level, it’s about inflection points – Uber couldn’t have existed without Google Maps and consumer GPS. But the tougher to solve and more interesting type of sequencing is when the goal is obvious, but the path unknown.

        It’s difficult because you can’t always mimic past successes – an olympian’s workout plan might be optimal, but not for someone just starting out. It’s also difficult because you can’t even copy the order – the temporal aspect of “the right time” means that the “right order” is always changing.

        Some examples of sequencing across different disciplines.

      • Trail Of BitsManaging risk in blockchain deployments

        Blockchains have significantly different constraints, security properties, and resource requirements than traditional data storage alternatives. The diversity of blockchain types and features can make it challenging to decide whether a blockchain is an appropriate technical solution for a given problem and, if so, which type of blockchain to use. To help readers make such decisions, the report contains written and graphical resources, including a decision tree, comparison tables, and a risk/impact matrix.

      • RlangCharting Kaggle’s growth to 10 million users | R-bloggers

        A few days ago, the Kaggle community crossed the amazing milestone of 10 million registered users! In celebration, I’ve put together a forum post that visualises the accelerated growth over the years. Here I show the R code behind those plots and talk a bit about my visualisation choices.

      • RlangVisualizing the Invasion of the Soviet Union with Luftwaffe Locations

        On June 22 1941 (81 years ago) Nazi Germany invaded the Soviet Union with the largest military force assembled in history. Behind the ground troops the Luftwaffe (German Air Force) quickly setup forward bases to support the campaign. Using data from http://ww2.dk I put together an infographic visualizing the monthly movements of the Luftwaffe during this time (map borders are current not the ones that existed in 1941).

        One can see planes flying into Poland from the west (Denmark, Norway, France, Belgium, and The Netherlands were conquered the previous year) and Greece (conquered the previous month) right before the campaign. As the Germans advanced along the Northern, Central, and Southern fronts one can also see the indecisive plan of attack. First they locate more planes to the North to attack Leningrad and then shift focus to the attack on Moscow.

      • Nolan LawsonStyle scoping versus shadow DOM: which is fastest?

        My new benchmark largely confirmed my previous research, and shadow DOM comes out as the most consistently performant option. Class-based style scoping slightly beats shadow DOM in some scenarios, but in others it’s much less performant. Firefox, thanks to its multi-threaded style engine, is much faster than Chrome or Safari.

      • Shell/Bash/Zsh/Ksh

        • RlangShell vs R Fundamentals – From Syntax to Control Structures with Zsh & BASH

          This walkthrough of the fundamentals of shell programming with Z shell (Zsh) and Bourne Again SHell (BASH) includes a comparison of similar components and features in R and RStudio. An alternate perspective from R is provided for you to leverage while learning the fundamentals of shell programming.

          It is important to be aware of the similarities and differences between Zsh and BASH when working with shell programming, particularly considering that Zsh is the default shell for Mac systems as of macOS Catalina, while BASH is the default shell of most distributions of Linux operating systems (OS). BASH is also included in the infrastructure of many remote servers.

  • Leftovers

    • HackadayQuantum Circuit Uses Just A Few Atoms

      Researchers at the University of New South Wales and a startup company, Silicon Quantum Computing, published results of their quantum dot experiments. The circuits use up to 10 carbon-based quantum dots on a silicon substrate. Metal gates control the flow of electrons.  The paper appears in Nature and you can download the full paper from there.

    • HackadayThe Prints Don’t Stop With This Prusa I3 MK3 Mod

      One of the issues with 3D printing is that when a print is done, you need to go back and pull the print off the bed to reset it for the next one. What if you needed to print 600 little parts for whatever reason? Most people might say get lots of printers and queue them up. Not [Pierre Trappe], as he decided that his Prusa i3 MK3S+ would print continuously.

    • HackadayA Passive Automatic CNC Tool Changer

      [Marius Hornberger] has been busy hacking his “Hammer” CNC router again, and now it sports a much desired feature — an automatic tool-changer. Having wanted one for a while, [Marius] was unhappy sacrificing a big chunk of useable bed area just to park the tool-changer magazine. An obvious solution would be to have the magazine retract away from the bed, outside of the working area. Sadly, the CNC controller had only enough spare outputs to drive the pneumatic tool changer (mounted on the spindle) leaving none spare to control the magazine assembly. So, there was only one obvious route to take, use some simple spring-loaded mechanics to move the magazine into tool-picking range with the Y axis motion instead.

    • Being A Confident Pedestrian

      I am glad, as of late, that I’ve never owned a car, or even had the faintest desire to own one. I have walked virtually everywhere for the last few years and it’s fantastic exercise. I honestly don’t know who would pay $10 a month for a gym membership when walking everywhere keeps the muscles limber, the respiratory system clean, and the bones flexible. In addition, it carries with it a veritable utility- that is, transportation.

      Add onto this the obscene gas prices caused by the recent Ukraine conflict, and it’s any wonder that more and more Americans are dumping their lemons and opting for either public transportation or walking. This is an intriguing development to watch play out in real time, every gas station’s little number counter rising as a result of an intricate web of economic conditions- trade negotiations overseas, the OPEC alliance, and certain shipping routes being delayed or cut off. I can see why the average driver would feel a bit irate currently, and do sympathize with them.

      Nonetheless I do take a confrontational approach to cars, whenever I’m out in heavy traffic, and I’d argue it is the thing to do as a responsible pedestrian, to recognize that cars are in many ways an inconvenient headache, for drivers and pedestrians alike, and that their use is highest in economically disadvantaged areas where public transit isn’t really an option. They are used out of necessity rather than convenience, and while walking one should keep in mind that if they are hit, they won’t be held legally responsible for any liabilities incurred.

    • feeling alone again
    • Science

      • HackadayNASA Called, They Want Their Cockroaches Back

        News hit earlier this month that the infamous “cockroach moon dust” was up for auction? Turns out, NASA is trying to block the sale as they assert that they own all the lunar material brought back from the Apollo missions. What? You didn’t know about cockroach moon dust? Well, it is a long and — frankly — weird story.

      • HackadayNeural Network Identifies Bird Calls, Even On Your Pi

        Recently, we’ve stumbled upon the extensive effort that is the BirdNET research platform. BirdNET uses a neural network to identify birds by the sounds they make, and is a joint project between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Chemnitz University of Technology. What strikes us is – this project is impressively featureful and accessible for a variety of applications. No doubt, BirdNET is aiming to become a one-stop shop for identifying birds as they sing.

    • Education

    • Health/Nutrition/Agriculture

      • The VergeThe brewing fight to keep abortion info online

        Right now, platforms have an easy answer to threats: Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Section 230 shields apps and websites from being considered the “publisher or speaker” of user-generated content, protecting them from liability over hosting it. Unlike a First Amendment defense, it doesn’t require fighting over whether the content in question is illegal, reducing the legal burden of lawsuits. “The thing about Section 230 is you don’t have to demonstrate that it’s First Amendment protected speech, which can take a long, long time sometimes in litigation,” says Granick. There’s an exception for conduct that violates federal criminal law, but not violations of state laws like the current abortion bans.

      • Ali Reza HayatiRoe v Wade overturned by American Taliban

        While those in Germany are abolishing Nazi-era laws, forbidding doctors from providing information about abortions, those in Supreme Court of the United States are bringing them back. While those in Germany are making progress about human rights, Those in United States are taking America back to the Middle Ages. I’m pretty sure if they could, they would’ve burn some women accused of witchery.

      • NBCThese ER doctors said profit-driven company officials pressed them to work while they had Covid symptoms

        “He insisted I stay and finish the shift,” she recalled in an interview with NBC News and in a recent lawsuit. “I told him it’s not the safe thing to do. We have a ton of immunocompromised patients and we were putting them at risk.”

        By requesting time off from work while sick with Covid, Patel breached an unofficial policy promoted by officials at the hospital staffing company she works for — American Physician Partners — according to the lawsuit filed against the company by her and seven physician colleagues.

    • Proprietary

      • Game RantMicrosoft Receives Backlash Over Minecraft Moderation Changes

        Ever since Minecraft’s release, fans have set up servers to allow for multiplayer in the game. However, a recent update is causing concern among server moderators and players alike, as Microsoft is moving to implement its own moderation on top of the already-existing tools provided to server owners.

        For several years now, Minecraft has been split into two versions. The Java Edition allows for more freedom with modding and server hosting, while the Bedrock edition allows cross-platform multiplayer, implements microtransactions, and gives its server owners less freedom.

      • Adriaan ZhangA Deep Dive into Minecraft 1.19.1′s Report System

        To accomodate the chat reporting system, chat messages are now signed using the user’s keypair. There is a setting under Options → Chat Settings… → Only Show Secure Chat that toggles whether messages with invalid signatures are hidden. This setting is off by default at the time of writing (1.19.1-pre1).

      • India Times‘3.5 million cyber security jobs will open up by 2025’ [Ed/iophk: their approach to "security" is job security (for them alone) and not actual computer security]

        Pointing out how the world is facing a major workforce shortage in the cybersecurity sector, Kate Behncken, vice- president and global head of Microsoft Philanthropies, on Friday, said that there would be 3.5 million open roles in cyber security around the world by 2025.

        Speaking at the launch of CyberShikshaa initiative, launched by Microsoft India in collaboration with ICT Academy as part of its ongoing commitment to create a robust cybersecurity ecosystem in the country, Behncken said, “The number of cyber security incidents in India have increased from 2.9 lakh in 2018 to almost 1.5 million in 2021.

      • Network WorldCisco announces plan to exit Russia and Belarus

        The networking company first made a statement on March 3, declaring that it would be halting all business operations in Russia and Belarus “for the foreseeable future.” On Thursday the company released another statement, noting that it had continued to “closely monitor” the war in Ukraine and as a result, a decision had been made to “begin an orderly wind-down of our business in Russia and Belarus.”

      • Android PoliceAfter years of delay, Plex replaces its desktop media player client

        Mediaphiles have had years to cope with the imminent demise of the Plex Media Player. Plans were first announced in August of 2019, right when the Plex had also released its intended replacement, the Home Theater PC app. Outrage from the crowd stopped everything in its tracks for three years, but at last, Plex is now calling time of death for PMP. Long live HTPC.

    • Linux Foundation

    • Security

      • Privacy/Surveillance

        • PC WorldMullvad VPN ditches subscriptions to protect your privacy even more

          If you’re scratching your head on why that’s necessary, Mullvad explains in a blog post (spotted by TechRadar). Apparently there was no way to continue to facilitate recurring subscription payments without storing the payment data users submitted for the entire length of that subscription. And keeping a credit card number or PayPal account associated with a login more or less forever is basically the opposite of privacy. That being the case, Mullvad is now only accepting one-time payments for its VPN services. That will allow the company to purge payment data after “the first few weeks.”

        • The HillHillicon Valley — Data privacy bill inches forward in House

          A House subpanel on consumer protection approved a comprehensive data privacy bill, advancing the legislation to the full committee. The bill would create national standards for how companies are able to collect and manage user data.

          Meanwhile, tech executives told lawmakers on Wednesday that the government needed to share more cyber threat intelligence with the private sector to mitigate cybersecurity risks.

        • CNNMan loses USB flash drive with data on entire city’s residents after night out

          On Tuesday, he went to the city administration’s information center and transferred residents’ data onto a flash drive. The data included the names, birth dates, and addresses of 465,177 people, the statement said — the city’s entire population.

          The flash drive also contained sensitive information including tax details, bank account names and numbers, and information on households receiving public assistance such as childcare payments.

        • IT WireEFF cybersecurity head warns US women to delete their period tracking apps in post Roe v. Wade world

          It may sound like a crazy far-fetched dystopian claim, but it’s today’s reality. Following the United States Supreme Court decision overturning access to abortion as a constitutional right, EFF head of cybersecurity Eva Galperin is warning women to delete period tracking apps, potentially identifying women who have terminated pregnancies.

    • Defence/Aggression

      • Frontpage MagazineWhen the Cid Shattered the Teeth of Jihad

        Raymond Ibrahim, author of the new book, Defenders of the West, from which the following article was excerpted, is a Shillman Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center

      • Gatestone InstituteSudan: The Genocide No One Talks About

        This, apparently, is also the conviction of El Nur. He notes with distress that the massacres organized by the Janjaweed and the Rapid Intervention Forces have not seen any let up. Daily peaceful demonstrations in Khartoum and the rest of the country are interrupted by the police and state militias, who fire live ammunition at the crowds, while raids are conducted throughout Sudan. Homes are burned. Villagers are forced into the desert without food or water. Summary executions take place. Women and children are crushed by cars. Students are mown down by bullets.

      • RTLTwo killed, 21 wounded in Oslo terror attack

        According to an NRK radio journalist present at the time of the shooting, the shooter arrived with a bag from which he pulled out a weapon and started firing.

      • Common Dreams‘A Hate Crime’: Oslo Pride Parade Canceled After Deadly Shooting at Gay Bar

        A 42-year-old gunman was arrested and charged with murder, attempted murder, and terrorist acts on Saturday after he killed two people and injured 21 during an overnight shooting rampage in and around an Oslo gay bar—just hours before the city was supposed to hold its annual Pride parade.

        “My first thought was that Pride was the target, so that’s frightening.”

      • TruthOutOslo Cancels Pride Parade After Mass Shooting at Gay Club
      • TruthOutBigoted Attacks Are Injecting Fear Into Pride Month, But We Won’t Back Down
      • A Day at Faslane

        In my early twenties, Faslane held a 365 day protest, so I went along to take part in family tradition. The lot of us were put up by the Salvation Army, in their church, and the night before, a workshop was held.

        In the workshop, the speaker asked us if setting light to a police car was useful, and if it was violent. If we thought it was violent, we’d go to the top of the room (otherwise, go to the bottom), and if we thought it was useful, we’d go left.

      • ScheerpostWhy Sanctions Always Fail

        The Enemy Always Adapts.

      • Common DreamsOpinion | ‘Not a Justification but a Provocation’: Chomsky on the Root Causes of the Russia-Ukraine War

        One of the reasons that Russian media has been completely blocked in the West, along with the unprecedented control and censorship over the Ukraine war narrative, is the fact that western governments simply do not want their public to know that the world is vastly changing.

    • Environment

      • Overpopulation

        • The EconomistA wave of unrest is coming. Here’s how to avert some of it

          Soaring food and fuel prices are the most excruciating form of inflation. If the prices of furniture or smartphones rise, people can delay a purchase or forgo it. But they cannot stop eating. Likewise, transport costs are baked into every physical good, and most people cannot easily walk to work. So when food and fuel grow dearer, standards of living tend to fall abruptly. The pain is most intense for city dwellers in poor countries, who spend a huge part of their income on bread and bus fares. Unlike rural folk, they cannot grow their own crops—but they can riot.

          Many governments want to ease the pain, but are indebted and short of cash after covid-19. The average poor country’s public debt-to-gdp ratio is nearly 70% and it is climbing. Poor countries also pay higher interest rates, which are rising. Some of them will find this unsustainable. The imf says that 41 are in “debt distress” or at high risk of it.

    • Finance

      • Common DreamsOpinion | The Continuing Damages From Corporate-Managed So-Called Free Trade

        The great progressive Harvard economist and prolific best-selling author, John Kenneth Galbraith, wrote that, “Ideas may be superior to vested interest. They are also very often the children of vested interest.” I wished he had written that assertion before I took Economic 101 at Princeton. One of the vested ideas taught as dogma then was the comparative advantage theory developed by the early 19th century British economist, David Ricardo. He gave the example of trading Portuguese wine for British textiles with both countries coming out winners due to their superior efficiencies in producing their native products.

      • FAIRNYT Hypes NYC Police Spending, Buries School Cuts

        The New York Times (6/10/22) reported on NYC Mayor Eric Adams’ first budget agreement, saying it “excludes…proposals to significantly increase staffing levels at the city’s jails…[and] increase the Police Department’s budget.” This is the culmination of a fierce debate, the Times told readers, between a mayor with “politically moderate roots” and a progressive city council “over how best to confront rising concerns about crime.”

      • Michael West MediaPerrottet’s land tax: how does it work and what will it do? – Michael West

        NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet has released what his long-awaited transition away from stamp duty will look like. Will Perrottet’s land tax bolster a more dynamic housing sector in NSW or result in another boon to vendors before the upcoming election? Callum Foote reports.

        The NSW government’s stated motivation for making the move away from stamp duty and to land tax for first-home buyers is to reduce the upfront cost of purchasing a house.

        All first home buyers purchasing a house worth less than $1.5 million in NSW will have the option of not paying stamp duty and instead move a land tax on the unimproved price of the land paid annually.

        The land tax for first home buyers will be calculated at $400 plus 0.3 per cent of land value for properties whose owners live in them. This is separate to the existing land tax levied on investment properties which is charged at $1500 plus 1.1% of land value.

      • Michael West MediaOcean view property with carpark views? Exciting ASX float a tough sell, then there’s title – Michael West

        A Maserati-driving entrepreneur and his exciting new property play have reeled in Stockland and Mirvac, and a posse of media and investment bankers, but is all as it seems? Michael West checks out the proposal to float Bricklet on the sharemarket.

        It’s a tried and tested formula. An investment banker is trying to raise money, suddenly a story drops in the Australian Financial Review to create the buzz. And it’s not hard to create a buzz around an “exciting” new property play.

        So it was that two days before Christmas 2019 came this drop marketing the idea that if you can’t afford a house you can still afford a bit of a house and buy into Australia’s property market:

      • ScheerpostInflation Sparks Global Wave of Protests for Higher Pay, Aid

        FILE -Health workers led by nurses take part in a demonstration over salaries at Parerenyatwa Hospital in Harare, on June, 21, 2022. As food costs and fuel bills soar, inflation is plundering peopl…

      • ScheerpostCan Workers Overseas Provide: Tips for US Labor Organizers?

        Mick Lynch (second left) is ‘concise and focused and good at seeming like a human being’, according to one digital strategist. Photograph: Guy Smallman/Getty Images By Steve Early / CounterPunch Th…

    • AstroTurf/Lobbying/Politics

      • NDTVFor Prophet Remarks, BJP Leaders Summoned By Police In Maharashtra

        The Mumbai Police have also summoned her to record a statement on June 25 in connection with her remarks about the Prophet during a TV debate triggered a huge controversy.

      • FirstpostProphet Muhammad remarks row: Maharashtra police summon suspended BJP spokesperson Nupur Sharma on 22 June

        Mumbai Police Commissioner Sanjay Pandey had on Monday said they will also summon Sharma to record her statement in connection with the FIR registered against her.

      • CNNSuspected Russian spy was well-liked by classmates, but something just seemed a little off

        Why the Kremlin would want to plant a spy in the International Criminal Court is clear, former intelligence officials say: It would offer Russia a crucial window into the investigation into alleged Russian war crimes — in Georgia in 2008 and in Ukraine in 2022.

      • Scheerpost‘The Times is Telling You to Choose Between Rights and Safety’

        CounterSpin interview with Alec Karakatsanis on Chesa Boudin recall.

      • Misinformation/Disinformation

        • ABCEuropean mayors duped into calls with fake Kyiv mayor

          The mayor of the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv warned Saturday that an imposter is posing as him and communicating with other officials, including three European mayors who were duped into believing they were having a video call with the real Vitali Klitschko.

          “Several mayors in Europe have been contacted by a fake mayor of Kyiv who has been saying absurd things,” Klitschko told German daily newspaper Bild. “This is criminal energy. It must be urgently investigated who is behind it.”

        • SalonState legislatures are effectively helping rogue doctors spread misinformation

          Unfortunately, a minority of doctors seem to have recently obtained an outsized voice through the use of social media, [Internet] forums, radio, and television appearances. Together, this fringe contingent has played a critical role in propagating misinformation about COVID-19 to the public. This arguably small number of individuals appear to be using their professional credentials and the image of the white coat — ironically the symbol which doctors began using in the 19th century to separate themselves from what they deemed as quackery — to advance ideas with no solid evidence and shaky scientific foundations.

    • Censorship/Free Speech

    • Freedom of Information / Freedom of the Press

    • Civil Rights/Policing

    • Internet Policy/Net Neutrality

      • Computer WorldThere’s just one thing businesses can do about the ‘splinternet’ — adapt

        The other growing trend involves increasing legal control over what’s allowed within political boundaries. One example that comes to mind here in Europe (I’m in France at the moment) is General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and similar legislation in Europe. Laudable goals of protecting user privacy placed the burden on individual global websites, which many have found not worth the trouble. As a result, a great number of news sites are blocked in Europe — the menu of news sources is different inside Europe than outside Europe. And there are many other examples.

        To counter the splinternet trend, the United States in April unveiled a global declaration to resist “digital authoritarianism,” a document signed by 61 countries, seeking an “open, free, global, interoperable, reliable, and secure” [Internet]. Good luck with that, 61 countries.

        The document essentially gets governments that oppose the splinternet to make a nonbinding commitment to the goals of a single open [Internet], while having no impact on the majority of nations, including those actively splintering the [Internet].

    • Digital Restrictions (DRM)

      • NPRNetflix lays off several hundred more employees

        Netflix’s first-quarter revenue call in April revealed slowing revenue growth. The company lost 200,000 U.S. subscribers in that quarter, marking its first decline in customers in over a decade.

    • Monopolies

      • Patents

        • Help Keep Hangprinter Free

          The US patent office has rewarded somebody else with the patent on Hangprinter. The patent gives its holders royalty rights on the same invention I donated to the commons eight years earlier.

      • Copyrights

        • Torrent FreakMovie & TV Pirates Increase in Italy But They Are Pirating Less Than Ever

          New Ipsos research carried out on behalf of Italian anti-piracy group FAPAV reveals that 43% of the adult population engaged in some type of audiovisual piracy in 2021, with almost a quarter using pirate IPTV. Despite the gloom, overall piracy volumes are down 53% on figures reported in 2016 but FAPAV says that Italy needs to do much better.

        • Times Higher EducationClaws out: WorldCat sues Clarivate over plan for rival platform

          In a 32-page deposition made at an Ohio court, the owner of WorldCat, which provides access to more than 500 million references to 4 billion books, essays and other reference materials, says plans by Clarivate to establish a “free and open community peer-to-peer sharing platform for metadata created and owned by libraries” are contingent on the “misappropriating” of a catalogue it has spent decades collating at a cost of tens of millions of dollars.

          It calls for a temporary restraining order on the proposed MetaDoor platform, which has been set up as a “direct competitor” to WorldCat, as well as seeking “punitive damages” of at least $75,000 (£61,000).

        • [Old] QuartzAcademics have found a way to access insanely expensive research papers—for free

          Scientists are tweeting a link of the paywalled article along with their email address in the hashtag—a riff on the infamous meme of a fluffy cat’s “I Can Has Cheezburger?” line. Someone else who does have access to the article downloads a pdf of the paper and emails the file to the person requesting it. The initial tweet is then deleted as soon as the requester receives the file.

          Andrea Kuszewski, a San Francisco-based cognitive scientist who started the hashtag, tells Quartz that “the biggest rule is that you don’t thank people.” Those who willingly share papers are, in most cases, breaking copyright laws. But Kuszewski says it’s an important act of “civil disobedience,” adding “it’s not an aggressive act but it’s just a way of saying things need to change.”

        • [Old] Scholarly Sharing via Twitter: #icanhazpdf Requests for Health Sciences Literature

          Abstract: Introduction: Although requesting access to journal articles and books via colleagues and authors is a long-established academic practice, websites and social media platforms have broadened the scope and visibility of academic literature sharing among researchers. On Twitter, the #icanhazpdf hashtag has emerged as a way for researchers to request and obtain journal articles quickly and efficiently. This study analyzes use of the #icanhazpdf hashtag as a means of obtaining health sciences literature. Methods: RowFeeder software was used to monitor and aggregate #icanhazpdf requests between 1 February and 30 April 2015. This software records data such as Twitter handle, tweet content, tweeter location, date, and time. Tweets were hand-coded for the journal subject area, the requestor’s geographic location, and the requestor’s occupational sector. Results: There were 302 requests for health sciences literature during the study period. Many requests were made by users affiliated with a post-secondary academic institution (45%, n = 136). Very few requests were made by users located in Canada (n = 15). Conclusion: #icanhazpdf requests for health sciences literature account for a relatively small proportion of peer-to-peer article sharing activities when compared with other online platforms. Nevertheless, this study provides evidence that some faculty and students are choosing social media over the library as a means of obtaining health sciences literature. Examining peer-to-peer article sharing practices can provide insights into patron behaviour and expectations.

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