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Links 13/10/2009: GNOME Summit Coming, KDE Would Have Cost $175 Million to Make

Posted in News Roundup at 9:44 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish



  • Linux Foundation woos with lifetime linux.com handle

    Individual members can now also get up to 40 per cent off Lenovo devices and standard employee purchase pricing discounts from Dell and HP, according to Zemlin.

  • Linux Foundation Rolls Out New Member Benefits

    The Linux Foundation rolls out some new member benefits this week, along with a membership classification just for students. Though there were already a ton of cool membership perks to begin wtih, new access to employee purchase pricing on products from HP, Dell, and Lenovo is a really terrific addition to the list.

  • Want a cheap Linux computer? Join the Linux Foundation
  • Everything is Unix

    Recently there has been some chatter on various programming blogs about how we should be using classic Unix features to build more scalable infrastructure. This all started when Ryan Tomayko wrote I like Unicorn because it’s Unix.

  • Linux 2009; Red Hat Linux; Unix programming

    Linux is predominantly known for its use in servers, although can be installed on a wide variety of computer hardware, ranging from embedded devices , mobile phones and even some watches to supercomputers. Linux distributions, installed on both desktop and laptop computers, have become increasingly commonplace in recent years, partly owing to the popular Ubuntu distribution and the emergence of netbooks.

  • Green Computing is More Than Sleep Mode

    The simplest thing you can do is to make sure that your desktop or laptop goes into sleep or standby mode when it’s not in use. First up, make sure that you’re not using a screensaver, or there will be little or no energy consumption difference between idle and in use. Next, KDE and Gnome both have menu items where you can set power preferences; or you can of course set things manually with various XF86 options, hdparm, and so on.

  • Linux lets TV news crews rove more freely

    Nomad Innovations has used Moblin Linux technology to build a camera-mounted 3g and/or WiMAX transceiver aimed at mobile TV news teams. The $50K LiveEdge device is touted as a cost-saving, more flexible alternative to the $500K microwave trucks commonly used today.

  • Bringing Linux to Small Business

    We are all impressed and excited by the success of commercial Linux vendors. Red Hat, Novell, Canonical, Mandriva, Oracle, and a host of other Linux companies are making great strides in delivering performance and value to the enterprise marketplace.

  • Desktop

    • Clonezilla Welcome, Symantec Ghost goodbye

      Clonezilla is a partition or disk clone tool similar to Norton Ghost®. It saves and restores only used blocks in hard drive.. Two types of Clonezilla are available, Clonezilla live : It is suitable for single machine backup and restore.

    • Breaking the Silence

      Given that the silence is finally being broken on this, surely it’s time that banks themselves came clean: for the security of their customers – and themselves – they should really start warning people off Windows, as the Australian police have done. If they don’t, they are being grossly negligent, and showing at best indifference and at worst contempt for the digital well-being of their customers. Who among them will be the first to break this particular silence?

  • Server

    • Windows Does Not Scale

      Certainly not GNU/Linux: the latest Top500 supercomputer rankings show that the GNU/Linux family has 88.60%. Windows? Glad you asked: 1%.

      So, forget about whether there will ever be a Year of the GNU/Linux Desktop: the future is about massive data-crunchers, and there GNU/Linux already reigns supreme, and has done for years. It’s Windows that’s got problems….

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • Gnome Summit (@MIT)

      For this year’s gnome summit I decided to attend. I wanted to see what was going on and keep in touch with various people in the FOSS community. While I’m not a gnome hacker myself, I have made gnome apps, plugins and know some of the people working on new things.

    • KDE/Qt

      • Code Statistics: KDE Costs 175 Million Dollars

        The official KDE Project currently consists of 4.2 million lines of code. Cornelius Schumacher has applied the lines to individual projects and published the stats.

        The current source code of the KDE core module contains 4,273,291 lines exactly, reports Schumacher in his blog. Almost half the lines are taken by the three largest projects, kdebase, kdelibs and kdepim. The KDE-Edu team takes fourth place in the code stakes followed by kdebinding and network modules.

      • Free N900

        At the Maemo Summit Conference in Amsterdam, Nokia gave out over 300 N900 phones running Maemo 5. The N900 is the successor to the N810, over a hundred of which were handed out at Akademy a year ago. Read on for some opinions about the N900 and the results of 3 days of hacking.

      • KDE Community Forums Celebrate Their First Birthday

        Exactly one year ago, on October 12th, the KDE Community Forums were founded. It was about time to give users a place for discussion and support beside the mailing lists, which were mainly used by developers and other contributors. A lot of time has passed since then, and the forums have grown into a healthy community, contributing to the KDE landscape as a whole. Here people can ask KDE-related questions, help other users, find useful information, or just discuss whatever comes to mind.

      • Get Things Done Faster With Kupfer

        Kupfer is a launcher inspired by quicksilver. It allows you to use keystrokes to rapidly perform tasks such as launching applications, manipulating files and data and running scripts. Kupfer’s philosophy is simplicity, speed and usability. It is written in Python and has a flexible plugin architecture.

  • Distributions

    • Debian Family

      • Debian powers robotic sub to victory

        The Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Competition is sponsored by the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International and the Office of Naval Research. It was held at a large acoustic testing pool operated by the US Navy Space and Naval Warfare Systems Centre.


        Nova runs a custom software stack atop a single board computer which runs GNU/Linux and relies heavily on Debian.

      • Ubuntu 9.10 makes a serious charge toward the enterprise level

        At the end of this month (October 29th, 2009 to be exact), Ubuntu will be releasing its newest take on the Linux operating system. This time around, it should be obvious (even to the biggest of skeptics) that Ubuntu is making some serious inroads to the business and enterprise scene.

      • Review: Ubuntu 9.10 Brings Good Karma To Linux

        Ubuntu 9.10 has a variety of system management tools. Computer Janitor is a utility that helps you find and remove software packages that you might not need anymore and suggests configuration changes that might aid in boosting system performance. System Testing is a utility that tests several components of a system to ensure they are working properly, such as audio, fingerprint readers, peripherals and more.

        Significant changes from Ubuntu 9.04 to 9.10 beta aren’t strictly cosmetic ones. Want to add software to Ubuntu 9.10? This release replaces the Add/Remove feature in the Applications menu with the more contemporary Ubuntu Software Center. Ubuntu 9.10 also replaces the Pidgin IM client with the feature-rich Empathy client. This is part of the updated GNOME 2.28 desktop environment.

  • Devices/Embedded

    • Android or WebOS? Try before you buy!

      Since VirtualBox automatically configures a working Internet connection, feel free to stop by the Linux Journal Website using your shiny new Android Virtual Appliance!

    • Sub-notebooks

      • ARMing desktop Linux

        For a brief time in 2008, Linux actually owned a segment of the desktop industry: netbooks. When netbooks first showed up, they ran Linux and nothing but Linux. Microsoft panicked and brought XP back from the dead, offering it for next to nothing to netbook vendors and thus successfully fighting off the Linux challenge.

        That was then; this is now. Today, Linux netbooks are still popular, though not as much as they once were. ARM-based netbooks, however, are on their way and, since these systems can’t run Windows, Linux has the potential market all to itself. The real question is, will PC vendors choose to offer low-cost, less than $200 netbooks?


        I quote Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer: “Our license tells you what a netbook is. Our license says it’s got to have a super-small screen, which means it probably has a super-small keyboard, and it has to have a certain processor and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.”

        That’s so Microsoft. Once the company feels like it’s on top, it immediately start dictating to the market how things are going to be from now on. With Linux still around, though, it doesn’t have to be that way.

        I think though there is a market for full-powered netbooks at a $200 price point, and that means Linux. Ubuntu already runs on ARM, and I expect Google’s Chrome operating system to run on ARM-powered systems.

      • OLPC Afghanistan’s Pedal Powered Progress

        By taking the Freeplay hand crank and connecting it to the feet which can more easily provide power it should make it much easier to deploy the laptop to countryside / rural areas. As the laptop charges as you use it no additional battery is needed. Photos / full specs will be published on the OLPC Afghanistan website. We are hoping to make this sustainably for XO / other power purposes in Afghanistan employing more Afghan staff. This should work fine with XO 1.5 as well!

      • Asus Eee PC 1008HA Linux source code now available

        The Asus Eee PC 1008HA is a thin and light netbook that weighs just 2.4 pounds and measures just an inc thick. It was the first Asus netbook to be feature the new “Seashell” style design. And it’s currently only available with Windows XP, even though Asus was a pioneer in putting Linux on netbooks.

        But this weekend Asus did something interesting. The company posted Linux source code for the Asus Eee PC 1008HA. In fact, there are 5 different downloads, ranging in size 299Mb to 488MB. I have no idea what the difference is between one and the other, and I’m not entirely sure what’s contained in the files yet. But if I had to guess, I’d say that Asus is preparing to launch a version of the Eee PC 1008HA that runs Moblin Linux.

Free Software/Open Source

  • fOSSa Conference 2009 (Free/Open Source Software Academia Conference)

    The history of FOSS can be traced back to academic origins: distributing source code under a permissive license was the de facto rule in academia in the 70′s. Since then, FOSS became a wide spread paradigm throughout the software industry, and its alignment with academic goals tended to be forgotten.

  • Why Public Education Must Use Public Software

    But the current state of the American public education system is no longer innovative. By now, many have realized that America no longer holds a monopoly on the math and sciences, and some question if we ever did. Other nations have been making such quick progress that a second Sputnik doesn’t seem far-fetched in the near future.

    We can’t risk falling behind on the math and sciences. According to Jefferson, “science is important to the preservation of our republican government, and . . . also essential to its protection against foreign power.” Thankfully, our current President claims to be aware of our education system’s troubles, but is awareness enough?


    Public education is supposed to provide a model for its students. Freely available software for the public that anyone can use, learn from, modify, and send back to the system for improvement is certainly an ideal and practical model. Here is software that endorses cooperation and functions on peer review — software that promotes creativity and independent thought. Why subjugate the student to the black boxes of proprietary software when they can learn freely with free software?

  • Open Innovation Awards: Kaltura

    Kaltura is also promoting a global ‘open video’ movement, called the Open Video Alliance, showing a deep understanding of the importance to work hard on fostering ecosystems. The license of choice is, as it must be, the AGPL.

    Kaltura’s vision is to be for video what Firefox is to browsers, or WordPress is to publishing, but my guess is that they are probably going to be what Twitter is to texting.

  • Cerner product invites users to ‘play active role’ in improvements

    Cerner said in a release that uDevelop is based on the concept of open-source software development, in which users collaborate on products that are freely available for download. Some of the most popular examples are the Internet browser Mozilla Firefox and the GNU/Linux operating system.

  • Five Super-Useful WordPress Plugins

    If you use WordPress then you know what a great blogging platform it is right out of the box. It does everything a blogger could want and more, but hundreds of industrious users have come up with plugins to make it even better. Here are just five of the over 6,800 different plugins the WordPress community has dreamed up.

  • 12 Tools and Collections for Greater Graphical Clout

    For Splashy Web Sites. Along the same lines, if you’re looking for good graphical templates for web pages, two good places to start are Open Source Web Designs and Open Designs. These sites house thousands of graphical templates, most of them XHTML/CSS-based, that you can use for free. On the design front, also don’t ignore creative use of fonts. Check out Lisa’s post on several open source font resources that can make a difference on your web pages, and with your graphics.

  • Top 5 open source Firewall

    Open source firewall not only offers better customization options, but also reduces the cost of ownership. After an comprehensive search we assorted the top 5 open source firewall.

  • Why Freedomware?

    In light of questions pertaining to the difference between freedomware and free and open source software, I have put together a slide show using OpenOffice.org. The assumption here is that certain pieces of knowledge, such as the four freedoms (FSF) and how open source originated are already known by anyone wanting to use the slide show to do a presentation.

  • Mozilla/Firefox

  • Sun

    • Sun releases Solaris 10 10/09

      Sun Microsystems has announced the availability of the 10/09 update for its Solaris 10 operating system (OS). The latest release includes a number of bug fixes, feature updates and expanded support for new processors.

      In addition to several efficiency and performance improvements, Solaris 10 10/09 includes new updates for Solaris ZFS which integrates the ability to use solid-state drive (SSD) technology for data caching and high volume transactional applications. Administrators can now set usage limits, such as by individual file system, user or group.

    • Oracle’s and Sun’s Top Guns Reassure the Sun Faithful

      Some of the best news on the open source front appears to be that Oracle will nurture MySQL. We’ve said before that MySQL could become an open source on-ramp for Oracle’s proprietary databases. MySQL founder Monty Widenius has speculated that Oracle could possibly kill MySQL. As Oracle OpenWorld starts, though, there are good reasons to believe that Oracle will increase its invesment in MySQL. After many bumps in the road for Oracle’s proposed acquisition, that would be good to see.

    • There’s a Friggin’ Sun in the Room

      What is in question is what the backing of a giant like Oracle will do for Solaris, Java, MySQL and SPARC. Also, how is Oracle itself going to change? Oracle will now be offering three different RDBMSs (innoDB, Oracle, MySQL), on three different platforms (Linux, Solaris, Windows), and three different hardware platforms (SPARC, x86, AMD64). Oracle is now poised to take on IBM directly, as well as potentially taking on Microsoft’s dominance in the business world. Solaris is a ready replacement for many different types of software installations. It works well on servers and desktops, has a commercial office suite that is very comparable to MS Office, it’s got Java, and it has database solutions galore. It is now possible that we are now adding Oracle to that platform. I hope so much that Oracle can make it all happen. They have the pockets, do they have the brains?

    • Marten Mickos: Trust the Mighty MySQL Nation

      If MySQL were any old database, putting it in the same camp as the market leader would certainly give pause for thought. But MySQL is not any old database: it’s a free software one, released under the GNU GPL. This changes the dynamics considerably, as this fascinating letter from Mickos to the European Commissioner Neelie Kroes eloquently explains.

  • Openness

    • European Commission’s Expert Group recommends OA for FP-funded research

      In early 2008, the European Commission assembled an Expert Group of 13 academics to rethink how the EU funds research and, in particular, “to undertake an evidence-based, ex-post evaluation of FP6.” As group chairman, it appointed Ernst Th. Rietschel, President of the Leibniz Association and Professor Emeritus at the University of Lübeck.

    • A chat with Stephen Downes on OER

      A prominent member of the open education community, Stephen Downes is a researcher, blogger, and big thinker in open education and access related issues. He frequently debates with other open education advocates via the medium of the Internet, once in a while meeting up in person at conferences to hash out more of the same. I thought I might capture his slice of insight into the future of open educational resources and how he views them evolving in an ideal world.


  • The Web’s Inventor Regrets One Small Thing

    Mr. Berners-Lee smiled and admitted he might make one change — a small one. He would get rid of the double slash “//” after the “http:” in Web addresses.

  • Spies Protest After Intel-Sharing Tools Shut Down

    In the finger-pointing-fest after 9/11, the U.S. intelligence community was scorched for not sharing information, and putting parochial interests ahead of good analysis. Which makes it particularly depressing to see that the Office of the Director of National Intelligence is shutting down two of its more important collaboration tools, called uGov and BRIDGE.

  • LG’s Solar-Powered E-Book Reader

    There will always be paper books for die-hard romantics like my friend Jimmy, who actually smells a volume before he reads it and then, when done, can sit for hours in almost-darkness, stroking his calloused poet’s fingers across the smooth wood-pulp and dreaming of the good-old days of cotton paper and cow-skin covers.

  • Twitter Suspends Researcher Over Security Warning

    Twitter suspended the account of a security researcher after he posted a message to his followers warning them about a threat, according to ZDnet.

  • Former Wall Street financiers face criminal action

    They are scribblings that may come back to haunt Matthew Tannin. The former high-flying Bear Stearns hedge fund manager – who goes on trial for fraud in a New York court this week – had a habit of recording his inner-most thoughts in emails sent to himself on a private Google Mail account.

  • Shark fin ban ends cruel slaughter

    Shark finning was banned by the EU in 2003 but loopholes in the legislation have allowed fishing boats in UK waters to continue finning. It is estimated that hundreds of tonnes of shark fin have been landed since the European “ban” was introduced.

  • Have Banks No Shame?

    A few months ago, I asked Simon Johnson, the former International Monetary Fund economist, now a prominent critic of the banking industry, what he thought the banks owed the country after all the government bailouts.

    “They can’t pay what they owe!” he began angrily. Then he paused, collected his thoughts and started over: “Tim Geithner saved them on terms extremely favorable to the banks. They should support all of his proposed reforms.”

    Mr. Johnson continued, “What gets me is that the banks have continued to oppose consumer protection. How can they be opposed to consumer protection as defined by a man who is the most favorable Treasury secretary they have had in a generation? If he has decided that this is what they need, what moral right do they have to oppose it? It is unconscionable.”

  • Minton report: Trafigura toxic dumping along the Ivory Coast broke EU regulations, 14 Sep 2006

    (update Oct 12, GMT) Following press reportage about dumping off the coast of Africa, Waterson & Hicks, a UK law firm acting for Trafigura, a large London based oil and commodity trader, ordered and received this confidential report (the so-called “Minton report”) into toxic dumping practices by its client along and on the Ivory Coast. The report reveals a number of toxic dumping incidents and appears to be the report behind the extraordinary secret October 11, 2009 gagging of the Guardian newspaper.

  • AstroTurf

    • A changing climate around nuclear energy

      A new, bipartisan consensus is building around the environmental benefits of nuclear energy in America.

      Just a few weeks ago, in a meadow in Rocky Mountain National Park, Democratic Sen. Mark Udall of Colorado joined Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona in concluding that nuclear energy “has to be part of the solution” as the country seeks to reduce its carbon footprint and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

      The debate about nuclear energy in Oregon, and across much of America, has been a highly emotional, often partisan affair. This new alliance is a breath of fresh air, representing a fundamental shift in political alignment. Fifty-nine percent of Americans polled by Gallup earlier this year said they support nuclear energy as one way to meet the nation’s electricity needs.

    • The Insurance Industry’s Deceptive Report

      But if the PWC’s report doesn’t offer much in the way of trustworthy policy analysis, it is an interesting looking at the changing politics of the issue. In short, the insurance industry is getting scared. After many months of quiet constructiveness, they’re launching a broadside on the week of the Senate Finance Committee’s vote. The White House, which had a pleasant meeting with the industry’s leadership last week, was shocked by the report, and so too was the Senate Finance Committee. The era of cooperation seems to be over, and they weren’t given much advance warning. But the report might have another impact, too: The evident anger and fear of the insurance industry might do a bit to reassure liberals that this plan is worth supporting, after all.

    • Patients Before Profits

      When an insurance company says an 11 percent increase in its rates — during a recession — is too small, it is clear that the health care system has lost its way. Health care must be about patients and medical treatment, not corporate profits. Until the country and especially Congress, which is currently writing and debating health care overhaul legislation, returns to this notion any reform will be more akin to window dressing than the fundamental change that is needed.

  • Censorship/Web Abuse

    • Telephone Company Is Arm of Government, Feds Admit in Spy Suit

      The Department of Justice has finally admitted it in court papers: The nation’s telecom companies are an arm of the government — at least when it comes to secret spying.

    • PSP Go launch has become a nightmare for gamers, Sony

      Sony’s DRM hurts the free-game program given to European PSP Go buyers, and a Sony exec explains why the UMD exchange program has been scrapped. The company is still insisting that it plans to take care of its loyal customers, but the PSP Go’s early days have been nothing short of a disaster.

    • Guardian gagged from reporting parliament

      The Guardian has been prevented from reporting parliamentary proceedings on legal grounds which appear to call into question privileges guaranteeing free speech established under the 1688 Bill of Rights.

      Today’s published Commons order papers contain a question to be answered by a minister later this week. The Guardian is prevented from identifying the MP who has asked the question, what the question is, which minister might answer it, or where the question is to be found.

    • Guardian Gagged from Reporting Parliament

      According to the Guardian, despite the 1688 Bill of Rights, it has been gagged from reporting a question to be asked in parliament later this week. The gag was obtained by Carter-Ruck.

    • Guardian Hiring Bloggers For Local News Network

      There’s now no doubt that Guardian News & Media is planning a local online news project. Despite parent company Guardian Media Group laying off almost 250 staff in its regional division this year, GNM is hiring for metropolitan “beatbloggers” in Cardiff, Leeds and Edinburgh for local news services set for launch early next year.

    • Will EU lawyers white-out Amendment 138?

      EU lawyers say that Amendment 138 has to go because of a legal technical problem. And they insist on a poor replacement that will do nothing to stop the imposition of copyright enforcement measures. Given that we know the political agenda for both copyright and Internet restrictions, shouldn’t they do better?

    • How I got an apology from the Met for my unlawful arrest

      On 28th July 2005, I was unlawfully arrested at Southwark tube station when attempting to take the tube after work to meet my wife. Chief Superintendent Wayne Chance, Metropolitan Police Service Borough Commander for Southwark, has eventually apologised to my wife and I for their actions and the trauma it caused us.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Pirate Bay co-founders deny ownership of site

      Lawyers representing The Pirate Bay co-founders, Frederik Neij and Gottfrid Warg, denied in a Dutch civil court yesterday that the Swedish men currently own the notorious BitTorrent tracker site.

    • Big Entertainment’s century-long technophobic binge

      Nice work from Ars Technica’s Nate Anderson on the ways that entertainment companies have spent the past century decrying new technology, claiming that it would destroy copyright, from the record player to the xerox machine to the VCR to DTV to Napster.

    • BCCLA Files Lawsuit Against City For Violation of Charter Rights, VO Blogger Chris Shaw Key Plaintiff

      Two citizens stood up today against the Vancouver Olympics Committee and the City of Vancouver to oppose a bylaw they say will infringe on free speech and erode Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

    • ASCAP and BMI – Another Royalty Battle for Broadcasters?

      While we have written much about the battle over the broadcast performance royalty (or the “performance tax” as broadcasters call is) – whether broadcasters will have to pay artists and record labels for the right to play their music on the air – we have not written much about another looming issue with the royalties that broadcasters must pay to play music on their stations. While broadcasters are very familiar with the ASCAP and BMI royalties, they may not be fully aware that there is a looming dispute over the amount that broadcasters will pay to these organizations in the near future. At a panel that I moderated at the NAB Radio Show, Bill Valez, the head of the Radio Music Licensing Committee, talked about the current negotiations for the renewal of the royalty agreements between radio stations and these two Performing Rights Organizations (“PROs”).

    • Anti-Pirates Scare Kids with Propagandistic Comic Book

      The Motion Picture Association has sent one of its big shot lobbyists to New Zealand to advocate tougher anti-piracy legislation, and to promote a propagandistic comic book set be handed out to thousands of local kids. Interestingly, the comic doesn’t touch the subject of copyright. Instead it uses false threats to scare children and parents about the dangers of file-sharing.

    • Judge Refuses to Punish Lawyer for Anti-RIAA Blogging

      An attorney defending against a music-piracy lawsuit didn’t cross ethical bounds by filing motions broadly attacking the recording industry and posting them on his blog, a magistrate judge has ruled, rejecting demands from the RIAA for monetary sanctions.

    • Guilty Pirates, Line Up Over Here

      The site is “reaching out” to the pragmatists and seekers, as these are the ones who can apparently be “rehabilitated” and with the site’s help, they can take their first step toward legitimacy and restful, sleep-filled nights. And the site just makes a little money helps by “coax[ing] them toward the light.” What’s the harm in that, right?

      In case you can’t tell, I think this is a really silly idea. I have trouble believing anyone (yes, anyone) would do it. The article notes that “interest from the public has not been especially high.” Well, that I understand.

      If you’re downloading and feel that what you are doing is illegal, the first step is to stop it. Then, find a way to help the artist or creator yourself, not through a site that takes 12% of your payment for itself. The slice off the top makes me wonder if this site is any better than the downloaders; it itself benefits monetarily from allegedly illegal downloads. You could argue that it encourages people to download by helping them feel “better” after they’ve done it. The more “unauthorized” downloaders there are, the more there are who might pay through this site, bringing (perhaps some) profit to the site.

    • The AP and News Corp DEMAND To Be Paid For Their Content

      Really? The AP’s response to people linking to and discussing AP articles is to go after sites for money? I am waiting to see which news organization will be the first to go after Twitter for payment for news tweets. Instead of focusing on how to demand payment for the distribution of an infinite good, news organizations should recognize the new opportunities afforded by the free distribution of their content and focus on how to build a business off their scarce goods.

    • Jimmy Leach: Murdoch will pay for the end of free news

      Rupert Murdoch has thrown down the gauntlet to search engines with his threat to charge the likes of Google for presenting his newspapers’ content in search results.

    • ‘The Economist’ switches to online subscription mode

      It tends to be difficult to generate income both from free and subscription-based content. The reason for that is the abundance of information online. So it is likely that other free media services will even further expand their importance as information sources and marginalise traditional journalistic content providers. It is a fatal process of structural change where we still don’t know if the traditional media online would be a sustainable model.

    • Reuters using Drupal

      Anyone who reads the news knows that Reuters is a major news agency; in fact, it is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency.

    • http://thomashawk.com/2009/10/an-update-on-the-international-olympic-committees-threatening-letter-to-flickr-user-richard-giles.html

      Among other things, the IOC noted that “any reproduction and distribution of images of the Olympic Games and IOC identifications by any means, including over the World Wide Web, without the consent of the IOC is unauthorized.” They further claimed ownership over the Olympic rings and actually over the word “Olympics,” itself. Perhaps most offensive to me personally, the IOC had written in their heavy handed letter to Giles that any images of the Olympic Games actually “belonged” to the IOC.

    • NBC Hit With Font Infringement Suit (Of All Things)

      The Boston-based Font Bureau is asking for “no less than $2 million” in damages, according to Cityfile, which broke news of the suit here. And here’s a link to the suit, which was filed in Brooklyn earlier this week.

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Internet Video Celebrity Caitlin Hill 16 (2007)

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  12. Support SUEPO or End Up Like They and Some of the Boards Did

    SUEPO, the fast-growing staff union of the EPO, increasingly needs the support and protection offered by action and participation from staff

  13. NRC Handelsblad (Dutch Evening Newspaper) Speaks About EPO's Refusal to Accept Court Orders From The Hague

    Article explains the depths of the issues inside the EPO and the unacceptable immunity that management at the EPO continues to exploit, shaming or discrediting the very notion of the rule of law in Europe

  14. HeBS Digital and Black Duck Press Releases Treated Like Articles, Used to Muddy the FOSS Waters

    Free/Open Source software (FOSS) is under attack again, and it's the proprietary software lobby that's responsible for that

  15. EPO President Battistelli Now Intimidates Even National Delegations

    Report about an embarrassing incident implicating Benoît Battistelli and some angry comments cast over the witch-hunting of a judge, using all sorts of questionable tactics

  16. A Look at the Latest Gross Deletionism at the EPO's 'Media Partner', French Newspaper Les Échos

    The EPO's bogus 'journal of record, which Team Battistelli likes to cite in order to bolster its warped version of events at the EPO while maintaining a close secret relationship with the publisher, keeps censoring its own reporters (spiked paragraphs, silently self-censored or censored after publications)

  17. Rumour About Efforts to Dismiss a Board Judge by Intimidating Boards of Appeal

    Comment found online accuses the Administrative Council of pressuring, by threats, Directorate-General 3 to dismiss a judge who is silently accused (with selective 'leaks' to the media, reportedly orchestrated by EPO managers) but not even proven guilty

  18. President Battistelli Now Pressures/Threatens Politicians Who 'Dare' to Complain About Abuses and Unacceptable Conditions at the EPO

    Pierre-Yves Le Borgn’, a French politician, unleashes an angry letter from Benoît Battistelli and reveals just to what lengths the EPO's Team Battistelli is willing to go in order to crush political backlash

  19. EPO: It's Like a Family Business - Part IV

    Some more background information about Elodie Bergot and Gilles Requena, who are married whilst also sharing positions of power at the EPO (and also strong connections/ties with the EPO's President, Mr. Battistelli); Rumours afloat at the EPO -- some with ever-increasing circulation too -- are worth noting

  20. Translation of Thomas Magenheim-Hörmann's Article in the German Media, Urging European Politicians to Intervene in EPO Chaos and Lawlessness

    Frankfurt-based media presents an opinion piece written by a Munich-based economic correspondent, Thomas Magenheim-Hörmann

  21. German Press Says Broken EPO Lets President Severely Punish Staff Not Even Guilty of Any Wrongdoing

    Juve publishes an article which attempts to be 'balanced' (meaning it believes everything that EPO officials say) but at the same time reveals unacceptable practices that go in inside the EPO

  22. German Media Reveals That Out-of-Control EPO Management is Even Threatening and Abusing Lawyers Now

    The EPO's longstanding fight against justice escalates to an unprecedented war on lawyers themselves; “After this latest move,” says a German newspaper, “even lawyers are starting to feel threatened by the Office.”

  23. Washington Post Only Entertains Debate About Patent Trolls (But Not Patent Scope) Whilst US Lawyers Trick the System to Patent Software

    The Bezos-owned Washington Post continues to help those who wish to eliminate patent trolls (which bother Amazon amongst other large conglomerates) but remains void of any coverage about patent scope, including software patents that patent lawyers work so hard to defend

  24. It Pays (Off) to 'Bribe' the Media: Watch How Les Échos Covers EPO Matters and Self-Censors

    French newspaper Les Échos is self-censoring yet again and it is framing the EPO scandals as the fault of employees, not the fault of abusive managers who are working with Les Échos as a so-called 'media partner' (the EPO management is French-dominated)

  25. 'Leaked' PDF Shows How EPO Management Tried to Crush Judge Who 'Dared' to Criticise EPO Management

    The EPO's management continues to chill potential critics and is now making an example of a board's judge, despite having no such authority over him

  26. Links 21/11/2015: Community Appreciation Day, Jolla's Problems

    Links for the day

  27. EPO: It's Like a Family Business - Part III

    A look at how the EPO's management (Željko Topić in particular) defended the unprecedented promotion of Ms Bergot (wife of the president's close assistant), even in the face of outcry from EPO staffwarning

  28. In an Effort to Counter EPO Staff Narrative (After ~2,000 of Staff Protest) EPO Management Portrays Staff as Violent But Provides No Evidence

    The EPO's management has a poor record on accuracy and truth and the latest staff-shaming tactics serve to reinforce that track record

  29. Gross Aggression by EPO Management Shows the Urgent Need to Remove Immunity From EPO

    The increasingly militant approach of EPO management (with counterterrorism staff added to interrogate EPO staff) serves to show an organisation gone truly bonkers

  30. Patents Roundup: Alice Decision Still Upsets Patent Lawyers, Microsoft AstroTurf Group Lobbies on FRAND, Google and Red Hat Recalled

    The reaction of patent profiteers to scope/boundary restrictions, the FRAND lobby by Microsoft's longtime front group, FRAND matters in Korea (affecting Android), Google's response to patent threats, and Red Hat still keeping quiet about its patent agreement with Microsoft


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