11.25.21

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Links 25/11/2021: PHP 8.1.0 Released and Linux 5.15.5

Posted in News Roundup at 9:34 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

  • GNU/Linux

    • Desktop/Laptop

      • Where Can You Buy a Preinstalled Linux Laptop?

        Linux has become a perfectly capable and easy-to-use operating system, but where can you actually buy a Linux laptop? You won’t find them in big box stores, aside from Chromebooks. Fortunately, that’s less of an issue as more of us do our shopping online. Now it’s only a matter of knowing where to look and what to look for.

        Here is a list of large corporations, smaller companies, and resellers that are happy to sell you a laptop with Linux preinstalled.

    • Server

      • Amazon Linux 3 To Be Based On Fedora Community Linux

        Amazon Web Services (AWS) released an early version of its upcoming distro, Amazon Linux 3, which is based on Red Hat’s Community Linux, Fedora.

        With Fedora as upstream, the new Amazon distro, AL2022 is extremely stable after extensive package stability tests and contains all available security updates. In addition, it is optimized for Amazon EC2 and integrates seamlessly with the latest AWS features and many AWS-specific tools.

        The brand new Amazon Linux also includes frequent and flexible quarterly updates, as each AL2022 update matches a specific version of the Amazon Linux package archive. Updates are only required if the user wants to make a move and not if a new version is released.

      • Amazon Linux 2022 Was Recently Opened to Public Preview

        The cloud provider will let you run many Linux distributions or their own homebrew Linux, Amazon Linux 2022.

        Amazon Linux 2022 (AL2022) is an Amazon’s new general purpose Linux for AWS that is designed to provide a secure, stable, and high-performance execution environment to develop and run your cloud applications. The distro has had two major releases till now – the first (Amazon Linux) in 2010, and the second (Amazon Linux 2) in 2017.

        Amazon Linux is popular among AWS users for its tight integration with AWS tools, and no license costs. That combination is a clear pitch for the AWS users to also use the upcoming AL2022 if they want full AWS experience.

    • Audiocasts/Shows

    • Applications

      • A shortcuts editor for Xfce and a couple of other things

          As you may know, I’m the maintainer of xfce4-terminal and a developer for Thunar. It just so happens that both of these programs have a ton of shortcuts. Until now, there was no GUI for changing shortcuts. Users had to manually edit the `accels.scm` file which is doable yet cumbersome.

          Additionally xfce4-terminal, being a terminal emulator, has the problem of its shorcuts colliding with the shorcuts of terminal applications, rendering them unusable. To fix that issue users needed to once again dive into the `accels.scm` file and change the default shortcuts manually.

          That is why I created a new widget called XfceShortcutsEditor in libxfce4ui. Applications that use XfceGtkActionEntries for their accelerators can easily integrate that editor in their UI and enjoy the benefits without any additional complexity.

      • BlueGriffon compiled but is broken

        Oh wow, finally got the WYSIWYG HTML editor BlueGriffon to compile, and run, here it is…

      • Richard Hughes: New LVFS redirect behavior

        tl;dr: if you’re using libfwupd to download firmware, nothing changes and everything continues as before. If you’re using something like wget that doesn’t follow redirects by default you might need to add a command line argument to download firmware from the LVFS.

        Just a quick note to explain something that some people might have noticed; if you’re using fwupd >= 1.6.1 or >= 1.5.10 when you connect to the LVFS to download a firmware file you actually get redirected to the same file on the CDN. e.g. downloading https://fwupd/download/foo.cab gets a redirect to https://cdn.fwupd/download/foo.cab which is then streamed to the user. Why this insanity?

    • Instructionals/Technical

      • How to install Aseprite on Linux

        Aseprite is a pixel-art program that users can use to create 2D animations for video games. It is paid software, and users can purchase the product via the official website. However, the source code is also available for free. Here’s how to install Aseprite on Linux.

      • How to convert images on Linux with XnConvert

        Aseprite is a pixel-art program that users can use to create 2D animations for video games. It is paid software, and users can purchase the product via

      • How to install TWS on a Chromebook

        Today we are looking at how to install Interactive Brokers TWS on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

      • How to Install Python 3 or Python 2 on Ubuntu 20.04 – Linux Nightly

        Ubuntu is a great distro for developers. Python programmers will need to install Python on the system before it’s possible to code programs and run Python scripts on Ubuntu.

        This tutorial will show you how to install Python 2 or Python 3 on Ubuntu 20.04.

      • How To Install VNC Server on Debian 11 – idroot

        In this tutorial, we will show you how to install VNC Server on Debian 11. For those of you who didn’t know, VNC stands for Virtual Network Computer. This is a graphical desktop sharing system that uses the Remote Frame Buffer protocol (RFB). Those who are not comfortable with the command line, use VNC to let them use a keyboard and mouse to interact with a graphical desktop environment on a remote server.

        This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the VNC Server on a Debian 11 (Bullseye).

      • Install OBS Studio 27.1.3 on Fedora 35/34 [NVIDIA NVENC Xorg (X11) / XWayland] [stable / edge] – If Not True Then False

        This is guide howto install OBS Studio 27.1.3 [stable / edge] on Fedora 35/34 [Xorg or Wayland support]. OBS Studio is free and open source software for video recording and live streaming. I use here Snapcrafters (Snap) version of OBS Studio, which is community-supported modified build of OBS Studio. Screen capture in a Wayland session is at least available edge channel, in video I test here options to use NVIDIA NVENC with Xorg (X11) / XWayland.

      • How to install and configure Wildfly on CentOS 8 – Unixcop the Unix / Linux the admins deams

        WildFly (formerly known as JBoss) is an application server written in Java and developed by Red Hat. It is an open source application server for JEE applications, it is fast and lightweight and particularly efficient for web and business applications.

        The technology behind WildFly is also available in JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.

        JBoss EAP is a hardened enterprise subscription with Red Hat’s world-class support, long multi-year maintenance cycles, and exclusive content.

      • How to run Prometheus with Podman – NextGenTips

        Prometheus is an open-source system monitoring and alerting toolkit. Prometheus collects and stores its metrics as time-series data. Metrics information is stored with the timestamp at which it was recorded, alongside optional key-value pairs called labels.

        In this tutorial we are going to learn how to run Prometheus with Podman.

      • How to Install PuTTY on Ubuntu 22.04 | 20.04 LTS – Linux Shout

        Learn the steps and commands to install free PuTTY on Ubuntu 22.04 LTS Jammy JellyFish and 20.04 Focal fossa using Terminal to get a free SSH and telnet client.

    • Games

      • Steam Adds Linux Support for DLSS, 24 More Games | Tom’s Hardware

        Valve has updated its Proton solution – the piece of software that’s meant to bridge the divide between Windows and Linux gaming — to version 6.3-8. Following the company’s announcement of the Steam Deck handheld gaming device, Valve has been doubling down on its Proton efforts, because the Linux-powered gaming device is going to need a robust game library to compete.

        The new version of Proton brings Linux support to a number of games that were previously locked out of the Linux ecosystem. Crucially, some BattleEye-infused games are now also supported — the gap between Linux and Windows gaming environments seems to be shrinking even in anti-cheat solutions, whose support is crucial for a device that aims to enable AAA and eSports gaming on the go. Games such as Conan Exiles, DayZ, Planetside 2, and PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds (and others) all require BattleEye suppport.

      • NVIDIA DLSS for DX11 & DX12 Games Now Available on Linux via Proton

        As promised last month, following the initial release of NVIDIA DLSS on Linux via Valve’s Proton with compatibility for Vulkan games like DOOM Eternal, Wolfenstein Youngblood, and No Man’s Sky, the new version of Proton (6.3.8) released yesterday added NVIDIA DLSS support for DirectX 11 and DirectX 12 games.

        Needless to say, that’s by far the largest group of games compatible with NVIDIA’s Deep Learning Super Sampling technology out of the over 130 games and apps that support it. For example, out of the most recent DLSS additions, Deathloop, Back 4 Blood, Battlefield 2042, Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy, Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy – The Definitive Edition, Alan Wake Remastered, F.I.S.T.: Forged In Shadow Torch, Bright Memory Infinite, Jurassic World Evolution 2, Chivalry II, The Elder Scrolls Online, Swords of Legends Online, Hot Wheels Unleashed, and Assetto Corsa Competizione are all DX11 and/or DX12 titles. Only Crysis Remastered Trilogy, Rise of the Tomb Raider, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, and Baldur’s Gate III support Vulkan.

      • Linux Gaming with Ubuntu Desktop Part 1: Steam & Proton

        The holidays are coming, and if you’re anything like me that means only one thing: The Steam Autumn Sale is live!

        A few years before joining Canonical as the Ubuntu Desktop Product Manager, I was a video game producer (with at least one of my titles getting a native Linux port you’ll be pleased to hear). So improving the gaming experience on Ubuntu is high on my to-do list. With the Linux user base on Steam breaking the 1% ceiling earlier this year- which may or may not be related to the upcoming Linux-based Steam Deck– 2022 is shaping up to be a great year for Linux gaming!

        In the first of a mini-series of blogs, I wanted to break down some of the easiest ways to get started with gaming on Ubuntu. With part 1 we start with the obvious; Steam (and Proton).

    • Distributions

      • IBM/Red Hat/Fedora

        • Red Hat Bolsters Partner Ecosystem to Accelerate Data Science Pipelines Across the Open Hybrid Cloud

          Red Hat, Inc., the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the availability of Red Hat OpenShift Data Science as a field trial, as well as an expanded partner ecosystem focused on this new cloud service offering. As leading artificial intelligence and machine-learning (AI/ML) partners support the service, Red Hat customers are provided with a range of solutions optimized for Red Hat OpenShift, letting them select the technologies to best meet their specific machine learning needs across the open hybrid cloud and edge computing environments.

        • Command Line Heroes: Season 8: Humans as Robot Caretakers

          People often distrust robots. But can robots trust humans?

        • Diversity in the Tech Industry: ‘We Have a Long Way to Go’

          This week, host Connor Craven interviews Laurie Krebs, CFO and SVP at Red Hat, about where the tech industry can be more diverse, how it can improve its diversity, and what the future holds for the movement.

          Hello, and welcome to 7 Layers. Where every episode we look at the different technologies that connect our world. From literal wires in the ground, to switches and routers, and all the way up to the exploding amount of smart devices around us.

        • The Inside Playbook

          Edge computing and networking is not specific to any industry; all of these scenarios span many different types of organizations. However, all edge scenarios have one common factor: creating and consuming data resources that are geographically distributed. As a final objective we want to analyze, consume or react to data to fulfill our customer and business needs.

    • Devices/Embedded

      • Open Hardware/Modding

        • ESP32 Brings Air Purifier Online With Home Assistant | Hackaday

          A lot of hackers are rightfully concerned about the privacy issues that surround many of today’s “smart” gadgets, but it’s hard to argue that the ability to remotely control devices around your home isn’t convenient. Enter self-hosted, open source projects like Home Assistant. This provides the framework for building out a home automation system without having your soul information sold, but as you might expect, you’re going to have to put some effort in to get the most of it.

        • N-Gage Controller Uses All The Buttons | Hackaday

          If there’s anything you can guarantee about a video game system, it’s that in 20 years after one suffers a commercial failure there will be a tiny yet rabid group of enthusiasts obsessed with that system. It’s true for the Virtual Boy, the Atari Jaguar, and of course, the Nokia N-Gage. For those not familiar, this was a quirky competitor of the Game Boy Advance that was also a cell phone. And for that reason it had more buttons than a four-player arcade cabinet, which has led to things like this custom controller.

          Most N-Gage gaming these days takes place on emulators, this build is specifically built for the emulator experience. The original system had so many buttons that it’s difficult to get even a standard 102-key keyboard mapped comfortably to it, so something custom is almost necessary. [Lvaneede], the creator of this project, took some parts from an existing arcade cabinet he had and 3D printed the case in order to craft this custom controller. The buttons he chose are a little stiff for his liking, but it’s much better than using a keyboard.

        • PicoMite Gives Your Pico A Deluxe BASIC | Hackaday

          What makes developing a microcontroller project quick and easy? Tops on our list are an interactive shell and comprehensive libraries that handle all the low-level peripheral stuff. You think we’re talking MicroPython? Not today! MMBasic has just been ported to the Raspberry Pi Pico dev board, and it has all the batteries included.

          Just to give you a taste, it has built-in support for SD cards, all sorts of displays, touch screens, real-time clocks, IR remotes, numerous sensors, and of course WS2812 LED strips. And because all of this is baked into the BASIC, writing code to use any of these peripherals is straightforward.

        • Build Your Own HP41C | Hackaday

          There was a time when engineers carried slide rules. Then there was a time when we all carried calculators. Sure, calculators are still around, but you are more likely to use your phone. If you really need serious number crunching, you’ll turn to a full computer. But there was that awkward time when calculators were very important and computers were very expensive that calculators tried to be what we needed from full-blown computers. The HP41C was probably the pinnacle of that trend. If you’ve ever had one, you know that is a marvel of the day’s technology with alphanumeric capabilities and four plug in ports for more memory or ROMs. It really was a little hand-held computer. Didn’t have one? Don’t worry, you can now build your own. In fact, the HP emulator will also act like an HP15C or 16C, if you prefer.

          You can see the device in action in the video below. As you might expect, this version uses a through-hole ATMEGA328 and even at 8 MHz, the emulation is faster than the original calculator. The machine also has over double the memory the original calculator had along with a real-time clock built-in. The display is also backlit, something we all wanted in the original.

    • Free, Libre, and Open Source Software

      • Web Browsers

        • Mozilla

          • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Mozilla reacts to new EU draft law on political advertising online

            The European Commission has just published its draft regulation on the transparency of political advertising online. The draft law is an important step towards increasing the resilience of European democracies for the digital age. Below we give our preliminary reaction to the new rules.

            We’ve long championed a healthier ecosystem for political advertising around the world, whether its by pushing for stronger commitments in the EU Code of Practice on Disinformation; uncovering the risks associated with undisclosed political influencer advertising on TikTok; supporting efforts to limit political microtargeting; or pushing platforms to effectively implement their Terms of Service during electoral periods. We’re glad to see that in its draft law the European Commission has taken on board many of our insights and recommendations, and those of our allies in the policy community.

      • Productivity Software/LibreOffice/Calligra

        • CODE 21.11 delivers key features for secure, easier and faster online document collaboration

          Collabora announces the availability of Collabora Online Developer Edition CODE 21.11. This major new release targets the three key areas: ease of use, performance and interoperability. The release demonstrates the company’s mission to the technology leader in collaborative editing. Collabora Online businesses the most effective and secure document creation environment with dedicated support and depth of development horsepower.

          CODE 21.11 is the herald of the next major business supported Collabora Online release. This free developer version includes all features and enhancements that will be available in our enterprise version, expected early December. CODE releases allows everyone to learn about new features early.

      • Content Management Systems (CMS)

        • CMSes & static site generators: why I (still) chose WordPress for my business websites – The Open Sourcerer

          Not everything is perfect of course. As of 2021, on the performance front, getting consistent and reliable caching working with SuperCache is a mindboggling experience, full of “mandelbugs” (like this one); in my case, each of my websites has at least some (or all) of the caching behavior not working (whether it is some pages never being able to generate cache files, or the cached files not being retained, no matter what you do and what combination of voodoo incantation and settings you use), but maybe someday someone will complete a heavy round of refactoring to improve the situation (maybe you can help there?) and things will Just Work™. But for now, I guess I’ll live with that.

          All in all, it is only from 2019 onwards, after much research (and much technological progress in general), that I found myself with enough tooling to make this work in a way that would meet my expectations of design & workflow flexibility, and therefore feel confident enough that this will be my long-term solution for a particular type/segment of my websites. My personal website (of which this blog is only a subset) still is hand-coded, however, because it “does the job.”

          Years ago, someone once told me that whenever someone in your team decides to write your company’s website from scratch (or using some templating system), they “inevitably end up reimplementing WordPress… poorly.”

          So yeah. We’re using WordPress.

      • Programming/Development

        • PHP

          • 25 Nov 2021: PHP 8.1.0 Released

            The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 8.1.0. This release marks the latest minor release of the PHP language.

          • PHP 8.1 Released With Fibers, Enumerations, Read-Only Properties & Much More – Phoronix

            PHP 8.1.0 was just officially released as the latest annual feature update to this widely-used, server-side programming language.

            PHP 8.1 finally introduces the notion of “enums” or enumerations for a custom type that is a discrete number of possible values. PHP enums can be used anywhere an object can be used.

          • Remi Collet: PHP version 8.1.0 is released!

            RC5 was GOLD, so version 8.1.0 GA is just released, at planed date.

            A great thanks to all developers who have contributed to this new major and long awaiting version of PHP and thanks to all testers of the RC versions who have allowed us to deliver a good quality version.

            RPM are available in the remi-php81 repository for Fedora ≥ 33 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 7 (RHEL, CentOS, Alma, Rocky…) and as Software Collection in the remi-safe repository.

  • Leftovers

    • Surfboard Gets Jet Upgrades | Hackaday

      Surfing is a fun and exciting sport but a lot of beginners can get discouraged with how little time is spent actually riding waves while learning. Not only are balance and wave selection critical skills that take time to learn, but a majority of time in the water is spent battling crashing waves to get out past the breakers. Many people have attempted to solve this problem through other means than willpower alone, and one of the latest attempts is [Andrew W] with a completely DIY surfboard with custom impeller jet drives.

      The surfboard is hand-made by [Andrew W] himself using a few blocks of styrofoam glued together and then cut into a generic surfboard shape. After the rough shaping is done, he cuts out a huge hole in the back of the board for the jet drive. This drive is almost completely built by [Andrew] as well including the impeller pumps themselves which he designed and 3D printed. The pair of impellers are driven by some beefy motors and a robust speed controller that connects wirelessly to a handheld waterproof throttle to hold while surfing. Once everything was secured in the motor box the surfboard was given a final shaping and then glassed. The final touch was an emergency disconnect attached to a leash so that if he falls off the board it doesn’t speed away without him.

    • Inverted Pendulum Balanced On A Drone | Hackaday

      [Nicholas Rehm] works during the day at the Applied Physics Laboratory at John Hopkins, Maryland, so has considerable experience with a variety of UAV applications. The question arose about how the perseverance mars rover landing worked, which prompted [Nicholas] to hang a rock under his drone, attached via a winch. This proved to be interesting. But what is more interesting for us, is what happens when you try to attach an inverted pendulum to the top of a drone in flight? (video embedded, below)

      This is a classic control theory problem, where you need to measure the angle of the pendulum with respect to the base, and close the loop by calculating the necessary acceleration from the pendulum angle. Typically this is demonstrated in one dimension only, but it is only a little more complicated to balance a pendulum with two degrees of freedom.

    • Education

      • Surviving the Right-Wing Assault on Education

        Shedding Neutrality and Staying Online: How Teachers Can Survive the Threat of Right-Wing Nationalism in School – Guest Blog by Leah Rosenzweig

        A recent article by the editors of Rethinking Schools recalls an 1867 Harper’s Weekly editorial which invoked the phrase: “The alphabet is abolitionist,” meaning during the denial of literacy under the “slavocracy,” merely learning or teaching others to read and write was in itself an abolitionist act.

        Educators have always been vulnerable to the threat of white nationalism—what with their main duty being the enhancement and diffusion of knowledge, a great, if not the greatest, weapon of all (just look at how fearful the idea of teaching formerly enslaved people to read made white supremacists during reconstruction).

        Now — 150 years later — white supremacism has evolved, not only as an intrusion to the way teachers relay facts or clarify concepts or ideas, but as a threat to the very stasis of the classroom, as kids are becoming influenced by back-alley online movements that promote nationalism, anti-Semitism, and misogyny. And so, while teachers don’t and shouldn’t create incognito accounts on 4chan, they should try to stay current with right-wing Internet trends, so that they’re able to catch things like hand symbols and disconcerting research paper citations.

    • Hardware

      • Find Your Way In The Starry Skies With DobsonianDSC | Hackaday

        An obvious problem with the use of a telescope is getting the former to point at the proper part of the sky which you intend to observe, or vice versa when you spot something interesting and wish to record the exact location. While all of this can be done manually with some trouble, there’s a lot to be said for automating this process. Unfortunately these Digital Setting Circles (DSC) features are not cheap even as add-on, which is why [Vladimir Atehortúa] created DobsonianDSC as a low-cost DIY solution.

        As the name suggests, this project is based around a Dobsonian-style telescope: Newtonian tube with simple altazimuth base. Aside from the mechanical construction, this system uses an ESP32 as its controller along with two rotary encoders, with the simple circuit detailed in a build guide. The firmware for the ESP32 is written in the Arduino C dialect, and a guide for flashing the ESP32 with the Arduino IDE and connecting it to the WLAN is provided as well.

    • Integrity/Availability

      • Proprietary

        • Security

          • Linux 5.15.5

            I’m announcing the release of the 5.15.5 kernel.

            All users of the 5.15 kernel series must upgrade.

            The updated 5.15.y git tree can be found at:
            git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.15.y
            and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:

            https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s…

            thanks,

            greg k-h

          • What does the Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure bill mean for me?

            The UK’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) introduced a bill to Parliament yesterday. But what does that mean for IoT manufacturers and consumers?

            First, this bill has been a long time coming. Many people have been lobbying and working hard to create it. Industry and others with vested interests had to be consulted, draft guidance had to be produced and then acceptable wording had to be agreed.

            Numerous researchers including us have been exposing and drawing attention to poor smart product security too.

            I’ve expressed concern along the way at attempts from industry to water it down, but the bill as it stands is a good first step towards enforcing IoT security.

            [...]

            Banning default passwords will help mitigate issues such as the problem with Sky routers we exposed recently.

          • Book Review: Designing Secure Software

            Designing Secure Software (Amazon, No Starch Press) by Loren Kohnfelder is one of the latest entries in No Starch Press’s line of security books. This book stands out to me for two big reasons. First, this is one of the most mindset-centric books I’ve seen (which means it is likely to age better than a lot of more technically-specific books). Second, this book caters to developers more than security professionals (but don’t take this to mean it’s only for developers), which is definitely a distinguishing feature from so many other security books.

          • 4 Certificate Authorities to use with Let’s Encrypt SSL certificates

            It’s obvious from the foregoing that I’m not in favor of the switch to the ZeroSSL CA as the default, so which of the other three would I recommend? I still use the Let’s Encrypt CA, but Buypass’s certificates have a longer lifetime – 180 days, compared to 90 days for the other CAs. When next I have to issue a new certificate or renew an existing one, I wouldn’t mind specifying Buypass as the CA.

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    Almost no sites are speaking about it (probably because they have no presence on the Internet except on the Web), but it's time to motivate more people to get off the Web, for their own good and for society's sake...



  23. Black Friday SPAM on the World Wide Web: A Reminder That the Web is a Dying Platform, Languishing Due to Marketing and Misinformation

    The junk that overruns the Web this 'Black Friday' week (consumerism 'on steroids') is a good reminder that the Web isn't healthy for the mind anymore; it's mostly spying on people, trying to compel them to buy particular things or vote a certain way



  24. Microsoft-Led Misinformation Campaign About Germany and Munich Reminds Us That Microsoft Hates and Actively Undermines GNU/Linux Adoption

    Regarding the latest moves to GNU/Linux in Germany we have 3 points to make



  25. Links 23/11/2021: Libreboot 20211122, Deepin Linux 20.3, Amazon Linux 2022, and Mabox Linux 21.11 Released

    Links for the day



  26. IRC Proceedings: Monday, November 22, 2021

    IRC logs for Monday, November 22, 2021



  27. Links 22/11/2021: EasyOS Dunfell 3.1.11, Microsoft 'Extends' Mesa for Windows

    Links for the day



  28. Microsoft's GitHub is Hugely Toxic and It Censors Critics of Corporations or People Sceptical of Those in Power

    Sociopaths have taken over GitHub and control over GitHub (by Microsoft) is being shamelessly misused, just as we’ve warned all along; GitHub is social control media/network for code, asserting control over projects and developers by means of censorship and other sanctions



  29. EPO Staff Engagement Survey Predates the Pandemic and Provides False Assumptions for EPO Policies or Policy-Setting

    The EPO ticks a box for "surveying the staff", but is it actually listening? Is that done often enough? It was last done almost 3 years ago...



  30. Links 22/11/2021: Claws Mail 4 Enters Debian and Catch-up With Legal Matters

    Links for the day


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