Bonum Certa Men Certa

Red Hat Should Keep Its Distance From NSA Facilitator Microsoft

Dragonfly



Summary: Criticism of Red Hat's increasing proximity to some of the very same bits of proprietary software which are accompanied by back doors (for the NSA)

THE DANGERS of Microsoft are very real, as a former foe of Microsoft, Novell, helped prove. Five years ago Red Hat consented to playing an active part in Microsoft VM hosts, despite knowing (even back then) about Microsoft's relationship with the NSA, which meant that VMs running RHEL would be accessible (to the NSA) from the back door, Microsoft Windows.



There are many back doors in Windows and therefore in Hyper-V, which sits on top of Windows (back doors further down the stack). Microsoft tells the NSA about these back doors. To give the latest example of back doors, see this new report [2] which says: "Nearly 30 days after reports of a zero-day flaw being exploited in the wild, Microsoft will finally patch this critical vulnerability."

Relying on Microsoft for technology means that one should also expect and accept back doors. A reader showed us this new article, claiming that "Mono [is] infecting Android," but it's not just Android. Even Red Hat is now making such mistakes, in addition to hiring from Microsoft for management of virtualisation. Based on [2,3], Red Hat now accommodates Microsoft .NET applications, despite them being proprietary and potential back doors. A week or so ago some speculated that Microsoft might buy Red Hat (one day) [4,5] and yesterday we found the article "Why Microsoft Will Pick Off Red Hat" (logic of investors, not technical people).

Microsoft is now knowingly abandoning hundreds of millions of Windows users, leaving them with permanent back doors [6,7], so why should Red Hat trust Microsoft .NET applications or anything that comes from Microsoft, including Hyper-V? Articles like [8-10] remind us that in GNU/Linux the main flaw is human error (not changing default passwords or not applying patches, which Red Hat is making easier to apply without any downtime [11]).

The bottom line is, Red Hat's relationship with the NSA withstanding, it oughtn't connect too much to Microsoft components like .NET and Hyper-V because these constitute back doors that jeopardise security of GNU/Linux users.

Related/contextual items from the news:
  1. Microsoft to Fix an Internet Explorer Zero-Day Flaw


  2. Red Hat Adds Microsoft .NET to Its OpenShift PaaS
  3. A Red Hat stunner: 'Miccosoft .NET apps on OpenShift' Yes, you read correctly
    On Wednesday, Working with Uhuru Software, Red Hat is now incorporate a rival Microsoft product - .NET - to its three-year-old OpenShift platform-as-a-service. Really? Red Hat even published a blog to explain what's going on to those who might find the concept a bit unbelievable.

    Chris Morgan, the OpenShift Partner Ecosystem Technical Director for Red Hat, wrote the blog - and even he acknowledged the incredulity of it all that something from Microsoft, which for years has been an enemy of Red Hat, Linux and Open Source, would be incorporated into OpenShift.


  4. An Indecent Proposal: Microsoft and Red Hat?


  5. Reviews, Indecent Proposal, and Ubuntu Graduation
    Today brings two new reviews. Jesse Smith reviews Linux Mint Debian Edition 201403 in today's Distrowatch Weekly and Jamie Watson posts his latest hands-on. Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols says folks don't care about operating systems anymore. Matt Hartley has a few suggestions for those ready to graduate from Ubuntu. All this and more in tonight's Linux news review.

    Jesse Smith tested the latest LMDE in this week's Distrowatch Weekly. He found a few bugs but Smith says it "lives up to its description" of having "rough edges." With all its "nasty surprises" Smith suggests folks just stick with the Ubuntu-based version of Mint. But see his full review for all the details.


  6. Perspective: Microsoft risks security reputation ruin by retiring XP
    A decade ago, Microsoft kicked off SDL, or Security Development Lifecycle, a now-widely-adopted process designed to bake security into software, and began building what has become an unmatched reputation in how a vendor writes more secure code, keeps customers informed about security issues, and backs that up with regular patches.
  7. Positive Feedback: M$ Uses XP To Publish The Insecurity Of Using That Other OS


  8. Flaws In People And Their Software
  9. Red Hat Risk Reflex (The Linux Security Flaw That Isn't)
    News headlines screaming that yet another Microsoft Windows vulnerability has been discovered, is in the wild or has just been patched are two a penny. Such has it ever been. News headlines declaring that a 'major security problem' has been found with Linux are a different kettle of fish. So when reports of an attack that could circumvent verification of X.509 security certificates, and by so doing bypass both secure sockets layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS) website protection, people sat up and took notice. Warnings have appeared that recount how the vulnerability can impact upon Debian, Red Hat and Ubuntu distributions. Red Hat itself issued an advisory warning that "GnuTLS did not correctly handle certain errors that could occur during the verification of an X.509 certificate, causing it to incorrectly report a successful verification... An attacker could use this flaw to create a specially crafted certificate that could be accepted by GnuTLS as valid." In all, at least 200 operating systems actually use GnuTLS when it comes to implementing SSL and TLS and the knock-on effect could mean that web applications and email alike are vulnerable to attack. And it's all Linux's fault. Or is it?


  10. Linux Bugs, Bugs Everywhere
    "We are seeing a lot of crypto bugs surfacing lately because these libraries are suddenly getting a lot of review thanks to Snowden's revelations," suggested blogger Chris Traver. "I think one has to separate the crypto bugs from others because they are occurring in a different context. "From what I have read about gnutls, though, it seems to me that this is probably the tip of the iceberg."
  11. Introducing kpatch: Dynamic Kernel Patching
    In upstream development news, the kernel team here at Red Hat has been working on a dynamic kernel patching project called kpatch for several months. At long last, the project has reached a point where we feel it’s ready for a wider audience and are very excited to announce that we’ve released the kpatch code under GPLv2.


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