07.15.11

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Links 15/7/2011: PCLinuxOS KDE MiniMe 2011.07, Symphony Contribution to Apache

Posted in News Roundup at 5:18 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Kernel Space

    • Graphics Stack

      • Two Months To The X.Org Chicago Conference
      • VP8 Gallium3D Support In Mesa Is Being Worked On

        Besides pipe-video landing in Mesa, there’s some more good news to report when it comes to accelerated video playback over Mesa/Gallium3D. There’s a VP8 state tracker for this Google format that’s actively being developed.

        Back in March one of the proposals this year was to create VP8 support over VDPAU in Gallium3D. Originally this began as an H.264 VDPAU state tracker and then targeting WebM or Theora instead. In the end the GSoC proposal was for VP8 in Gallium3D via the VDPAU state tracker. However, the proposal was not accepted by Google due to technicalities.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments

    • Intel AppUp Workshop at Desktop Summit

      The DesktopSummit 2011 team is pleased to announce the Intel AppUpSM Application Lab: MeeGo Series. The session will take place at the Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany as part of the Desktop Summit. Intel® is the Platinum Sponsor of the Desktop Summit.

    • GNOME Desktop

      • Trending Gnome 3 alternative distros

        Gnome3 on its release on April 6 2011 was touted as the next generation of GNOME in nine long years. The highlight of Gnome 3, is the brand new user interface, modern desktop for modern technologies. Besides, Gnome 2 had a very long life and maintaining it, technically, was reaching the point of ‘critical mass.’ Secondly, Gnome 3 aims to get rid of a lot of clutter on the desktop.

      • Expected Changes In GNOME Shell 3.2

        Here’s a list of what to expect in GNOME Shell 3.2 (to be released on September 28), according to Allan Day, one of the main GNOME Shell developers:

  • Distributions

    • New Releases

    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

    • Red Hat Family

      • Scientific Linux: Enterprise Infrastructure on the rise

        Scientific Linux, among other distros, tries to provide an answer to this whole fiasco. If you are, for example, a grade school or a high school you can’t really afford to pay Microsoft for 40+ Windows 7 licences and a Windows 2008 Server, especially if your students are going to use those computers to do a little C++ or Java programming at most.

        The researchers at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) know how limited funds can be. Ironically, in the world, research and education are among the most underfunded branches of society, so the less you have to spend on necessities, the more resources you have for your actual research.

      • Virtual Bridges Joins Open Virtualization Alliance, Extends Support for Linux Desktops
    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot Alpha 2 Review, Screenshots, Download Links

            Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot Alpha 2 is released already and the changes we expected to see in Ubuntu 11.10 is slowly starting to show up. Among other things, the most important change is the arrival of GNOME 3.0 stack. Ubuntu is not based on GNOME 2.x anymore. Most of the default Ubuntu themes have been ported to GNOME 3.0 and lot of other things are changing as well. Read our detailed Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot Alpha 2 review.

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

  • Just how “open” is open source vendor-neutrality?

    This week’s release of Jaspersoft Studio represents a new option for Eclipse-based business intelligence (BI) design environments.

    This product release sees Jaspersoft become an official member of the Eclipse Foundation — which is interesting, as its tools compete with those of existing Eclipse projects.

    If you’ve not visited Eclipse for a while, in it’s own words, “Eclipse is an open source community, whose projects are focused on building an open development platform comprised of extensible frameworks, tools and runtimes for building, deploying and managing software across the lifecycle.”

  • As Facebook Shows Its Fear, Open-Xchange Bounces Back

    The arrival of the Google+ social network has caused a battle to erupt over ownership of Facebook users’ contact information, and on Wednesday open source provider Open-Xchange fought back against Facebook’s earlier deactivation of its OX.IO export tool.

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Mozilla in the New Internet Era — More Than the Browser

        Mozilla’s mission is to build user sovereignty into the fabric of the Internet. We work to ensure that the the Internet remains open, interoperable and accessible to all. To do this we build products, we build decentralized participation worldwide, and we build the ability for people to create their own experiences in addition to consuming commercial offerings.

        Internet life is undergoing immense changes. The mobile revolution has huge implications, from new devices to operating systems to user expectations. The social experience means a lot of personal data about me becomes central. The increasingly ubiquitous nature of computing devices (phone to tablets to microwaves to lights and electric meters) means the amount and kinds of data being generated are changing dramatically.

      • Mozilla Delivers New Firefox Versions at Rapid-Fire Pace

        Mozilla announced its intent to pursue a new rapid release cycle early this year, and while the company’s recent release of version 5 of the Firefox browser is being met with much less criticism than the previous version 4, we’ve reported on the fact that not everyone is happy with the speed of the releases. Enterprise IT administrators may be among the most unhappy observers. Still, if you’re keeping track, Mozilla is more on target to please users with rapidly delivered, high-quality versions of Firefox than it ever was before.

        It’s worth remembering that heading into this year, just before Mozilla announced its new rapid release cycle plans for Firefox, the browser hadn’t even reached version 4.0. Meanwhile, Google Chrome was snapping up browser market share with new and improved versions showing up every couple of months. In fact, Chrome’s development cycle is a big part of why Mozilla stepped up its release cycle for Firefox.

      • Firefox Leaps Ahead With Versions 6, 7, and 8
  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • Symphony contribution

      Also, as the PC Magazine review notes, we’ve done some really good UI
      work. I invite you to download Symphony [2] and take a closer look at
      this. Yes, it is different from what OOo has today. And a move of
      that magnitude has an impact on documentation and translations as
      well. But the feedback we’ve received from customers and reviewers
      is very positive. Do we integrate parts of the Symphony UI? That is
      something for the project to discuss and decide on.

      Finally, we will be proposing [3] a new incubation project at Apache,
      for the ODF Toolkit. These Java libraries enable new kinds of
      lightweight document processing applications. We think this would
      work well as an Apache project, and we look forward to moving that
      into incubation and developing that complementary project forward.

    • IBM to donate Symphony code to Apache for consideration
    • IBM throws its source code and support behind OpenOffice

      Of all the companies that support OpenOffice, there were only two that didn’t support the LibreOffice fork: Oracle and IBM. I could understand Oracle. While Larry Ellison, Oracle’s CEO, didn’t really care about OpenOffice–after all Oracle essentially gave OpenOffice away to The Apache Foundation–I also know that Ellison wasn’t going to let The Document Foundation, LibreOffice’s parent organization, dictate terms to him. But, I’ve never quite understood why IBM didn’t help create LibreOffice. Be that as it may, IBM will be announcing tomorrow that it’s donating essentially all its IBM Lotus Symphony source code and resources to Apache’s OpenOffice project.

    • SAP joins OpenJDK Java project

      SAP has joined the OpenJDK project, an Oracle-led initiative producing an open source implementation of Java that also has gained support of such companies as IBM and Apple in recent months.

  • Business

    • Open Source Earns New Opportunity With Channel Partners
    • Semi-Open Source

      • Jaspersoft joins Eclipse Foundation

        Open source business intelligence software specialist Jaspersoft has joined the Eclipse Foundation and presented Jaspersoft Studio, which integrates into the Eclipse IDE. The development environment enables developers to build reports and integrate them into existing applications free of charge. Potential data sources for reports include relational, “big data” and NoSQL databases, as well as text files.

  • FSF/FSFE/GNU/SFLC

    • Hurd Progresses – Debian GNU/Hurd by end of 2012?

      The GNU Hurd developers are moving forward with their work on the free software operating system. According to the most recent progress report from the project, there is now a “real plan” to release a Hurd variant of Debian with the release of Debian 7.0 Wheezy.

  • Project Releases

    • Compiz 0.9.5 Has Arrived

      Sam Spilsbury has just tagged Compiz 0.9.5 for release as the latest development milestone for this compositing window manager.

  • Licensing

  • Openness/Sharing

    • New book from Creative Commons celebrates the power of open

      By the end of 2010, more than 400 million works had been licensed with Creative Commons licenses. That’s 400 million musical compositions, news items, academic manuscripts, artworks, blueprints, presentations, photographs, books, blog posts, and videos whose owners believed traditional copyright restrictions didn’t allow their creations to properly circulate, grow, and flourish.

Leftovers

  • Health/Nutrition

    • Insurance Exchanges Tilted Toward Health Insurers, Not Consumers

      The insurance industry made it abundantly clear this week that it is in the driver’s seat — in both Washington and state capitols — of one of the most important vehicles created by Congress to reform the U.S. health care system.

      The Affordable Care Act requires the states to create new marketplaces — “exchanges” — where individuals and small businesses can shop for health insurance. In the 15 months since the law took effect, insurers have lobbied the Obama administration relentlessly to give states the broadest possible latitude in setting up their exchanges. And those insurance companies have been equally relentless at the state level in making sure governors and legislators follow their orders in determining how the exchanges will be operated.

  • Defence/Police/Aggression

    • ‘Ex-terrorist’ rakes in homeland security bucks

      Walid Shoebat had a blunt message for the roughly 300 South Dakota police officers and sheriff’s deputies who gathered to hear him warn about the dangers of Islamic radicalism.

      Terrorism and Islam are inseparable, he tells them. All U.S. mosques should be under scrutiny.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. drops bid for BSkyB

      Political and public outrage over the phone-hacking scandal involving some of its newspapers forces News Corp. to withdraw its $12-billion offer to take over Britain’s biggest satellite broadcaster.

  • Privacy

    • Apple Pays Out $946 in ‘Locationgate’ Settlement

      Apple has begun shelling out dough for its location-tracking debacle lovingly referred to as “Locationgate.”

      Apple was ordered to pay out 1 million South Korean won ($946) in compensation for collecting user geolocation data without permission in May, Reuters reported Thursday. The payment was made to a lawyer named Kim Hyung-suk.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • Rogers facing Internet throttling deadline

      nada’s largest cable Internet provider admitted to unintentionally throttling access to World of Warcraft — a popular massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) with more than 11 million subscribers around the world.

      The Toronto-based company disclosed its activities after one of its customers filed a complaint with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in February.

    • What to do About Retail Usage Based Billing: A Modest Proposal

      OpenMedia.ca, which spearheaded the public uproar over usage based billing earlier this year, launched a Vote Internet campaign that quickly attracted political support. The campaign asks candidates to be pro-Internet, which includes standing up for an open and accessible Internet and stopping the “pay meter on the Internet.” While this predictably raises claims of retail price regulation, addressing concerns about retail UBB need not involve a return to regulatory approvals over retail pricing of Internet services.

      I’ve argued that UBB is fundamentally a competition problem and that addressing the competition concerns (which OpenMedia also supports) will address many of the concerns. Increased competition takes time, however, and in the meantime there are legitimate concerns about the use of UBB in Canada at the retail level given the approaches in other countries and the pricing far above costs. In addition to discussing those issues, my UBB paper makes a modest proposal for addressing retail UBB that includes greater transparency and a reasonableness standard. The proposal – which I’ve called the creation of Internet Billing Usage Management Practices or IBUMPs – is explained below.

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