EditorsAbout the SiteComes vs. MicrosoftUsing This Web SiteSite ArchivesCredibility IndexOOXMLOpenDocumentPatentsNovellNews DigestSite NewsRSS

02.25.19

There is Still a Patent Quality Crisis at the EPO

Posted in Europe, Patents at 1:19 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Even the word "crisis" is nowadays being used, and not for the first time

God and EPO
“System Battistelli” has been such an utter failure that the Office abandons it [1, 2, 3] (after spending 223 million euros on it and having created baseless patent monopolies that can cost Europeans billions of euros)

Summary: The race to the bottom (of patent quality) is proving to be a very costly one; there are more signs that even the management of the EPO belatedly recognises this

THREE years ago we published "The European Patent Office Suffers Quality Crisis, Finally (Belatedly) Agrees to Publicly Comment on It" and around the same time we also showed internal documents that speak of a crisis at the EPO. The word “crisis” being used by management wouldn’t be unprecedented at all, albeit Mr. “Colgate Smile” António Campinos is trying to hide all this. That’s apparently his chief role now.

Has the EPO fallen/succumbed to the quality levels of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO)? Maybe even lower than that? A couple of days ago Watchtroll published “Merck and Pfizer Downgrades on Patent Cliff Concerns Signal Importance of Patents to Pharma” (the typical alarmist nonsense from patent maximalists). Should we not be celebrating this? A boon for generics, surely…

Either way, in the wake of Alice and Mayo (SCOTUS), or 35 U.S.C. § 101, US patents became a lot harder to enforce in US courts. Not too surprisingly, the number of lawsuits has almost been halved. Will this crisis of confidence (in the legitimacy of patents) be coming to Europe? Has it come already? The other day we took note of the EPO's statement on “patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding,” to borrow Ben Wodecki’s framing of the subject in his new article, “EPO member states meet to discuss plant patent crisis,” which we quote below:

Representatives from the 38 member states of the European Patent Office (EPO) have met to discuss the patentability of plants obtained by essentially biological processes following several high profile invalidation cases.

Representatives from the member states, along with the European Commission as an observer and the office of the EPO met to discuss the patentability of conventionally bred plants and animals.

More than 40 organisations had appealed to EPO president António Campinos in January calling for an end to all patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding.

This has meanwhile been pointed out by patent maximalists as well:

The European Patent Office and representatives of the 38 Member States organised a meeting last week of the Committee on Patent Law to discuss next steps following decision T 1063/18 of an EPO Board of Appeal on plant patentability. Representatives of the European Commission were present as observer.

In its landmark decision of 5 December 2018, the Board of Appeal decided that plants which are produced according to essentially biological processes need to be held patentable, despite EPO Guidelines which were introduced in 2017 to exclude them from patentability.

These patents never made any sense, not just as a matter of law but also a matter of common sense/intuition. Life and nature are not inventions. Neither is mathematics, yet the EPO keeps advocating/promoting software patents in Europe. Just before the weekend we saw this article titled “Global Artificial Intelligence Patent Survey” and the parts about the EPO are all buzzwords (the familiar ones):

Research and development conducted worldwide is currently driving the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” (“4IR”), which encompasses three major fields: (1) physical technologies, (2) biological technologies, and (3) digital technologies. [1,2]

Corresponding to the rise of 4IR digital technologies, the number of international artificial intelligence (“AI”) based patent filings has expanded rapidly over the last few years, mostly concentrated in the United States and Asia. [3] According to a 2016 study, approximately 75% of all AI-related patent publications in the world come from three jurisdictions: China, Japan, and the United States. [4] Although the majority of AI-related patents are filed in these countries, Europe is also seeing substantial increases in such patent filings.

[...]

AI-related patent applications in Europe grew at a 54% annualized rate from 2014 to 2017. [18] The European Patent Office (EPO) has expressed a dedication to developing examination practices which are friendlier to computer implemented inventions, including AI-related subject matter. For example, the EPO adopted a new approach to interdisciplinary software patent applications which can now be examined by a team of three examiners with diverse technical backgrounds. Additionally, the EPO aims to speed up examination according to a 12-18 month timeline from filing to either allowance or final rejection.

Furthermore, in May 2018, the EPO held a conference entitled “Patenting Artificial Intelligence” centering on the challenges and opportunities of patenting AI-related innovations. [19] Experts emphasized that AI-related applications in the EP should address technical considerations of the internal functioning of a computer, such as speed and/or computational load. [20]

[...]

As AI-based innovations become an ever-increasing presence in our daily lives, it appears inevitable that an expanding number of patent applications will be filed to protect such inventions. Certain international jurisdictions have been amenable to clarification and adjustment of their patent laws and examination procedures with respect to AI, while others have remained relatively unchanged. It is promising to see both the Japanese and European patent offices clarifying expectations and streamline examination procedures in these emerging technical areas. As US practitioners, it can only be hoped that the USPTO will establish similar initiatives to expedite and clarify AI-based patent prosecution as the 4IR marches forward.

The term “4IR” was promoted if not made up by the Battistelli regime, which had paid publishers to spread it worldwide. It keeps spreading.

We have more or less lost hope in justice from within the EPO because the topology of the Organisation is all messed up and the Office is in charge of everything, even judges. Yes, the Enlarged Board of Appeal too is still afraid of — and thus dependent on — corrupt officials at Office. That needs to change in order to improve the perceived legitimacy of boards’ decisions.

Here’s IP Kat taking note of the latest referral to the Enlarged Board of Appeal:

The issue of double-patenting has been considered before by the EBA, in G 1/05 and G 1/06. In these decisions the EBA proposed that the principle that double patenting should be prohibited given that an applicant “had no legitimate interest in proceedings that gave rise to the grant of a second patent in respect of the same subject-matter for which he already held a patent” (G 1/05, r. 13.4).

However, there are two situations where the issue of double patenting may arise – divisional applications and internal priority. In the latter case, it seems that an applicant may have a legitimate reason for the second patent, as this will have a later expiry date than the first (patent term being determined by filing date and not priority date).

As Eric then put it:

Board 3.3.01 has decided to refer a question to the Enlarged Board of Appeal, in connection with the issue of double-patenting. Decision T 318/14 is not published yet but the minutes are available on the EP register at https://register.epo.org/application?number=EP10718590&lng=en&tab=doclist

1. Can a European patent application be refused under Article 97(2) EPC if it claims the same subject-matter as a European patent granted to the same applicant which does not form part of the state of the art pursuant to Article 54(2) and (3) EPC?

2.1 If the answer to the first question is yes, what are the conditions for such a refusal and are different conditions to be applied where the European patent application under examination was filed:
a) on the same date as, or
b) as a European divisional application (Article 76(1) EPC) in respect of, or
c) claiming the priority (Article 88 EPC) in respect of
a European patent application on the basis of which a European patent was granted to the same applicant?

2.2 In particular, in the latter case, does an applicant have a legitimate interest in the grant of the (subsequent) European patent application in view of the fact that the filing date and not the priority date is the relevant date for calculating the term of the European patent under Article 63(1) EPC?

“May I add that the Board also considered the situation where two EP applications are filed on the same date by the same applicant,” Eric later added. “This situation may also lead to a double-patenting objection (preliminary opinion of the board pt 5.2, and G-IV, 5.4 ). This corresponds to alternative a) of question 2.1.”

Double patenting may seem attractive to the likes of Battistelli as that helps game (inflate) numbers. It’s no secret that the EPO became a monopoly-printing fanatic rather than a proper, reserved, ‘conservative’ examination centre. The danger therein is that it harms the very consent from which the EPO derives its power/authority.

Worry not, however, as corporate media does not seem interested in covering any of this. The corporations it protects have a lot of patents and if the public found out about the underlying quality, it would diminish their over-inflated value.

Remember that the EPO repeatedly bribed the Financial Times and the Financial Times still reciprocates by rewarding patent maximalists. Days ago it published “Apply for new FT ranking: Europe’s leading patent law firms 2019″ and spread this lie that we need patent lawyers for innovation (“Europe needs technology and patent lawyers,” says the title). To quote:

The Financial Times is looking to identify leading European patent law firms which are securing patents and protecting European innovation.

What we see here is the press as enabler of abuse and aggression. There’s also this new press release (paid) that speaks of another “EPO” in relation to US patent 10,207,922. In very general terms, we’ve found virtually no journalism about patents over the past week, just promotional ‘articles’ composed by law firms and not a word about software patents, patent quality, etc.

Share this post: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Reddit
  • co.mments
  • DZone
  • email
  • Google Bookmarks
  • LinkedIn
  • NewsVine
  • Print
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • Facebook

If you liked this post, consider subscribing to the RSS feed or join us now at the IRC channels.

Pages that cross-reference this one

What Else is New


  1. Debian Leadership Should Not be 'Shy' of Politics (and It's OK to Admit Palestinians Are Human Beings Too)

    The contemporary tendency to limit people's freedom of speech (e.g. permission to express political views) means that while people may find software freedom they will lose other essential freedoms



  2. New Series: Inside the Free Software Foundation (FSF)

    In the interest and motivation of exposing the true nature of things, Techrights will turn its attention to internal affairs at the higher echelons of the FSF, founded more than three and a half decades ago in MIT (where Stallman launched the GNU Project, developed the GNU Compiler Collection and a lot more foundational Free software)



  3. IRC Proceedings: Sunday, February 23, 2020

    IRC logs for Sunday, February 23, 2020



  4. Links 23/2/2020: PipeWire 0.3 and Osu!

    Links for the day



  5. FSF's Interim Co-President Alexandre Oliva on Being Cancelled

    It was reading this that I realized I’d been cancelled myself. In my case, I was painted misogynist and transphobic, and for a post in which I supported women but denounced a crowd of men twisting the feminist cause, that I share, to attack rms, as if he wasn’t a feminist himself; and in which I express curiosity as to what pronoun to use to refer to zero women to paint me as someone who disregards gender identities and their pronouns.



  6. Good People Need to Run for Free Software Foundation (FSF) Board Positions After an FSF Coup Threw in the Towel, Pushing Out the Founder

    "I have been hit, but not knocked out, and my campaign for free software is not over." --Richard Stallman, October 2019



  7. IRC Proceedings: Saturday, February 22, 2020

    IRC logs for Saturday, February 22, 2020



  8. Alexandre Oliva's Message About Cancel Culture at the FSF

    Being cancelled is no fun. In my case, it was for standing for a friend who got canceled for defending someone else from an accusation that was later proven false.



  9. Links 22/2/2020: Polish Government Increases GNU/Linux Use, Samza 1.3.1

    Links for the day



  10. Being Rich Does Not Imply Being Smart (Especially When One is Born Into Wealth)

    Presenting the 'genius' (college dropout, but that does not matter when the yardstick of wisdom is wealth alone), with his own predictions overlaid on top of his photo from the show of Bloomberg (another 'genius' whose supposed brilliance is measured using money alone)



  11. The Rise and Fall of Free Software

    "We simply need to make the movement less corporate, and more grassroots."



  12. Why You Should Adopt Debian 10, Not Vista 10 (Windows Vista With Microsoft's Latest Surveillance Add-ons)

    A little personal story and recommendation of Debian "Buster" (10) or Devuan (whose developers persist)



  13. Ethics by Exclusion

    It's the same old philosophical question; can excluding those who are perceived to be intolerant be seen as an act of tolerance?



  14. Even Worse Than Microsoft Inside the Board of the OSI

    The OSI has accepted people from companies that actively attack Software Freedom and there may be more on their way



  15. ZDNet Continues to Stuff Its 'Linux' Section With Proprietary Software of Microsoft

    The above is what the "Linux" section of ZDNet is going to look like throughout the weekend (and this is hardly unusual, either)



  16. IRC Proceedings: Friday, February 21, 2020

    IRC logs for Friday, February 21, 2020



  17. Links 21/2/2020: EasyOS 2.2.11 Released, Microsoft's Control of the Linux Foundation Increases and More Binary Blobs Arrive

    Links for the day



  18. IRC Proceedings: Thursday, February 20, 2020

    IRC logs for Thursday, February 20, 2020



  19. Video: LinuxWorld 1999, Torvalds and Stallman

    LinuxWorld 1999, Torvalds and Stallman



  20. GNU World Order is a Personal Sacrifice, LinuxWorld Just Business

    As the Linux Foundation shows, Linux is just business (and proprietary software) as usual, software patents included, whereas it’s GNU that continues the Free Software Movement’s battles



  21. Links 20/2/2020: Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU18, Mesa 20, VirtualBox 6.1.4

    Links for the day



  22. Open Source Did Not Win, It Was Assimilated to and by Proprietary Software

    Don’t fall for the whole “Open Source has won!” spiel; You know we’ve lost the battle (and were in effect gradually conquered) at OSI and elsewhere when those who speak for the OSI are Michael Cheng (Facebook), Max Sills (Google), and Chris Aniszczyk (Linux Foundation); they say “Open Source Under Attack” (FOSDEM talk) but their employers are the ones attacking and they downplay openwashing



  23. Former Microsoft Employees Don't Like Talking About Past and Present Microsoft Back Doors (Designed for Spy Agencies)

    In a typical Microsoftian fashion, once they cannot defend the illusion/delusion that Microsoft values security the 'Softers' run away and block any further debate



  24. Techrights Warns Against Impending Extradition Efforts (Passage of Julian Assange to His Death in the United States)

    Imprisonment of journalists who are effective at exposing crimes (of the powerful, not petty crimes) must never be condoned



  25. Team UPC: Many Mouths and No Ears

    The mental condition of Team UPC gets more worrisome by the week



  26. Team UPC Insults Judges Because the UPC is Dead and UPC Lobbyists Have Nothing Left to Lose

    More judge-shaming tactics are in the mix; Team UPC seems to feel like there's nothing left to lose as the UPC is already dead (hope itself is next to die)



  27. IRC Proceedings: Wednesday, February 19, 2020

    IRC logs for Wednesday, February 19, 2020



  28. China Bashing is Grounded in Fear (That They Can Simply Do Better Than the West)

    The atmosphere of hate towards China — fuelled partly by a white supremacist in the White House — is unhelpful and insulting; dignity and understanding is the way to go



  29. IRC Proceedings: Tuesday, February 18, 2020

    IRC logs for Tuesday, February 18, 2020



  30. FFII Press Release: Germany Can No Longer Ratify the Unitary Patent Due to Brexit and the Established AETR Case-law, says FFII

    Germany cannot ratify the current Unitary Patent due to Brexit and the established AETR case-law. The ratification of the UPC (Unified Patent Court) by Germany would constitute a violation of the AETR case-law, which was used during the EPLA negotiations in 2006 to consider a deal with non-EU countries, such as Switzerland.


RSS 64x64RSS Feed: subscribe to the RSS feed for regular updates

Home iconSite Wiki: You can improve this site by helping the extension of the site's content

Home iconSite Home: Background about the site and some key features in the front page

Chat iconIRC Channel: Come and chat with us in real time

Recent Posts