08.30.09

Gemini version available ♊︎

Links 30/08/2009: Dell’s GNU/Linux in Europe

Posted in News Roundup at 6:46 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Linux doesn’t suffer from the economic downturn

    Currently Microsoft is feeling the full impact of the global economic slowdown. Reduced demand for its Windows OS & other software products has had a negative impact on Microsoft. Both sales & profit are down. Meanwhile, Linux isn’t feeling any impact at all.

  • Race Ubuntu Karmic Alpha 2 vs Windows 7 RC
  • Applications

    • Skype 2.1 Beta Brings New Features To Linux

      For anyone that extensively uses Skype on Linux, you will probably want to head on over to the Linux Skype Developer page to fetch the latest beta. Skype has just rolled out the first 2.1 beta (2.1.0.47 Beta) of the Linux Skype client, which adds several new features and also brings a number of fixes and other improvements.

    • Warsow Update Delivers New Maps & More

      While most open-source games still lack the graphics quality and features that the latest proprietary game engines support within retail games that are backed by the large studios, their quality has been improving as with their artwork and other characteristics. As an example of this, Warsow 0.5 made it out this week with a horde of new features and improvements.

    • Four More Cool Word Processors

      If you’ve seen one online word processor–or even a handful of them–you haven’t seen them all, not by a longshot. In addition to Google Docs, Zoho Writer, and emerging competitors such as EtherPad, other online offerings you might want to try include AjaxWrite, Writeboard, picoWrite and MonkeyTeX, to name a few.

    • Set up a Personal Microblog with Bilboblog

      There are many reasons why you would want to run your own private microblog, but how do you actually do that? The easiest way is to install Bilboblog, a tiny, no-frills PHP/MySQL-based microblogging engine.

  • Dell

Free Software/Open Source

  • NHIN code-a-thon may change government attitude toward open source

    About 80 programmers, led by Apache developer (and Collabnet employee) Brian Behlendorf, will spend about four hours trying to stamp out bugs in the open source software gateway, which is based on National Health Information Network (NHIN) conventions.

  • EuroBSDCon 2009

    The eighth European BSD conference is a great opportunity to present new ideas to the community and to meet some of the developers behind the different BSDs.

  • FLOSS Weekly 84: FoxyProxy

    FoxyProxy, the Firefox extension that automatically switches an Internet connection across one or more proxy servers.

  • Wall Street companies now trying Open Source technologies

    Bangalore: Economic slowdown had a huge impact on the financial institutions around the world. Recession has forced these financial institutions to take a look at their budget as well as the technology that they are using. In times like this open source technology is growing in the capital markets because of increased cost pressures. Many Wall Street companies are now adopting open source even though there are many who still believe that any software that they develop is proprietary and has a competitive edge.

  • Using open source for IT

    The Tamil Nadu Industrial Investment Corporation Limited (TIIC) is a State Financial Corporation engaged in industrializing the state of Tamil Nadu through various financial schemes, including term lending. We commenced computerization in 1987 and have completed the IT enablement of our core operations such as loan disbursement, financial accounting and MIS, HRM, etc. However, these areas are not integrated with other business functions. Therefore, during 2008-09, the corporation took up integration of these functions on a centralized database concept similar to core-banking solution on an open source platform. The project is expected to be completed in 2010-11.

  • Benefits from Web 2.0: Open Source

    Though Linux started about 15 years ago, the open source movement has only started to gain momentum.

    [...]

    There are a few developments needed in the open source world. We need more open source system integrators that specialize in the implementation of open source solutions and deliver support. We need more big organizations that lead the way and share their open source success stories. Once these two develop, open source will become a normal way of ‘doing software’.

  • OpenXava 3.1.4: Open Source Framework to Develop WebSphere Portal Applications

    OpenXava 3.1.4 is an open source framework to rapid development of Portlet Enterprise applications deployable in WebSphere Portal 6.1.

  • FSF/GNU

    • Gnutiken – International GNU Cooperative Sweden

      Since I ended my internship with the FSFE in May, my main priority has been the establishing of a Free Software cooperative in Göteborg. The result is about to unfold itself, and it’s name is Gnutiken, or “the Gnutique” if you want to be English about it. Together with two of my favourite hackers, Jeremiah Foster and Patrik Willard, I have been able to establish a for-profit NGO (ekonomisk förening), and spent a lot of time wading through all the bureaucratic windings needed to start a business. I am now happy to say that we are about to launch. We have found a nice shop in central Göteborg and are awaiting the last formal answers to some of our applications.

  • Government

    • The issues making IT a political hot potato

      For the first time, it looks as if IT will become a significant political battleground at the next election, says Mark Taylor.

      With an election on the horizon, Labour and the Conservatives are increasingly homing in on issues they believe will win them votes. Nothing unusual in that, but what is remarkable this time is that IT is heading for centre stage.

    • NZOSS brings open source into the public sector

      The Public Sector Remix project will aim to reduce the cost of desktop computing for the public sector by demonstrating the viability of free open source software.

      A number of central, regional and local government agencies are working to run trials using free software for common desktop tasks. The Remix project will deploy open source software to nominated staff to use and then evaluate the results.

  • Open Access

    • Download Over a Million Public Domain Books from Google Books in the Open EPUB Format

      Over the years, we’ve heard a lot from people who’ve unearthed hidden treasures in Google Books: a crafter who uncovered a forgotten knitting technique, a family historian who discovered her ancestor once traveled the country with a dancing, roller-skating bear. The books they found were out of copyright and in the public domain, which meant they could read the full text and even download a PDF version of the book.

    • Sony Sides With Google in ‘Library of Future’ Settlement

      In the battle to win readers for the books of the future, Sony has sided with Google over a controversial, proposed copyright lawsuit settlement that lets Google build out the library and bookstore of the future.

      That pits Sony and Google against Yahoo, Microsoft and Amazon, all of which have allied in opposition to the settlement. (See Wired.com’s Google Book Search FAQ to learn more.)

    • Clive Thompson on the New Literacy

      It’s almost hard to remember how big a paradigm shift this is. Before the Internet came along, most Americans never wrote anything, ever, that wasn’t a school assignment. Unless they got a job that required producing text (like in law, advertising, or media), they’d leave school and virtually never construct a paragraph again.

    • A few notes about openness (and a request)

      For example, the “open” in open source is not nuanced at all and has been artificially binary-ized. The open source definition tells us very clearly what a license must and must not do in order to be permitted to describe itself with the trademarked term “open source.” In the eyes of the defenders of the “open source” brand, if you’re not open enough you’re not open at all.

    • “Shrinking the Commons”: Today, Linux is open-source. Tomorrow, …?

      In the paper, I take a couple of stabs at creatively reinterpreting existing copyright law to fix the problem, before ultimately throwing up my hands and kicking it over to Congress. I’ll post the abstract of the paper after the jump.

    • Another Reason for Open Access

      Why not, indeed? For as Neylon points out:

      If an author feels strongly enough that a paper will get to a wider audience in a new journal, if they feel strongly enough that it will benefit from that journal’s peer review process, and they are prepared to pay a fee for that publication, why should they be prevented from doing so? If that publication does bring that science to a wider audience, is not a public service publisher discharging their mission through that publication?

      Which is only possible, of course, in open access journals adopting a funder pays approach, since traditional publishers need to be able to point to the uniqueness of their content if they are trying to sell it – after all, why would you want to buy it twice? Open access journals have no such imperative, since they are giving it away, so readers have no expectations that the stuff is unique and never seen before.

    • Draft Open Access and Licensing Framework released

      Today the State Services Commission is releasing the draft New Zealand Government Open Access and Licensing framework (NZGOAL) (HTML with comments [*]). This document provides guidance for State Services agencies on:

      * open access to non-copyright information; and
      * open licensing of copyright works,

      in both cases with a view to allowing their re-use by others. (It does not apply to information or works containing personal or other sensitive information).

    • Defending the Digitised Public Domain

      This is a crucially important issue. At the moment, some publishers are trying to create a new copyright in public domain materials just because they have been digitised. This is not only absurd, but threatens to nullify much of the huge potential of turning analogue knowledge into digital form.

    • Europe Seeks to Ease Rules for Putting Books Online

      The European Commission on Friday will propose drafting rules that would make it easier to put many books and manuscripts online. The move is a part of the commission’s effort to bolster access to information and to encourage online businesses.

    • Steve Schultze to Join CITP as Associate Director

      I’m thrilled to announce that Steve Schultze will be joining the Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton, as our new Associate Director, starting September 15. We know Steve well, having followed his work as a fellow at the Berkman Center at Harvard, not to mention his collaboration with us on RECAP.

    • Online tool sheds sunlight on court records

      “User fees are not on their face an absurd proposition,” said RECAP co-developer Stephen Schultze, who is also a fellow at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society. “On the other hand, there may be enough benefits to open access . . . and justice that it would be worth funding it out of general taxpayer dollars.”

  • Standards/Consortia

    • Google’s EPUB Embrace Challenges Kindle

      “Google’s support of this format lends even more credibility to EPUB as the industry standard for e-books. Book publishers are going to celebrate the emergence of one industry standard, because it means that they don’t need to incur the cost of converting their content to multiple proprietary formats in order to work with partners like Sony and Google,” Epps told InternetNews.com.

Leftovers

  • McAfee seeks gag on exec ousted over options

    Former McAfee President Kevin Weiss, exonerated of wrongdoing in a stock option-backdating scandal, plans to ask a judge on Monday to unseal the arbitration award that cleared him of wrongdoing and ordered McAfee to pay damages for firing him without proper cause.

  • Home Office data loss included drug records

    The Home Office has confirmed that the volume of data on a lost memory stick was much larger than originally reported.

  • Stealing 130 Million Credit Card Numbers

    Years ago, when giving advice on how to avoid identity theft, I would tell people to shred their trash. Today, that advice is completely obsolete. No one steals credit card numbers one by one out of the trash when they can be stolen by the millions from merchant databases.

  • Zoho Launches Sign-In Integration With Google Apps

    Last summer, Zoho, a web-based software suite that includes document, project and invoicing management tools, integrated Google and Yahoo sign-ins, allowing users to sign into Zoho using a Google or Yahoo account. Today, Zoho is launching sign-in integration with Google Apps, letting users login to Zoho using their Google Apps credentials.

  • Google Uses Crowdsourcing for Traffic Data

    Google is talking up its maps application and the apps ability to use the location and speed data from a users phone to make a crowdsourced traffic map for an entire city.

  • Censorship/Web Abuse

    • UK “Three Strikes”: Please Write to Your MP

      Yesterday I wrote a quick analysis of the insane U-turn effected by the UK government over “three strikes and you’re out”. Below I’ve posted the corresponding letter that I’ve sent to my MP on the subject.

    • Lord Mandelson pays off his £750,000 mortgage within a year

      The mystery of how Lord Mandelson managed to afford a £2.4 million town house in Regent’s Park took a new twist this week with his claim in a newspaper interview that he did not possess a mortgage on the property.

    • 38 Degrees backs campaign against ‘Digital Dictator’ Mandelson

      Online campaigners 38 Degrees have launched an attack on Mandelson’s plans to give himself the power to order internet cut-offs without trial. Other campaigners from a range of NGOs are getting in touch with us about this: there is a growing sense of outrage among people who know that the internet is the most important political tool we have.

    • Taking something for nothing is wrong . . .

      [by] Peter Mandelson

    • Fon and Games with “Three Strikes”

      Suppose, now, that people use some of those million hotspots to download copyright material: how easy is it going to be (a) establishing exactly who downloaded it and (b) cutting off that person?

      Gives a new meaning to the term “hotspot”…

    • UK Wants to Zap File-Sharers

      It seems the British government is going loony for anti-piracy rhetoric from the likes of U2 and David Geffen.

    • China’s internet: the wild, wild East

      The government frequently cites pornography as the most important reason for China’s controls on the Internet, but right now, the censors are particularly nervous for political reasons including the recent riots in Xinjiang, and the possibility of something going wrong on October 1, when the People’s Republic celebrates the 60th anniversary of its founding.

    • China: Are Tibetan Bloggers Being Silenced?

      Quite alarming to report that all of the most popular Tibetan language blog hosting sites (except one) have been inaccessible for almost three weeks now.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • The Pirate Party UK and a new frontier for filesharing

      As the government rethinks penalties for illegal downloaders, a new political party is campaigning for laws to keep pace with technology, Kevin Anderson talks to its leader

    • Independent Film Company Responds To BERR Consultation

      This week the latest news in the Digital Britain debate caused a wave of protests as it was revealed the government is considering disconnecting Internet users on allegations of copyright infringement. TorrentFreak caught up with a British independent film company to gauge their response to the news.

    • James Murdoch is Confused

      Two quotations from James Murdoch’s speech at the Edinburgh International Television Festival…

Digital Tipping Point: Clip of the Day

Kevin Foreman, General Manager at RealNetworks 04 (2004)

Digital Tipping Point is a Free software-like project where the raw videos are code. You can assist by participating.

Share in other sites/networks: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Reddit
  • email

Decor ᶃ Gemini Space

Below is a Web proxy. We recommend getting a Gemini client/browser.

Black/white/grey bullet button This post is also available in Gemini over at this address (requires a Gemini client/browser to open).

Decor ✐ Cross-references

Black/white/grey bullet button Pages that cross-reference this one, if any exist, are listed below or will be listed below over time.

Decor ▢ Respond and Discuss

Black/white/grey bullet button If you liked this post, consider subscribing to the RSS feed or join us now at the IRC channels.

DecorWhat Else is New


  1. Gemini at 2,000: 86% of Capsules Use Self-Signed Certificate, Just Like the Techrights Web Site (WWW)

    As shown in the charts above (updated an hour ago), the relative share of ‘Linux’ Foundation (LE/LF; same thing, same office) in the capsules’ certificates has decreased over time; more and more (in terms of proportion) capsules choose to sign their own certificate/s; the concept of ‘fake security’ (centralisation and consolidation) should be rejected universally because it leaves nobody safe except plutocrats



  2. [Meme] UPC: Many Lies as Headlines, Almost Exclusively in Publishers Sponsored by EPO and Team UPC to Produce Fake News (Lobbying Through Misinformation)

    Lest we forget that EPO dictators, like Pinky and the Brainless Benoît Battistelli and António Campinos, have long littered the EPO's official Web site as well as publishers not directly connected to the EPO (but funded by it) with disinformation about the UPC



  3. EPO as the 'Ministry of Truth' of Team UPC and Special Interests

    The 'Ministry of Truth' of the patent world is turning the EPO's Web site into a propaganda mill, a misinformation farm, and a laughing stock with stock photography



  4. Microsoft 'Delighted' by Windows 11 (Vista 11) Usage, Which is Only 1% Three Months After Official Launch and Six Months After Release Online

    Microsoft boosters such as Bogdan Popa and Mark Hachman work overtime on distraction from the failure Vista 11 has been (the share of Windows continues to fall relative to other platforms)



  5. Links 27/1/2022: Preinstalled GNU/Linux (Ubuntu) and Arch Linux-Powered Steam Deck 30 Days Away

    Links for the day



  6. Don't Fall for Microsoft's Spin That Says Everything is Not Secure and Cannot be Secured

    Microsoft keeps promoting the utterly false concept that everything is not secure and there's nothing that can be done about it (hence, might as well stay with Windows, whose insecurity is even intentional)



  7. At Long Last: 2,000 Known Gemini Capsules!

    The corporate media, looking to appease its major sponsors (such as Web/advertising giants), won't tell you that Gemini Protocol is rising very rapidly; its userbase and the tools available for users are rapidly improving while more and more groups, institutions and individuals set up their own capsule (equivalent of a Web site)



  8. Links 26/1/2022: Gamebuntu 1.0, PiGear Nano, and Much More

    Links for the day



  9. IRC Proceedings: Tuesday, January 25, 2022

    IRC logs for Tuesday, January 25, 2022



  10. Links 26/1/2022: No ARM for Nvidia, End of EasyArch, and WordPress 5.9 is Out

    Links for the day



  11. Why the Unified Patent Court (UPC) is Still Just a Fantasy and the UPC's Fake News Mill Merely Discredits the Whole Patent 'Profession'

    Patents and science used to be connected; but now that the patent litigation 'sector' is hijacking patent offices (and even courts in places like Texas) it's trying to shove a Unified Patent Court (UPC) down the EU's throat under the disingenuous cover of "community" or "unity"



  12. Links 25/1/2022: Vulkan 1.3 Released, Kiwi TCMS 11.0, and antiX 19.5

    Links for the day



  13. Gemini Milestones and Growth (Almost 2,000 Known Gemini Servers Now, 39,000 Pages in Ours)

    The diaspora to Gemini Protocol or the transition to alternative 'webs' is underway; a linearly growing curve suggests that inertia/momentum is still there and we reap the benefits of early adoption of Gemini



  14. [Meme] Get Ready for Unified Patent Court (UPC) to be Taken to Court

    The Unified Patent Court (UPC) and Unitary Patent system that’s crafted to empower EPO thugs isn’t legal and isn’t constitutional either; even a thousand fake news 'articles' (deliberate misinformation or disinformation) cannot change the simple facts because CJEU isn’t “trial by media”



  15. The EPO Needs High-Calibre Examiners, Not Politicians Who Pretend to Understand Patents and Science

    Examiners are meant to obstruct fake patents or reject meritless patent applications; why is it that working conditions deteriorate for those who are intellectually equipped to do the job?



  16. Free Software is Greener

    Software Freedom is the only way to properly tackle environmental perils through reuse and recycling; the mainstream media never talks about it because it wants people to "consume" more and more products



  17. Links 25/1/2022: Git 2.35 and New openSUSE Hardware

    Links for the day



  18. IRC Proceedings: Monday, January 24, 2022

    IRC logs for Monday, January 24, 2022



  19. Links 25/1/2022: GPL Settlement With Patrick McHardy, Godot 4.0 Alpha 1, and DXVK 1.9.4 Released

    Links for the day



  20. Proprietary Software is Pollution

    "My daughter asked me about why are we throwing away some bits of technology," Dr. Andy Farnell says. "This is my attempt to put into words for "ordinary" people what I tried to explain to a 6 year old."



  21. Microsoft GitHub Exposé — Part XV — Cover-Up and Defamation

    Defamation of one’s victims might be another offence to add to the long list of offences committed by Microsoft’s Chief Architect of GitHub Copilot, Balabhadra (Alex) Graveley; attempting to discredit the police report is a new low and can get Mr. Graveley even deeper in trouble (Microsoft protecting him only makes matters worse)



  22. [Meme] Alexander Ramsay and Team UPC Inciting Politicians to Break the Law and Violate Constitutions, Based on Misinformation, Fake News, and Deliberate Lies Wrapped up as 'Studies'

    The EPO‘s law-breaking leadership (Benoît Battistelli, António Campinos and their corrupt cronies), helped by liars who don't enjoy diplomatic immunity, are cooperating to undermine courts across the EU, in effect replacing them with EPO puppets who are patent maximalists (Europe’s equivalents of James Rodney Gilstrap and Alan D Albright, a Donald Trump appointee, in the Eastern and Western Districts of Texas, respectively)



  23. Has the Administrative Council Belatedly Realised What Its Job in the European Patent Organisation Really Is?

    The "Mafia" which took over the EPO (the EPO's own workers call it "Mafia") isn't getting its way with a proposal, so it's preventing the states from even voting on it!



  24. [Meme] Team UPC is Celebrating a Pyrrhic Victory

    Pyrrhic victory best describes what's happening at the moment (it’s a lobbying tactic, faking/staging things to help false prophecies be fulfilled, based on hopes and wishes alone), for faking something without bothering to explain the legal basis is going to lead to further escalations and complaints (already impending)



  25. Links 24/1/2022: Scribus 1.5.8 and LXLE Reviewed

    Links for the day



  26. IRC Proceedings: Sunday, January 23, 2022

    IRC logs for Sunday, January 23, 2022



  27. [Meme] Team UPC Congratulating Itself

    The barrage of fake news and misinformation about the UPC deliberately leaves out all the obvious and very important facts; even the EPO‘s António Campinos and Breton (Benoît Battistelli‘s buddy) participated in the lying



  28. Links 24/1/2022: pgBadger 11.7 Released, Catch-up With Patents

    Links for the day



  29. The Demonisation and Stereotyping of Coders Not Working for Big Corporations (or 'The System')

    The war on encrypted communication (or secure communications) carries on despite a lack of evidence that encryption stands in the way of crime investigations (most criminals use none of it)



  30. On the 'Peak Hacker' Series

    Hacker culture, unlike Ludditism, is ultimately a movement for justice, for equality, and for human rights through personal and collective emancipation; Dr. Farnell has done a good job explaining where we stand and his splendid series has come to a close


RSS 64x64RSS Feed: subscribe to the RSS feed for regular updates

Home iconSite Wiki: You can improve this site by helping the extension of the site's content

Home iconSite Home: Background about the site and some key features in the front page

Chat iconIRC Channel: Come and chat with us in real time

Recent Posts