Bonum Certa Men Certa

More ISO Madness -- Only Accepts Microsoft Word Files

"This is truly an insult and a bruise to the ISO's credibility."The irregular behavior at the ISO continues. Hold your hats because this one's a bit of a shocker. According to the following bit of text, the accumulation of comments in Microsoft Word format is no coincidence, accident, or choice made by the standards committees around the world. The ISO actually requests/demands that people use Microsoft Word (or an application capable of 'emulating'/mimicking/backward-engineering Word's proprietary formats). Isn't that ironic? From a standards body voting on open standards...

Note: updated with the official ISO results except in the not yet clear "Cuban case" and the Lybian vote, finally submitted by post mail, because they decided not to accept the ISO imposition to send the comments in a deprecated, exclusive and proprietary ".doc" format.


This is truly an insult and a bruise to the ISO's credibility. Pamela Jones, which is apparently unaware of this at this stage (she'll know shortly), has the following to say:

The comments have been officially published, although as .doc files, sigh. Here's the zip file to download). But I thought I'd make them available to you as HTML also, which is how the members got them to make sure everyone has access and because of my idea.


On Groklaw, you can help organise the comments on this pile of paper.

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