11.30.07

Gemini version available ♊︎

OpenDocument Format Has Solid Foundation in the World Wide Web

Posted in Deception, Formats, Microsoft, Open XML, OpenDocument, Standard at 3:15 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

OOXML vs. ODF
Permission granted to use this plot, which has been slightly modified (annotation)

Rob Weir has just published an excellent new post which describes not only how far ahead of OOXML OpenDocument Format has already gone, but also shows how Microsoft deception (or “spin”, or “lies”, depending on whose side you’re on) is used to hide this fact. The first comment from Stephane Rodriguez is worth reading also.

There are fewer than 2,000 OOXML documents on the entire internet (as indexed by Google at least) and the trend is flat.

What about ODF? Almost 160,000 and growing strongly.

Looking at the comments, Microsoft has not yet found a response or a decent rebuttal. The silence speaks volumes.

Several times in the past we have shown cases where Microsoft uses the tricks such as (selective) statistics to pretend that OOXML is spreading quickly. It’s a case where the “numbers game” is called “statistics” or “study”, just as “lies” are called “marketing”, "astroturfing" is called “evangelism”, and "bribery" is called “marketing help” (yes, that’s how Microsoft sneaked out of the recent fiasco in Nigeria).

The title of this post is intended to contain a bit of a pun. David Berlind reminds us yet again that the entity which goes by the name “Foundation” has very little to do with the future and great success of ODF. The “Foundation” has become more of an excuse for Microsoft to push some lies into media streams, which it virtually controls.

OpenDocument Format community steadfast despite theatrics of now impotent ‘Foundation‘

[...]

…Microsoft, the company whose Office empire is probably more threatened by ODF than most people realize, capitalized on the confusion by spreading its own FUD on the story.

The headline says “theatrics”. Dare I say that Sam Hiser himself has told me that it’s all theatre? Yes, his own words.

Other concerns to bear in mind here include journalistic integrity, which has been put to question. Time after time. After time. After. Time. Peter Galli from eWeek spreads FUD (no, he hasn’t stopped yet) which is based on the Foundation’s views. He seems to have joined the more Microsoft-dependent ‘journalists’, such as Mary Jo Foley.

This isn’t the first time that we catch Peter Galli spreading some FUD (see this open letter). Be cautious whose word you take (possible for granted, without doubts). A few weeks ago Peter wrote an article whose headline was not correct (about Obama’s policy on formats) and some months ago there was unnecessary outrage because of an incorrect headline in an article that speaks about Microsoft and virtualisation.

I have personally given hope on the mainstream media, which now more than ever is inclined to please its advertisers, sponsors, and benefactors. I’ll say more about this in the next post.

Share in other sites/networks: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Reddit
  • email

Decor ᶃ Gemini Space

Below is a Web proxy. We recommend getting a Gemini client/browser.

Black/white/grey bullet button This post is also available in Gemini over at this address (requires a Gemini client/browser to open).

Decor ✐ Cross-references

Black/white/grey bullet button Pages that cross-reference this one, if any exist, are listed below or will be listed below over time.

Decor ▢ Respond and Discuss

Black/white/grey bullet button If you liked this post, consider subscribing to the RSS feed or join us now at the IRC channels.

6 Comments

  1. Sam Hiser said,

    November 30, 2007 at 3:51 pm

    Gravatar

    Rob’s not getting the .docx’s behind the firewall.

    It’s a pure guess how many are there. Quite a few if Office 2007 numbers are true.

  2. Jim Powers said,

    November 30, 2007 at 4:07 pm

    Gravatar

    Certainly the number only reflects documents that can be reached by Google crawlers. Also, sad to say, there are probably a lot more OOXML documents out there, orders of magnitude more. Remember Vista ships with a 25 use Office 2007 install that only saves in ooxml. My parents just got a new laptop and after I lost the fight to get Linux on it I at least got OpenOffice on it and uninstalled the 25 use Office 2007 “teaser”, but the vast majority of people like my parents are sheep and victims of whatever crap vendors and Microsoft decides to pile on a new PC. Seriously, we HAVE to get rid of bundled PCs. All machines should be purchasable naked and you can add an OS (of your choice) during the checkout process. Also, any “bundled” software should not be pre-installed, including Office. S.O.Bs

  3. Roy Schestowitz said,

    November 30, 2007 at 4:08 pm

    Gravatar

    I said:

    Looking at the comments, Microsoft has not yet found a response or a decent rebuttal. The silence speaks volumes.

    Thanks, Sam, for reminding us that no ODF file has even been served behind a firewall. (sarcasm)

  4. Rob Weir said,

    November 30, 2007 at 6:13 pm

    Gravatar

    Note that if we think OOXML adoption is actually high, but my chart artificially shows it as flat because these documents are all behind firewalls, then we would also then need to assume that the % of OOXML document that are placed behind firewalls has been increasing over time. In other words, that the probability that a given OOXML document is behind a firewall has increased over time, and at such a rate that it exactly compensates for OOXML’s adoption rate. That would be an amazing coincidence if true. But is there any evidence or a motivation for such a change in user behavior?

    The more natural assumption (Occam’s Razor, etc)., is to assume that aggregate user behavior is constant over this 12 month period and that X% of documents will appear on the web and 100-X% will be hidden behind firewalls. But if document adoption causes the overall base of users saving to that format to increase, it would raise both counts by the same percentage. So the stark flatness of the OOXML curve is the key indicator here.

    You can talk firewalls all you want. But fewer than 2,000 OOXML documents on the web a year after the format was made a standard? That is hard to explain away.

  5. Jim Powers said,

    November 30, 2007 at 6:30 pm

    Gravatar

    Well, OOXML isn’t a standard yet ;-). But with the help of GNOME, Miguel de Icaza, and such they’ll get there. Then Microsoft will abandon it for OO-Silverlight or some such, leaving FLOSS developers no choice but to reverse engineer this new abomination and get more threats of patent infringement. Sounds fun!

    I’m guessing that most folks with fill 2007 Office are still forced to save in .doc format because they need to interact with other folks who cannot read OOXML files yet.

    Well, about the flat curve, I’m not completely comfortable with the idea that the flat curve is representative of the total number of OOOXML documents. In the exact same way that I don’t think that the number of Adobe PhotoShop files indexable by Google are is representative of the total number of PhotoShop files in circulation. There aren’t a lot of OOXML files out there because there isn’t a critical mass of people running software that can read/edit that format (just like the PhotoShop files above). I’m not trying to be contrary, I’d like nothing more than for OOXML to fail miserably and be forgotten in the annals of history, I’m just not convinced that we should take *that* much comfort in these results.

  6. Roy Schestowitz said,

    November 30, 2007 at 8:26 pm

    Gravatar

    Well, OOXML isn’t a standard yet ;-) . But with the help of GNOME, Miguel de Icaza, and such they’ll get there.

    I’m always reminded again and again why I replace the “Oh Oh” in OOXML with a couple of coins. Last reminder came just half an hour ago.

    Microsoft uses its moneyflow to protect that same moneyflow. Isn’t there some law against such practices? It’s the equivalent of “dumping” or “selling at a loss” in the businesses sense (to suppress and eliminate competition). This is related to Intel/Microsoft sabotage of OLPC (covered here just days ago).

DecorWhat Else is New


  1. Sirius 'Open Source' Pensiongate: An Introduction

    The Sirius ‘Open Source’ series continues in the form of a mini-series about pensions; it’s part of an ongoing investigation of a deep mystery that impacts people who left the company quite a long time ago and some of the lessons herein are applicable to any worker with a pension (at times of financial uncertainties)



  2. Links 07/02/2023: Endless OS 5.0 and Voice.AI GPL Violations

    Links for the day



  3. No Doubt Microsoft Unleashed Another 'Tay', Spreading Bigotry Under the Guise of Hey Hi (AI)

    Reprinted with permission from Ryan



  4. Links 07/02/2023: Fedora 39 Development Plans Outlines

    Links for the day



  5. IRC Proceedings: Monday, February 06, 2023

    IRC logs for Monday, February 06, 2023



  6. Links 06/02/2023: Escuelas Linux 8.0 and Many Political Issues

    Links for the day



  7. Links 06/02/2023: Sparky 6.6 and IPFire 2.27 – Core Update 173

    Links for the day



  8. Taking Back Control or Seizing Autonomy Over the News Cycle (Informing People, Culling the Marketing)





  9. Reality Versus Fiction: EPO Insiders Versus EPO Web Site and UPC 'Churnalists'

    The "official" sources of the European Patent Office (EPO), as well as the sedated "media" that the EPO is bribing for further bias, cannot tell the truth about this very large institution; for proper examination of Europe's largest patent office one must pursue the interpretation by longtime veterans and insiders, who are increasingly upset and abused (they're being pressured to grant patents in violation of the charter of the EPO)



  10. Links 06/02/2023: Linux 6.2 RC7 and Fatal Earthquake

    Links for the day



  11. IRC Proceedings: Sunday, February 05, 2023

    IRC logs for Sunday, February 05, 2023



  12. Links 05/02/2023: Wayland in Bookworm and xvidtune 1.0.4

    Links for the day



  13. Links 05/02/2023: Pakistan Blocks Wikipedia, Musharraf Dies

    Links for the day



  14. IRC Proceedings: Saturday, February 04, 2023

    IRC logs for Saturday, February 04, 2023



  15. Links 04/02/2023: FOSDEM Happening and Ken Thompson in SoCal Linux Expo

    Links for the day



  16. 2023 is the Year Taxpayers' Money Goes to War and Energy Subsidies, Not Tech

    Now that a lot of powerful and omnipresent ‘tech’ (spying and policing) companies are rotting away we have golden opportunities to bring about positive change and maybe even recruit technical people for good causes



  17. Getting Back to Productive Computer Systems Would Benefit Public Health and Not Just Boost Productivity

    “Smartphoneshame” (shaming an unhealthy culture of obsession with “apps”) would potentially bring about a better, more sociable society with fewer mental health crises and higher productivity levels



  18. Links 04/02/2023: This Week in KDE and Many More Tech Layoffs

    Links for the day



  19. Dotcom Boom and Bust, Round 2

    The age of technology giants/monopolies devouring everything or military-funded (i.e. taxpayers-subsidised) surveillance/censorship tentacles, in effect privatised eyes of the state, may be ending; the United States can barely sustain that anymore and raising the debt ceiling won't solve that (buying time isn't the solution)



  20. Society Would Benefit From a Smartphoneshame Movement

    In a society plagued by blackmail, surveillance and frivolous lawsuits it is important to reconsider the notion of “smart” phone ownership; these devices give potentially authoritarian companies and governments far too much power over people (in the EU they want to introduce new legislation that would, in effect, ban Free software if it enables true privacy)



  21. IRC Proceedings: Friday, February 03, 2023

    IRC logs for Friday, February 03, 2023



  22. IRC Proceedings: Thursday, February 02, 2023

    IRC logs for Thursday, February 02, 2023



  23. Links 03/02/2023: Proton 7.0-6 Released, ScummVM 2.7 Testing

    Links for the day



  24. Links 03/02/2023: OpenSSH 9.2 and OBS Studio 29.0.1

    Links for the day



  25. Links 03/02/2023: GNU C Library 2.37

    Links for the day



  26. Sirius Finished

    Yesterday I was sent a letter approving my resignation from Sirius ‘Open Source’, two months after I had already announced that I was resigning with immediate effect; they sent an identical letter to my wife (this time, unlike before, they remembered to also change the names!!)



  27. The Collapse of Sirius in a Nutshell: How to Identify the Symptoms and Decide When to Leave

    Sirius is finished, but it's important to share the lessons learned with other people; there might be other "pretenders" out there and they need to be abandoned



  28. Links 03/02/2023: WINE 8.1 and RapidDisk 9.0.0

    Links for the day



  29. Links 02/02/2023: KDE Gear 22.12.2 and LibreOffice 7.5

    Links for the day



  30. Linux News or Marketing Platform?

    Ads everywhere: Phoronix puts them at the top, bottom, navigation bar, left, and right just to read some Microsoft junk (puff pieces about something that nobody other than Microsoft even uses); in addition there are pop-ups asking for consent to send visitors’ data to hundreds of data brokers


RSS 64x64RSS Feed: subscribe to the RSS feed for regular updates

Home iconSite Wiki: You can improve this site by helping the extension of the site's content

Home iconSite Home: Background about the site and some key features in the front page

Chat iconIRC Channel: Come and chat with us in real time

Recent Posts