10.27.15

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Links 27/10/2015: KDevelop 5.0.0 Beta 1, GParted 0.24

Posted in News Roundup at 5:24 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Stream It!

    An entertained home is a happy home, with the digital dream a real one, most homes have turned into a digital entertainment heaven. My home’s daily routine often revolves around keeping the tiny humans entertained streaming music, video and photos from a home Linux server (plus online services) around the home to a variety of devices. From the traditional TV with a Raspberry Pi media centre to Android tablets and Chromebooks, or through the Pi-powered projector for cinema-style fun.

  • A happy home

    As software improves we like to take advantage of new features. For a while we’ve been putting up with the closed-source Plex, but finally Emby has appeared and we’re basing our new home media heaven on this fully open source solution. So from a base Ubuntu server, you’ll be able to dish out transcoded video, music and photos around your home with the option of recorded TV without the hassle of MythTV. It’s a slick solution and one I’m sure you’ll love when you read about it.

  • Linux / Open Source on Churches

    I talked to church heads about this and open about open source alternative software getting their responses that they are not aware that there are available free open source sofware that they can use as an alternative to commercial software.

  • Solu Mini-PC Taps Linux for Organic Cloud UI

    A Finnish startup called Solu Machines is closing in on its Kickstarter funding for a smartphone-like mini-PC with a Linux-based, cloud-oriented operating system and a novel UI stack. Funding packages start at $388 for the Solu, which would join a fairly short list of mini-PCs with pre-installed Linux, and an even smaller group of ARM-based Linux mini-PCs. Solu is much more singular than that, however, in that it’s a battery-powered touchscreen device that can also drive a 4K display. It is not only replacing standard PC and phone paradigms with a fully cloud-based platform, but is also reinventing the user interface.

  • Desktop

    • Google Adds New “Chell” Chromebook & New Coreboot Graphics Library

      Google engineers have landed a bunch of new code this morning into Coreboot.

      Perhaps most interesting out of today’s Coreboot commits by Google is the addition of a Chell mainboard. Chell is based on the “Glados” Chromebook but with some minor changes. This “Chell” codenamed device will use an Intel Skylake SoC. Details beyond that are scarce at the moment.

    • Google’s CPUFreq “Interactive” Governor Looks To Go Mainline
    • Linux in the Office

      I work in an office which utilities many different devices and operating system, yet I only know of two places we use linux, and that’s not including embedded.

      When I started my current role as a PHP Developer, I was given a laptop and the general accessories, but was given the choice of what OS I wanted to use. From a linux background I wanted linux, but as the other developers used windows I went with windows.

    • Xiaomi Linux Laptop To Enter Production Early Next Year

      Xiaomi’s long-rumoured Linux laptop will enter production in the first part of 2016, a new report claims.

      Industry watcher Digitimes’ sources also reveal that China’s Xiaomi plans to launch two notebooks: one sporting a 12.5-inch display and another with a 13.3-inch display.

  • Server

    • rkt v0.10.0: With a New API Service and a Better Image Build Tool

      rkt v0.10.0 is here and marks another important milestone on our path to creating the most secure and composable container runtime. This release includes an improved user interface and a preview of the rkt service API, making it even easier to experiment with rkt in your microservices architectures.

    • Companies That Support Linux: Rausch Netzwerktechnik

      Rausch Netzwerktechnik is a distributor of individual and standard server and storage systems for the data center. The company is also developing one of the first solutions around the Kinetic Open Storage Project. We talked to Rausch Netzwerktechnik CEO Sebastian Nölting to learn more about the company and their involvement with open source.

    • Tales from the SRE trenches: Dev vs Ops

      Traditionally, Devs get frustrated when they want to release, but Ops won’t accept it. Ops thinks there will be problems, but it is difficult to back this feeling with hard data. This fuels resentment and distrust, and management is never pleased. Using error budgets based on already established SLAs means there is nobody to get upset at: SRE does not need to play bad cop, and SWE is free to innovate as much as they want, as long as things don’t break.

    • rkt 0.10.0 released. Comes with new API service and improved image build tool
  • Kernel Space

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments/WMs

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • Plasma 5 Powers KaOS Productivity

        KaOS has a few known issues, but these mostly affect specific hardware configurations. For example, to use a GUID Partition Table, or GPT, on a BIOS system, make sure you set it up following a guide available on the KaOS website. The installer’s partitioner can only handle GPT correctly for the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface.

      • Plasma 5 will be the default desktop environment in Chakra

        We are excited to announce that in a couple of days Chakra will be switching to Plasma 5 developed by KDE for the default desktop environment. The restructuring of the repositories is almost done, we just need to test it for a while before making it available to everyone.

      • KDevelop 5.0.0 Beta 1 available!

        Hello all,

        I’m very glad to finally announce the first beta of KDevelop 5.0.0, based on Qt 5, KF 5 and Clang: https://www.kdevelop.org/news/first-beta-release-kdevelop-500-available

        Like I’ve said previously, I’m very thankful of the tons of contributors that made this step possible. From the early testers, over the many new KDevelop contributors who helped a lot in porting our code base to Qt 5 and KF5, to the people that worked on improving kdev-clang and all the other areas. It’s a great feeling to finally release this beast. A year ago, just after we started in this process, I still wasn’t too sure we can pull it all off. Now, look where we are Smile “Just” a few more weeks of polishing and I’m positively sure KDevelop 5.0.0 will be a really good milestone.

        That said, I also want to express my thanks towards the KDE e.V. which graciously sponsored our recent KDevelop/Kate sprint in Berlin. We rented a flat for the 8 hackers that visited Berlin and had a productive five days directly after the Qt World Summit. Personally, I worked on kdev-clang and polished it a bit more in the preparation of the first beta release. One handy feature I added is the display of size information about classes and member variables, displayed in the image to the right.

        If you want to give back to the KDevelop community, please consider a donation to the KDE e.v., which is used for our yearly developer sprints and the Akademy conference.

      • KDE Pulled In Around $162k USD Last Year

        KDE e.V. yesterday released their last quarterly report to end out 2014, which offer a look at their finances for the past year. I’ve also taken the liberty to do a cursory comparison against the GNOME Foundation’s finances for 2014.

      • KDevelop 5.0 Enters Beta With Qt5/KF5 Port

        The first beta of KDevelop 5.0 is now available. This huge update comes after more than a year of hard work and its code-base has been ported over to using Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5.

        Besides the big step-up in using Qt5 and KF5, KDevelop has replaced its legacy C++ parser and semantic analysis plug-in with a more powerful one derived from LLVM’s Clang compiler and its extensive code analysis tools.

    • GNOME Desktop/GTK

      • GParted 0.24 Adds ZFS & NVMe Detection

        For those using GParted as GUI-driven Linux disk partitioning, the GParted 0.24 release is now available with new features.

      • GUADEC 2016 to take place in Karlsruhe, Germany

        It is with pleasure that the GNOME Foundation is announcing that Karlsruhe, Germany, will host GUADEC in the summer of 2016.

      • Some ideas about this year’s Google Summer of Code

        After the GSoC, I’ve done some work related to the open source community in China. We have a organization called kaiyuanshe and they did some work to help promote open source. Last weekend they organized the Apache Roadshow in Beijing and I was one of the volunteers. Also, I gave a speech about my experience in GSoC on the conference. Although it’s not the GNOME community, but I think sometimes we should contribute to the open source world as a whole without caring which one it is. Hope our effort would enlarge the open source force in China.

  • Distributions

    • Arch Family

    • Ballnux/SUSE

    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Given $83.375 Consensus PT
      • Citrix Forms OpenStack Partnership with Red Hat
      • Fedora

        • Getting Started with Fedora – Update

          Some time ago, I announced the ‘Getting Started with Fedora’ handbook which we had published in Czech. I also announced the plan to translate it to English, so that it can be translated to other languages. I asked around who could help me with that, especially to figure out the whole system how to get a translated print PDF from a document written in English. A couple of native speakers offered that they would help with proof reading, thank them for that, but first we need to figure out the whole system.

        • Looking for a Community Lead for Project Atomic

          One of the most exciting projects I’m getting to work with these days is Project Atomic. It touches on the full stack–from OS development to storage, to networking, containers, application development, and pretty much everything in between. Red Hat is working hard on the tools to develop, deploy, and manage containerized applications.

        • Fedora 20 Through Fedora 23 Benchmarks

          For your viewing pleasure today are some fresh benchmarks comparing the out-of-the-box performance of Fedora 20, Fedora 21, Fedora 22, and Fedora 23 RC3 out-of-the-box on an Intel Xeon system with AMD R600g graphics. Here’s a look at the Fedora Linux performance and that of the upstream Linux kernel / Mesa / GCC over the past two years.

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Is SteamOS Any Faster Than Ubuntu 15.10 Linux?

          Over the past few days have been a number of SteamOS Linux gaming benchmarks, namely published so far are the 22-Way Comparison Of NVIDIA & AMD Graphics Cards On SteamOS For Steam Linux Gaming and 4K AMD/NVIDIA High-End GPU Comparison On SteamOS Linux. When seeing all of those SteamOS results, you may have started wondering: is SteamOS any faster/slower than say Ubuntu Linux? In this article are some benchmarks comparing SteamOS to Ubuntu 15.10.

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Development Has Started

            The Ubuntu developers have already started to work on the 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and the first packages are beginning to land. It’s a long way to go until the stable launch in April 2016, but this is how it starts.

          • Ubuntu Touch with a Mouse Cursor Is Interesting and Cool at the Same Time

            One of the latest updates for Ubuntu Touch has brought a most coveted feature that was still missing, the mouse cursor. This will most likely land with OTA-8, which is scheduled to arrive in about five weeks.

          • Meet the Ubuntu family

            There are 9 members of the ‘Ubuntu family’ that are recognized as official flavors (i.e., Linux distributions that use the same operating system base but feature different desktop environments).

          • Linux Based Ubuntu Phones: Aquaris E4.5 and E5 Now In Market

            Ubuntu, Linux operating system is now built to provide the Linux server to desktops, phones, tablets and TV operating systems. Demand of Ubuntu phones in India is already increase by Linux system fans.

            The new phones released last month, which based on Linux operating system. And now in India Aquaris E4.5 and Aquaris E5 are available to purchase. Costumer can buy it from online website like Snapdeal.

          • Unity 8 Features Available Now For Ubuntu Touch OS

            The Ubuntu Touch OTA-8 software update, slated for a November 18 release date, is only a few weeks away and Cononical’s Lukasz Zemczak promised it would bring with it lots of new features and changes especially when it comes to Unity 8.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Resolving Tension

              A post on the Fridge today claims “both councils collaborated and resolved any tensions together”. The Ubuntu Community Council bullied me for asking questions that made Canonical feel uncomfortable and this is the only response to that. That bullying someone until they leave a project is the UCC way of resolving tensions leaves me speachless. That nobody else has commented in the Ubuntu project in public (I’ve had people in private tell me they’re wanting to leave Ubuntu and/or Canonical) confirms to me the project has a culture of fear.

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

Leftovers

  • Hardware

    • Console wars: Predicting this holiday season’s gaming winner

      Earlier this month, Sony announced that it was dropping the price of its PlayStation 4 game console by $50 to $349.99. The move put the PlayStation 4’s price in line with Microsoft’s Xbox One. The decision made clear what the price cut was desired to do: get gamers who have not yet moved to the company’s latest console to take the plunge this holiday season.

  • Security

    • The Zone 9 Bloggers are Free: but Ethiopia Still Thinks Digital Security is Terrorism

      The last of the Zone 9 Bloggers are finally free from jail, after nearly 18 months of detention for simply speaking out online. All the bloggers were acquitted of terrorism charges by the Ethiopian courts; one blogger, Befeqadu Hailu was found guilty of a single charge of “inciting violence” as a result of a confession made during his detention. He was released on bail last Wednesday. Given the time he has already served, he is unlikely to return to jail.

    • TrueCrypt Travails Continue

      The credibility of the TrueCrypt encryption application is in tatters following the discovery of two serious flaws in the code.

      Its anonymous developers abandoned the open source TrueCrypt project in May 2014, and since then no updates to the code have been released. At the time the developers advised users to switch to an alternative encryption program such as Microsoft’s BitLocker. Although TrueCrypt is still available for download, the developers suggest it should only be used to migrate data off TrueCrypt encrypted drives.

    • W3C Sets Up Web Payments Standards Group to Improve Check-Out Security

      W3C (World Wide Web Consortium), the regulatory body that oversees the creation of Web standards, has announced plans to set up a special group tasked with the responsibility of putting together a standardized API that will simplify the payment and check-out process, but also improve its overall security.

  • PR/AstroTurf/Lobbying

    • NYT Claims Clinton ‘Emerging as Unrivaled Leader’ in Democratic Race

      Hmm. The “unrivaled leader” leads her closest rival, Bernie Sanders, by 7 percentage points in an average of recent polls in the first caucus state, Iowa. In the first primary state, New Hampshire, she trails Sanders by 2 points; it’s been two months since she had a clear lead over him there. (In an accompanying graphic, the Times ranks Clinton as No. 1 in New Hampshire polls—based on a different polling average that has her ahead by 0.2 percentage points.)

    • WSJ Misleadingly Hypes Obamacare Enrollment Numbers To Push GOP Health Care Plans

      The Wall Street Journal editorial board used sharply revised government estimates on the number of Americans expected to purchase health insurance through federal marketplaces to claim that Obamacare is failing and hype so-called Republican “alternatives” to the landmark health care reform legislation. The Journal’s fearmongering about the long-term viability of Obamacare failed to acknowledge that while enrollment via federal marketplaces is less than expected, millions of Americans are still gaining access to affordable health insurance coverage.

  • Censorship

    • Verizon’s Twisted Plan to Censor Your Internet

      Earlier this year, the Newseum Institute asked 1,000 Americans to name their rights under the First Amendment. A clear majority listed freedom of speech first — before freedom of religion, assembly, and other core civil liberties.

      And that makes sense. Protecting free speech is essential to the health of any functioning democracy.

      Free speech matters to the hundreds of millions of Internet users who exercise this right every time they connect with others online. But if you ask some of the lawyers working for the companies that sell you Internet access, they’ll insist that it’s more important to protect the free speech rights of phone and cable giants like AT&T, Comcast, and Verizon.

    • Twitter hints at unblocking Politwoops accounts

      Politwoops, the site that saved and republished tweets first published and later deleted by politicians, may get back its access to the Twitter API. After disabling Politwoops’ developer accounts this summer, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey last week hinted that the company might restore access to the Twitter streams.

    • Anti-Israel Activism Criminalized in the Land of Charlie Hebdo and “Free Speech“

      The post-Charlie Hebdo “free speech” march in Paris was a fraud for multiple reasons, as I wrote at the time. It was led by dozens of world leaders, many of whom imprison or even kill people for expressing prohibited views. It was cheered by many Westerners who feign upset only when free speech abridgments are perpetrated by Muslims, but not — as is far more common — by their own governments against Muslims.

  • Privacy

    • Microsoft Helping to Store Police Video From Taser Body Cameras

      Microsoft has joined forces with Taser to combine the Azure cloud platform with law enforcement management tools.

      [..]

      In order to ensure Taser maintains a monopoly on police body cameras, the corporation acquired contracts with police departments all across the nation for the purchase of body cameras through dubious ties to certain chiefs of police.

  • Civil Rights

    • Garters in a Twist

      The British constitution is appallingly undemocratic. The fact that an undemocratic chamber has fended off a proposal from an undemocratic executive which gained the votes of only 34% of the voting electors, is not a blow struck for democracy. It is however a temporary victory for human decency in mitigating an attack on the poor.

    • “She Had No Respect”: CNN Analyst Blames Student Who Was Thrown To The Ground By The Police For The Officer’s Actions
    • Black Lives Matter movement

      This week’s program addresses the Black Lives Matter movement, and other efforts to challenge police brutality. Devonte Jackson, organizer with the Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI) speaks about uniting Black communities against abuses by police and other agencies of government. Attorney Izaak Schwaiger summarizes a pending civil rights lawsuit on behalf of inmates at the Sonoma County, CA jail, who were subjected to a systematic beating by guards. Philosophy Professor Glen Martin of Radford University shares his ideas on how to build a world without police violence. And there’s a live call-in from police-brutality protestors in New York.

    • Obama officials at odds over Saudi airstrikes

      Saudi Arabia’s airstrikes in Yemen, conducted with U.S. assistance,
      are alleged to have killed at least 1,500 civilians, dividing members of the Obama administration over whether the U.S. risks being accused of abetting war crimes in a bombing campaign that could ultimately strengthen Islamist militants.

      Sources inside the administration say they are struggling to keep in check
      the opposing sides in Yemen, one of the clearest examples of the intensifying Saudi-Iran proxy war in the Middle East. But even as reports of civilian suffering and terrorist gains pile up, U.S. officials believe that reducing American support for the Saudis could make the situation even worse.

  • Internet/Net Neutrality

    • Tim Berners-Lee in plea to MEPs to protect net neutrality in Europe

      FATHER OF the World Wide Web Tim Berners-Lee has issued a stark warning to the European Union ahead of a crucial vote on net neutrality due to take place tomorrow.

      After the historic win for net neutrality supporters in the US earlier this year, tomorrow will see MEPs looking at plans for internet fast lanes in the UK and mainland Europe.

      Berners-Lee said in a blog post on the World Wide Web Foundation website: “When I designed the World Wide Web, I built it as an open platform to foster collaboration and innovation. The web evolved into a powerful and ubiquitous platform because I was able to build it on an open network that treated all packets of information equally. This principle of net neutrality has kept the internet a free and open space since its inception.”

    • Why Europe’s net neutrality plan is more controversial than US rules

      The European Parliament is scheduled to vote on net neutrality rules on Tuesday, and at first glance the proposed regulations appear very similar to ones already in place in the United States.

      Both the European proposal and the US rules prevent Internet service providers from blocking or throttling traffic, and they impose a ban on “paid prioritization.”

    • Game over for real net neutrality? European Parliament votes in favor of disappointingly weak rules

      Today, members of the European Parliament voted on a proposal (PDF) for rules affecting how Internet traffic is managed, following the European Commission’s release of a draft agreement for regulation back in June. And Europe’s lawmakers have decided Europe doesn’t need a truly open, free Internet.

    • Net neutrality: EU votes in favour of Internet fast lanes and slow lanes

      The European Parliament has passed the flawed compromise text on net neutrality without including any of the amendments that would have closed serious loopholes. The vote, with 500 in favour, and 163 against, took place in a plenary session a few hours after a rather lacklustre debate this morning, which was attended by only 50 MEPs out of the European Parliament’s total of 751, indicating little interest in this key topic among most European politicians. The Greens MEP Jan Philipp Albrecht called the final result a “dirty deal.”

    • European Parliament delivers neither Net Neutrality nor an End to Roaming

      “Today’s vote on the Telecoms Single Market package in the European Parliament constitutes a broken promise both on the end of roaming surcharges and the establishment of net neutrality”, says Julia Reda, Member of the European Parliament for the Pirate Party and shadow rapporteur for the Greens/EFA group in the Internal Market and Consumer Protection Committee.

      “The European Parliament’s first reading position in April 2014 proposed far-reaching provisions for the introduction of net neutrality in Europe. In the end, not even the words ‘net neutrality’ survived the closed-door negotiations with the Commission and the Council. The text leaves open critical loopholes. Today, the Parliament decided not to adopt opposition amendments that could have fixed these shortcomings.

    • The European Union’s New Net Neutrality ‘Protections’ Are A Joke

      After months of negotiations (read: ISP lawyer and lobbyist rewrites), the European Union has voted to approve new net neutrality rules (pdf) that for many nation states may be worse than having no net neutrality protections at all. As we’ve noted, the rules ignore zero rating, carve out massive loopholes for “specialized services,” “class-based discrimination,” and even include provisions allowing ISP throttling and discrimination provided it’s addressing phantom congestion that hasn’t even happened yet. In short, these rules effectively protect ISPs looking to creatively violate net neutrality, not European consumers.

      European Parliament members completely ignored last-minute suggested amendments that would have closed these loopholes. They also completely ignored opposition to the rules by the likes of BitTorrent, EyeEm, Foursquare, Kickstarter, WordPress, Netflix, Reddit, Transferwise, Vimeo, the EFF and Tim Berners-Lee (who penned a lengthy blog post outlining his opposition to the rules). Similarly, only 50 MEPs out of the European Parliament’s total of 751 could be bothered to even attend a superficial “debate” preceding the approval vote.

    • European Parliament rejects amendments protecting net neutrality

      The EU has rejected legal amendments that would firmly protect the concept of net neutrality in Europe. The European Parliament voted in favor of new regulations which proponents say establish an internet “without discrimination,” but advocates for net neutrality say the laws contain a number of loopholes which could lead to the creation of a tiered internet service. The legislation also includes an end to roaming charges in Europe, although some critics say those laws are also less robust than they appear.

    • Net Neutrality: Major Setback for Free and Open Internet

      Today, the European Parliament voted the Telecommunication Single Market regulation text by 500 votes against 163, hereby ending the negotiations on this matter. Despite numerous citizen’s calls, despite repeated international calls to support the amendments, including Tim Berners-Lee’s, this ambiguous text leaves important loopholes and cannot ensure Net Neutrality1. Worst, it allows commercial discrimination. It is a profound disillusion for all those who, throughout the years, battled to ensure Net Neutrality in Europe.

    • EU Parliament adopts highly ambiguous Net Neutrality legislation

      The European Parliament has voted to adopt the Telecoms Single Market (TSM) regulation. The regulation was supposed to guarantee net neutrality in Europe.

      Unfortunately, MEPs have created large loopholes and left ambiguity in much of the legislation. Net neutrality is the principle whereby Internet access providers treat internet traffic equally. Because of the vagueness of the new regulations, telecoms regulators in EU Member States will now have to decide whether telecoms companies in their country will be able to prioritise different categories of data.

    • The EU Tried to End Roaming Fees and Ended Net Neutrality Instead

      The internet is a global network. That means if one part of the world decides to start pulling the wrong levers, we could be dealing with the consequences. And the European parliament just pulled a very big lever by voting down amendments to net neutrality rules that include dangerous loopholes.

    • EU Parliament rejects amendments protecting net neutrality

      European Parliament has voted for a package of EU internet traffic regulations, rejecting all amendments on net neutrality. The move was slammed by activists and companies alike, who say it will allow some to have faster internet access than others.

  • DRM

    • Siri Reserves Some Answers for Apple Music Subscribers Only

      Siri, the digital assistant found on Apple’s iOS devices, has become a familiar presence for many, and a prompt (sometimes even mischievous) answer to questions you ask it has always been forthcoming. But it seems Siri is now holding back some answers, only providing certain information to those users who pay for Apple Music.

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