11.01.17

Gemini version available ♊︎

Links 1/11/2017: GNOME 3.26.2, 4MLinux 23.0

Posted in News Roundup at 6:49 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Desktop

    • Linux command line tools for working with non-Linux users

      I spend most of my computing life in the Shell (command line, terminal or whatever you want to call it on your platform of choice). This can be a bit challenging, though, when I need to work with large groups of other people, especially in big enterprise companies that — well — use anything but the Shell.

      The problems that crop up are made worse when other people within your company use a different platform than you. I tend to use Linux. If I’m doing a lot of my daily work from a Linux terminal and the bulk of my co-workers use Windows 10 (entirely from the GUI side), things can get … problematic.

    • Yes, you can use Linux without knowing the command line

      If there’s one thing surrounding Linux usage that bothers me more than anything else, it’s when the detractors say you cannot work with Linux without knowing the command line. This is a bit of FUD — fear, uncertainty, and doubt — that keeps new users from giving the open source platform a try. I’m here, right now, to dispel that myth.

  • Server

    • Demand for Certified SysAdmins and Developers Is On the Rise

      Even with a shortage of IT workers, some employers are still discerning in their hiring requirements and are either seeking certified candidates or offering to pay for their employees to become certified.

      The Linux Foundation’s 2017 Open Source Jobs Report finds that half of hiring managers are more likely to hire a certified professional, while 47 percent of companies are willing to help pay for employees’ certifications. Meanwhile, 89% of hiring managers find it difficult to find open source talent.

      The demand for skills relating to cloud administration, DevOps, and continuous integration/continuous delivery is fueling interest in training and certifications related to open source projects and tools that power the cloud, according to the report. Workers find certification important, too. In fact, 76 percent of open source pros say certifications are useful to their careers.

    • Video: The State of Linux Containers

      Christian Kniep is a Software Evangelist at Docker. With a 10-year journey rooted in the HPC parts of the german automotive industry, Christian started to support CAE applications and VR installations. After getting bored with the small pieces, he became the InfiniBand go-to-guy while operating a 4000 node crash-test cluster and pivoted to the R&D department of Bulls BXI interconnect. When told at a conference that HPC can not learn anything from the emerging Cloud and BigData companies, he became curious and is now pushing for containerization within Sony Interactive Entertainment. Christian likes to explore new emerging trends by containerizing them first and seek application in the nebulous world of DevOps. As an organiser of three workshops at ISC HPC and ISC Cloud as well as talking frequently at HPC Advisory Council events, FOSDEM and MeetUps, Christian has a long standing commitment to share valuable information about Linux Containers in the HPC and BigData community.

    • Cloud-Native, Seven Years On…

      Back in 2010, I published a blog post defining the term cloud-native, based on discussions between I’d had with my colleagues at WSO2. At around the same time, Netflix also started using that term in presentations. Since then the interest in cloud-native has rocketed, including many blog posts, books, and of course the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).

      The high-level concept of cloud-native is simple: systems that give users a better experience by virtue of operating in the cloud in a genuinely cloud-centric way. In other words, the cloud may make an existing database easier to start up, but if the database doesn’t support elasticity then it can’t take advantage of the scaling capabilities of the cloud.

    • 20 questions DevOps hiring managers should be prepared to answer
    • 7 Non-Technical Skills You Need To Succeed In A DevOps Career
  • Kernel Space

    • Linux Foundation to host Acumos AI project backed by AT&T

      The Linux Foundation introduced the new Acumos AI project which is still in formation and is expected to be launched in early 2018. The project aims to make artificial intelligence (AI) available to everyone by providing a common framework and platform for the free exchange of machine learning products. The founding organisations include AT&T and Tech Mahindra. Others are invited to participate as members in the coming weeks as the Acumos Project establishes its governance model.

      With the Acumos platform, the organisation said it’s working to create an industry standard for making AI applications and models reusable and easily accessible to any developer. The Acumos platform will be user-centric, with an initial focus on creating apps and micro-services.

    • Linux Creates New Open-Source Project for Artificial Intelligence

      The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, has introduced the Acumos Project, which aims to make artificial intelligence (AI) available to everyone – including drone developers – by providing a common framework and platform for the free exchange of machine learning solutions.

    • The Linux Foundation Announces 20 New Silver Members

      The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced that 20 new organizations have joined the Foundation as Silver members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the greatest shared technology resources in history, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation.

    • Intel Graphics Driver Likely To Re-Enable Fastboot By Default

      For the past five years or so has been work on Intel DRM “Fastboot” support and it’s looking like this feature may finally be re-enabled by default.

    • Graphics Stack

      • Intel i965 Mesa Driver Finally Lands Its On-Disk Shader Cache

        Intel developers have finally landed their patches for supporting the i965 Mesa OpenGL on-disk shader cache.

        While RadeonSI has implemented its on-disk shader cache since earlier this year, the Intel shader cache that originally pre-dates that work was finally carried over the finish line last night and are now in Git. This work is present for the Mesa 18.0 release due out in early 2018 and not the upcoming Mesa 17.3 update due out in about two weeks.

    • Benchmarks

      • 18-Way Radeon GPU Benchmarks On Ubuntu 17.10 With Linux 4.14 + Mesa 17.4-dev

        Continuing on in our fresh Radeon Linux graphics benchmarks in commemorating 10 years of AMD’s open-source driver strategy with already showing how the driver compares to the old Catalyst/fglrx and Ubuntu 14.04 to 17.10 OpenGL tests, up next is an 18 way graphics card comparison of both old and new Radeon graphics cards while using the very latest Linux driver stack.

  • Applications

  • Desktop Environments/WMs

    • K Desktop Environment/KDE SC/Qt

      • Plasma Mobile: Inside KDE’s Plan To Create A Full-featured Linux Smartphone Software

        The Linux smartphone scenario has never been so exciting. Recently, Purism’s Librem 5 smartphone achieved its crowdfunding goal and scored partnerships from GNOME and KDE. On the other hand, postmarketOS is also showing some good promise.

        When KDE partnered with Purism, it announced that Plasma Mobile will be ready for the real world and integrate with a commercial device for the first time. “Slowly, but surely, hardware vendors have discovered that Plasma Mobile is an entirely different software platform to build products on top of,” KDE developer Sebastian Kügler wrote in a blog post.

    • GNOME Desktop/GTK

      • GNOME 3.26.2 released

        I’m pleased to announce the release of GNOME 3.26.2, the final planned release for the GNOME 3.26 series. It includes many bugfixes, documentation improvements, and translation updates. All distributions shipping GNOME 3.26 are strongly encouraged to upgrade.

      • GNOME 3.26.2 Released
      • GNOME 3.26.2 Released as Last Scheduled Maintenance Update for the Linux Desktop

        GNOME’s Michael Catanzaro is announcing today the availability of the second and last scheduled maintenance update for the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment carrying numerous bug fixes.

        GNOME 3.26.2 is out just in time, as initially scheduled, and it’s here three weeks after the first point release to improve the stability, security, and reliability of your GNOME 3.26 desktop environment. It will be coming soon to the stable repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distro, so make sure you update as soon as possible.

      • GNOME Bug squash month
      • GNOME.Asia summit 2017

        GNOME.Asia summit 2017 was held in Chongqing city of China. The venue was the Chongqing University approximately 90 years old with the vast beautiful Eco-friendly campus. I was invited as one of the speakers. The topic of my speech was “Why FOSS in education make sense?”. The message of my talk was to incorporate the open source in the education system. I believe that faculty members in the computer science department in various Universities around the world should be made aware and practice open source software and also if possible contribute to open source project. This way they can guide their students in the best possible way. They can act as the medium between the student and the open source project mentors as the teachers knows their students well. They can direct their students according to their capabilities and interests.

  • Distributions

    • Solus 4 Is Working On Restoring Wayland Support, NVIDIA Improvements

      The Solus Linux distribution project has shared some of the work they are currently pursuing for their Solus 4 operating system update.

      Solus developers are planning to turn back on Wayland support for the distribution. They are also planning to improve the NVIDIA driver support, including making use of the GLVND library (OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch) so its OpenGL driver can co-exist happily without disturbing the Mesa drivers on the system. They are also looking at enabling EGLStreams support to allow the NVIDIA driver to work under Wayland on their operating system. As part of their GLVND push is also looking to improve NVIDIA Optimus laptop support.

    • New Releases

      • 4MLinux 23.0 STABLE released.

        The status of the 4MLinux 23.0 series has been changed to STABLE. Create your own images with GIMP 2.8.22, edit your documents with LibreOffice 5.4.3.1 and GNOME Office (AbiWord 3.0.2 with Gnumeric 1.12.35), share your files using DropBox 37.4.29, surf the Internet with Firefox 56.0 and Chromium 61.0.3163.100, stay in touch with your friends via Skype 5.5.0.1 and Thunderbird 52.4.0, enjoy your music collection with Audacious 3.9, watch your favorite videos with MPlayer SVN-r37931 and VLC 2.2.6, play games powered by Mesa 17.0.4 and Wine 2.19. You can also setup the 4MLinux LAMP Server (Linux 4.9.52, Apache 2.4.28, MariaDB 10.2.9, PHP 5.6.31 and PHP 7.0.24). Perl 5.24.1 and Python 2.7.13 are also available.

    • Arch Family

    • Red Hat Family

    • Debian Family

      • Derivatives

        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • GNOME Project Welcomes Canonical and Ubuntu to GNOME Foundation Advisory Board

            With the release of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, Canonical replaced their Unity user interface with the GNOME desktop environment, and now they’re looking to sponsor the project by becoming a member of the Advisory Board.

            Among some powerful members of GNOME Foundation’s Advisory Board, we can mention Google, FSF (Free Software Foundation), and Linux Foundation. And now, Canonical will also support the GNOME Project by providing funding and expert consultation.

          • Ubuntu Linux-maker Canonical joins GNOME Foundation advisory board
          • Canonical Joins The GNOME Advisory Board
          • Canonical Has Joined the GNOME Foundation Advisory Board

            It’s a timely and logical appointment what with the recent Ubuntu 17.10 release being the first version of Ubuntu to ship with the GNOME Shell desktop environment by default.

            But what is the GNOME Advisory Board?

            Well, GNOME explain it as “…a body of stakeholder organizations and companies who support the GNOME Project by providing funding and expert consultation.”

            Other members of the board include Google, The Document Foundation, Red Hat and SUSE.

          • Canonical joins GNOME Foundation Advisory Board

            As you’re no doubt aware, the default Ubuntu desktop is now running GNOME Shell following the 17.10 release and so we naturally have a great deal of interest in the plans and direction of the GNOME project. The best way for us to get more involved in the future of GNOME is to become a member of the Advisory Board, and so, I’m happy to announce that we are now fully signed up members.

          • Retiring my Ubuntu Phone after 1000 days

            With some sadness I recently replaced my Ubuntu Phone with a Nexus 5. It lasted me just over 1000 days (almost three years) as my everyday phone, and I last wrote about it at the 500 mark.

          • Flavours and Variants

            • Zorin OS 12 Passes One Million Downloads Mark, 60% Are Windows and Mac Users

              Seven months after reaching half million downloads, the Zorin OS 12 GNU/Linux operating system passed today the one million downloads mark.

              Zorin OS is an Ubuntu-based distribution targeted at those who want to migrate from Microsoft’s Windows and Apple’s macOS computer operating system to an Open Source alternative that offers them a more secure, stable, and reliable computing environment. Zorin OS 12 is the latest stable version of the Linux OS, and it got its second point release in September 2017.

  • Devices/Embedded

Free Software/Open Source

  • Happy birthday ROS: A decade of open-source robotics

    It all started ten years ago. ROS grew out of several early open-source robotic software frameworks, including switchyard by the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.

    The same year, legendary research lab and technology incubator Willow Garage hired its first employees: Jonathan Stark, Melonee Wise, Curt Meyers, and John Hsu. You can point to a lot of seminal moments in robotics history, but this is a top contender for the year modern robotics was born.

  • Why you should consider open source IoT solutions

    The society-wide adoption of the Internet of Things into our everyday business and cultural lives has left many company’s scrambling to find the best fit for the IoT in their businesses. Most of them have encountered serious trouble; choosing which IoT platform is right for you is no easy job, and the complexities of your decision can sometimes seem overwhelming.

    Considering an open source IoT solution to your company’s problems can help alleviate some of the burdens brought on by this decision. A quick review of how open source IoT solutions stand to benefit you without breaking the bank shows why this route may be the go-to option for IoT practitioners in the future.

  • What Happened When One Texas County Tried To Build A Cheap, Open-Source Election System

    STAR Vote’s goal was to make voters more comfortable with the security and reliability of electronic voting, DeBeauvoir says. STAR Vote would have provided voters with a paper receipt of their ballot. Such a receipt is called a Voter-Verified Paper Audit Trail, or VVPAT.

    “The purpose of a VVPAT Is to make sure the voter knows for a fact that the choices they have entered on the electronic voting system are in fact the correct choices that really represent their decisions,” DeBeauvoir says.

    Besides reassuring voters, a paper trail can help election officials perform post-election audits.

    “Most people think what we’re using the paper trail for is a recount,” she says. “You can just do post-election audits because you’re double-checking the math and the statistics of an election.”

  • Open-source—‘the way the future is being built’

    Pineberry Manufacturing Inc. makes friction feeders that insert coupons, paperboard inserts, envelopes, cards, etc. The firm claims to have the only open-source feeders in the marketplace, which means proprietary electrical components have been eliminated. Pineberry Manufacturing’s HSF and SF Series friction feeders, says the firm, are characterized by an unmatched level of operational simplicity, reliability, robustness, and cost efficiency. Also, they can be easily integrated into manual or automated lines. The HSF operates at 8,000 inches/min and the SF at 3,000.

    “Our friction feeders are open-source, servo-controlled power platforms with a Schneider Electric PLC touchscreen controller, reducing the overall number of components to the machine,” says Pineberry Manufacturing President David McCharles. “Users can get information from the terminal remotely through an app on a smart phone. Open-source technology is the way the future is being built.”

  • Events

    • Watch Keynote Videos from OS Summit and ELC Europe 2017 Including a Conversation with Linus Torvalds

      Check out the on-stage conversation with Linus Torvalds and VMware’s Dirk Hohndel, opening remarks from The Linux Foundation’s Executive Director Jim Zemlin, and a special presentation from 11-year-old CyberShaolin founder Reuben Paul. You can watch these and other ELC and OS Summit keynotes below for insight into open source collaboration, community and technical expertise on containers, cloud computing, embedded Linux, Linux kernel, networking, and much more.

    • 2017 KDE Edu Sprint

      Between the 7th and 9th October the KDE Edu team met in the Endocode offices in Berlin to work on and plan KDE’s educational software.

      We split up the work into three general areas: organization, infrastructure and coding.

      The KDE Edu team is diverse in that there are different people interested in different tools. A sprint such as this one is the ideal meeting place to work on making sure that we are headed in the same direction. We discussed the website and how we present our projects to the outside world. We also covered improvements to our usage of Phabricator and our roles on the different goals we set for ourselves. We wanted to make sure all our members are aware and on board with them.

    • CppCon 2017: trip report

      During the last week of September I attended the 2017 edition of CppCon, in Bellevue, WA. Unusually late due to my presence at Qt World Summit which took place just after it, here’s my trip report.

    • Percona Live Open Source Database Conference Europe 2017 Showcases Power, Popularity and Innovation of Open Source Database-Powered Infrastructures

      Percona, the company that delivers enterprise-class MySQL®, MongoDB® and other open source database solutions and services, announced the success of Percona Live Open Source Database Conference Europe 2017, which took place September 25-27, 2017 at the Radisson Blu Royal Hotel in Dublin, Ireland.

    • FOSDEM 2018 – SDN/NFV DevRoom Call for Content

      The SDN & NFV DevRoom is back this year for FOSDEM, and the call for content is open until November 16th. Submissions are welcome now!

  • Web Browsers

    • Chrome

    • Mozilla

      • 10 Fascinating Things We Learned When We Asked The World ‘How Connected Are You?’

        We inquired about people’s relationships with their connected devices, like smart TVs, Fitbits, and routers. Questions ranged from “What connected devices do you own?“ to “What is your biggest fear as we move toward a more connected future?”

        Nearly 190,000 people around the world responded. People from the tiny islands of Tuvalu to the huge landmass of China and everywhere in between. (Mozilla released the survey in six languages: English, Spanish, German, Italian, French, and Portuguese.)

        What we learned is fascinating. Like: People in India are more likely to own a smart appliance, whereas people in Argentina are more likely to own a smart TV. And: People everywhere are worried that a more connected future will jeopardize their privacy.

      • $275K for Creative Gigabit Projects Across the U.S.

        Mozilla is partnering with museums, universities, nonprofits, libraries, and high schools in Texas, Louisiana, Kansas, and beyond.

        “We’re focusing on projects that leverage gigabit internet speeds — up to 250x average speeds — to make a positive impact in the communities we serve and across the country,” says Lindsey Frost, who directs Mozilla’s gigabit work. “Projects use augmented reality to train first responders; raise awareness about coastal erosion through virtual reality simulations; bring robotics into high school classrooms; and much more.”

        Through the Mozilla Gigabit Community Fund — a partnership with the National Science Foundation and U.S. Ignite — Mozilla invests in projects that leverage lightning-fast gigabit internet connectivity to further education and workforce development.

  • Funding

  • BSD

    • pfSense 2.3.5 Security Update Addresses WPA2 KRACK Issue, Improves WebGUI

      If you haven’t upgraded your pfSense BSD-based firewall to the major 2.4.x stable series yet, we have some good news for you today as the pfSense 2.3.5 security update is now available to download.

      pfSense 2.3.5 is a maintenance and bugfix release for the pfSense 2.3 stable series of the world’s most trusted open source firewall, and it’s here to patch a few critical security vulnerabilities, including that nasty WPA2 KRACK (Key Reinstallation Attack) issue.

    • OpenZFS RAID-Z Online Expansion Project Announcement

      The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce a collaborative project with Delphix to implement one of the most requested ZFS features, to allow RAID-Z pools to be expanded one disk at a time. We’ve combined our resources with iXsystems and Delphix to bring this project to fruition. The RAID-Z Expansion project will allow OpenZFS users to incrementally add storage to their RAID pools, one device at a time. The expansion will happen online, in the background, with zero downtime, and while maintaining the redundancy and reliability of RAID-Z.

  • Licensing/Legal

    • GitLab Changes its Contributor Licensing to Better Serve Open-Source Projects

      Self-hosted Git repository management tool GitLab today announced that it is abandoning its Contributor Licensing Agreement (CLA) and adopting a Developer Certificate of Origin (DCO) and license.

      According to the company, which claims 67% market share in the self-hosted Git market, “the DCO gives developers greater flexibility and portability for their contributions.”

    • GitLab Transitions Contributor Licensing to Developer Certificate of Origin to Better Support Open Source Projects; Empower Contributors

      GitLab, a software product used by 2/3 of all enterprises, today announced it was abandoning the industry-standard Contributor License Agreement (CLA) in favor of a Developer Certificate of Origin (DCO) and license. The DCO gives developers greater flexibility and portability for their contributions. The move has already attracted the attention of large open source projects who recognize the benefits. Debian and GNOME both plan to migrate their communities and open source projects to GitLab.

      GitLab’s move away from a CLA is meant to modernize its code hosting and collaborative development infrastructure for all open source projects. Additionally, requiring a CLA became problematic for developers who didn’t want to enter into legal terms; they weren’t reviewing the CLA contract and they effectively gave up their rights to own and contribute to open source code.

  • Programming/Development

    • NEWS: Node.js 8 Moves into Long-Term Support and Node.js 9 Becomes the New Current Release Line

      We are super excited to announce that later today Node.js 8 will be ready for production as it transfers into the de facto Long-Term Support release line opening it up to a larger user base that demands stability and security (Node.js 8.9.0 is the first official Node.js 8 release to hit LTS status). Node.js 8 is one of the biggest release lines from the Node.js community to date with features and add-ons like Async / Await and V8 JavaScript Engine 6.1. It is up to 20 percent faster than its predecessor Node.js 6 (source nearForm) in typical web applications. An early tester found that Node.js 8 cut its web response by 70 percent:

    • Open Source Sparse Tensor Computation Is Fast

      Tensors are data tables in n dimensions and when they occur they are often sparse, i.e. most of the entries are zero. In the past we have hand-crafted code to work efficiently with sparse tensors, but now we have Taco, an open source compiler that can automatically generate code that can run up to 100 times faster.

Leftovers

  • Security

    • Kaspersky purged from ‘vast majority’ of US government systems

      Michael Duffy, who leads cybersecurity and communications at the DHS, explained that fewer than half of their agencies were using Kaspersky’s anti-virus software.

    • The EU’s GDPR is even more relevant to Linux systems, and here is why

      This new regulation represents a tightening of the data protection laws. The new regulation requires far faster responses to data breaches (within 72 hours), and the maximum penalty for breaching the legislation has increased by over four times to twenty million euros or four percent of a business’s annual global turnover, whichever is higher. In addition, GDPR will unify the processes by which EU countries regulate their data security. This will ensure breaches are easier to report, investigate and respond to the new supervisory authorities being introduced.

    • New Network Security Standards Will Protect Internet’s Routing

      Electronic messages traveling across the internet are under constant threat from data thieves, but new security standards created with the technical guidance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will reduce the risk of messages being intercepted or stolen. These standards address a security weakness that has been a part of the internet since its earliest days.

    • Disney-branded internet filter had Mickey Mouse security

      A Disney-branded home internet filtering device might keep bad content out, but it was an open door to bad actors until earlier this month.

      That’s what Cisco Talos’s William Largfent found when he took a look at “Circle with Disney”, a Circle Media parental control device on which the entertainment giant slapped its brand.

      Whatever its qualities in filtering an screen time management, the US$99 box is riddled with 23 vulns, as the Talos post discloses.

    • Episode 68 – Ruining the Internet: Episode 68 – Ruining the Internet
    • Security updates for Wednesday
    • Trump administration reportedly kills vehicle-to-vehicle safety mandate [Updated]
    • Members of Congress want you to hack the US election voting system

      This summer, DefCon’s “Voting Machine Hacking Village” turned up a host of US election vulnerabilities (PDF). Now, imagine a more mainstream national hacking event backed by the Department of Homeland Security that has the same goal: to discover weaknesses in voting machines used by states for local and national elections.

      That might just become a reality if federal legislation (PDF) unveiled Tuesday becomes law. The proposal comes with a safe harbor provision to exempt participants from federal hacking laws. Several federal exemptions for ethical hacking that paved the way for the DefCon hacking village expire next year.

      The bipartisan “Securing America’s Voting Equipment Act” also would provide election funding to the states and would designate voting systems as critical infrastructure—a designation that would open up communication channels between the federal government and the states to share classified threat information.

  • Defence/Aggression

    • CIA releases 321 gigabytes of Bin Laden’s digital library, Web cache crap

      Today, the Central Intelligence Agency posted a cache of files obtained from Osama Bin Laden’s personal computer and other devices recovered from his compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan by Navy SEALs during the raid in which he was killed on May 2, 2011. The 470,000 files, 321 gigabytes in all, include documents, images, videos, and audio recordings, including Al Qaeda propaganda and planning documents, home videos of Bin Laden’s son Hazma, and “drafts” of propaganda videos. There is also a lot of digital junk among the files.

  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife/Nature

    • ITC suggests Trump impose up to a 35% tariff on imported solar modules

      The International Trade Commission (ITC) issued its recommendations for solar panel component tariffs on Tuesday, a month after it decided that US manufacturers of cells and modules had been harmed by cheap equipment imports. The commissioners offered three different recommendations, but it will be up to President Trump to decide on which recommendation to follow—or to make a completely new recommendation.

  • Finance

    • Time To Get Rid Of Corporate Sovereignty? USTR Robert Lighthizer Seems To Think So

      As we noted a couple of months ago, the topic of corporate sovereignty — also known as investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) — has rather dropped out of the public eye. One post on the subject from earlier this year pointed out that an editorial in the Financial Times had called for ISDS to be “ditched”. That was welcome but surprising. At the time, it seemed like an outlier, but it now looks more as if it was simply ahead of the field, as many more have started to call for the same. For example 230 law and economics professors are urging President Trump to remove corporate sovereignty from NAFTA and other trade deals (pdf).

  • AstroTurf/Lobbying/Politics

  • Censorship/Free Speech

  • Privacy/Surveillance

  • Civil Rights/Policing

    • Reporter Arrested, Thrown To The Ground For Cursing

      Do the police in Fairfax County, Virginia really not know about the 1st Amendment? It certainly appears that way after watching the video of them violently arresting a reporter named Mike Stark, who was trying to cover the gubernatorial campaign of Ed Gillespie. Now, because some people will want to mention this, I’ll note that the following is (a) true and (b) makes no difference at all to this story: Stark works for a highly partisan website that is strongly opposed to Gillespie. But the points here would be identical if it were a reporter at the other end of the partisan divide following the opposing candidate. The positions of the reporter (or the candidate) are meaningless to the basic question of why the fuck was Mike Stark thrown to the ground, piled on by cops and arrested.

  • Internet Policy/Net Neutrality

    • Verizon Lobbies FCC To Block States From Protecting Broadband Privacy, Net Neutrality

      Earlier this year, the Trump administration and GOP handed a giant gift to the nation’s telecom duopolies when they dismantled FCC broadband privacy protections. While ISPs whined incessantly about the rules, the protections were relatively modest — simply requiring that large ISPs be transparent about what personal data is being collected and sold, who it’s being sold to, and that working opt out tools be provided to consumers. The FCC’s rules were only created after Verizon was caught modifying packets to covertly track users around the internet and AT&T tried to make consumer privacy a luxury add on.

      But in the wake of the GOP’s myopic dismantling of the rules, more than 30 states began considering their own disparate privacy protections for consumers. The EFF threw its support behind one such bill in California, arguing that it could provide a good template for other states to follow in order to gain some uniformity. But Google, Comcast, AT&T and Verizon collectively lobbied to scuttle that law last month, leaked documents showing how they lied to California lawmakers by claiming the rules would have emboldened extremists, boosted annoying popups, and somehow harmed consumers.

    • The Web began dying in 2014, here’s how

      What has changed over the last 4 years is market share of traffic on the Web. It looks like nothing has changed, but GOOG and FB now have direct influence over 70%+ of internet traffic. Mobile internet traffic is now the majority of traffic worldwide and in Latin America alone, GOOG and FB services have had 60% of mobile traffic in 2015, growing to 70% by the end of 2016. The remaining 30% of traffic is shared among all other mobile apps and websites. Mobile devices are primarily used for accessing GOOG and FB networks.

    • AT&T admits defeat in lawsuit it filed to stall Google Fiber

      AT&T is reportedly abandoning its attempt to stop a Louisville ordinance that helped draw Google Fiber into the city.

      In February 2016, AT&T sued the local government in Louisville and Jefferson County, Kentucky to stop an ordinance that gives Google Fiber and other ISPs faster access to utility poles. A US District Court judge dismissed AT&T’s lawsuit in August of this year, when he determined that AT&T’s claims that the ordinance is invalid are false.

    • Dead People Mysteriously Support The FCC’s Attack On Net Neutrality

      We’ve noted for months how an unknown party has been using bots to bombard the FCC website with entirely bogus support for the agency’s planned attack on net neutrality. Inquiries so far have indicated that whatever group or individual is behind the fake support used a bot that automatically pulled names — in alphabetical order — from a compromised database of some kind. Earlier this year one reporter actually managed to track down some of these folks — who say they never filed such comments or in many instances had no idea what net neutrality even is.

    • Verizon has a new strategy to undermine online privacy and net neutrality

      Verizon has asked the Federal Communications Commission to preempt any state laws that regulate network neutrality and broadband privacy.

      The FCC’s Republican majority is on course to overturn two-year-old net neutrality rules, perhaps by the end of the year. Broadband privacy rules passed by the FCC during the Obama administration were already undone by Congress and President Donald Trump early this year.

      With the two sets of rules either gone or on their way out, it’s possible that state governments might impose similar rules to protect consumers in their states. Verizon told the FCC in a filing last week that the commission should preempt laws in any state that does so.

  • DRM

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Copyrights

      • CBS sues man for copyright over screenshots of 59-year-old TV show

        CBS has sued a photographer for copyright infringement for doing something that’s practically ubiquitous in the news and entertainment business—publishing still images from a television show.

        The lawsuit against New York photojournalist Jon Tannen, filed on Friday, is essentially a retaliatory strike. Tannen sued CBS Interactive in February, claiming that the online division of CBS had used two of his photographs without permission. Now, CBS has sued Tannen back, claiming that he “hypocritically” used CBS’ intellectual property “while simultaneously bringing suit against Plaintiff’s sister company, CBS Interactive Inc., claiming it had violated his own copyright.”

      • ‘Pirate’ IPTV Provider Loses Case, Despite Not Offering Content Itself

        A company that sold Kodi-based software which accessed infringing TV, movie and sports streams has lost an interesting case featuring Dutch anti-piracy group BREIN. MovieStreamer claimed that it only provided a referral service to third-party content through a series of links but the court found that despite the convoluted process, it still communicated copyrighted works to the public.

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  1. IRC Proceedings: Friday, January 28, 2022

    IRC logs for Friday, January 28, 2022



  2. Links 28/1/2022: GStreamer 1.20 RC1 and DXVK-NVAPI 0.5.2

    Links for the day



  3. Microsoft Staff Trying to Subvert the Freedom of Gemini (Without Disclosure of the Paymaster)

    Looking back at the past couple of years, it seems like Microsoft staff and boosters were more than eager to steer developers away from freedom and into Microsoft's cage



  4. Gemini Gone Mainstream: German Media Now in Geminispace

    With the likes of TAZ embracing Geminispace/Gemini Protocol we seem to have reached some sort of inflection point; taz.de did in fact add official presence to Geminispace



  5. Links 28/1/2022: LSFMM 2022 and 2021 UI Study Results From Elementary's Distro

    Links for the day



  6. IRC Proceedings: Thursday, January 27, 2022

    IRC logs for Thursday, January 27, 2022



  7. Links 28/1/2022: GNU Poke 2.0 and OPNsense 22.1 Released

    Links for the day



  8. Links 27/1/2022: Archinstall 2.3.1 and Nix 2.6.0

    Links for the day



  9. On the Internet, Trust Should Not Become Centralised

    “Trust” is a word that lost its meaning in the era of “TPM” and fancier names for 'Palladium'; we need to reject this idea that computers need to check with Microsoft if the operating system is trusted (not just Windows!), check with Gulag/Chrome if a Web site is trusted, and whether it's OK to run some application/s on one's own computer (as if Jim Zemlin et al get to decide what is trusted)



  10. Microsoft-Connected Publishers Suffer and Perish With Microsoft (While Peddling 'Fake News' for Their Beloved Sponsor)

    IDG and other fake news outlets/networks/sites (selling to companies flattering articles about themselves or renting out 'news space' to them, not just ad space) want us to think Microsoft is doing very well, but it's just that same old Ponzi scheme



  11. Links 27/1/2022: Mabox Linux 21.11 Herbolth and PipeWire 0.3.44

    Links for the day



  12. IRC Proceedings: Wednesday, January 26, 2022

    IRC logs for Wednesday, January 26, 2022



  13. [Meme] EPO: Pursuing an Eastern and Western District of Europe (for Patent Trolls and Software Patents)

    With the EPO so flagrantly lying and paying for misinformation maybe we should expect Benoît Battistelli and António Campinos to have delusions of grandeur… such as presiding over the Eastern and Western District of Europe, just like Mr. Gilstrap and Mr. Albright (political appointment by Donald Trump, ushering in “the swamp”)



  14. Gemini at 2,000: 86% of Capsules Use Self-Signed Certificate, Just Like the Techrights Web Site (WWW)

    As shown in the charts above (updated an hour ago), the relative share of ‘Linux’ Foundation (LE/LF; same thing, same office) in the capsules’ certificates has decreased over time; more and more (in terms of proportion) capsules choose to sign their own certificate/s; the concept of ‘fake security’ (centralisation and consolidation) should be rejected universally because it leaves nobody safe except plutocrats



  15. [Meme] UPC: Many Lies as Headlines, Almost Exclusively in Publishers Sponsored by EPO and Team UPC to Produce Fake News (Lobbying Through Misinformation)

    Lest we forget that EPO dictators, like Pinky and the Brainless Benoît Battistelli and António Campinos, have long littered the EPO's official Web site as well as publishers not directly connected to the EPO (but funded by it) with disinformation about the UPC



  16. EPO as the 'Ministry of Truth' of Team UPC and Special Interests

    The 'Ministry of Truth' of the patent world is turning the EPO's Web site into a propaganda mill, a misinformation farm, and a laughing stock with stock photography



  17. Microsoft 'Delighted' by Windows 11 (Vista 11) Usage, Which is Only 1% Three Months After Official Launch and Six Months After Release Online

    Microsoft boosters such as Bogdan Popa and Mark Hachman work overtime on distraction from the failure Vista 11 has been (the share of Windows continues to fall relative to other platforms)



  18. Links 27/1/2022: Preinstalled GNU/Linux (Ubuntu) and Arch Linux-Powered Steam Deck 30 Days Away

    Links for the day



  19. Don't Fall for Microsoft's Spin That Says Everything is Not Secure and Cannot be Secured

    Microsoft keeps promoting the utterly false concept that everything is not secure and there's nothing that can be done about it (hence, might as well stay with Windows, whose insecurity is even intentional)



  20. At Long Last: 2,000 Known Gemini Capsules!

    The corporate media, looking to appease its major sponsors (such as Web/advertising giants), won't tell you that Gemini Protocol is rising very rapidly; its userbase and the tools available for users are rapidly improving while more and more groups, institutions and individuals set up their own capsule (equivalent of a Web site)



  21. Links 26/1/2022: Gamebuntu 1.0, PiGear Nano, and Much More

    Links for the day



  22. IRC Proceedings: Tuesday, January 25, 2022

    IRC logs for Tuesday, January 25, 2022



  23. Links 26/1/2022: No ARM for Nvidia, End of EasyArch, and WordPress 5.9 is Out

    Links for the day



  24. Why the Unified Patent Court (UPC) is Still Just a Fantasy and the UPC's Fake News Mill Merely Discredits the Whole Patent 'Profession'

    Patents and science used to be connected; but now that the patent litigation 'sector' is hijacking patent offices (and even courts in places like Texas) it's trying to shove a Unified Patent Court (UPC) down the EU's throat under the disingenuous cover of "community" or "unity"



  25. Links 25/1/2022: Vulkan 1.3 Released, Kiwi TCMS 11.0, and antiX 19.5

    Links for the day



  26. Gemini Milestones and Growth (Almost 2,000 Known Gemini Servers Now, 39,000 Pages in Ours)

    The diaspora to Gemini Protocol or the transition to alternative 'webs' is underway; a linearly growing curve suggests that inertia/momentum is still there and we reap the benefits of early adoption of Gemini



  27. [Meme] Get Ready for Unified Patent Court (UPC) to be Taken to Court

    The Unified Patent Court (UPC) and Unitary Patent system that’s crafted to empower EPO thugs isn’t legal and isn’t constitutional either; even a thousand fake news 'articles' (deliberate misinformation or disinformation) cannot change the simple facts because CJEU isn’t “trial by media”



  28. The EPO Needs High-Calibre Examiners, Not Politicians Who Pretend to Understand Patents and Science

    Examiners are meant to obstruct fake patents or reject meritless patent applications; why is it that working conditions deteriorate for those who are intellectually equipped to do the job?



  29. Free Software is Greener

    Software Freedom is the only way to properly tackle environmental perils through reuse and recycling; the mainstream media never talks about it because it wants people to "consume" more and more products



  30. Links 25/1/2022: Git 2.35 and New openSUSE Hardware

    Links for the day


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