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Links 13/6/2013: CyanogenMod Gets Incognito Mode



GNOME bluefish

Contents





GNU/Linux

  • Macs No More: After Edward Snowden, Time to Come to the Penguin
    The devil some of us have most sold our souls to isn't Apple or Google or Amazon but Adobe. How can we be creative without our "Creative Suite"? If we're actually creative, though, I bet we can. Besides, there are more-or-less functional people-powered alternatives to a lot of those programs, which are a bit less forgiving and a lot more customizable for the clever. It's a better way to go in the long run anyway. Shiny new equipment tends to breed shiny fake art.

    Then there's the steampunk thrill of the UNIX terminal at the heart of your new OS. The terminal means going back in time to a text-only screen -- now with customizable colors in transparent windows! -- and telling the computer what you want with magic spells on a command line. Slow tech is addictive. This article is being written in a terminal program that's almost 40 years old, and thanks to a devoted community of hackers it works better than ever.

    That's the open-source ethic: If it still works, build on it -- don't design for obsolescence. And when a new improvement comes along, everyone can benefit. When there's an error, the community (eventually) corrects it.

    For example, ghost-of-Steve Jobs: It's "think differently."


  • Server

    • Tulsa’s Community Collaboration Model for Supercomputing
      Two weeks ago the Tandy Supercomputing Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma launched as the home to one of the country’s first shared, publicly available supercomputers.

      The project -- born of a collaboration between The University of Tulsa, Oklahoma State University, The University of Oklahoma, Tulsa Community College, the city of Tulsa, business owners and nonprofit foundations -- gives community members equal access to a $3.5 million, 100-node supercomputing system at a fraction of the cost to build their own.


    • BeyondTrust Extends Password Security to Linux, Unix
      Last week, security vendor BeyondTrust combined its "context-aware" approach to vulnerability assessment with user-privilege management on Windows. Today, it has taken another step in the same direction with new software that delivers similar features for systems reporting, analytics and password security on Linux and Unix servers. Read on for the details, and what the emphasis on context-awareness means for the channel.


    • Securing Your Linux Server






  • Kernel Space

    • IBM to bring Linux KVM virtualization to its Power server line
      Linux has its own built-in hypervisor, KVM, for x86 virtualization, and now IBM is porting it to its Power architecture.


    • Graphics Stack

      • CUDA 5.5 release candidate out for some
        Members of NVIDIA's Registered Developer Programs can now start testing out the CUDA 5.5 release candidate. According to the announcement, the features in the next release of the platform and architecture for parallel programming include multi-process MPI debugging and profiling, step-by-step guided performance analysis and a static CUDA runtime library.


      • Updated Nouveau Graphics Driver Released
        It's been a while since the last Nouveau DDX driver update, but xf86-video-nouveau 1.0.8 was released this morning. This updated Nouveau X.Org driver comes with nearly two dozen changes.


      • Reasons For Losing Motivation In Wayland
        While many are super excited about Wayland and the thought of X11 finally going away in the coming years, some who have been enthusiastic about Wayland/Weston are starting to lose interest. Here's the reasons by one Wayland enthusiast for losing motivation in the project.

        Darxus, a Wayland enthusiast and Phoronix Forums moderator, shared on the mailing list what killed his motivation to play with Wayland. He was once very involved with the upstream Wayland community, but that's not so much the case anymore. Here's a synopsis of his reasons:




    • Benchmarks

      • 11-Way Linux, BSD Platform Comparison
        Building upon last month's eight-way Linux vs. BSD operating system comparison, out today is an expanded 11-way OS showdown. The new OS test results available are for the Arch-based Manjaro Linux distribution, Debian GNU/Linux, and Debian GNU/kFreeBSD. The other competitors include PC-BSD, DragonFlyBSD, CentOS, Fedora, Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Mageia, and openSUSE.


      • SNA Acceleration Works Great For Intel Core i7 Haswell
        To complement the Intel Haswell Linux OpenGL benchmarks that we have been publishing on Phoronix for the past week, up today are some Intel Linux 2D performance benchmarks of Haswell with the Intel Core i7 4770K CPU. The 2D performance is comparing Intel's default UXA accelerated code-paths against the experimental SNA acceleration back-end.






  • Applications



  • Desktop Environments/WMs



  • Distributions



    • PCLinuxOS/Mageia/Mandrake/Mandriva Family

      • Mageia releases new Mageia 3 ISO images
        The Mageia project has released new ISO images for the Mageia 3 edition using the distribution's classical installer. A configuration fault with the images meant that users who specified the use of online repositories inadvertently switched their distribution updates to receive development packages. The developers fixed this problem on the server infrastructure, but that caused problems for users actually wanting to use the development repositories.




    • Arch Family



    • Red Hat Family

      • Red Hat Launches Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.2
        Red Hat Brings Storage Live Migration and Third-Party Plug-in Framework to Enterprise Virtualization Offering


      • Red Hat Integrates OpenStack with Enterprise Linux [VIDEO]


      • Red Hat Launches Linux-Based OpenStack Platform, Targets VMware For Control Of The Data Center
        Red Hat launched an enterprise Linux-based OpenStack platform today that provides a way to build out cloud services from either inside the data center or from a services provider.

        Red Hat Enterprise Linux will integrate a vanilla version of OpenStack to create the new Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform. It will mean that Red Hat applications can run in an IaaS platform and provide support for web and mobile oriented applications that are more cloud aware. It will serve as the main platform for Red Hat’s cloud strategy.

        The news is significant as it positions Red Hat as a clear leader for building out OpenStack clouds. The company is also using OpenStack to offer an alternative to the virtualized environments long dominated by VMware.


      • Video: 20 Years of Red Hat
        Red Hat Summit is going on in Boston this week. Here is promo video they released about Red Hat turning 20.


      • Red Hat emphasises cloud focus in JBoss EAP
        In the lead-up to this year's Red Hat Summit, Red Hat has released version 6.1 of its JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP). Like its predecessor, the platform is based on version 7 of the Java application server JBoss; it supports the Java EE 6 platform as well as frameworks such as Spring and Struts. JBoss EAP also works with tools including the Google Web Toolkit (GWT), Maven, Eclipse Hudson and Red Hat-sponsored technologies such as Hibernate and Arquillian.


      • Red Hat's OpenShift Online opens for paying customers
        Red Hat has announced the commercial launch of its public Platform-as-a-Service cloud, OpenShift Online. The new service has been in preview or beta since May 2011 and has been developed alongside an on-premises enterprise version, OpenShift Enterprise, released in November 2012, and drawn its technology from open source basis for the platform, OpenShift Origin, released in May 2012.


      • CentOS Makes Its Mark in the Cloud


      • Red Hat CEO: Open Source is Not Just About Cost
        Red Hat is a company that generates over $1 billion a year in revenues from open source software.

        It should come as no surprise then, that the CEO of Red Hat sees being open as the key to innovation. Speaking at the opening keynote for the Red Hat Summit, CEO Jim Whitehurst stressed that open isn't just a marketing slogan, it's the only way that modern IT companies can survive.


      • Red Hat, HP, Intel Partner on Big Data Storage


        Red Hat has teamed with CommVault, Hewlett-Packard, Intel and Supermicro to develop reference architectures for data backup, content clouds, Big Data storage and other industry-specific storage solutions.


      • RHEL 7 Linux To Use GNOME 3 Classic Mode
        For those not out in Boston this week for the 2013 Red Hat Summit, new details on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.0 have emerged.


      • Red Hat confirms GNOME Classic Mode for RHEL 7
        The engineering director for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), Denise Dumas, has said that the upcoming version of the company's enterprise Linux distribution will use GNOME 3's Classic Mode by default. Dumas was talking to TechTarget ahead of the 2013 Red Hat Summit that is currently ongoing in Boston. RHEL 7 is scheduled to be released in the second half of this year and Dumas says the decision to use Classic Mode instead of GNOME's default interface, which she calls "modern mode", was made to not inconvenience RHEL's enterprise user base – "the last thing we want to do is disrupt our customers' workflows."


      • Run Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Free on the AWS Cloud
        While it was announced fairly quietly, the Amazon Web Services (AWS) blog recenlty confirmed that the AWS Free Usage Tier, which lets users run applications and operating systems in the cloud, now includes 750 hours of Red Hat Enterprise Linux usage.


      • Fedora





    • Debian Family

      • Debian Developers Get User Input on Systemd
        Systemd has been taking it on the chin lately because a lot of users just don't like it. There are varying reasons and Debian developer Michael Stapelberg has identified several through a recent user systemd survey. Developers hope the data will help them minimize the difficulty when the transition from SysVinit to Systemd begins.


      • Derivatives



        • Canonical/Ubuntu

          • Ubuntu holds its own
            My mother is the ultimate bargain hunter. Her cellular contract decisions are not based on device, data bundle or minutes, but rather on what she gets for free... an extra phone, perhaps a TV, maybe a gaming console. As long as it's free, it doesn't really matter if she already has five phones; you never know when a sixth will come in handy.

            A few weeks ago, she produced a netbook she had received with her most recent contract. “I don't know how to use it,” she said, as she handed over the gadget. The reason she couldn't figure it out was because her limited computing skills meant she was familiar with Microsoft, and only Microsoft. When I pointed out that the netbook ran on Ubuntu, I got a blank stare in return. “Okay, well, you can have it then.”


          • Canonical Working On Mir's Performance, Mir On Mir
            This past week Canonical developers made a little more progress on their Mir Display Server stack and the next-generation Unity desktop interface.


          • Ubuntu Still Looks To Chromium Default Browser
            Ubuntu developers are still likely to be switching from Mozilla Firefox as the Linux distribution's default web-browser to now using Google's open-source Chromium platform.

            For weeks now developers have been talking of making the transition in Ubuntu 13.10 of going from Firefox to Chromium. Among the reasons this is being considered is that Chromium is being used on the Ubuntu mobile front, Chromium has become just as fast (or faster) than Firefox, and the features are also very competitive. Firefox will continued to be offered through the Ubuntu package archives, but it wouldn't be installed by default.


          • Ubuntu’s Best Selling Apps for May 2013
            What hasn’t been revealed is a surprise. Stormcloud, a desktop-based weather app, remains the top-selling app on Ubuntu for the 5th consecutive month in a row, selling 78 copies between May 1st and May 31st.










  • Devices/Embedded

    • World’s smallest dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 module
      Variscite announced what it calls “the world’s tiniest Cortex-A9 system-on-module,” measuring 52 x 17mm. The Linux- and Android-compatible DART-4460 module is based on a 1.5GHz dual-core TI OMAP4460 SoC, is available with up to 1GB of DDR2 RAM and 8GB eMMC flash, and can run at 400MHz on only 44mA, says the company.


    • Compact webserver can host web apps on a Pi
      Real Time Logic announced an Linux-compatible embeddable webserver designed for supporting server-side web applications. Based on the Lua scripting language, Mako Server integrates technologies such as Apache, SQLite, and SMTP and HTTPS clients, and is said to be compact enough to host web services on a Raspberry Pi.


    • Raspberry Pi and Lego Mindstorms to be united by BrickPi
      Lego Mindstorms has been used to build robots since its introduction, but a small company by the name of Dexter Industries is now set to add a far more advanced brain to those robots, by installing a Raspberry Pi at the core, in a project called BrickPi. The project launched a Kickstarter campaign in May to raise just under $2000; with four days to go, the campaign has so far raised $96,000. Dexter Industries specialises in creating sensors and other enhancements for Lego Mindstorms equipment.


    • Phones



      • Ballnux



      • Android

        • CyanogenMod to get Incognito Mode
          The revelation NSA survillance has encouraged developers to safeguard people's personal data. While companies like Canonical are working on pushing users towards sending more and more personal 'meta' data to their servers via features like Dash Search, CyanogenMod developers are working in opposite direction. They are working towards protecting user's personal data.


        • CyanogenMod is working on privacy mode for apps
          CyanogenMod founder Steve "Cyanogen" Kondik has taken to Google+ to announce that the developers of the popular open source third-party firmware for Android phones are working to implement a privacy sandbox for applications. The planned feature will be unique to CyanogenMod and will enable users to isolate the private, personal data stored in their Android phone from applications on an app-by-app basis. Kondik has not given a date for when the feature will be included in CyanogenMod, but he is hopeful that it is "coming soon".


        • SpiderOak Launches Open-Source HTML5 Android App


        • Open source HTML5 secure file sync for Android
          File sync specialist SpiderOak has bolstered the Google Play Android app market with an open source secure sync tool.


        • Halo by Paranoid Android video demo, open source project
          The Paranoid Android team has announced that its new HALO project will become open source, and this will bring an array of new features, we have included a demo video of Halo in motion on a smartphone.


        • Paranoid Android HALO goes open source


        • Apple iOS 7: Android copycat?
          Some people think Apple's forthcoming iPhone and iPad operating system iOS 7 is awesome. Others think it's awful. I think it's a derivative copycat not only of Android but of almost every other major mobile operating system out there.


        • Seamless Photo Transfer and Backup with Android
          If you want to keep your photos safe when travelling, you don’t need to schlep a notebook or netbook around: an Android device can be used to pull photos from the camera’s storage card and back them up on an external hard disk or upload them to a cloud storage. The easiest solution is to use a USB On-The-Go (OTG) cable to connect an external storage device like a portable hard disk or a high-capacity USB stick and use them for storing backup copies of the photos. However, this approach requires an Android device which supports the USB OTG functionality, and not all smartphones and tables do that. This also means that you have to remember to pack yet another piece of hardware. An alternative solution is to set up a wireless backup system which enables you to seamlessly back up photos on a remote storage device or service using your Android device. Here is how this can be done.










Free Software/Open Source



Leftovers

  • Shape Up! Google and Other Tech Firms React to Government Snoops
    How secure is your sensitive data online? That question has been making headlines lately with the NSA scandal, but big technology companies have long acknowledged that world government bodies make requests for data that many users would never expect to be disclosed. In fact, as we've reported, according to Google's regularly issued transparency reports, in the last six months of 2012 Google received over 21,000 requests for data on over 33,000 users.


  • Security



    • Piecemeal patches from QNAP
      Shortly after the disclosure of several security holes in QNAP's NAS and network video recording systems that enabled potential attackers to gain full control, the company has started to release updated versions of its software; however, the security updates are only being released bit by bit.




  • Defence/Police/Secrecy/Aggression



    • NSA leaker Edward Snowden: U.S. targets China with hackers
      Edward Snowden, the self-confessed leaker of secret surveillance documents, claimed Wednesday that the United States has mounted massive hacking operations against hundreds of Chinese targets since 2009.


    • Beijing Reacts to Snowden Claims U.S. Hacked ‘Hundreds’ of Chinese Targets
      The China Daily, the Chinese government’s English-language mouthpiece, couldn’t have been handed a better story. On June 13, Edward Snowden, the former contractor for the U.S. National Security Agency who exposed a vast American electronic surveillance program before fleeing to Hong Kong, told the South China Morning Post, Hong Kong’s leading English-language daily, that the U.S. has for years hacked into Chinese computer systems. After days of silence about the presence of a U.S. whistle-blower on Chinese soil — albeit in a territory governed separately from the rest of the country — the Chinese state media swung into action. “This is not the first time that U.S. government agencies’ wrongdoings have aroused widespread public concern,” opined the China Daily in an editorial. In a separate news article, the official state newspaper wrote that “analysts” believed the bombshells dropped in the Snowden affair are “certain to stain Washington’s overseas image and test developing Sino-U.S. ties.”


    • Pre-emptive Policing
      The rounding up, arresting and beating of groups of protestors before they had even begun to protest is so taken for granted in London now that I can find no reflection in the media of the outrage I feel. If an old duffer like me feels completely alienated from the authoritarian state in which I find I now live, how do younger, more radical people feel? There seems a terrible divide between the corporate-political elite surrounded by their massive Praetorian guard at Bilderberg, and everybody else. Society is not stable.


    • The Secret War
      INFILTRATION. SABOTAGE. MAYHEM. FOR YEARS FOUR-STAR GENERAL KEITH ALEXANDER HAS BEEN BUILDING A SECRET ARMY CAPABLE OF LAUNCHING DEVASTATING CYBERATTACKS. NOW IT’S READY TO UNLEASH HELL.


    • Turkish PM's chilling warning: 'these protests will be over in 24 hours'
      Turkey's prime minister defied a growing wave of international criticism on Wednesday and issued a chilling warning to the protesters who have captured central Istanbul for a fortnight, declaring that the demonstrations against his rule would be over within 24 hours.




  • Environment/Energy/Wildlife

    • The fracking story comes closer to home
      On Monday, The New York Times wrote about an “unlikely resistance” building in “energy-friendly” Greeley, CO. “As [oil and gas] companies here and across the energy-rich West look for new places to drill,” reported the Times’s Jack Healy, “they are increasingly looking toward more densely populated areas, and bumping into environmentalists and homeowners.”

      Forty-five minutes northwest of Greeley, in Fort Collins, people once thought that oil and gas extraction and the questions it raises about environmental hazards were concerns for elsewhere, according to Fort Collins Coloradoan reporter Bobby Magill. While oil drilling has been going on in this part of the state for decades, in recent years oil rigs have started showing up near residential areas and, in February, an area well blew out, sending a gusher of oil and hydraulic fracturing chemicals into the sky near homes and families.


    • Farmers fail to feed UK after extreme weather hits wheat crop
      The wettest autumn since records began, followed by the coldest spring in 50 years, has devastated British wheat, forcing food manufacturers to import nearly 2.5m tonnes of the crop.

      "Normally we export around 2.5m tonnes of wheat but this year we expect to have to import 2.5m tonnes," said Charlotte Garbutt, a senior analyst at the industry-financed Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board. "The crop that came through the winter has struggled and is patchy and variable. The area of wheat grown this year has been much smaller."






  • Finance

    • Wisconsin’s System Increasingly Rigged Against the Unemployed
      With the latest Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia index ranking Wisconsin 49th out of 50 in economic outlook, high unemployment in Wisconsin is a problem that is not likely to go away any time soon. But, instead of trying to fix the economy in Wisconsin, Governor Scott Walker’s Department of Workforce Development (DWD) is finding new ways to disqualify the unemployed from collecting benefits. This is unlikely to do anything but compound Wisconsin’s economic woes.




  • Censorship

    • Today was the first time I deleted a comment
      Moderating blog comments is a very sensitive task. It is not easy to strike a balance between chaos and censorship.

      [...]

      What I do not accept, though, is a comment which, to me, seems to be aimed solely at ticking me off. Starting a comment with “I think KDE applications in general looks like crap” is not setting the mood for constructive criticism. Continuing by listing things one does not like about KDE applications (but most of which are simply not part of the HIG yet) is not helping either. And then concluding your main point with “I think the user interface KDE brings up stinks. As such I don’t want people to follow whatever guides suggest to do applications that way.” will get your comment deleted by me.

      [...]

      So here is the rule: Criticize me all you want, but do it in a polite and constructive manner. And please actually look at things before criticizing them. This helps a lot in turning a troll post into constructive criticism.




  • Privacy

    • Edward Snowden and the State-Identified Journalist
      Josh Marshall of Talking Points Memo (6/11/13) wrote about Edward Snowden yesterday in a way that helped make it clear why so many in the press seem upset that the former NSA consultant revealed the extent of U.S. spying programs aimed at the American public.


    • Caspar Bowden - How to wiretap the Cloud (without almost anybody noticing)
      Independent privacy advocate and ex-Microsoft employee Caspar Bowden gives the crucial legal context to PRISM and FISAAA. Bowden explains how the 4th Amendment does not apply to non-US citizens leaving the US government able to conduct mass surveillance of the cloud. This timely ORGCon2013 talk is essential viewing!


    • (1). How to wiretap the Cloud (without anybody noticing) by Caspar Bowden (PRISM)


    • Baroness Ludford amendment - opening the door to FISAAA?
      Liberal Democrat MEP Baroness Ludford has proposed an amendment to the Data Protection Regulation that would mean your data could be transferred to the USA without you being informed.


    • Good News! You're Not Paranoid - NSA Oversight


    • NSA leaker's purported online activity, interests come to light
      Posts on the Ars Technica site under the username "TheTrueHOOHA" show an interest in technology, gaming, and online anonymity.


    • NSA revelations only 'the tip of the iceberg,' says Dem lawmaker
      The federal surveillance programs revealed in media reports are just "the tip of the iceberg," a House Democrat said Wednesday.

      Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Calif.) said lawmakers learned "significantly more" about the spy programs at the National Security Agency (NSA) during a briefing on Tuesday with counterterrorism officials.

      "What we learned in there," Sanchez said, "is significantly more than what is out in the media today."

      Lawmakers are barred from revealing the classified information they receive in intelligence briefings, and Sanchez was careful not to specify what members might have learned about the NSA's work.

      Read more: http://thehill.com/video/house/305047-dem-rep-lawmakers-learned-significantly-more-about-surveillance-programs-in-nsa-briefing#ixzz2W6SkR9ps Follow us: @thehill on Twitter | TheHill on Facebook


    • The IRS is in your internets, watching your financial transactions
      Richard Satran at US News has a scary little piece out about how The Internal Revenue Service collects more than your taxes: "It's also acquiring a huge volume of personal information on taxpayers' digital activities, from eBay auctions to Facebook posts and, for the first time ever, credit card and e-payment transaction records, as it expands its search for tax cheats to places it's never gone before."


    • It’s Time to Rewrite the Internet to Give Us Better Privacy, and Security
      It’s not too late to restore confidence, writes “digital Cassandra” Lawrence Lessig, but we need to start by asking the right questions.


    • So Just Exactly What Is NSA’s Prism, More Than Reprehensibly Evil?
      The US NSA’s PRISM program appears to be a set of specialized deep-packet inspection filters combined with pre-existing wiretapping points at high-level Internet carriers in the United States. Since the program’s revelation the day before yesterday, speculations have ranged far and wide about who does what to make this surveillance state nightmare possible. Adding it all together, it would appear that the social tech companies did not, repeat not, supply bulk data about their users at the US Government’s will – but that the situation for you as an end user remains just as if they had.


    • More Americans see man who leaked NSA secrets as 'patriot' than traitor: Poll




  • Civil Rights

    • Former Goldman Sachs Programmer Back To Court
      Sergey Aleynikov is set to go back to court. Aleynikov was previously a programmer for Goldman Sachs who was tried and convicted of theft of trade secrets in federal court – a conviction that was overturned on appeal. Now Aleynikov is facing charges under New York State law for the same actions that were ruled legal by the appeals court.


    • Protest treated as anti-social behaviour
      Powers given to the police to deal with anti-social behaviour are increasingly being used to gather information on participants in political protest.




  • Intellectual Monopolies



    • Copyrights



      • Kim Dotcom Releases New Raid Footage Captured By In-House CCTV
        Following the high-profile raid on his New Zealand mansion in 2012, Kim Dotcom released dramatic film of the event taken from police helicopters. Now the Megaupload founder is back with new footage captured by his own in-house CCTV system. Among other events, the new material shows police carrying machine guns fitted with silencers, arrests of staff and the towing of his cars. Dotcom’s sense of humor still shines through though, with an ending fit for a Hollywood blockbuster.








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